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History & Archaeology×

Bangor University, Full Time Masters Degrees in History & Archaeology

We have 9 Bangor University, Full Time Masters Degrees in History & Archaeology

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This course is designed to allow students to further their undergraduate interest in archaeology or a related subject, and to develop the skills and knowledge needed if they decided to undertake further research into the past. Read more
This course is designed to allow students to further their undergraduate interest in archaeology or a related subject, and to develop the skills and knowledge needed if they decided to undertake further research into the past. The modular degree scheme includes a choice of specialist modules in aspects of Celtic Archaeology, Theory and Interpretation in Celtic Archaeology and training modules to develop relevant skills.

The programme aims to deepen knowledge of archaeology beyond undergraduate level, with particular emphasis on Celtic archaeology. It provides the opportunity for students to specialise in a particular academic area, so as to gain a close understanding of the archaeological debates around it. The programme acquaints students with relevant archaeological theoretical issues and methods of interpretation and the use of evidence. It also provides the student with the necessary research skills to produce an original piece of work on a chosen topic, under supportive supervision.

Courses
ONE Special Option module chosen from the following:

The Prehistoric Archaeology of the Irish Sea Zone
Celtic Societies in Europe
The Archaeology of the Early Medieval Celtic Churches
Compulsory modules:

Theory and Interpretation in Celtic Archaeology
Initiating a Research Project
Various Skills Option module(s)
One 20,000 word dissertation

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This modular course is designed to allow students to further their undergraduate interest in history or a related subject by developing a particular specialism in the History of Wales. Read more
This modular course is designed to allow students to further their undergraduate interest in history or a related subject by developing a particular specialism in the History of Wales. The course may be taken in its own right or as a preparation for further research in this area. It combines training in research techniques and theoretical and historiographic analysis, with taught courses and a substantial dissertation. There is a choice of specialist modules covering a range of periods, matching the research interests of the teaching staff.

This programme aims to provide a detailed knowledge and understanding of a specific academic area of the history of Wales through rigorous research training. Students will become acquainted with relevant historical theoretical issues and methods of interpretation and the use of evidence. It also provides the student with the necessary research skills to carry out an original piece of historical research in the chosen area of study, under supportive supervision.

Courses
ONE Special Option module chosen from the following:

The Age of Llywelyn ap Iorwerth
State, Society and Culture in Tudor Wales
Plaid Cymru a Gwleidyddiaeth Cymru
Compulsory modules:

Themes and Issues in History
ONE Documents and Sources module (20 credits) chosen from the following: Documents and Sources in Medieval and Early Modern History OR Documents and Sources in Modern History
Initiating a Research Project
Skills Option module
MA Dissertation

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This modular degree scheme is designed to allow students to further their undergraduate interest in history, and to develop the skills and knowledge needed to undertake further research into the past. Read more
This modular degree scheme is designed to allow students to further their undergraduate interest in history, and to develop the skills and knowledge needed to undertake further research into the past. It combines training in research techniques and theoretical and historiographic analysis, with a wide range of taught courses, skills modules and a substantial dissertation. There is a choice of specialist modules covering a range of periods from medieval to contemporary history, matching the research interests of the teaching staff.

This programme aims to provide a detailed knowledge and understanding of a specific academic area through rigorous research training. Students will become acquainted with relevant historical theoretical issues and methods of interpretation and the use of evidence. It also provides the student with the necessary research skills to carry out an original piece of historical research in the chosen area of study, under supportive supervision.

