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History & Archaeology×

University of Glasgow, Full Time Masters Degrees in History & Archaeology

We have 30 University of Glasgow, Full Time Masters Degrees in History & Archaeology

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This programme provides you with thorough research training, an outstanding learning experience, and a wide set of transferable skills in the conception, design and execution of a research project. Read more
This programme provides you with thorough research training, an outstanding learning experience, and a wide set of transferable skills in the conception, design and execution of a research project.

Why this programme

-If you are looking to pursue a specialisation in the history of medicine, led and supported by internationally-regarded historians, this programme is ideal for you.
-Strong links with the University's Hunterian Museum, Anatomy Museum and Art Gallery, will give you access to primary source material including an enormous collection of anatomical and pathological specimens, coins, books, manuscripts and ethnography.
-The Centre for the History of Medicine has a reference library, computing facilities, and other equipment providing excellent support for research. We also run research seminars and workshops, and an annual research forum, all of which bring in speakers from throughout the world.
-Our researchers have access to rich archival materials held locally by the Greater Glasgow Health Board, the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow, Glasgow University Archives, Glasgow City Archives and the Special Collections of the Glasgow University Library. Archives elsewhere in Scotland are also easily accessible.

Programme structure

You will take four core courses and two optional courses, you will then produce a dissertation on a topic related to the history of medicine.

Core courses
-Research resources and skills for historians
-Approaches to history
-History of medicine 1: studies in the history of medicine before 1850
-History of medicine 2: studies in the history of medicine from 1850 to 2000.

There are variations to the structure of the programme depending on your choice of an MSc or MLitt.

For the MSc you need to choose two optional courses from the social sciences training courses
-Quantitative methods
-Qualitative methods
-Introduction to social theory for researchers.

Other optional courses are taught in History, Economic and Social History (in the College of Social Sciences), and by related Subject Areas in the School of Humanities (Archaeology, Celtic, Classics) and the College of Arts (such as English Language and French).

You will be taught through a series of seminars and workshops. Internationally recognised historians give guest lectures throughout the year.

Career prospects

Apart from continuing to study a PhD, you can transfer the Arts research skills and methods you learn on this programme to positions in the modern public and private sectors, such as heritage, policy and projects, journalism and teaching.

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The Masters in History provides you with an outstanding learning experience in the company of Glasgow's thirty-strong cohort of historians, and the opportunity to conceive, design and execute a research project/dissertation. Read more
The Masters in History provides you with an outstanding learning experience in the company of Glasgow's thirty-strong cohort of historians, and the opportunity to conceive, design and execute a research project/dissertation. The programme combines training in historical theory, skills and methods with a wide range of specialist taught options which cover all periods from medieval to late modern, in relation to Scotland, Britain, Europe, America and elsewhere.

Why this programme

-Our links with the University’s museum and art gallery, The Hunterian, provide access to primary source material including an enormous collection of anatomical and pathological specimens, coins, books, manuscripts and ethnography.
-You will also enjoy access to The Baillie Collection, our prized collection of printed medieval and modern sources in Scottish, Irish and English history, which includes printed state papers, Historical Manuscript Commission publications and a select collection of modern monographs.
-If you are looking for the opportunity to pursue your own historical interests in a lively and friendly environment, led and supported by internationally-regarded historians, this programme is ideal for you.

Programme structure

Our pathway structure allows you to tailor your degree to match an interest in one of the following fields:
-Medieval history
-Modern and late modern history
-Scottish history
-Social and cultural history
-Gender history
-Military history

Each programme is built around a hands-on research training course, specialised courses on historical and theoretical themes, and other courses developing your technical skills and other abilities like languages and palaeography.

For your chosen programme, there will be a guided selection of courses that will provide you with specialised knowledge in that field. You will be taught through a series of seminars and workshops. Internationally recognised historians give guest lectures throughout the year.

These courses are taught in history, economic and social history (in the College of Social Sciences), and by related subject areas in the School of Humanities (archaeology, Celtic, classics) and the College of Arts (such as English language and French).

In the final part of the programme, you will select a specialised topic and conduct original primary source research for your dissertation. You are supported in your research and writing up by an assigned supervisor with expertise in your field of enquiry.

Core course
-Research resources and skills for historians

Career prospects

Apart from continuing to study a PhD, you can transfer the Arts research skills and methods you learn on this programme to positions in the modern public and private sectors, such as heritage, policy and projects, journalism and teaching.

Positions held by recent History graduates include Editor Business & History Products, Lead Scholar/Instructor and Secretary.

