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History & Archaeology×

University College London, Full Time Masters Degrees in History & Archaeology

We have 56 University College London, Full Time Masters Degrees in History & Archaeology

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The Comparative Art and Archaeology MA at UCL is a wide-ranging and challenging programme designed to provide students with a sophisticated understanding of the major problems, theories and approaches in the sociological and anthropological interpretation of the art of pre-modern societies. Read more

The Comparative Art and Archaeology MA at UCL is a wide-ranging and challenging programme designed to provide students with a sophisticated understanding of the major problems, theories and approaches in the sociological and anthropological interpretation of the art of pre-modern societies.

About this degree

Students are encouraged to think critically and work independently, from a broadly comparative perspective, across the boundaries of regional and period specialisation which have traditionally characterised the study of art. They develop subject-specific, research-oriented skills relevant to their development as practising analysts within the history, anthropology or archaeology of art.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (30 credits), optional modules (60 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules

All students are required to take the following: 

  • Nature, Culture and the Languages of Art: theories and methodologies of art interpretation
  • Social and Material Contexts of Art: comparative approaches to art explanation

Optional modules

Students choose to follow further optional modules up to the value of 60 credits from an outstanding range of Master's module options available at the UCL Institute of Archaeology. For this degree the most popular choices include: 

  • Ancient Italy in the Mediterranean
  • Archaeology of Buddhism
  • Archaeology of Egypt and the Near East: a Comparative Approach
  • Aztec Archaeology: Codices and Ethnohistory
  • Cities, States and Religion in Ancient India
  • Making and Meaning in Ancient Greek Art
  • Making and Meaning in Ancient Roman Art
  • Maya Art, Architecture and Archaeology
  • Social Complexity in Early China: from the Neolithic to the Early Empire
  • Society and Culture in Ancient Egypt
  • Technology in Society: archaeology and ethnography in the Andes
  • The Mediterranean World in the Iron Age
  • The Transformation of the Roman Mediterranean

Dissertation/report

All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures and presentations. Some optional modules include site visits to museums. Assessment is through essays, coursework, oral examination and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Comparative Art and Archaeology MA

Careers

Some recent graduates of the programme have progressed to PhD studies while others have developed careers in museums, other professional cultural heritage organisations, as well as art and archaeology-related publishing and television. A high level of success has been achieved by students going on to fully funded PhD research at the University of Oxford, UCL, University of California Berkeley, and Stanford, funded by the AHRC, the Chilean government, Japanese Government, UCL, and the Ministry of Education of Taiwan. Other students have secured positions in the museums and heritage sector, for example at the Petrie Museum at UCL and the Museum for Asian Civilizations in Singapore.

Employability

Successful graduates will have been fully prepared to undertake research on the art history and archaeology of early civilizations, from a comparative or region/period/theme-specific perspective, and will also possess the expert background knowledge to move on to related professional work in art history, archaeology and cultural heritage (subject to the particular requirements of a given position).

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse department of archaeology in the UK, and provides a stimulating environment for postgraduate study.

We are international in outlook, with students and staff from over 40 countries, and involvement in field research projects around the globe. The teaching staff for this programme bring together a range and depth of expertise that is arguably unparalleled at other institutions.

UCL is located in central London, within walking distance of the British Museum and the British Library. UCL's own museums and collections form a resource of international importance for academic research.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Institute of Archaeology

73% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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UCL is a world-leading centre for research and teaching in the archaeology and cultural heritage of Egypt and the Middle East. The programme is ideally suited to students seeking to combine advanced study of these regions with new technical and interpretative skills, and offers an ideal grounding for doctoral research. Read more

UCL is a world-leading centre for research and teaching in the archaeology and cultural heritage of Egypt and the Middle East. The programme is ideally suited to students seeking to combine advanced study of these regions with new technical and interpretative skills, and offers an ideal grounding for doctoral research.

About this degree

UCL’s wide range of archaeological expertise provides a unique opportunity to study Egypt and the Middle East in a truly comparative context, and for students to develop a programme and research dissertation tailored to individual interests. These may include the application of new skills in archaeological science, exploring new theoretical perspectives, or the significance of archaeology for the wider cultural heritage of these regions.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (45 credits), two or three optional modules (45 credits), and a dissertation.

Core modules

All students must take the following: 

  • Archaeology of Egypt and the Near East: A Comparative Approach
  • Themes, Thought and Theory in World Archaeology: Foundations
  • Heritage Ethics and Archaeological Practice in the Mediterranean and Middle East

Optional modules

You are then able to choose further optional modules to the value of 45 credits. The most popular choices are: 

  • Ancient Cyprus: Colonisations, Copper and City-States (by arrangement with King's College London)
  • Archaeologies of Asia
  • Aegean Prehistory: major themes and debates
  • Beyond Chiefdoms: Archaeologies of African Political Complexity
  • Egyptian Archaeology: An Object-Based Theoretical Approach
  • Intangible Dimensions of Museum Objects from Egypt
  • Introductory Akkadian (by arrangement with SOAS)
  • Mediterranean Dynamics
  • Mediterranean Prehistory
  • Middle Egyptian Language
  • Society and Culture in Ancient Egypt
  • The Neolithic and Early Bronze Age of the Near East: the emergence of villages and urban societies
  • Middle Bronze Age to the Iron Age in the Near East: City-States and Empires

Students may also elect options from the wide range of other graduate courses in world archaeology, ancient languages, archaeological sciences, or cultural heritage offered at the Institute of Archaeology, subject to availability

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project, with guidance from an assigned supervisor, which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning

Teaching at the IoA is delivered through a combination of lectures and seminars to support student interaction, and examination is primarily through module-based essays and the individual dissertation. Depending on the options taken, teaching may also include object handling, museum work, and laboratory practicals.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Archaeology and Heritage of Egypt and the Middle East MA

Careers

The first cohort of students on the Archaeology and Heritage of Egypt and the Middle East MA is due to graduate in 2018, therefore no specific career destinations are currently available.

Previous UCL graduates in these areas have regularly gone on to undertake doctoral research, or found employment in related areas of the public, museum and heritage sector.

