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History & Archaeology×

University of Warwick, Full Time Masters Degrees in History & Archaeology

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This programme explores religious, social, economic, political and cultural developments in the early modern world (c.1450-c.1800). Read more

Introduction

This programme explores religious, social, economic, political and cultural developments in the early modern world (c.1450-c.1800).

Early modern history is a core strength of the the Warwick University History Department. Approximately one-third of the Department's academic staff are scholars of the early modern period, from Britain and Europe to the Americas and China.

Course Structure

The first term core module Themes in Early Modern History provides a critical perspective on key themes and introduces you to a range of expertise at Warwick. This runs alongside a module taken by all MA students exploring theories, skills and methods. In the second term you have a choice of two taught modules - each one taking a different topic and exploring it across time and space. These will help you place your early modern interests in religion, gender, empire, consumption or medicine in a comparative framework as well as deepen your acquaintance with relevant ideas and approaches from outside early modern scholarship. These modules enable you to focus on your early modern interests (you can write all your assessed work on early modern themes) whilst situating them in a wider context that will enrich your studies. The final key element is the dissertation - here you have a large amount of freedom to develop a project of your own choice with help and guidance from your supervisor.

MA students are encouraged to engage with the lively early modern research culture at Warwick - you can find out more about the programme of lectures, seminars, workshops and conferences hosted by the department, and about the research projects being undertaken, in the right hand column.

The programme will also help you to acquire the conceptual and practical skills needed to conduct PhD research in Early Modern history.

All our MA courses can be followed on a part-time basis over two years. For further information, please contact the MA Director, Dr Sarah Hodges or the director of the early modern course, Prof. Mark Knights.

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The Warwick History Department is recognised internationally as a centre for innovative and influential research and is consistently ranked among the best history departments in the UK. Read more

Introduction

The Warwick History Department is recognised internationally as a centre for innovative and influential research and is consistently ranked among the best history departments in the UK. The MA in the History of Medicine aims to introduce students to the advanced study of the history of medicine, and to equip them with the conceptual and practical skills to carry out independent historical research in this field. The students on the MA are encouraged to engage with a range of concepts, and to place developments within medical theory and practice in a broad social and cultural framework.

The Term One core module ‘Themes and Methods in Medical History’ is designed to introduce students to some of the main historiographical approaches and debates within the history of medicine from the early modern period to the twenty-first century. The module focuses on the evolution of ideas, institutions and practices within medicine, the reception of new approaches and lay responses, the structure of medical practice and the medical professions, and the scientific, social and cultural context of medical intervention. Students are encouraged to situate illness, disease and health care in a broad context, and to frame discussions in seminars in response to a detailed and critical survey of the literature in this area.

The Term Two core module, 'Matters of Life and Death', will address three sets of topics in the history of medicine (broadly construed) selected by its students from a menu of possible options. This unusual structure gives 'Matters of Life and Death' the flexibility required to ensure that it is always focused on subjects closely related to student interests and dissertation research. Possible topics range across the expertise of teaching and research staff in the Centre for the History of Medicine, and of our Associates in the wider University context.

Students actively engage with a wide range of sources available to the historian of medicine (e.g. medical texts, practice records, diaries, case records, public health reports and health propaganda, and visual sources).

Prospective students may be nominated for Wellcome Awards, as well as Departmental, University and ESRC funding.

Course Overview

AUTUMN TERM
◾Core Module Themes and Methods in Medical History (HI907) (30 CATS)
◾Core Module (Term 1): Theory, Skills and Method (HI989) (30 CATS)
A compulsory course designed to help students acquire the methodological skills required to undertake an extended piece of historical research and writing.

SPRING TERM
◾Core Module (Term 2): Matters of Life and Death: Topics in the Medical Humanities (HI991) (30 CATS)
◾Optional Module (Term 2): to be selected from the list below. (All 30 CATS)

SUMMER TERM
◾Dissertation : (20,000 words) (60 CATS)

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You will study the art, literature, philosophy, religion and science of the period c.1300-c.1650, taking a strongly interdisciplinary approach, and learning from academics in the Departments of Classics, English, History, History of Art, Modern Languages and Cultures, and Theatre Studies. Read more
You will study the art, literature, philosophy, religion and science of the period c.1300-c.1650, taking a strongly interdisciplinary approach, and learning from academics in the Departments of Classics, English, History, History of Art, Modern Languages and Cultures, and Theatre Studies.

You’ll spend an exciting, full term in Venice, studying the city’s art, history and culture from our base at the Palazzo Pesaro Papafava. The programme includes site visits, study sessions in Venetian workshops and behind-the-scenes visits to the warehouses of Venice’s museums. Modules focusing on Venetian culture, religion and art form the opening term, while during the spring term, you’ll explore the dissemination of Italian culture in Europe. Alongside these modules, we run palaeographical and research skills sessions to help with your dissertation research in the summer. You’ll also have unlimited access to relevant print and electronic resources, including ITER, Early English Books Online, The Making of the Modern World, and European Books, through our library.