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The Masters in Celtic & Viking Archaeology provides an introduction to both theory and practice in approaches to early medieval archaeology, based on our particular research strengths in the settlements and material culture of Celtic, Pictish and Viking peoples, and in the archaeology of kingship and political development. Read more

The Masters in Celtic & Viking Archaeology provides an introduction to both theory and practice in approaches to early medieval archaeology, based on our particular research strengths in the settlements and material culture of Celtic, Pictish and Viking peoples, and in the archaeology of kingship and political development.

Why this programme

  • If you want to further your career in archaeology, our new approaches to early medieval studies bring fresh insights into the life and ideas of the period and provide you with a stimulating environment, learning from internationally-renowned scholars
  • You will have the opportunity to take fieldtrips to a number of sites relevant to your studies.
  • Our programme has strong links with the University's Hunterian Museum, and Glasgow Life giving you access to primary source material, including objects and archives.

Programme structure

You will take two core courses and three optional courses. For the MLitt you will produce a dissertation on a specialist topic agreed with the course convenor.

The core courses provides you with a theoretical background to the study of early medieval archaeology, examining themes such as burial, settlement, material culture, religion through a series of case studies. You will also get training and support in a wide variety of research methods including library skills, humanities computing, writing and presenting papers.

Core courses

  • Approaches to Celtic and Viking Archaeology
  • Research Skills

Optional courses

Three optional courses must be selected, two of which from the following

  • Themes in Early Medieval Scottish archaeology
  • Early Christian monuments of Scotland
  • Early Medieval artefacts
  • Viking and late Norse artefacts
  • Norse in the North Atlantic, AD 800–1500
  • Viking and late Norse British Isles.

You may also choose one of the following options

  • Thematic studies: any one of the thematic courses offered via other MLitt programmes, by agreement with the course convener. These may include courses available via other Masters programmes within the University (most relevant are those offered as part of Celtic Studies and Scottish Medieval Studies)
  • Independent study on a topic agreed with the course convenor.
  • Artefact studies: any one of the specialist courses offered in the MLitt Material Culture & Artefact Studies
  • Multimedia analysis and design or 2D digitisation.

Career prospects

Graduates have gone on to work for various heritage bodies such as the National Museum of Scotland, and for UK-based commercial archaeology firms.

The programme provides an excellent platform for you to move onto PhD studies and an academic career. The wide variety of specialist optional courses allow you to tailor your particular programme experience towards a direction that best suits your future plans upon completion.

Positions held by recent graduates include Field Archaeologist, Open Learning Tutor, University lectureships and research managers.



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This Masters in Conflict Archaeology & Heritage specialises in the archaeological approaches to conflict and historic battlefields. Read more

This Masters in Conflict Archaeology & Heritage specialises in the archaeological approaches to conflict and historic battlefields. The course reflects the importance of archaeological manifestations of conflict as a vital component of the world’s cultural heritage, providing a firm grounding in the latest methodologies, concepts, and applications within this exciting multi-disciplinary field.

Why this programme

  • The programme is based within the Centre for Battlefield Archaeology, which is an internationally renowned centre of excellence for the study of conflict heritage and archaeology.
  • The Centre is consistently engaged in high profile fieldwork and research projects covering a wide geographical area and chronological span; the scope of research includes battlefields, memorialisation, military infrastructure, cultural resource management, etc.
  • The programme’s focus on conflict landscapes makes fieldtrips an integral part of the MLitt: amongst the significant battlefields you will visit will be the iconic sites of Bannockburn and Culloden.
  • Conflict sites, both ancient and modern, have come to be accepted as important elements of the world’s cultural heritage, and this programme provides an ideal grounding if you are interested in the management of these fields of conflict; the Centre has played a lead role in the development of government policy on the conservation and management of historic battlefields in Scotland.
  • You will benefit from a unique portfolio of ongoing research and archive material, including artefacts, historic documents, and other resources; you will also have access to a wide range of specialist archives, museums, professional archaeological units, and scientific institutions.

Programme structure

From battlefield archaeology, to the anthropology of warfare, to archaeologies of confinement, the programme will explore in depth the many and varied ways that human conflict can be interrogated via an archaeologically focused interdisciplinary approach, encompassing time periods from the prehistoric to the modern. In addition to taught elements, the course will encourage students to engage with the subject on a practical basis and will involve fieldtrips to a number of battlefields and other sites relevant to their studies.