Employability

In addition to receiving advanced training in their chosen subject areas, students will have the opportunity to acquire a strong combination of general research skills, communication skills, skills in teamwork and networking and overall personal effectiveness.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Egyptian and Middle Eastern archaeology at UCL are embedded in the vibrant research environment of London's Bloomsbury Campus, in the centre of one of the most exciting cities in the world. The research facilities and collections of the British Museum, the UCL Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, and the Institute of Archaeology's own extensive collections from these regions will be on your doorstep. Our institute includes over 20 researchers with regional expertise in these areas, from prehistory to the present, and has a long and ongoing history of active fieldwork throughout the study region. We are also an international centre for research in cultural heritage and museum studies, where the study of the past is critically related to the concerns of the present.

UCL’s wide range of expertise in archaeology and cultural heritage will allow you to study the Egyptian and Middle Eastern past under the instruction of world-leading experts, and with a sensitivity to the contemporary circumstances of the study region. In addition to taught modules, students are given the opportunity to develop a programme of research tailored to their individual interests, including hands-on work with collections from Egypt and the Middle East. New skills you may acquire include the application of techniques in archaeological science, new theoretical perspectives, and critical approaches to the use of museum collections and archives in research. The legacy of colonialism, and the ethical challenges of archaeological research in regions of current conflict, are also core topics in the teaching of the programme.

With its international staff and student body, the UCL Institute of Archaeology (IoA) is well known for its welcoming atmosphere, challenging intellectual climate, and supportive feedback structure. It is regularly rated in first place among UK archaeology departments for student experience.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Institute of Archaeology

73% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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The Palaeoanthropology and Palaeolithic Archaeology MSc, run jointly by the Institute of Archaeology and UCL Anthropology, brings together the expertise of the two departments to provide graduate students with an integrated training in the biological and archaeological aspects of human evolutionary studies. Read more

The Palaeoanthropology and Palaeolithic Archaeology MSc, run jointly by the Institute of Archaeology and UCL Anthropology, brings together the expertise of the two departments to provide graduate students with an integrated training in the biological and archaeological aspects of human evolutionary studies.

About this degree

Students gain training in research methods and a scientific grounding in the principles, content and practice of palaeoanthropology and palaeolithic archaeology, including: fossil and archaeological evidence of human evolution; temporal and spatial patterns and processes of evolutionary and environmental change; and the evolutionary background for understanding human adaptation and culture.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (30 credits) four optional modules (60 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules

All students are required to take the following: 

  • Themes in Palaeoanthropology and Palaeolithic Archaeology

Optional modules

Students will be encouraged to select options from the following list up to the value of 60 credits. Alternatively, they may choose from the wider range of Master's options available at the UCL Institute of Archaeology or the Department of Anthropology

  • Archaeology of Human Evolution in Africa
  • Advanced Human Evolution
  • Archaeology of Hunter-Gatherers from the Emergence of Modern Humans
  • Evolution of Human Brain and Behaviour
  • Geoarchaeology
  • Prehistoric Stone Artefact Analysis
  • Palaeoanthropology
  • Primate Evolution
  • Primate Socioecology
  • Zooarchaeology in Practice

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words (90 credits).

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, discussions, seminars, laboratory practicals and student presentations. Assessment is through essays, practical examination and seminar presentations, (depending on the options chosen), and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Palaeoanthropology and Palaeolithic Archaeology MSc

Funding

Institute of Archaeology Master's Awards: a small number of grants up to the value of £1,000 are available for the academic year 2018/19. All UK/EU and Overseas fee-paying students with an offer to start any Master's degree offered by the IoA are eligible to apply. For an application form please email . The deadline for applications is 1 March 2018.

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

A significant number of the graduate students from this programme have gone on to take PhDs at UCL, elsewhere in the UK and in other countries. A number of those have been awarded prestigious scholarships to cover their costs. Other graduates have gone on to work in cultural resource management and museums, and others have used their skills to pursue careers in fields such as IT, teaching and management.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Conference Producer, Global Transport Forum
  • Field Archaeologist, NPS Group (Norfolk Property Services)
  • Senior Scientist: Archaeology, Tetra Tech
  • PhD in Anthropology and Archaeology, Stockholms Universitet (Stockholm University)

Employability

The skills which students develop include the critical evaluation of scholarship across the discipline, design and management of personal research, primary data collection and analysis, and the preparation of detailed reports/dissertations up to publication standard. Although these will relate to anthropology and archaeology, they are invaluable skills for other areas of employment.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology and UCL Anthropology have considerable staff expertise in the fields of palaeoanthropology and palaeolithic archaeology. Staff and research students are currently involved in field projects as well as museum-based studies in Britain, various parts of Europe, the Middle East, China, East and South Africa and South America.

Our excellent results in the recent Research Excellence Framework (2014) show that our two departments are both very highly ranked in the UK.

Situated in central London, the university is within easy access of the British Museum and Natural History Museum and their outstanding palaeontological and archaeological collections.



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This MA is unique in the UK in providing such a comprehensive overview of Asian archaeology and cultural heritage. The UCL Institute of Archaeology is one of the few places in the world with the expertise to deliver such a programme, encompassing not only India and China, but also South–East and Central Asia. Read more

This MA is unique in the UK in providing such a comprehensive overview of Asian archaeology and cultural heritage. The UCL Institute of Archaeology is one of the few places in the world with the expertise to deliver such a programme, encompassing not only India and China, but also South–East and Central Asia.

About this degree

The aim of this programme is to develop a comparative appreciation of the cultural histories and heritage of Asia, moving chronologically from early human history, through movements towards the Neolithic, and the rise of cities and states, to the present day. It looks at current debates around conservation ethics, reconstruction and authenticity of archaeological remains.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (45 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and a dissertation/report (90 credits).

Core modules

All students are required to take the following: 

  • Themes, Thought and Theory in World Archaeology: Foundations
  • Archaeologies of Asia
  • Archaeological Heritage Management in Asia

Optional modules

Students take three further optional modules to the value of 45 credits. These can be selected from the outstanding range of Master's options available at the UCL Institute of Archaeology, but for this degree, the normal choices include: 

  • Archaeology and Education
  • Archaeology of Buddhism
  • Archaeology of Egypt and the Near East: A Comparative Approach
  • Critical Perspectives on Cultural Heritage
  • Cultural Memory
  • Managing Archaeological Sites
  • Managing Museums
  • Public Archaeology
  • Social Complexity in Early China: from the Neolithic to the Early Empire

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures and seminars. Assessment is through essays, PowerPoint presentations, supervised independent research project and dissertation, and an oral viva towards the end of the degree.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Archaeology and Heritage of Asia MA

Careers

Graduates of this programme are expected to pursue further studies at PhD level or embark on a wide range of professional careers in archaeology - in the archaeological servics or heritage organisations specialising in Asian countries - and beyond.