Previous graduates from this course have chosen to progress to PhD study at Warwick or another institution, and/or to pursue a career in academia (most recently at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore), museums or galleries.

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Are you interested in exploring classical material and visual culture, and its impact upon subsequent historical conceptions of antiquity? If so, this course is the ideal foundation for a career in museum work or education. Read more
Are you interested in exploring classical material and visual culture, and its impact upon subsequent historical conceptions of antiquity? If so, this course is the ideal foundation for a career in museum work or education. It also equips you for further PhD study in related fields.

You will undertake specialist research training in art, numismatics and epigraphy, with museum visits forming an important part of the programme. Teaching comprises two core modules — one language module and the other focusing on issues of reception, historiography and museum display — plus your choice of optional modules.

Options can be taken from within the Classics Department or you may decide to study a module from a related department, such as History of Art. Over the summer, you will complete a supervised dissertation, enabling you to research independently an area of personal academic interest in more depth.

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This innovative MA course is one of the first in the UK to focus specifically on global history, offering you the chance to investigate one of the most dynamic areas of current historical enquiry and debate. Read more

Introduction

This innovative MA course is one of the first in the UK to focus specifically on global history, offering you the chance to investigate one of the most dynamic areas of current historical enquiry and debate. At its centre is a core module exploring the way in which global history has emerged, the methods it adopts, the subject areas it addresses and the criticisms it has attracted.

Throughout, you are encouraged to explore how the global can be investigated in relation to the regional and the local, as part of wider debates on historical methods and interpretation. This provides a route into studying major regions of the globe, including Latin America, India and China. You’ll also benefit from the Department’s Global History and Culture Centre, with the option to participate in seminars, lectures and conferences arranged by the Centre.

The course offers an excellent route into PhD research in the emerging field of global history and culture. Recent postgraduates have also advanced into careers in the cultural sector, consultancy and teaching.

Course Overview

AUTUMN TERM

◾Core Module: Theory, Skills & Methods (HI989) (30 CATS)
A compulsory course designed to help students acquire the methodological skills needed to undertake an extended piece of historical research and writing.

◾Core Module: Themes in Early Modern History (HI992) (30 CATS)

Outline syllabus:

Week 1: Introduction
Week 2: Key Early Modern debates
Week 3: Religion
Week 4: Politics and state building or revolutions
Week 5: Global expansion/colonialism
Week 7: Science, tecnology & environment
Week 8: Society & culture
Week 9: The public sphere & communicative practices
Week 10: Comparative Early Modernities

SPRING TERM
◾Two Optional Modules: to be selected from options listed below (30 CATS each)

SUMMER TERM
◾Dissertation (15,000 words) (60 CATS)

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At the core of this programme lies the design, research and composition of a dissertation (maximum length 40,000 words). You meet regularly with your supervisor/s and other members of the department to review your progress. Read more
At the core of this programme lies the design, research and composition of a dissertation (maximum length 40,000 words). You meet regularly with your supervisor/s and other members of the department to review your progress. Alongside the research project, you are expected to follow the Warwick Historical Research Core module, Theory, Skill and Method.

Research areas include, by period

Renaissance; Early Modern; and Modern

By geographical region

Africa; North, Central and South America; the Caribbean; Britain and Continental Europe; and Asia
(with a particular focus on South Asia and China)

By theme

Race, Ethnicity and Slavery; Popular and Political Protest; History of Religion; Gender and Family History; 18th-Century Studies; Technology; Cultures and Practices of Health and the History of Medicine; Global History; Visual and Material Culture; Luxury; Histories of Violence; Empires and imperialism.

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This course enables you to apply the study of ancient material and visual culture to a particular historical and geographical context. Read more
This course enables you to apply the study of ancient material and visual culture to a particular historical and geographical context. You’ll undertake specialist research training in art, numismatics and epigraphy that will equip you for further PhD study in these fields, or for a career in museum work or education.

The course includes a core module in Approaching Ancient Visual and Material Culture, plus a core language module, as well as the Core module in Rome. You will also select one optional module at Warwick.

Students on the MA in Visual and Material Culture of Ancient Rome will participate in the British School at Rome’s ‘City of Rome’ postgraduate course, a two-month residential programme. This involves a busy schedule of expert presentations and onsite seminars.

Admission to the course in Rome is subject to the discretion of the BSA/BSR and cannot be guaranteed. Students are responsible for funding their travel to Italy and for accommodation costs in Rome.