The programme consists of three core courses which will provide a general framework for the study of conflict archaeology and heritage, accompanied by three more specialised optional courses. For the MLitt you will produce a dissertation on a specialist topic agreed with your supervisor.

Core courses

  • Research and Professional Skills
  • The Art of War: Concepts and Theories
  • Method & Practice in Conflict Heritage

Optional courses

You need to choose three options in total; two options are selected from the following:

  • Modern Warfare
  • British Battlefields

One option is selected from any of the specialist courses offered in the Archaeology, War Studies or other relevant programmes.

Career prospects

The Centre has an excellent track record of students going on to employment in universities, museums, commercial archaeology, government agencies, and archives both here and abroad. The MLitt in particular has proved to be an excellent platform to progression into PhD studies at universities both in the UK and overseas.



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The Scottish History Masters offers courses in social, political, religious, military and cultural history of Scotland from the medieval period through to the 20th century. Read more

The Scottish History Masters offers courses in social, political, religious, military and cultural history of Scotland from the medieval period through to the 20th century. The course focuses on Gaelic Scotland, Scotland’s place in the British Isles and Europe, and on urban Scotland. You’ll have access to excellent primary sources, including the Baillie Collection of printed medieval and modern sources in Scottish, Irish and English history.

Why this programme

  • Glasgow is home to one of the largest groupings of Scottish historians in the world who participate in the Centre for Scottish and Celtic Studies with colleagues in related disciplines such as Archaeology, Scottish Literature, Celtic & Gaelic and Theology and Religious Studies.
  • Glasgow is an outstanding resource hub for the study of Scottish History. On campus, the University Library holds superb printed and manuscript collections from the medieval to the present. You can also use the Baillie Collection of printed medieval and modern sources in Scottish, Irish and English history.
  • The University’s Hunterian Museum and Art Gallery provides access to primary source materials in fields such as fine art, numismatics and ethnography. The city is home to world-class museums and galleries, the Mitchell Library and Glasgow Women’s Library.
  • We have a dynamic and supportive research environment, where you’re encouraged to take part in many research-led initiatives such as seminar programmes.

Programme structure

You’ll take:

  • One core courses
  • Five optional courses

You’ll also write a dissertation.

Semester 1: September to December

  • Research, Resources and Skills for Historians (RRSH) (Core course)
  • Two (or three) optional courses

Semester 2: January to March

  • Research, Resources and Skills for Historians (RRSH) (Core course)
  • Three (or two) optional courses

Summer: April to September

Dissertation

Career prospects

The research skills and methods you’ll gain on this programme give you the transferable skills needed for positions in the public and private sectors, including heritage policy and projects, media and teaching.

The programme is also a good foundation for a PhD. 



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The first of its kind in the world, Ancestral Studies is an innovative new interdisciplinary programme. Read more

The first of its kind in the world, Ancestral Studies is an innovative new interdisciplinary programme. Uniting teaching across humanities and sciences, Ancestral Studies explores the social and biological contours of identity, allowing you to study across multiple disciplines, create your own curriculum and pursue self-directed unique research.

Why this programme

  • A truly interdisciplinary degree programme taught collaboratively by world leading academic departments
  • An emphasis on building practical skills through professional masterclasses and skills workshops
  • An immersive learning experience drawing upon the unique Scottish landscape and its rich history 
  • The opportunity to contribute to, and shape, a new academic field of research

Programme structure

This course can be taken full or part time (at the convener’s discretion). It is comprised of two core modules and several optional taught modules. This structure allows you to shape your own curriculum and tailor it to your interests (insofar as staffing and course availability allows). You will work closely with the convener to shape a meaningful and intellectually cogent programme of study. Over the summer you will complete a dissertation or professional report dependent upon your interests.

Core and Optional Courses

Core Courses

Research Methods for Ancestral Studies introduces you to key research methodologies and practices drawn from a range of disciplines. You will receive an introduction to specialist and transferable skills such as working with archives and online genealogical resources, visual culture, heritage landscapes, museums and material culture. Emphasis is placed on the interpretation of primary sources. 

Approaches to Ancestral Studies provides a conceptual framework for exploring core themes of the discipline through weekly topics drawn from multiple disciplines. You will consider questions of identity (genetic and social), examine current trends in family history and heritage research and address questions of past generations and their experiences of place, language and material culture. You will be exposed to theoretical, critical and practical insights from across the arts, humanities and sciences to explore ancestry, relational identity, intellectual inheritance and memory works.