Courses
ONE Special Option module chosen from the following:

Normandy under the Normans, 911–1144
Women and Power in the High Middle Ages
National Identities in Britain and Ireland 1660-1800
Identities and the Victorian City
An Open Elite? Nineteenth-Century England and Wales
Sport and Politics 1918–1991
Consumerism and Anti-Consumerism in the Cold War
The Politics of the Labour Party
Compulsory modules:

Themes and Issues in History: Interpretations, Approaches and Debates
ONE Documents and Sources module chosen from the following: Documents and Sources in Medieval and Early Modern History OR Documents and Sources in Modern History
Initiating a Research Project
Skills Option
MA Dissertation

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Medieval Studies is a well-known and internationally recognised area of expertise at Bangor. Over the decades particular strengths in Arthurian literature, Welsh History and Archaeology and Cymraeg, as well as Music have attracted postgraduates to Bangor to work with experts in each of these areas. Read more
Medieval Studies is a well-known and internationally recognised area of expertise at Bangor. Over the decades particular strengths in Arthurian literature, Welsh History and Archaeology and Cymraeg, as well as Music have attracted postgraduates to Bangor to work with experts in each of these areas. Additional strengths include gender and devotional literature (in the School of English), Anglo-Norman studies, and early sacred music, among others. Interdisciplinary approaches form the core of medieval studies, and the current expertise at Bangor guarantees this approach both through the core module and through the option modules. In addition to this, Bangor can boast a unique combination of modules students can choose from, such as do not normally feature together: Welsh, Arthurian studies and Music form the distinctive core of the provision, alongside our widely recognised expertise in teaching palaeography and codicology.

Course Structure
In Part 1 of the course, students develop skills and acquire subject knowledge by way of preparation for Part Two, a 20,000 word dissertation. The Diploma, which consists of Part One of the MA programme, aims to develop learner autonomy to the point where the student is capable of beginning a scholarly dissertation at MA level.

Part 1: At the beginning of this course, all students must register for the following modules:

Understanding the Middle Ages (semesters 1 and 2)
Manuscripts and Printed Books (1 semester)
In addition to these modules, students may choose from a wide range of modules in this part of the course which may include:

Cymraeg:

CXC4004: Britain’s Celtic Heritage (40 credits)
CXC4005: Medieval Welsh literature (40 credits)
English:

QXE4030: Medieval Arthur (30 credits)

QXE4029: Women’s Devotional Writing (30 credits)

QXE4016: Pre-Modern Travel (30 credits)

QXE4032: Advanced Latin for Postgraduates (20 credits)

History, Welsh History and Archaeology:

HPH4000: The Age of Llywelyn ap Iorwerth (40 credits) (English: HPW-4000; Welsh: HPC-4000)

HPH4002: The Archaeology of the Early Medieval Celtic Churches (40 credits)

HPH4013: The Duke, Duchy and Institutions of Normandy, 942-1135 (40 credits)

HPH4017: Women and Power in the High Middle Ages (40 credits)

HPH4018: Medieval Latin (20 credits)

Music:

General explanation: Modules in Early Music place a thematic focus on music of the Middle Ages and Renaissance. They are intended to broaden the student’s knowledge of different types of music composed during these periods as well as the various contexts within which they were placed. This will include consideration of analytical, repertorial, palaeographic, biographical, institutional, social and cultural aspects. A number of case studies, complemented by directed reading and assignments, will explore the depth of historical and musicological study and understanding and enable a student to address specific, focused periods, topics and/or issues in which they have an interest.

Major (40 credits) and Minor (20 credits) Submissions are different in scope.

The choice of Early Music a s Principal Subject entails that students make their Part II submission in the area of Early Music as well.

WMM4044: Principal Subject: Early Music (40 credits)
WMM4046: Major Open Submission: Early Music (40 credits)
WMM4047 and WMM4048: Minor Open Submission: Early Music (20 credits)
WMM4050: Preparing for the Part II project (20 credits)
Students may also select relevant modules also on offer by the Graduate School of the College of Arts and Humanities which include:

QXE4032: Advanced Latin for Postgraduates
QXE4033: Postgraduate Portfolio
Further information about the above modules is available directly from the Directors of Graduate Studies in each contributing schools. Module availability depends on yearly internal arrangements in each contributing school. For further details, contact the School of History, Welsh History and Archaeology, the School of Music, and School of Welsh.