Employability

The experience and skills acquired depends on the optional modules selected, and how those skills are developed through assessed work, practical elements and dissertation, but in general we expect students to develop expertise in the archaeology of specific regions of Asia (in particular East Asia, South Asia, Central Asia and to some extent South–East Asia) and a broader comparative, international perspective on that specific region. Students gain knowledge of both current scholarly debates in archaeology as well as heritage management issues.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This programme is unique in training pan-Asian specialists – escaping traditional study area boundaries where China, India, South–East and Central Asia are studied on their own – and conducting inter-regional dialogue on the human past.

Students are given the opportunity to develop depth of expertise in a particular region in Asia while benefiting from an innovative macro-regional comparative perspective.

This MA focuses on the development of human societies and civilisations in a part of the world which is becoming increasingly influential in world affairs but has been under-represented in most general and regional archaeological programmes.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Institute of Archaeology

73% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



Read less
This MSc provides participants with a theoretical understanding of research questions and methodologies in the study of past human-environment interactions, including subsistence and subsistence change. Read more

This MSc provides participants with a theoretical understanding of research questions and methodologies in the study of past human-environment interactions, including subsistence and subsistence change. The Institute of Archaeology has a long research and training tradition in environmental archaeology, and has well-established laboratory facilities and reference collections as a result.

About this degree

Students gain practical experience in laboratory analysis of at least one of either: identification of animal bones, identification of plant macro-remains, sedimentological analyses. They develop an understanding of stratigraphic formation processes and their implications for developing sampling strategies, and are trained to collect and analyse data and report scientific results.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (30 credits), optional modules (60 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules

Students are required to take the following: 

  • Environmental Archaeology in Practice
  • Resources and Subsistence

Optional modules

  • Aegean Prehistory: Major Themes and Current Debates
  • Archaeology of Hunter-Gatherers from Emergence of Modern Humans
  • British and European Prehistory: Neolithic to Iron Age
  • Funerary Archaeology
  • Key Topics in the Archaeology of the Americas
  • The Mediterranean World in the Iron Age
  • The Neolithic and Early Bronze Age of the Near East: The emergence of villages and urban societies

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project, normally based on practical laboratory-based research, which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words (90 credits).

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, presentations, laboratory sessions, practicals, and site and museum visits. Assessment is through the dissertation, and a combination of essays, coursework, presentations, practical examination and laboratory reports, depending on the options selected.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Environmental Archaeology MSc

Careers

Some graduates of the programme go on to PhD studies but others will be well-placed to pursue a wide range of professional careers both within and beyond archaeology, including employment as environmental specialists for contract archaeology units.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Trainee Archaeologist, Cotswold Archaeology
  • Freelance Researcher, Self-Employed Rearcher

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse department of archaeology in the UK, and provides a stimulating environment for postgraduate study.

The institute boasts a wide range of laboratory facilities relevant to this degree including dedicated laboratories for zooarchaeology (with a comparative collection of Near Eastern and European faunal remains), archaeobotany (with extensive comparative collections for seeds, wood, tubers, phytoliths and pollen); phytolith processing, sedimentology and scanning electron microscopy.

UCL is located in central London, close to the resources of the British Museum, the British Library and the Natural History Museum.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Institute of Archaeology

73% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



Read less
The Mediterranean, the world' s largest inland sea and the interface of Europe, Africa and western Asia, is one of the major crucibles of cultural, economic and political change in world history, a focus of scholarship for all periods between the Palaeolithic and the present, and a place where the past plays a critical role in the present, as well as in the creation of a viable future. Read more

The Mediterranean, the world' s largest inland sea and the interface of Europe, Africa and western Asia, is one of the major crucibles of cultural, economic and political change in world history, a focus of scholarship for all periods between the Palaeolithic and the present, and a place where the past plays a critical role in the present, as well as in the creation of a viable future.

About this degree

Students will develop an understanding of Mediterranean societies from earliest times through Classical antiquity until the early medieval period, and of major interpretative paradigms and principal investigative techniques - including fieldwork and archaeological science - applied to the Mediterranean. One or more specific regions will be analysed in depth from a comparative perspective, and Mediterranean societies will be studied holistically.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (30 credits), four optional modules (60 credits) and a dissertation/report (90 credits).

Core modules

All students are required to take the following: 

  • Mediterranean Dynamics
  • Themes, Thought and Theory in World Archaeology: Foundations

Optional modules

From an outstanding range of Master's optional modules, students choose options to the value of 60 credits, at least one of which must be chosen from the following:

  • Mediterranean Prehistory 
  • The Mediterranean World in the Iron Age
  • The Transformation of the Roman Mediterranean. 

The remaining must be made up from the list below (Please note not all modules are available every year): 

  • Aegean Prehistory: major themes and current debates
  • Ancient Italy in the Mediterranean
  • British and European Prehistory: Neolithic to Iron Age
  • Egyptian Archaeology: An Object-Based Theoretical Approach
  • Intangible Dimensions of Museum Objects from Egypt
  • Making and Meaning in Ancient Greek Art
  • Making and Meaning in Ancient Roman Art
  • Medieval Archaeology: Selected Topics and Current Problems
  • Middle Bronze Age to the Iron Age in the Near East: City-states and Empires
  • Museum and Site Interpretation
  • Society and Culture in Ancient Egypt
  • The Neolithic and Early Bronze Age of the Near East: The Emergence of Villages and Urban Societies
  • Themes and Debates in Islamic Archaeology and Heritage
  • Themes, Thought and Theory in World Archaeology: Current Topics

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words (90 credits). Approaches that explore new connections or comparisons are strongly encouraged, and students will be able to draw on the expertise of more than 50 members of the institute's staff.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars and assessed through essays and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Mediterranean Archaeology MA

Careers

Graduates of this programme are expected to pursue further studies at PhD level or embark on a wide range of professional careers both within and beyond archaeology.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Consultant, Archaeological Research Services (ARS) Ltd
  • PhD in Archaeology, University of Cambridge

Employability

Successful graduates will have been fully prepared to undertake research on ancient Mediterranean societies, from a comparative region/period/theme-specific perspective, and will also possess the expert background knowledge to move on to related professional work in or on the Mediterranean (subject to the particular requirements of the role). They will also have honed their transferable skills in critical analysis, debate, presentation and writing skills that are key to any future professional career.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse department of archaeology in the UK, and provides a stimulating environment for postgraduate study. Its own outstanding library is complemented by UCL’s Main Library, University of London Senate House and other specialist libraries.