Optional courses

Optional courses will be drawn from a range of disciplines and will therefore change on a yearly basis. You will work with the programme convener to choose a complement of optional courses that will align with your interests. These courses may be taken from History, Archaeology, Celtic and Gaelic, and more (depending on course offerings in any particular year).

Dissertation

MSc students will complete a dissertation. Innovative, cross-disciplinary dissertations are encouraged and will be supervised/co-supervised within the appropriate Schools.  

Career prospects

The combination of practical and theory based learning will equip graduates of Ancestral Studies with a well-balanced and broad set of transferrable skills. You will have practical research skills in primary and secondary sources (from artefacts to archives), the ability to critically evaluate sources, to debate and formulate your own arguments and theories, and to present your research to your peers.

Potential career paths include academic and commercial archaeology, a variety of positions within museums, galleries, archives and libraries, or within the growing Ancestral Tourism sector.



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This programme offers you the opportunity to explore the ancient world from a multicultural and interdisciplinary perspective from the Near-East to North-Western Europe. Read more

This programme offers you the opportunity to explore the ancient world from a multicultural and interdisciplinary perspective from the Near-East to North-Western Europe. It is based in Classics, with the participation of Archaeology, Egyptology, Celtic and Gaelic, and Theology and Religious Studies.

Why this programme

  • The programme makes extensive use of the unique collections in the University of Glasgow's Hunterian Museum as well as collections in other Glasgow museums such as the Burrell Collection and the Glasgow Museums Resource Centre.
  • Hands-on sessions in a range of museums and libraries can be tailor-made to suit your interests.
  • You will have the opportunity to take up an ancient language (Greek, Latin, Egyptian, Coptic, Hebrew, early Gaelic, Welsh) from scratch, or continue it at advanced level.

Programme structure

The ancient world was both multicultural and highly interconnected, with trade routes running from the Middle East through Greece and Italy to Celtic Britain, with peoples of diverse cultures, faiths, and ethnicities living together in bustling cities such as Athens, Rome, and Alexandria.

Core courses

  • Approaching the Ancient World through Text
  • Approaching the Ancient World through Material Culture

Both core courses include handling sessions with ancient objects taking advantage of the unique resources of the University of Glasgow in the shape of the university library, the Hunterian Museum, and the Glasgow Museums Resource Centre.

Optional courses may include

  • Languages at all levels: Ancient Greek, Latin, early Gaelic, Welsh, Hebrew, Ancient Egyptian (hieroglyphs), Coptic
  • Democracy and Government in the Ancient World
  • Explorations in the Classical Tradition
  • Rituals, Feasts and Festivals – Power, Community and Consumption in the East Mediterranean and the Near East
  • Mediterranean Landscapes
  • Climate and Civilisation
  • Celtic Art
  • Jewish Contexts of Early Christianity
  • Early Church History and Theology
  • Ancient Egyptian Art and Archaeology
  • Courses on Celtic and Viking archaeology
  • Courses in Museum Studies

You must take courses from at least two subject areas. The course convener will offer guidance and approve your choices to ensure their feasibility and intellectual cogency.

Please note that you can only study one language at beginner’s level.

You will also complete a dissertation of 12,000-15,000 words on a research topic of your choice. Your dissertation will be supervised in individual subjects or jointly between subjects as appropriate. 

Our research environment

You will enjoy the use of the excellent postgraduate facilities offered by Classics in Glasgow. There is a dedicated postgraduate study space, which makes available an extensive research collection, now augmented by a bequest from the late Professor Douglas MacDowell.

The subjects, Classics, Archaeology, Celtic and Gaelic, and Theology and Religious Studies, all run a programme of research seminars which provide Ancient Cultures students with a wide range of stimulating events to choose from.

Career prospects

The programme provides excellent technical and linguistic skills for further postgraduate study in any of the subjects involved. It is also well suited for those considering a career in heritage, teaching, archives, or libraries.



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Material culture and artefact studies combines the archaeological recovery and specialist examination of an object with its presentation, management and understanding within a cultural context. Read more

Material culture and artefact studies combines the archaeological recovery and specialist examination of an object with its presentation, management and understanding within a cultural context.

Why this programme

  • This MSc in Material Culture & Artefact Studies will prepare you to participate at both a practical and theoretical level within the field of specialist artefactual analysis.
  • You will be able to undertake a work placement to gain valuable work experience in a museum, archaeological unit or other cultural institution.
  • You will benefit from the involvement of staff from Glasgow Museums, National Museums Scotland and other institutions within Scotland, and will have the opportunity to work with collections from local museums, including the University’s own Hunterian Museum and Art Gallery.