Part 2: Preparation of a 20,000 word dissertation on a subject related to medieval studies agreed by your chosen supervisor. This preparation will involve a series of one-to-one supervisory meetings during the summer, once Part 1 has been completed successfully.

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Few words are as evocative and intriguing as ‘Celtic’, bringing to mind the intricacies of Bronze Age jewellery, the massive structures of Stonehenge and Newgrange, the legends of Arthur and Cú Chulainn and the Bardic craft of medieval kings and princes. Read more
Few words are as evocative and intriguing as ‘Celtic’, bringing to mind the intricacies of Bronze Age jewellery, the massive structures of Stonehenge and Newgrange, the legends of Arthur and Cú Chulainn and the Bardic craft of medieval kings and princes. But ‘Celtic’ is also about the Renaissance, the Enlightenment and the New World; Romanticism, Revolution and the struggles for survival in modernity of languages, literatures and entire national identities.

This new course from Bangor University gives students the opportunity and ability to sift fact and fiction, and to answer in detail the question:

‘Who were – and who are – the Celts?’

Over a single academic year, modules will be taught by experts in the Schools of Welsh, History, and Music, focusing on literature, archaeology, religion, mythology, antiquarianism, art history and music, to explore the culture and identity of the Celtic peoples from the hillforts of prehistory to the devolved and independent parliaments of today.

Students on the course will also be guided as they perform their own research towards a Master’s thesis on a topic of their choice.

All instruction is available through English or Welsh, and comprehensive ESOL support is available where necessary.

Major issues covered on the MA ‘Y Celtiaid – The Celts’ include:

Do ‘The Celts’ actually exist, and if so, who and what are they? How can we discuss such questions, with what methodology and with what evidence?
How has the word itself (‘Celt’, ‘Keltoi’, etc.) been used through the centuries, from Classical historians to modern pop musicians?
What are the strengths and weaknesses of ‘Celtomania’ and ‘Celtoscepticism’? How has the concept of the ‘Celt’ has been discovered and discarded in various fields such as Literature, Archaeology, Linguistics, Music, Religion?
How did nineteenth-century Continental scholars contribute to the creation of the ‘Celt’?
How do and how did the Celtic-speaking peoples negotiate their own identities? What do the medieval texts (Laws, Legends, Court Poetry, Saints’ Lives) and archaeological findings tell us, and what does recent history have to say?
What are the main sources of evidence for the histories and identities of the ‘Celtic’ peoples (i.e. those speaking Celtic languages in the modern period)? How do we use these sources? Can Arthur and Cú Chulainn tell us anything useful?
How have the ethnic and national identities of the modern ‘Celts’ been represented and negotiated with reference to this concept of the ‘Celtic’?
What has been – and what is – the political and ideological relevance of the ‘Celt’?
With issues such as these in mind, the MA ‘Y Celtiaid – The Celts’ is designed to develop participants’ skills through a scheme of specialist advanced study. An important objective is to provide participants with relevant analytical training, so that they are familiar with the latest theoretical and practical developments relating to Celtic Studies. On completing this course, students will have a solid grounding in the main methods and sources of the discipline, and will also have developed widely-transferrable skills which will be of clear relevance to a broad range of careers.

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Medieval Studies is a well-known and internationally recognised area of expertise at Bangor. Over the decades particular strengths in Arthurian literature, Welsh History and Archaeology and Cymraeg, as well as Music have attracted postgraduates to Bangor to work with experts in each of these areas. Read more
Medieval Studies is a well-known and internationally recognised area of expertise at Bangor. Over the decades particular strengths in Arthurian literature, Welsh History and Archaeology and Cymraeg, as well as Music have attracted postgraduates to Bangor to work with experts in each of these areas. Additional strengths include gender and devotional literature (in the School of English), Anglo-Norman studies, and early sacred music, among others. Interdisciplinary approaches form the core of medieval studies, and the current expertise at Bangor guarantees this approach both through the core module and through the option modules. In addition to this, Bangor can boast a unique combination of modules students can choose from, such as do not normally feature together: Welsh, Arthurian studies and Music form the distinctive core of the provision, alongside our widely recognised expertise in teaching palaeography and codicology.