This programme deploys the institute’s unparalleled research and teaching strengths in Mediterranean archaeology, which must constitute the largest single concentration of expertise anywhere in the UK.

UCL’s own museums and collections form a resource of international importance for academic research and students may work on material from the institute’s collection as part of their assessment. Regular interaction with the British Museum, its collections and staff offers a further invaluable opportunity to add to one's learning experience. 

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Institute of Archaeology

73% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



Read less
Top archaeological researchers and heritage professionals use a raft of computational methods including GIS, data mining, web science, ABM, point-process modelling and network analysis. Read more

Top archaeological researchers and heritage professionals use a raft of computational methods including GIS, data mining, web science, ABM, point-process modelling and network analysis. To impress employers you need the flexibility to learn on the job, leverage open data and program open source software. This MSc draws on UCL's unparalleled concentration of expertise to equip you for future research or significantly enhance your employability.

About this degree

Students learn about a wide range of concepts that underpin computational approaches to archaeology and human history. Students become proficient in the archaeological application of both commercial and open source GIS software and learn other practical skills such as programming, data-mining, advanced spatial analysis with R, and agent-based simulation.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (30 credits), four optional modules (60 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules

  • Archaeological Data Science
  • Complexity, Space and Human History

Optional modules

  • Exploratory Data Analysis in Archaeology
  • GIS Approaches to Past Landscapes
  • GIS in Archaeology and History
  • Remote Sensing in Archaeology
  • Spatial Statistics, Network Analysis and Human History
  • The Archaeology of Complex Urban Sites: Analytical and Interpretative Technology
  • Web and Mobile GIS (by arrangement with the UCL Department of Civil and Geomatic Engineering
  • Other options available within the UCL Institute of Archaeology

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through lectures, tutorials and practical sessions. Careful provision is made to facilitate remote access to software, tutorials, datasets and readings through a combination of dedicated websites and virtual learning environments. Assessment is through essays, practical components, project reports and portfolio, and the research dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Computational Archaeology: GIS, Data Science and Complexity MSc

Careers

Approximately one third of graduates of the programme have gone on to do PhDs at universities such as Cambridge, Leiden, McGill, Thessaloniki and Washington State. Of these, some continue to pursue GIS and/or spatial analysis techniques as a core research interest, while others use the skills and inferential rigour they acquired during their Master's as a platform for more wide-ranging doctoral research. Several graduates who went on to doctoral research are now lecturers in computational Archaeology: at the University of Cambridge, Queen's University Belfast and the University of Colorado. Other graduates have gone to work in a range of archaeological and non-archaeological organisations worldwide. These include specialist careers in national governmental or heritage organisations, commercial archaeological units, planning departments, utility companies, the defence industry and consultancies.

Employability

This degree offers a considerable range of transferable practical skills as well as instilling a more general inferential rigour which is attractive to almost any potential employer. Graduates will be comfortable with a wide range of web-based, database-led, statistical and cartographic tasks. They will be able to operate both commercial and oper source software, will be able to think clearly about both scientific and humanities-led issues, and will have a demonstrable track record of both individual research and group-based collaboration.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The teaching staff bring together a range and depth of expertise that enables students to develop specialisms including industry-standard and open-source GIS, advanced spatial and temporal statistics, computer simulation, geophysical prospection techniques and digital topographic survey.

Most practical classes are held in the institute's Archaeological Computing and GIS laboratory. This laboratory contains Linux servers, ten powerful workstations running Microsoft Windows 10, a digitising table and map scanner.

Students benefit from the collaborations we have established with other institutions and GIS specialists in Canada, Germany, Italy and Greece together with several commercial archaeological units in the UK.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Institute of Archaeology

73% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



Read less
The Ancient History MA is an intercollegiate degree programme of the University of London. It offers students the opportunity to focus on a specific period or topic, explore adjacent disciplines, and acquire technical skills in such areas as archaeology, epigraphy, numismatics, papyrology, and textual criticism. Read more

The Ancient History MA is an intercollegiate degree programme of the University of London. It offers students the opportunity to focus on a specific period or topic, explore adjacent disciplines, and acquire technical skills in such areas as archaeology, epigraphy, numismatics, papyrology, and textual criticism.

About this degree

Students gain a thorough grounding in the key aspects of and approaches to ancient history. They develop the ability to assess historical evidence critically and synthesise historical data from printed, manuscript, archaeological, numismatic, epigraphic, and papyrological sources, and are equipped with the tools necessary for further research in this field.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (40 credits), two to four optional modules (80 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Sources and Methods in Ancient History

Optional modules

Optional modules will be finalised in Spring 2018. Please contact the department for more information. The following optional modules were available in 2017/18 and this is an indicative list only:

  • Babylon under Imperial Rule, 539-c. 50 BC
  • Hellenistic Encounters with Egypt
  • The City of Rome (BA/MA), (Royal Holloway)
  • Lived Ancient Religion in Hellenistic Greece
  • Economic and Social History of Rome (Royal Holloway)
  • Greek and Latin language at various levels
  • Propaganda and Ideology in Ancient Rome
  • Hellenistic Epigraphy
  • Greek Law and Lawcourts (Royal Holloway)
  • Continuity and Change in the Ancient Near East
  • Classical Chinese Medicine
  • Persepolis (King's College London)
  • Roman Britain (King's College London)

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project in the field of ancient history, which culminates in a dissertation of up to 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures and museum visits. Most teaching is available inside UCL, but some is held at other London colleges. Assessment is through unseen examinations, coursework essays, and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Ancient History MA

Careers

This degree provides an outstanding foundation for those wishing to undertake PhD research and pursue an academic career. It is also popular with students wishing to go into journalism, the civil service, business, museums and heritage and the education sector.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Communications Intern, Terra Firma
  • PhD in Ancient History, UCL
  • Senior Executive Officer, Department of Energy & Climate Change (DECC)
  • Editorial Assistant, Bloomsbury Publishing
  • Senior Intelligence Analyst, British Transport Police

Employability

Students develop an enviable range of skills by taking this degree. Debates, small-group seminars and tutorials help students to acquire strong presentation and negotiation skills for their future career. The analytical and research skills gained are also highly valued by employers from a range of industries. There are many additional activities available, both within the department and the wider UCL community, to help students focus on employability skills whilst they are here, for example, departmental careers talks and networking opportunities with UCL History alumni.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL History enjoys an outstanding international reputation for its research and teaching.