Programme structure

The taught component consists of core courses and optional courses, running over two semesters.

Assessment is normally focused on written performance, but oral presentation skills and other modes of assessment allow you to develop your writing skills in a number of formats. This is in addition to the practical emphasis on developing your ability to interpret and analyse artefacts.

For the MSc you can opt to do either a dissertation or an extended work placement (assessed by work placement eportfolio and either a research report or a student exhibition design).

Core courses

  • Material culture in context
  • The process of artefact studies.

Optional courses include modules such as:

  • Lithic analysis
  • Independent study
  • Critical themes in the display and reception of objects
  • Early medieval artefacts 
  • Viking and late Norse artefacts (AD 750-1350). 
  • Optional courses drawn from Archaeology or from other programmes across the University can be taken by agreement with the programme convener.

Career prospects

The two strands to the degree enable you to prepare for further doctoral research whilst also providing opportunities for valuable vocational experience in a commercial environment.

The wealth of experience and knowledge provided by the interdisciplinary nature and focus of the degree and the networks and relationships developed during their time here, has stood past graduates in good stead upon graduation. They have found full-time positions with Historic Scotland, Headland Archaeology Ltd, Guard Archaeology Ltd. While others are working with various heritage organisations and some are continuing with their postgraduate studies.

Several of our international graduates have found employment working at the Smithsonian, Washington D.C and at the Pink Palace Museum, Memphis Tennessee. Others continue to work in the Cultural Resource Management sector. Several students have gone on to further doctoral research at Glasgow University and beyond, on prehistoric stone tools, Shetland lace knitting, Bronze Age ceramics and medieval settlement.



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The Masters in Museum Studies will help you develop the knowledge, understanding and skills required of today’s versatile museum professional. Read more

The Masters in Museum Studies will help you develop the knowledge, understanding and skills required of today’s versatile museum professional. It has been designed in conjunction with employers to meet their needs for well-rounded museum professionals trained in the latest theoretical and practical approaches.

Why this programme

  • Glasgow’s civic and university collections are the richest and most diverse outside of London and are of international standing.
  • Taught alongside staff from the University's own museum and art gallery, The Hunterian, the degree programme provides a combination of academic and practitioner input.
  • If you want to develop a career in the cultural heritage sector, this programme has been developed for you.
  • Three versions of the degree allow you follow standard or specialist strands.
  • There are great opportunities for you to take practice based courses or work placements at the museums and galleries that partner the programme.
  • We welcome applicants from across the arts and sciences, current professionals or career changers, from the UK or abroad.

Programme structure

Three different strands of the MSc Museum Studies are offered.

The Theory and Practice strand is our standard Museum Studies programme where the museum itself is the primary object of study.

Two specialist strands: Collecting and Provenance; and Artefact and Material Culture, enable you to combine courses in Museum Studies with specialist courses from Masters programmes provided by Archaeology and History of Art.

Each strand will give you a different mix of core and optional courses. All students take two 20 credit common core courses in Museology and Research and Professional Skills. You also take four 20 credit courses from your strand (a combination of strand core and optional courses) and one 60 credit research project.

Career prospects



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The programme offers ESRC accredited training in language-based area studies, as well as advanced training in qualitative and quantitative methods; specialised area studies research training; and language training in one of the region’s languages. Read more
The programme offers ESRC accredited training in language-based area studies, as well as advanced training in qualitative and quantitative methods; specialised area studies research training; and language training in one of the region’s languages.

Why this programme

-The programme is intended for those who wish to pursue a research-based career in the region, with or without the completion of a PhD.
-Language and other study trips to the region are available. You will be offered the opportunity to spend a month in Russia. Some financial support is available to help you fund these trips.
-Annual scholarships are available for the language-based area studies pathways on a 2+3 (MRes + intensive language training to advanced level + PhD), 1+3 (MRes or intensive language training to advanced level + PhD) and +3 (PhD only) models, depending on your prior qualifications.
-The University Library holds one of the best Russian, Central and East European collections in the world.
-We have active postgraduate training links with thirteen overseas partner institutions in eleven countries. They visit to provide research master classes and participate in seminars.

Programme structure

You will take five core courses and submit a 12,000-15,000 word dissertation.