Course Structure
In Part 1 of the course, students develop skills and acquire subject knowledge by way of preparation for Part Two, a 20,000 word dissertation. The Diploma, which consists of Part One of the MA programme, aims to develop learner autonomy to the point where the student is capable of beginning a scholarly dissertation at MA level.

Part 1: At the beginning of this course, all students must register for the following modules:

Understanding the Middle Ages (semesters 1 and 2)
Manuscripts and Printed Books (1 semester)
In addition to these modules, students may choose from a wide range of modules in this part of the course which may include:

Cymraeg:

CXC4004: Britain’s Celtic Heritage (40 credits)
CXC4005: Medieval Welsh literature (40 credits)

English:

QXE4030: Medieval Arthur (30 credits): This module explores the Arthurian myth from the earliest archaeological evidence to the end of the fifteenth century, with a view to exploring its evolution in a variety of the socio-political contexts, as well as material culture (manuscript and printed editions, artefacts). Focusing on a number of texts in different genres and languages (read in English translation when necessary), the module will offer postgraduates an insight into the origins and development of Arthurian themes in medieval literature (Convener: Dr Raluca Radulescu.)

QXE4029: Women’s Devotional Writing (30 credits)

QXE4016: Pre-Modern Travel (30 credits)

QXE4032: Advanced Latin for Postgraduates (20 credits)

History, Welsh History and Archaeology:

HPH4000: The Age of Llywelyn ap Iorwerth (40 credits)

HPH4002: The Archaeology of the Early Medieval Celtic Churches (40 credits)

HPH4013: The Duke, Duchy and Institutions of Normandy, 942-1135 (40 credits)

HPH4017: Women and Power in the High Middle Ages (40 credits)

HPH4018: Medieval Latin (20 credits)

Music:

General explanation: Modules in Early Music place a thematic focus on music of the Middle Ages and Renaissance. They are intended to broaden the student’s knowledge of different types of music composed during these periods as well as the various contexts within which they were placed. This will include consideration of analytical, repertorial, palaeographic, biographical, institutional, social and cultural aspects. A number of case studies, complemented by directed reading and assignments, will explore the depth of historical and musicological study and understanding and enable a student to address specific, focused periods, topics and/or issues in which they have an interest.

Part 2: Preparation of a 20,000 word dissertation on a subject related to medieval studies agreed by your chosen supervisor. This preparation will involve a series of one-to-one supervisory meetings during the summer, once Part 1 has been completed successfully.

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Taught jointly by the Schools of Welsh and English, the Literatures of Wales MA is the first course anywhere in the world which focuses on the study and comparison of texts from the two main literary traditions in Wales (where necessary in English translation). Read more
Taught jointly by the Schools of Welsh and English, the Literatures of Wales MA is the first course anywhere in the world which focuses on the study and comparison of texts from the two main literary traditions in Wales (where necessary in English translation). Wales is the only one of the British Celtic nations to retain a widely-spoken, viable indigenous language and a vibrant contemporary literature. It is also the only British nation whose distinctive Anglophone literature remains marginalised within its own education system. At university level, the linguistic divide of the twentieth century encouraged the separate study of the two literatures, a schism which modern scholarship has only recently started to overcome. Bangor – a genuinely bilingual cultural centre – is an ideal place in which to study these two literary traditions from Wales, and to consider the question of what happens to English-language literature when it is not the principal tradition.