This intercollegiate programme is taught jointly with King's College London and Royal Holloway, University of London, and students benefit from the international expertise and wealth of resources that the three colleges have to offer.

Located in Bloomsbury, UCL History is just a few minutes' walk away from the exceptional resources of the British Library, the British Museum and the research institutes of the University of London, including the Institute of Classical Studies, the Warburg Institute and the Institute of Historical Research.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: History

82% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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The Principles of Conservation MA offers students an introduction to the context of heritage conservation, of how conservation works, and of the issues and constraints which affect conservation practice. Read more

The Principles of Conservation MA offers students an introduction to the context of heritage conservation, of how conservation works, and of the issues and constraints which affect conservation practice. The programme explores the principles, theory, ethics and practicalities relating to the care and conservation of a wide variety of objects and structures.

About this degree

Students gain an in-depth understanding of approaches to collections care, preventive conservation, risk assessment, conservation strategies, ethics, management and professionalism, and develop critically aware perspectives on professional practice and research processes.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (60 credits), optional modules (30 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules

Students are required to take the following: 

  • Issues in Conservation: Context of Conservation
  • Issues in Conservation: Understanding Objects
  • Conservation in Practice: Preventive Conservation
  • Skills for Conservation Management

Optional modules

Students choose further optional modules up to the value of 30 credits from the following list of related options (the degree co-ordinator may seek to guide the option choices made by those intending to carry on for the MSc in Conservation for Archaeology and Museums.

  • Approaches to Artefact Studies
  • Archaeolmetallurgy
  • Archaeological Ceramics Analysis
  • Archaeological Glass and Glazes
  • Interpreting Pottery
  • Materials structure and deterioration of craft materials

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words (90 credits).

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures, small-group tutorials, workshops and practical projects. Some modules include visits to conservation workshops and museums, including the British Museum, National Trust and the Museum of London. Assessment is through coursework, essays, poster, portfolio, project reports and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Principles of Conservation MA

Funding

Institute of Archaeology Master's Awards: a small number of grants up to the value of £1,000 are available for the academic year 2018/19. All UK/EU and Overseas fee-paying students with an offer to start any Master's degree offered by the IoA are eligible to apply. For an application form please email . The deadline for applications is 1 March 2018.

UK students are eligible to apply to the Anna Plowden Trust 

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

The Institute of Archaeology has a long history of training in conservation, and many of its graduates are now employed in key posts around the world. Many students go on to take the Conservation for Archaeology and Museums MSc. Others pursue careers in preventive conservation and collections management in local and national museums, art galleries and heritage organisations (mainly in Europe, North America and Asia). Some students have also used this degree as a platform to become a PhD candidate at both UCL and elsewhere.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Freelance Conservator, National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH)
  • Andrew W. Mellon Fellow in Conservation, New York University and studying MA in Principles of Conservation, UCL
  • Collections Intern, George Washington University Museum - The Textile Museum and studying MA in Principles of Conservation, UCL
  • Historic Property Steward, English Heritage
  • Assistant Curator, Tower of London

Employability

Knowledge and skills acquired during the programme include the understanding of the roles conservators play in the care and study of cultural heritage, and the ethical issues involved. This is complemented by a basic understanding of raw materials, manufacturing technologies, assessment of condition and the ways in which different values and meanings are assigned to cultural objects. The student will be able to perform visual examination techniques as well as assessments and monitoring of museum collections. They will also be proficient in various types of documentation, analysis of numerical data, report writing, and presentation of conservation issues through posters, social media, talks and essays.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse department of archaeology in the UK, and provides a stimulating environment for postgraduate study. Its conservation programmes have an international reputation.

Students benefit from the institute's lively international involvement in archaeology and heritage, from its well-equipped facilities, and access to UCL's extensive science, art and archaeology collections.

The institute's conservation laboratories provide a modern and pleasant learning environment, while the Wolfson Archaeological Science Laboratories provide excellent facilities for the examination and analysis of a wide variety of archaeological materials.



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The Managing Archaeological Sites MA examines why certain archaeological sites, including World Heritage Sites, are selected for preservation, and how power relationships and different perceptions of contemporary values impact upon this. Read more

The Managing Archaeological Sites MA examines why certain archaeological sites, including World Heritage Sites, are selected for preservation, and how power relationships and different perceptions of contemporary values impact upon this. It explores approaches to how sites can be successfully managed, conserved and presented to preserve their significance.

About this degree

Students will grasp theoretical issues surrounding heritage management, and how to apply a planning process to holistic and sustainable site management, based on the recognition of a site's values to its interest groups. They will also learn practical methods for participatory processes, physical conservation, visitor management, site interpretation, World Heritage nomination, and heritage tourism.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of a core module (30 credits), optional modules (60 credits), an optional work placement and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules

Students are required to take the following: 

  • Managing Archaeological Sites

Optional modules

  • Antiquities and the Law
  • Applied Heritage Management
  • Archaeologies of Modern Conflict
  • Archaeologies of the Modern World
  • Archaeology and Education
  • Critical Perspectives on Cultural Heritage
  • Cultural Heritage, Globalisation and Development
  • Cultural Memory
  • GIS in Archaeology and History
  • GIS Approaches to Past Landscapes
  • Key Topics in the Archaeology of the Americas
  • Managing Museums
  • Museum and Site Interpretation
  • Nature, Culture and the Languages of Art: Theories and Methodologies of Art Interpretation
  • Public Archaeology
  • Social and Material Contexts of Art: Comparative Approaches to Art Explanation
  • Themes, Thought and Theory in World Archaeology: Foundations
  • Themes, Thought and Theory in World Archaeology: Current Issues

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words (90 credits). 

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, practical demonstrations and site visits. It includes an optional three-week placement in an appropriate organisation or on-site project. Assessment is through essays, project reports, projects and practicals (depending on the options chosen), and the dissertation.