Semester 1
-Social science statistics 1
-Qualitative methods
-Language (Czech, Estonian, Hungarian, Polish, Russian)

Semester 2
-Research methods for studying Russia and Central and Eastern Europe
-Advanced qualitative methods or Social science statistics 2
Language (Czech, Estonian, Latvian, Lithuanian, Polish, Russian, Slovak or Hungarian)
Dissertation (12,000–15,000 words)

Note: Some languages and courses might not be available every year. You may also be able to choose from courses in the other subjects in the School of Social & Political Sciences. Language training is offered over a range of levels from beginners to advanced. If you are a native speaker or have a degree in one of the region’s languages, you will take an additional course instead.

Career prospects

Many of our graduates have gone on to establish careers as lecturers and researchers at universities in the UK, Norway, Greece, Italy and Poland or have become secondary school teachers. Some have also gone on to pursue research and policy-making careers with government, business and international organisations.

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Our History Masters covers all periods from medieval to late modern, focusing on Scotland, Britain, Europe and America. You’ll study historical skills and methods and produce a research dissertation based on primary sources. Read more

Our History Masters covers all periods from medieval to late modern, focusing on Scotland, Britain, Europe and America. You’ll study historical skills and methods and produce a research dissertation based on primary sources. History at Glasgow rates joint 4th in the UK for research excellence and impact. Our research directs our postgraduate teaching so that you'll explore cutting-edge topics.

Why this programme

  • Glasgow is an outstanding resource hub for the study of History. On campus, the University Library holds superb printed and manuscript collections from the medieval to the present. You can also use the Baillie Collection of printed medieval and modern sources in Scottish, Irish and English history.
  • The University’s Hunterian Museum and Art Gallery provides access to primary source materials in fields such as fine art, numismatics and ethnography. The city is home to world-class museums and galleries, the Mitchell Library and Glasgow Women’s Library.
  • History staff contribute to the Masters programmes in American Studies, War Studies and Global Security, and you can take taught options from these and other programmes, enabling you to tailor the programme to your interests.
  • We are a dynamic and supportive research community, where you’re encouraged to take part in many research-led initiatives such as seminar programmes.

Programme Structure

You’ll take:

  • One core course
  • Five optional courses

You’ll also produce a dissertation.

Semester 1: September to December

  • Research, Resources and Skills for Historians (RRSH) (Core course)
  • Two (or three) optional courses

Semester 2: January to March

  • Research, Resources and Skills for Historians (RRSH) (Core course)
  • Three (or two) optional courses

Summer: April to September

Dissertation

Teaching and assessment

Teaching is mainly seminar and discussion-based, in small classes. Technical skills are taught through lectures and workshops associated with the core course, while the conceptual foundations for gender history are taught through the weekly seminars. Independent and self-reflective critical work is fostered through written assignments and seminar presentations, culminating in the dissertation.

Career prospects

The research skills and methods you’ll gain on this programme give you the transferable skills for positions in the public and private sectors, including heritage policy and projects, media and teaching. The programme is also a good foundation for a PhD. 



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An understanding of war, for good or ill, is of vital importance. This programme offers the opportunity to study the theory and practice of war in a wide range of aspects, from the Middle Ages to the present day, and from causes to consequences. Read more

An understanding of war, for good or ill, is of vital importance. This programme offers the opportunity to study the theory and practice of war in a wide range of aspects, from the Middle Ages to the present day, and from causes to consequences.

Why this programme

  • This MLitt aims to challenge, educate and engage by exposing you to a wide range of different ideas about war. It is specifically designed to broaden and deepen your understanding of the nature of war in theory and practice, and its place in history.
  • The University of Glasgow is home to the Scottish Centre for War Studies. You will be able to participate in regular research seminars on critical themes related to conflict as well as to related conferences.
  • All courses are designed to expose you to detailed research topics, source criticism and current debate, and are led by internationally acknowledged experts.

Programme structure

You will spend the first semester studying on the degree’s core course which covers both the major thinkers on warfare and the practice and conduct of war.

Core topics may include

  • Jomini, aggressive warfare and the Confederate States of America at war
  • The evolution of Military Thought between the two World Wars
  • Europe’s ‘small wars’, 1800–present
  • Vegetius and ‘Vegetian strategy’ in medieval warfare.

In the second semester, you will take three optional courses which delve in greater detail into a particular aspect of military or strategic history.

Optional courses may include

  • Chivalry and warfare in later medieval Europe, 1300–1450
  • The American way of warfare; from the Revolution to the War on Terror
  • Insurgency and counter-insurgency, 1800-present
  • Western intelligence in an age of terror.

You will complete the programme by writing a dissertation based on your own research. This requires you to engage in original research guided by an expert in the field.

