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History & Archaeology×

University of Lincoln, Full Time Masters Degrees in History & Archaeology

We have 6 University of Lincoln, Full Time Masters Degrees in History & Archaeology

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This academically rigorous Master’s programme is designed to give you the opportunity to progress your specialist knowledge of history and the chance to develop the advanced research skills that are transferable to a variety of careers paths, including PhD study. Read more
This academically rigorous Master’s programme is designed to give you the opportunity to progress your specialist knowledge of history and the chance to develop the advanced research skills that are transferable to a variety of careers paths, including PhD study.

Teaching is informed by research expertise in the School of History & Heritage and you will be encouraged to engage with our interdisciplinary research community.

You can benefit from the historical resources available in the city of Lincoln, including the unique manuscripts at Lincoln Cathedral and one of only four surviving original copies of the Magna Carta, which is housed at Lincoln Castle. There is also an extensive archive of materials at the on campus Media Archive of Central England (MACE) and the International Bomber Command Centre. The Wren Library at Lincoln Cathedral also possesses several thousand early modern books.

You will have the opportunity to undertake an in-depth independent research project and have the chance to produce a detailed dissertation.

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Lincoln’s long and fascinating history, along with its range of medieval resources, make it an ideal location in which to undertake an advanced study of the Middle Ages. Read more
Lincoln’s long and fascinating history, along with its range of medieval resources, make it an ideal location in which to undertake an advanced study of the Middle Ages.

This course is designed to develop the critical understanding and extensive analytical skills that may be particularly beneficial to careers in the heritage sector, museums and teaching. Core modules look to provide a grounding in the skills needed for advanced study. Students can also choose from an exciting palette of optional modules: these vary from year to year, but can include Intermediate Medieval Latin, Reason and Rebellion, and Public and Private Emotions in the Middle Ages.

You will have the opportunity to develop skills such as palaeography and to utilise historical archives to explore the economic, social and religious history of England. Some modules are supported by the wealth of literary manuscripts at Lincoln Cathedral, including one of only 50 full manuscripts of The Canterbury Tales, and The Thornton Romances, which contains the earliest known accounts of King Arthur’s death.

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This programme aims to allow students who have a clearly-defined research project and good research skills to develop advanced knowledge in a particular field, without studying for the more extended degree of MPhil/PhD. Read more
This programme aims to allow students who have a clearly-defined research project and good research skills to develop advanced knowledge in a particular field, without studying for the more extended degree of MPhil/PhD. The MA by Research in History takes the form of supervised individual research, providing the chance to complete a dissertation.

Members of staff in the School of History & Heritage aim to provide you with the academic support to conduct in-depth research into the topic that interests you. Example areas of research expertise in the School include medieval history and modern British history.

You will join a vibrant academic community with regular research seminars, such as the History & Heritage seminar series.

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These programmes of study are designed for students who have a passion to pursue a conservation or heritage based research project defined by themselves, but with the support of an academic environment and supervisors. Read more
These programmes of study are designed for students who have a passion to pursue a conservation or heritage based research project defined by themselves, but with the support of an academic environment and supervisors.

As a research student, you will have access to support and training designed to develop the practical and critical skills necessary for investigation and study at doctoral level. Direction will be available from a supervisory team and you will have the opportunity to benefit from the School’s research expertise in a broad range of conservation and cultural heritage areas.

Strong links exist with the Colleges of Science and Arts, and an interdisciplinary research culture can facilitate collaboration with colleagues across a wide range of topics.

Current doctoral research topics include:
-How can architectural paint research and analysis enhance the conservation-restoration and historiography of cultural built heritage in the UK?
-Regarding mediocrity: conservation, interpretation and presentation of the Doddington Hall tapestries.
-Biodeterioration of limestone: role of microbial biofilms and possible intervention strategies (in collaboration with Dr Ronald Dixon, School of Life Sciences).
-Nineteenth-Century Amateur Art in Places of Christian Worship.
-Tennyson and the Archive.
-David Brewster and the Development of the Kaleidoscope.
-The Life and Work of William Logsdail.

Research Areas, Projects & Topics

Research areas covered within the School include:
-Archaeological conservation
-Architectural paint research
-Collections Management
-Conservation of a broad range of objects and material types
-Cultural heritage and climate change
-Material culture
-Paint and pigment analysis
-Preventive conservation

Previous areas of PhD study include:
-The Materials, Construction and Conservation of Eighteenth-Century Women’s Shoes.
-A Practical and Historical Examination of Jacob Christian Schaffer (1718-1790) and his Search for Non-rag Paper.
-An Analysis of the Success and Cultural Significance of Parian Ware Sculpture in Victorian England.
-'Curatorship and Conservation: A Theoretical Enquiry into the Scope of Each Realm, their Interaction and the Consequences for the Perception of Works of Art'.
-The History, Development and Conservation of Wrought Iron in Lincolnshire; the Significance of Minor Architectural Details.