Part One:

The first part of the course comprises three modules which seek to provide students with an understanding of modern Welsh literary and cultural history, enable them to develop their understanding of key issues in modern Welsh literary scholarship and consider key issues across both literary traditions, from a cross-community perspective.

Introduction: ‘Who Speaks for Wales?’: In this introductory module, students will be asked to consider how issues of identity pertinent to Wales from 1840 to the present have been understood. Typically, students will study internal difference within Wales, Britishness, notions of Celtic identity, Wales as a postcolonial nation, parallels with other ‘dominated’ British nations, nationalist movements. Work by the following writers might be studied: Hywel Teifi Edwards, Saunders Lewis, Raymond Williams, Matthew Arnold, J.R. Jones, M. Wynn Thomas, Tony Conran, Dai Smith, Kirsti Bohata.
Welsh Modernity: Students will be asked to consider the ways in which literature across both linguistic traditions registers the arrival of modernity, and the changes subsequently wrought. Themes might include industry, class, urbanisation, capitalism, rural culture, religion, linguistic change and exile. Writers to be studied might include Caradoc Evans, Lynette Roberts, Caradog Pritchard, Dylan Thomas, Kate Roberts, R.S. Thomas, Arthur Machen, Emyr Humphreys, Idris Davies.
Gender and Wales: Students will study the relation between gender and the Welsh nation, and how gender roles have changed over the last century. Themes might include sexuality, masculinity and industry, gendered representations of the colonised space, the male body, women and representations of land. Writers to be studied might include: Elin ap Hywel, Jan Morris, John Sam Jones, Glyn Jones, Jane Aaron, Lewis Jones, Gwyneth Lewis, Rhys Davies, Amy Dillwyn, Menna Gallie.
Part Two:

Preparation of a 20,000-word Dissertation, written in English or Welsh, on any aspect of the literatures in which the student is interested a subject of your choice, researched and written under the individual supervision of a subject specialist.

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Wedi’i ddysgu ar y cyd gan Ysgol y Gymraeg ac Ysgol y Saesneg, y cwrs MA Llenyddiaethau Cymru yw’r cwrs cyntaf yn unlle yn y byd sy’n canolbwyntio ar astudio a chymharu testunau o’r ddau brif draddodiad yng Nghymru (lle bo angen, mewn cyfieithiad i’r Saesneg). Read more
Wedi’i ddysgu ar y cyd gan Ysgol y Gymraeg ac Ysgol y Saesneg, y cwrs MA Llenyddiaethau Cymru yw’r cwrs cyntaf yn unlle yn y byd sy’n canolbwyntio ar astudio a chymharu testunau o’r ddau brif draddodiad yng Nghymru (lle bo angen, mewn cyfieithiad i’r Saesneg). Cymru yw’r unig un o genhedloedd Celtaidd gwledydd Prydain i fod ag iaith frodorol hyfyw a siaredir ar raddfa eang a llenyddiaeth gyfoes gyffrous. Ar ben hynny, hi yw’r unig genedl yng ngwledydd Prydain y mae ei llenyddiaeth Saesneg unigryw yn parhau ar yr ymylon o fewn ei chyfundrefn addysg ei hun. Ar lefel brifysgol, oherwydd rhaniad ieithyddol a fodolai yn yr 20fed ganrif, anogwyd astudiaeth ar y ddwy lenyddiaeth ar wahân – agendor nad yw ysgolheigion cyfoes ond megis dechrau ei phontio. Oherwydd ei chanolfan ddiwylliannol wirioneddol ddwyieithog, mae Bangor yn lle delfrydol i astudio’r ddau draddodiad llenyddol hyn, ac i ystyried y cwestiwn ynglÅ·n â beth sy’n digwydd i lenyddiaeth yn y Saesneg os nad hwn yw’r prif draddodiad.