Placement

Students will have the option to undertake a voluntary placement in an appropriate organisation or on-site project for a period of three weeks in total. In recent years, these placements have included organisations such as English Heritage, the National Trust, Historic Royal Palaces, ICOMOS (Paris), World Monuments Fund (Paris), UNESCO World Heritage Centre (Paris), the Museum of London, Atkins Global, the Parque Arqueológico do Vale do Côa (Portugal), MIRAS (Iran), City Museum (Palermo), Ancient Merv State Archaeological Park (Turkmenistan), and the National Institute of Informatics (Tokyo, Japan). This is not assessed.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Managing Archaeological Sites MA

Careers

Recent graduates of this programme have gone on to work in policy areas and project areas for national and international organisations, such as English Heritage, the National Trust, ICOMOS and UNESCO. They have also worked in development control, heritage consultancies (such as Atkins Global), museums, site interpretation and education. Many students have also gone on to further research in academic institutions around the world, such as Stanford, Athens and Leiden, or here at UCL.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Academic Assistant, Beijing Guowenyan Cultural Heritage Conservation Center
  • Culture and Human Development Officer, Association for the Protection of the Mountain of Moses
  • Account Executive, Thomson Reuters
  • Art Investment and Management Worker, Poly Art Investment Management Co. Ltd
  • Culture Unit Volunteer, UNESCO

Employability

Students on this programme gain understanding of a wide range of practical methods for the conservation, management and interpretation of cultural heritage, which provides a sound basis for a wide range of employment opportunities of the heritage sector. Students also master a technical vocabulary to communicate with heritage professional and agencies, and develop strong transferable skills in written and oral communication, teamworking and dealing with complex stakeholders.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The theory and practice of archaeological heritage management is undertaken within the context of the Institute of Archaeology's international outlook and membership, with student and staff involvement in field research projects around the globe. This provides a unique range of perspectives and circumstances, reflected in critical discourse.

UCL is located in central London, close to the British Museum and British Library. The institute's outstanding library is complemented by UCL's main and specialist libraries.

Students undertake placements with London-based agencies, such as Historic England and the Museum of London, or international bodies, such as UNESCO, ICOMOS and Global Heritage Fund.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Institute of Archaeology

73% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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This MA provides a broad academic and professional training in all aspects of museum work, and encourages students to reflect on the concept of the museum and its associated practices. Read more

This MA provides a broad academic and professional training in all aspects of museum work, and encourages students to reflect on the concept of the museum and its associated practices. Grounded in museum practice and research, the programme looks at all types of museums.

About this degree

Students are equipped with a range of skills that they can apply in any museum and develop critically aware perspectives on professional practice and research processes. The programme's main aim is to provide an in-depth understanding of approaches to the research, documentation, communication, public engagement, interpretation, presentation and preservation of curated materials in museums, while responding to their audiences and communities. 

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (75 credits), two optional modules (30 credits), work placement (15 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

All students are required to take the following: 

  • The Museum: Critical Perspectives
  • Managing Museums
  • Collections Management and Care
  • Museum Communication

Optional modules

Students also choose further options to the value of 30 credits from the following: 

  • Antiquities and the Law
  • Collections Curatorship
  • Cultural Heritage, Globalisation and Development
  • Cultural Memory
  • Exhibition Project
  • Intangible Dimensions of Museum Objects from Egypt
  • Oral History from Creation to Curation
  • Curating Science & Technology
  • Nature, culture and the languages of art: theories and methodologies of art interpretation
  • Archaeologies of the Modern World
  • GIS in Archaeology and History

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project on a museological topic which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words (60 credits).

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through lectures, small group seminars, practical workshops, student-led panel meetings, museum visits and guest speakers. Students are required to undertake a work placement for a total of 20 days. Assessment is through coursework assignments, projects, essays, field reports, portfolio and the dissertation.

Placement

Students are required to undertake a minimum of 20 days' work in a museum (or similar institution). Drawing from an extensive network of musuems we collaborate with, the aim is to arrange placements that match students' prior skills, interests and expectations. Placements usually take place one day per week during term-time, although other arrangements may be possible. Students create and present a poster, through which they are assessed, and organise a poster session and placement provider reception. 

Recent placements have included: Brent Museum, the British Museum, The Jewish Museum, Freud Museum, Hackney Museum, London Transport Museum, Handle Hendrix Museum, Alexandra Palace, the Royal Academy, Royal Botanical Gardens Kew, Royal Historical Palaces, St Paul's Cathedral, Benjamin Franklin Museum, Islington Museum, the House of Illustration, Marx Memorial Museum, UCL Museums & Collections and the Wallace Collection.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Museum Studies MA

Careers

Some recent graduates of the programme have gone on to complete a PhD while others have pursued a career in professional organisations associated with the museum and/or heritage sector. 90% of UK graduates from this degree take up employment in the museum sector within six months.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Assistant Keeper, Historic Royal Palaces
  • Exhibition Project Manager, Athens Biennale
  • Assistant House and Collections Officer, National Trust
  • MA in History of Art, Sapienza University of Rome
  • Archivist, Madame Tussauds

Employability

The MA in Museum Studies facilitates the development of both practical skills relevant to a professional career in the museum and galleries sector and a solid understanding of, and critical engagement with, theoretical issues involved in contemporary museum practice. Core practical skills include collections care procedures, packing and storing objects, documentation, collections-based research, exhibition production, and display evaluation. A museum-based placement and optional modules can be chosen to enable students to focus on specific additional areas of theory and practice. Transferable skills include independent research, writing and communication skills, interpersonal skills, use of IT, time management and group working.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse department of archaeology in the UK, and provides a stimulating environment for postgraduate study in related fields such as museum studies, heritage studies and conservation.

Its outstanding archaeological library is complemented by UCL's main library, University of London Senate House and other specialist libraries.

London's many museums and galleries are a wonderful source of discussion and material for this degree, but in particular UCL's own important museums and collections are drawn upon for teaching and research, including those of the Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, the Art Museum, and the Grant Museum of Zoology. Students participate in real-life projects through a number of courses and placements offered on the programme. Students also have access to MA degree programmes taught in other UCL departments. Please note that students need to contact the relevant programme co-ordinators to register their interest since there are only limited spaces available.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Institute of Archaeology

73% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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This MA equips students with the skills necessary for advanced medieval and renaissance scholarship. A wide range of historical, literary, palaeographical, art historical and archaeological modules enables students to explore the aspects of medieval and renaissance culture in which they are interested. Read more

This MA equips students with the skills necessary for advanced medieval and renaissance scholarship. A wide range of historical, literary, palaeographical, art historical and archaeological modules enables students to explore the aspects of medieval and renaissance culture in which they are interested.