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This MA introduces you to the advanced study of the history of the modern world, investigating historical change within a broader conceptual and theoretical framework. Read more

Introduction

This MA introduces you to the advanced study of the history of the modern world, investigating historical change within a broader conceptual and theoretical framework.

One core taught module in Term 1 provides a solid foundation in the approaches to the study of society and culture in historical context from the early modern period to the contemporary world; while a second analyses key components of ‘the modern’ as it has unfolded across the world. Optional modules explore key themes in modern history in Term 2.

You’ll be able to take advantage of the Department’s six research centres, including participating in the lively schedule of academic research seminars, lectures and conferences.

The programme will particularly appeal if you wish to acquire the conceptual and practical skills needed to conduct further research in history.

Course Overview

AUTUMN TERM
◾Core Module: Theory, Skills & Methods (HI989) (30 CATS)
A compulsory course designed to help students acquire the methodological skills needed to undertake an extended piece of historical research and writing.

◾Core Module: Themes in Modern History (HI998) (30 CATS)

Indicative outline syllabus:

Week 1: Defining Modernity and Modern History

Week 2: Capitalism

Week 3: Gender

Week 4: Class

Week 5: Everyday Life

Week 6: Reading Week

Week 7: Post-colonialism

Week 8: Sexuality

Week 9: Subjectivity and the Self

Week 10: Memory


SPRING TERM
◾Two Optional Modules: to be selected from options listed below (30 CATS each)

SUMMER TERM
◾Dissertation (15,000 words) (60 CATS)

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This course enables you to apply the study of ancient material and visual culture to a particular historical and geographical context. Read more
This course enables you to apply the study of ancient material and visual culture to a particular historical and geographical context. You’ll undertake specialist research training in art, numismatics and epigraphy that will equip you for further PhD study in these fields, or for a career in museum work or education.

The course includes a core module in Approaching Ancient Visual and Material Culture, plus a core language module, as well as the Core module in Greece. You will also select one optional module at Warwick.

The MA in the Visual and Material Culture of Ancient Greece is the first in the UK to give you access to the postgraduate training courses of the British School at Athens, an institute for advanced research based in Greece. You will have the opportunity to spend two to three weeks in Athens or Knossos, following a full programme of site visits and seminars from visiting scholars.

Admission to the course is subject to the discretion of the BSA/BSR and cannot be guaranteed. Students are responsible for funding their travel to Greece.

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For the art historian, Venice is one of the most extraordinary cities in the world. Our MA gives you a unique opportunity to study the artistic production and cultural identity of Venice, and includes a term studying in Venice. Read more
For the art historian, Venice is one of the most extraordinary cities in the world. Our MA gives you a unique opportunity to study the artistic production and cultural identity of Venice, and includes a term studying in Venice. Alongside the art and architecture of Venice, the course explores the broader historical and theoretical issues raised by the city and its cultural legacies, such as global connections, colour and perception, and materiality.

The course starts in mid-September with a two-week induction before the beginning of the autumn term. This allows us to introduce you to the department and its procedures. This is a chance for students to acquaint themselves with the university, its campus, and the support it offers to postgraduates. The induction also includes introductory classes on Venice and its art, plus one or two field trips to important art-historical or architectural sites in the region.

You’ll spend the autumn term in Venice at our teaching and research base Palazzo Pesaro Papafava, where you will explore Venetian and North Italian art in situ. On your return to Warwick in the spring term, you take a third module concerned with some aspect of the legacies of Venetian art and culture. You’ll also take a core module in research methods which prepares you for researching and writing your dissertation over the summer.

For part-time students, you will attend the induction and spend the first term in Venice, taking two modules. You then take a third module in the spring term of the first year, the fourth in the spring term of the second year, and you research and write your dissertation over the summer of your second year.Our postgraduates go on to work in a range of creative and heritage roles, in museums, NGOs and the arts sector. Others have continued their studies at PhD level, and pursued careers as curators and academics.

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Our Diploma is specifically designed for students whose background may not be in art history, but who wish to study the subject at postgraduate level. Read more
Our Diploma is specifically designed for students whose background may not be in art history, but who wish to study the subject at postgraduate level. It provides an ideal bridge between undergraduate and postgraduate study, and many of our Diploma students go on to our MA degree programme.

The structure of the Diploma is designed to move you towards an increasingly advanced level of study as you progress through the course. You will follow a broad range of historical and theoretical modules, beginning with options from our extensive menu of secondyear undergraduate courses. You will then have the opportunity to pursue a specialised area in more depth, choosing from options such as Colour and its Meaning, Mannerism, Visual Art and Poetry, and East meets West.

These specialised modules are taught in small groups and are directly informed by the research activities of members of staff. Your course culminates in a dissertation that enables you to further explore an area of personal academic interest.