Rhan Un:

Mae rhan gyntaf y cwrs yn cynnwys tri modiwl sy’n ceisio rhoi dealltwriaeth i fyfyrwyr o hanes llenyddol a diwylliannol modern Cymru, eu galluogi i ddatblygu eu dealltwriaeth o faterion allweddol ym maes ysgolheictod llenyddol modern Cymru ac ystyried themâu allweddol ar draws y ddau draddodiad llenyddol, o safbwynt traws-gymunedol.

Rhagarweiniad: "Pwy Sy’n Siarad dros Gymru?": Yn y modiwl rhagarweiniol hwn, gofynnir i fyfyrwyr ystyried sut y deallwyd ac y deellir materion yn ymwneud â hunaniaeth Gymreig o 1840 tan y presennol. Bydd myfyrwyr yn nodweddiadol yn astudio gwahaniaethau mewnol yng Nghymru, Prydeindod, cysyniadau o hunaniaeth Geltaidd, Cymru fel cenedl ôl-drefedigaethol, profiadau cyfochrog â chenhedloedd eraill Prydeinig sydd wedi’u "dominyddu", mudiadau cenedlaethol. Mae’n bosib yr astudir gweithiau gan yr awduron canlynol: Hywel Teifi Edwards, Saunders Lewis, Raymond Williams, Matthew Arnold, J.R. Jones, M. Wynn Thomas, Tony Conran, Dai Smith, Kirsti Bohata.
Moderniaeth Gymreig: Gofynnir i fyfyrwyr ystyried sut y bu i lenyddiaeth ar draws y ddau draddodiad ieithyddol gofnodi dyfodiad moderniaeth, a’r newidiadau a ddilynodd yn ei sgil. Gall themâu gynnwys diwydiant, dosbarth, trefoli, cyfalafiaeth, diwylliant gwledig, crefydd, newid ieithyddol ac alltudiaeth. Gall llenorion i’w hastudio gynnwys Caradoc Evans, Lynette Roberts, Caradog Pritchard, Dylan Thomas, Kate Roberts, R.S. Thomas, Arthur Machen, Emyr Humphreys, Idris Davies.
Rhywedd a Chymru: Bydd y myfyrwyr yn astudio’r berthynas rhwng rhywedd a’r genedl Gymreig, a sut mae rolau rhywedd wedi newid dros y ganrif ddiwethaf. Gall themâu gynnwys rhywioldeb, gwrywdod a diwydiant, cynrychiolaethau ar sail rhywedd o’r gofod a wladychwyd, y corff gwrywaidd, merched a chynrychiolaethau o dir. Gall llenorion i’w hastudio gynnwys: Elin ap Hywel, Jan Morris, John Sam Jones, Glyn Jones, Jane Aaron, Lewis Jones, Gwyneth Lewis, Rhys Davies, Amy Dillwyn, Menna Gallie.
Rhan Dau:

Paratoi traethawd hir 20,000 o eiriau, wedi’i ysgrifennu naill ai yn Saesneg neu yn Gymraeg, ar bwnc o’ch dewis chi yn ymwneud ag unrhyw agwedd ar y llenyddiaethau sydd o ddiddordeb i’r myfyriwr, wedi’i ymchwilio a’i ysgrifennu dan oruchwyliaeth unigol arbenigwr yn y maes.

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It is entirely possible to study with us through the medium of English or Welsh. This course is tailor made to suit the individual’s needs and interests and include a full academic year of full-time study. Read more
It is entirely possible to study with us through the medium of English or Welsh.

This course is tailor made to suit the individual’s needs and interests and include a full academic year of full-time study. During that academic year the student, under the School’s supervision, will produce essay work on a regular basis. Before the end of the calendar year, the student is asked to produce a dissertation of up to 20,000 words. Recent successful MA dissertations have included work on writers such as Aled Islwyn, R. Gerallt Jones, Meic Povey and Martin Davies; others have been thematic studies, e.g. women in the works of Kate Roberts; still others have been more strictly philological, such as a recent edition of an Interlude by Twm o’r Nant.

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