About this degree

This MA provides exceptional opportunities to master medieval and renaissance languages and to acquire manuscript expertise working with original manuscripts; key skills for those who want to go on to original research. Students with primary interests in many different areas ‒ linguistic, historical, literary or archaeological ‒ will be able to build on and extend their expertise and skills.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of 30 credits of core language modules, optional modules (90 credits), and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Old and Middle English
  • Medieval Latin (Beginners)
  • Medieval Latin (Intermediate)
  • Medieval French
  • Old and Middle French
  • Medieval Italian
  • Medieval German
  • Classical Hebrew
  • Rabbinic Hebrew
  • Introduction to Old Norse

Optional modules

Up to 90 credits of options drawn from the following:

  • Identity and Power in Medieval Europe, AD 500-1300
  • Magic in the Middle Ages
  • Writing History in Europe, c. 900-1200
  • A Global History of the Middle Ages?
  • Russsian Monarchy: Court Ritual and Political Ideas 1498-1917
  • Science and Medicine across Medieval Worlds
  • Reframing the Renaissance
  • Forging the Early Modern
  • Unstitching the Early Modern: Archival and Book Skills
  • Web 0.1: Early Modern Information Culture c. 1470-1750
  • Confessional Cultures in the Dutch Republic and England, c. 1500-c. 1700
  • Seeing Through Materials: Matter, Vision and Transformation in the Renaissance
  • Sex and the Body in Early Modern Europe
  • Men on the Moon: Cosmic Voyages in the Early Modern Period
  • Metamorphosis: The Limits of the Human
  • Wolfram von Eschenbach's "Parzival"
  • Legendary Histories (Medieval French Literature)
  • The Transformation of the Roman Mediterranean
  • Themes and Debates in Islamic Archaeology and Heritage

This list is indicative only; the modules available are subject to change each year.

Dissertation/research project

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of up to 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars and classes. Several modules include site visits to institutions, notably the British Library, the Warburg Institute, the National Archives and the Institute of Historical Research. Assessment is through unseen examination, long essays, coursework and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Medieval and Renaissance Studies MA

Careers

Recent destinations of recent graduates of this programme include: funded PhDs at UCL, Universities of Oxford, St Andrews, Cambridge, Durham, Cardiff, Lancaster, and UEA; the British Library: Cataloguer; Reuters: News Assistant; Ministry of Trade Industry and Tourism: Government Advisor.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Curatorial and Art Intern, Swiss Institute
  • Policy and Communications Officer, Caritas
  • Project Assistant, British Library
  • GDL (Graduate Diploma in Law), BPP University
  • PhD in Medieval Studies, University of Leeds

Employability

The MARS degree allows students to develop an enviable range of skills. This programme not only provides an outstanding foundation for those hoping to undertake PhD research and pursue an academic career but is also popular with students wishing to go into journalism, the civil service, business, museum and heritage and the education sector. Debates, small group seminars and tutorials help students to acquire strong presentation and negotiation skills for their future career. Likewise the analytical and research skills gained by students on this programme are highly valued by employers from a range of industries.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The departments contributing to this degree - History; English; the School of European Languages, Culture and Society; History of Art - enjoy outstanding international reputations for research and teaching.

We are strongly committed to the intellectual development of all our students; if you come to UCL, you will receive individual supervision from leading researchers in their fields.

Located in Bloomsbury, we are just a few minutes' walk away from the exceptional resources of the British Library, the British Museum and the research institutes of the University of London, including the Warburg and the Institute of Historical Research.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: History

82% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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The Early Modern Studies MA offers an innovative blend of skills training (palaeography and historical bibliography), object-based learning and museum visits. Read more

The Early Modern Studies MA offers an innovative blend of skills training (palaeography and historical bibliography), object-based learning and museum visits. The core modules cover a wide range of disciplines, giving you a broad understanding of the early modern period. You can then tailor your programme to suit your interests, with over thirty optional modules, covering early modern culture, history and society.

About this degree

The MA will teach you critical reading skills, the ability to assess and weigh evidence, and construct persuasive arguments. It combines training in book history, bibliography, and paleography with a range of theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of the early modern period.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (45 credits), between two and four optional modules (45 credits) and a dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules

  • Reframing the Renaissance
  • Forging the Early Modern
  • Unstitching the Early Modern: Archival and Book Skills

Optional modules (indicative list)

Students choose up to 45 credits from a list which varies each year. An up-to-date list is available on our department website. Below is an indicative list, showing modules that have been offered previously.

  • Shakespeare in his Time
  • Sex and the Body in Early Modern Europe
  • Confessional Cultures in the Dutch Republic & England, c.1500-c.1700
  • Early Modern Science
  • Web 0.1: Early Modern Information Culture, c.1450-c.1750
  • Aztec Archaeology: Codices and Ethnohistory
  • Continental Connections: Britain and Europe in the Eighteenth Century
  • I.T. for Graduate Research
  • Paradoxes of Enlightenment: German Thought from Leibniz to Humboldt
  • Beginners Latin for Research
  • Metamorphosis: The Limits of the Human
  • Seeing Through Materials: Matter, Vision and Transformation in the Renaissance
  • Wolfram von Eschenbach's 'Parzival'
  • Men on the Moon: Cosmic Voyages in the Early Modern Period

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 18,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of tutorials, seminars, workshops, presentations, class discussions and library, archive, museum and gallery visits. Assessment is through essays, annotated bibliography and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Early Modern Studies MA

Careers

Many of our students have been accepted to undertake further study as research students both at UCL and elsewhere, including the Universities of Oxford, Cambridge, York and Swansea. In addition our students have been successful in obtaining funding and prizes including the Bryce-Jebb and Doris Russell Scholarships and the prestigious John Edward Kerry Prize awarded by the Malone Society. Graduates may also find careers in the heritage or cultural industries.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Research Intern, Opus
  • PhD in English and Digitisation, Swansea University
  • PhD in History, University of Cambridge
  • Editorial Assistant, Law Business Research
  • DPhil in English, University of Cambridge

Employability

This MA will give you a very specific skill set, including manuscript handling and archival research. Depending on the optional modules you select you may also develop language skills and knowledge in information technologies and database use. These transferable skills will make you very employable within the heritage or cultural sectors, as well as library work, the arts, and other roles which require intensive research and/or information management.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This is a bespoke programme of study, unique to your interests with over thirty optional modules, all taught by leading scholars, in a wide range of subjects including art, history, law, literature, politics and science.