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Are you keen to specialise in academic study of your chosen language and culture, and do you have the curiosity and motivation to develop an individual research path, leading potentially to PhD study? This innovative course, combining cross-School taught modules with language specific research, offers an advanced preparation for doctoral research. Read more
Are you keen to specialise in academic study of your chosen language and culture, and do you have the curiosity and motivation to develop an individual research path, leading potentially to PhD study? This innovative course, combining cross-School taught modules with language specific research, offers an advanced preparation for doctoral research.

You’ll work with the support of leading researchers of international reputation, drawing on our expertise in critical theory, research skills, and key research themes from across the School of Modern Languages and Cultures. You’ll benefit from a broad introduction to critical theories and perspectives across the European and North American intellectual traditions, as well as the opportunity to develop your research specialism in French, German, Hispanic or Italian Studies, or in comparative analysis of these cultures. We also provide research skills training, helping you to build subject-specific and transferrable skills.

Our researchers collaborate to teach the core critical modules, and we encourage interdisciplinary teaching or supervision within and outside Modern Languages through optional taught modules, Advanced Study Options, and your dissertation. Advanced Study Options enable you to pursue individual research pathways with the guidance of a tutor or tutors before undertaking your dissertation.

The skills you’ll acquire in research, critical analysis and advanced argumentation, written and oral presentation, project design, and time management will prepare you thoroughly for doctoral research and an academic research career. Equally, you’ll be well placed to pursue professional routes into sectors such as publishing, media, and non-academic research.

Structure and assessment

The syllabus for the MA for Research in German Studies comprises:
-A taught core module on cultural and critical theory, typically taken in the first term, and assessed by a 5,000 word essay.
-Two supervised study programmes (Guided Study Options), topic dependent on the interests of the candidate, each assessed by a 5,000 word essay.
-A 20,000 word dissertation.
-A skills programme (assessed by two short bibliographical exercises), which includes a library induction/electronic resources in German Studies and general research skills, giving oral presentations and using PowerPoint, writing a literature review, choosing a topic and writing a dissertation, writing a PhD proposal, and applying for funding.

Note that this course is different from the German Studies BY Research MA, in that the latter does not include taught elements.

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Our Centre’s aim is to stimulate teaching and research on the Caribbean, helping you to develop your awareness of the region and of its historically interdependent linkages with Britain and the world. Read more
Our Centre’s aim is to stimulate teaching and research on the Caribbean, helping you to develop your awareness of the region and of its historically interdependent linkages with Britain and the world. We encourage the study of the Caribbean in an Atlantic context, emphasising African, North and South American, Asian and European influences from a comparative, cross-cultural and interdisciplinary perspective.

The Centre is an umbrella unit of academics drawn from different departments. If you are writing Caribbean dissertations supervised by these academics, you may be registered at the Centre or in the departments of the respective academics.

Research Areas

Current areas of research expertise are: Slavery and empire in the 18th and 19th centuries; Caribbean maritime worlds and networks; white identities; Caribbean writing in French and Spanish; postcolonial Caribbean texts; pre-1900 English Caribbean literatures; women's writing and feminist theory; disaster law and culture; slavery and law; the Haitian Revolution; postcolonial studies, world literature, literary and cultural theory; gender and slavery; enslaved runaways and maroons. Students will be supervised by faculty members with expertise in these areas.

Regular term-time seminars in Caribbean Studies and Comparative Caribbean Literatures are run within the Faculty of Arts, and form a compulsory element of our research degrees.

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Our Centre’s aim is to stimulate teaching and research on the Caribbean, helping you to develop your awareness of the region and of its historically interdependent linkages with Britain and the world. Read more
Our Centre’s aim is to stimulate teaching and research on the Caribbean, helping you to develop your awareness of the region and of its historically interdependent linkages with Britain and the world. We encourage the study of the Caribbean in an Atlantic context, emphasising African, North and South American, Asian and European influences from a comparative, cross-cultural and interdisciplinary perspective.

The Centre is an umbrella unit of academics drawn from different departments. If you are writing Caribbean dissertations supervised by these academics, you may be registered at the Centre or in the departments of the respective academics.

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The Department has a lively community of postgraduate research students contributing to the research in the Department. All research programmes include a programme of induction, work-in-progress seminars and a graduate conference. Read more
The Department has a lively community of postgraduate research students contributing to the research in the Department. All research programmes include a programme of induction, work-in-progress seminars and a graduate conference.

There are two options offered for the MA by research:
-Candidates research and write a 40,000 word dissertation.
-Linguistic training, two 5,000-word essays and a 25,000-word dissertation.

In both cases the thesis must show evidence of originality in knowledge and interpretation.

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