Career prospects

The programme provides an excellent platform for you to move onto PhD studies and an academic career.

Positions held by recent graduates include Development Director, Professor, Correspondent, and Freelance Journalist.



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This programme welcomes you to a lively intellectual and cultural scene, at a university ranked in the world’s top 50 for English Literature (QS World University Rankings 2017). Read more

This programme welcomes you to a lively intellectual and cultural scene, at a university ranked in the world’s top 50 for English Literature (QS World University Rankings 2017). You will study with world-class experts in Victorian literature whose interests range across many aspects of literature and culture. You’ll be able to draw on the extraordinary resources of Glasgow’s museums and libraries and have the opportunity to meet with visiting scholars from around the UK, Europe and the United States.

Why this programme

  • At the height of the nineteenth century, during the two Great Exhibitions of 1881 and 1901 in Kelvingrove Park, Glasgow was often called the ‘Second City of the Empire’. This M.Litt. offers a chance to come and study Victorian literature in this impressive historical city with its fantastic heritage.
  • You will be taught by a team of highly qualified researchers and lecturers with an international reputation for research and teaching in Victorian literature.
  • You will benefit from direct access to our outstanding holdings of Victorian primary and critical sources within the Special Collections of the University Library and the Hunterian Gallery and Museum.
  • We offer an exciting series of workshops tailored to research on Victorian topics, including tours of Glasgow University’s Special Collections, workshops on electronic resources, and field trips to sites of special interest such as the Murray Collection in the National Library of Scotland, Robert Owen’s New Lanark, and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons.

Programme structure

You’ll take:

  • Three core courses
  • Three optional courses

You’ll also write a 15,000 word dissertation.

Semester 1: September to December

  • Victorian 1: Writing the Times
  • Research Training Course
  • Optional course

Semester 2: January to March

  • Victorian 2: Writers, Readers, Publishers
  • Optional course
  • Optional course

Summer: April to September

Dissertation

Find out more about core and optional courses.

Part-time students: programme structure

Teaching methods

Teaching will be by a combination of 90-minute seminars for the core and option courses and 45-minute supervisions for the dissertation. You will also be given the opportunity to attend relevant lectures in the undergraduate programme, particularly where your first degree has not given you a wide background in Victorian literature. There may be occasional workshops on humanities computing in the STELLA laboratory. The teaching sessions will be designed throughout to maximise student involvement, and there will be a range of opportunities for informal contact among staff and students outside teaching hours.

Career prospects

You’ll develop a wide range of skills sought by many employers, including:

  • the ability to find, select and manage large quantities of information 
  • confident and persuasive oral and written communication
  • problem solving through creative and critical thinking.

The programme also provides an excellent platform for PhD studies.



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This Masters is concerned with outlining and critically evaluating the concept of the ‘avant-garde’ both theoretically and in terms of its applicability to representative areas of 20th-century art. Read more

This Masters is concerned with outlining and critically evaluating the concept of the ‘avant-garde’ both theoretically and in terms of its applicability to representative areas of 20th-century art. Dealing with art from the early twentieth century to the present, you will investigate concepts such as historical avant-garde, neo-avant-garde, and post-avant-garde, paying close attention to the theorists who have elaborated these ideas.

Why this programme

  • Glasgow’s civic and university collections are some of the richest and most diverse in Europe and are of international standing. You are granted privileged access to the extensive collections in our own Hunterian Museum and Art Gallery.
  • You have the opportunity to take part in a project-based work placement, where you can explore a possible future career while meeting professional practitioners and developing your skills and experience.
  • If you want to learn from world-leading researchers and develop expert knowledge of 20th-century Avant-Gardes, this programme is for you.
  • Our research forum provides you with a lively and stimulating introduction to methodological debates within art history. It provides a sense of art history’s own history as well as contemporary concerns and practice, examining the beliefs and values that have informed various forms of historical and visual analysis and enquiry. It is focused around a series of seminars or workshops run by members of staff and visiting academics.

Programme structure

Closely focused on the visual and historical specificities of the subject, the core teaching will have you examining the politically oppositional and ‘transgressive’ impulses of the avant-garde.

You will interpret ‘transgression’ in the widest sense and in relation to a range of diverse historical contexts, including: the anti-art concerns of Dada; the political tensions arising from conflicts between nationalist and internationalist currents in European art of the early 20th century and the Nietzschian/Bataillean testing of the boundaries of conventional moral positions, particularly regarding sexual identity and the body.

The optional courses available are closely geared to the research interests of our staff. Their content will draw upon current exhibitions and debates. 