How You Study

Study at MPhil/PhD level takes the form of supervised individual research. You are expected to work on one topic of your choice for the duration of the study period. On a regular basis, you are expected to produce appropriate written work, submit it to your supervisors, then meet with your supervisors to receive feedback on your submission and agree the next stage of work.

Due to the nature of postgraduate research programmes, the vast majority of your time will be spent in independent study and research. You will have meetings with your academic supervisor, however the regularity of these will vary depending on your own individual requirements, subject area, staff availability and the stage of your programme.

How You Are Assessed

The assessment at PhD level takes the form of an approximately 80,000 word thesis.

A PhD is awarded based on the quality of your thesis and your ability in an oral examination (viva voce) to present and successfully defend your chosen research topic to a group of academics. You are also expected to demonstrate how your research findings have contributed to knowledge or developed existing theory or understanding.

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This intensive one-year conversion course aims to enable graduates from a non-conservation background to advance their knowledge and skills in preparation for further study or a career in the heritage sector. Read more
This intensive one-year conversion course aims to enable graduates from a non-conservation background to advance their knowledge and skills in preparation for further study or a career in the heritage sector.

You have the opportunity to learn from practitioners with extensive experience and can benefit from our team’s strong links with museums, professional bodies and heritage agencies.

During this course, you will be expected to produce your own portfolios of specialist drawings and photographs, and have the chance to develop technical skills for the treatment of historic objects. You will be encouraged to take advantage of opportunities to become involved in live projects.

How You Study

You will have access to a wide variety of historic materials and will have the chance to focus on their remedial treatment and preventive conservation.

The composition and delivery for the course breaks down differently for each module and may include lectures, seminars, workshops, independent study, practicals, research and one-to-one learning.

Weekly contact hours on this programme may vary depending on the individual modules and the stage of study. Postgraduate level study involves a significant proportion of independent study, exploring the material covered in lectures and seminars. As a general guide, for every hour in class students are expected to spend at least two - three hours in independent study. For more detailed information please contact the programme leader.

How You Are Assessed

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to you promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date.

Students on this course are assessed through coursework and a phase test.

Special Features

Students on this programme will receive a free tool kit and personal protection equipment for use during their studies.

Career and Personal Development

This programme is designed to provide students from non-conservation backgrounds with the opportunity to develop the skills, knowledge and understanding required to undertake the study of conservation at Masters level. For others, it may provide a foundation for further training or work in fields allied to conservation.

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The School of History and Heritage offers advanced research opportunities in the subject of History. As a research student, you will have access to support and training which aims to develop the practical and critical skills necessary for investigation and study at doctoral level. Read more
The School of History and Heritage offers advanced research opportunities in the subject of History.

As a research student, you will have access to support and training which aims to develop the practical and critical skills necessary for investigation and study at doctoral level. Direction will be available from a supervisory team and you have the opportunity to benefit from the School’s research expertise in areas including medieval history, gender history and modern British history.

Regular research seminars aim to provide a stimulating environment in which to discuss and debate theoretical concepts with fellow students, scholars and visiting academics. Strong links exist with the Schools of Film & Media, English & Journalism and Fine & Performing Arts and an interdisciplinary research culture facilitates collaboration with colleagues across a wide range of topics.

Research Areas, Projects & Topics

Research areas covered within the School include:
-Roman and Byzantine history
-Medieval ecclesiastical history
-20th Century British political history
-History and culture in the 19th Century
-Gender history
-Urban history
-Early modern science and medicine
-Late antique and medieval Spain
-Imperial history
-20th Century mass culture

How You Study

Study at MPhil/PhD level takes the form of supervised individual research. You work on one topic of your choice for the duration of the study period. On a regular basis, you are expected to produce appropriate written work, submit it to your supervisors, then meet with your supervisors to receive feedback on your submission and agree the next stage of work.

Due to the nature of postgraduate research programmes, the vast majority of your time will be spent in independent study and research. You will have meetings with your academic supervisor, however the regularity of these will vary depending on your own individual requirements, subject area, staff availability and the stage of your programme.

How You Are Assessed

The assessment at this level of study takes the form of an 80,000 word thesis.

A PhD is awarded based on the quality of your thesis and your ability in an oral examination (viva voce) to present and successfully defend your chosen research topic to a group of academics. You are also expected to demonstrate how your research findings have contributed to knowledge or developed existing theory or understanding.

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