Practical, hands-on modules, with ‘traditional’ skills such as palaeography and textual bibliography are taught alongside the latest techniques in databases and XML. The programme includes field trips to museums, archives and galleries.

Our central London location provides privileged access to a wide range of world-class museums, rare-books libraries and archives. Located in Bloomsbury, it is a short walk to the exceptional resources of the British Library and the British Museum.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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This intercollegiate MA is taught in collaboration with King's College London and Royal Holloway, University of London. The programme draws on the wealth of expertise across the three colleges and students benefit from full access to all modules. Read more

This intercollegiate MA is taught in collaboration with King's College London and Royal Holloway, University of London. The programme draws on the wealth of expertise across the three colleges and students benefit from full access to all modules. The programme attracts European students and other students from overseas as well as the UK.

About this degree

The programme enables students to study in depth key aspects of the languages, literatures and cultures of ancient Greece and Rome (and their reception). It provides students with the skills of critical and conceptual thinking and equips them with the tools necessary for further research (including training in the use of digital resources online, library catalogues and archives).

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of a research methods module (non credit-bearing), three taught modules (120 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Research Methods

Optional modules

Choose three modules in the following areas of study:

  • Language
  • Literature
  • Reception
  • Religion and Philosophy
  • History
  • Art and Archaeology
  • Late Antique and Byzantine Studies

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project in classical language, literature, thought or the classical tradition. The project culminates in a dissertation of 12,000 words (60 credits). The project must display advanced knowledge of at least one of the classical languages.

Teaching and learning

The programme is taught in small seminars or classes, rarely exceeding twelve participants. Students are expected to prepare for class each week, typically by reading preparatory material and texts in the original Greek or Latin. Student performance is assessed through coursework essays, unseen examination, and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Classics MA

Careers

The MA is an ideal springboard for a PhD programme, and students will find unique opportunities to acquire skills in the handling of documentary evidence particularly valuable for further research. Some students go on to pursue research at UCL or other institutions. Others have developed their skills in order to enter careers in e.g. teaching, publishing, the media, cultural heritage or the legal, business, charitable or financial sectors.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Project Administrator, Horticultural Trades Association
  • GDL (Graduate Diploma in Law), The University of Law
  • PhD in Classics, University of Cambridge
  • Associate Recruiter, Kite Consulting Group
  • PhD in Classical Studies, University of Michigan

Employability

The MA in Classics offers a wide range of skills highly valued by employers, such as advanced oral communication; the ability to abstract and synthesise information, and to construct and manage arguments; independent and critical thinking on difficult issues; IT skills (including the ability to access and evaluate electronic data); and good time management, organisational, and planning skills. Students go on to employment in many sectors including advertising, publishing, education, law, finance, libraries and museums, and the culture industries.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Greek & Latin is recognised as one of the leading international centres for postgraduate study and research in the ancient world, with a large staff of international experts in Greek and Latin literature, papyrology, historical linguistics, philosophy, ancient history and classical reception. Its MA programmes open a pathway to a wide variety of careers.

The department is very well resourced for the study of the ancient world and UCL's central location provides unrivalled access to the British Museum, British Library, Senate House Library, Warburg Institute and the Institute of Classical Studies. 

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Greek & Latin

76% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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The Reception of the Classical World MA investigates the interactions of later ages with the cultures of the ancient world across a variety of media, making extensive use of London's unique resources of literary, historical and artistic study and research. Read more

The Reception of the Classical World MA investigates the interactions of later ages with the cultures of the ancient world across a variety of media, making extensive use of London's unique resources of literary, historical and artistic study and research. The programme attracts European students and other students from overseas as well as the UK.

About this degree

Students gain a thorough grounding in the key figures, narratives, art forms, concepts, and social, religious and political practices of the classical world that have been most put to use by later cultures. The programme equips them with the tools necessary for research, including training in the use of digital resources online, library catalogues and archives.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (40 credits), two optional modules (80 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Approaches to the Reception of the Classical World

Optional modules

Dedicated reception modules have included:

  • Rome on Film
  • Ancient Greece on Stage
  • Dionysus in Rome
  • Athens in Ancient and Modern Political Thought
  • Students can also choose modules available also to other programmes concerning the ancient world, in areas such as:
  • Language
  • Literature
  • History
  • Religion and Philosophy
  • Art and Archaeology
  • other reception topics

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project on a subject related to the reception of the classical world, which culminates in a dissertation of 12,000 words (60 credits).

Teaching and learning

The programme is taught by a combination of lectures, seminars and research visits to relevant institutions. Seminars will provide practical tuition in bibliographic searches and the use of a variety of electronic databases. Student performance will be assessed through coursework essays, unseen examination and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Reception of the Classical World MA

Funding

Several funding options may be possible for applicants to this programme, including: UCL Scholarships for UK/EU & Overseas Students, Arts & Humanities Faculty Awards, and Greek and Latin departmental awards.

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

The MA is an ideal springboard for a PhD programme and offers a unique range and depth of study in reception contexts from antiquity to the present. Some students go on to pursue research at UCL or in other institutions. Others have developed their skills in order to enter careers in e.g. teaching, publishing, the media, cultural heritage or the legal, business, charitable or financial sectors.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Librarian, University of Cambridge
  • Programme Manager, Key4Life
  • Programme Manager, Spire Hub
  • CRM Information Manager - Telecommunications, Tancroft Communications
  • Research Degree: Greek and Latin,UCL

Employability

Students develop a wide range of skills highly valued by employers, such as advanced written and oral communication, the ability to abstract and synthesise information, the ability to construct and manage arguments, independent and critical thinking on difficult issues, competence in planning and executing essays, presentations and projects, self-motivation, information technology skills (including the ability to access and evaluate electronic data), team work, co-operation, and good time management. Students go on to employment in many sectors, including advertising, publishing, education, law, finance, libraries and museums, and the culture industries (including theatre and the media).

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This programme makes extensive use of the unique features of UCL: its central location, diverse international expertise and interdisciplinary outlook. Students benefit from research tours of nearby resources, such as the British Museum and the Warburg Institute as well as UCL's Petrie Museum and Library Special Collections.

UCL Greek & Latin is recognised as one of the leading international centres for postgraduate study and research in the ancient world. Students benefit from the large range of modules offered by the department, by other departments at UCL, and by the intercollegiate Classics MA programme. The MA opens a pathway to a wide variety of careers.



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