You will take five core courses and one optional course. This is followed by a period of self-study towards a dissertation 15,000 words in length (including footnotes but excluding bibliography) and will be on a topic chosen in consultation with the tutors and the programme convenor.

Core courses

  • Research methods in practice
  • Theories of the Avant Garde
  • Readings in Duchamp: anti-art, blasphemy, sexuality
  • Art, embodiment, transgression
  • Dada in Switzerland and Germany.

Optional courses

You may choose from the following options in the College of Arts

  • a Humanities Advanced Technology and Information Institute (HATII) course: 2D Digitisation (Theory and Practice)
  • a course from the MLitt Modernities: Modernism, Modernity & Post-Modernity run by English Literature 
  • a course from elsewhere in the College of Arts, subject to the approval of the programme convenor.

Or from courses run by History of Art

  • Art in the making: modern and Avant-Garde techniques
  • Independent study 
  • Work placement.

Study trip

Students on this programme are invited to take part in an optional study trip of approximately one week, which is funded by the student. Previous destinations include Berlin and Dublin.

Career prospects

Career opportunities include positions in curation, digitisation and research within museums and other cultural and heritage institutions. The programme also provides an excellent platform for you to move onto PhD studies and an academic career.



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This programme is an advanced study of historical and contemporary developments in the economy, politics, culture and society of Russia and the countries of Eastern Europe and Eurasia. Read more
This programme is an advanced study of historical and contemporary developments in the economy, politics, culture and society of Russia and the countries of Eastern Europe and Eurasia.

Why this programme

-This programme is for those planning careers in major public, commercial and voluntary institutional settings who wish to acquire a specialised knowledge of Central and Eastern Europe and proficiency in one of the region's languages.
-Language and other study trips to the region are available. You will be offered the opportunity to spend a month in Russia. Some financial support is available to help you fund these trips.
-Choose between three specialist pathways: Central and East European Studies, Russian Studies, and Eurasian Studies.
-You will examine the history of communism and why it collapsed. You will learn about the impact of international organisations (e.g. the European Union, NATO) and of major world powers on the region as well as retaining an appreciation of the region’s internal diversity in a variety of spheres (cultural, economic, ethnic, political and social).
-You can participate in our extensive range of conferences, workshops, business days, seminars and networking activities involving representatives of the business, policy-making and third sector communities.
-The University Library holds one of the best Russian, Central and East European collections in the world.

Programme structure

You will take four core and one optional course, as well as complete a dissertation as a piece of independent research. You will select a specialist pathway, which includes a specialist core courses and a language. (choices vary depending on pathway).

Core courses
All pathways
-Issues in Russian, East European, and Eurasian studies
-Research methods for studying Russia, Eastern Europe & Eurasia

Central and East European Studies
-Geopolitics of Central and Eastern Europe OR Statehood and nationality in Central and Eastern Europe
-Language options: Czech, Estonian, Hungarian, Latvian OR Polish

Russian Studies
-Gender and identity in Soviet & Post-Soviet Russia OR Russian foreign policy
-Language: Russian

Eurasian Studies
-Contested states: The South Caucasus after 1991 OR Rethinking Central Asian security
-Language options: Russian OR Chinese

Optional courses
-Contested states: The South Caucasus since 1991
-De facto states in the Post-Soviet space
-Developments in Czech society since 1989
-Gender and identity in Soviet and Post-Soviet Russia
-Media and democratisation in Central and Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union
-Political modernisation: The Georgian case
-Post-Soviet Russia: Renegotiating global and local identities
-Post-Soviet Ukraine: a case study in socio-economic and political transformation
-Rethinking Central Asian security
-Russian foreign policy
-Statehood and nationality in Russia, Central and Eastern Europe
-The geopolitics of Central Europe

Career prospects

Many of our graduates have gone on to establish careers as lecturers and researchers at universities in the UK, Norway, Greece, Italy, and Poland or have become secondary school teachers. Our graduates have also been very successful in establishing careers with organisations such as BBC World Service, British Army, British Civil Service, British Council, Centre for Defence Information (Moscow), Coalition to Stop the Use of Child Soldiers, European Policies Research Centre, University of Strathclyde (Glasgow), European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (London), Jamestown Foundation (Washington D.C), KPMG, Ministry of Defence, UK, Open Society Foundation (Bratislava), Open Society Institute (Budapest), Operation Mobilisation, Czech Republic and the Trust for Civil Society in Central & Eastern Europe (Warsaw).

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