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University of Winchester, Full Time Masters Degrees in History & Archaeology

We have 7 University of Winchester, Full Time Masters Degrees in History & Archaeology

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COURSE OVERVIEW. Access to collections in the Novium Collections at Fishbourne and the holdings of the Hampshire Cultural Trust. Wide range of research options. Read more

COURSE OVERVIEW

  • Access to collections in the Novium Collections at Fishbourne and the holdings of the Hampshire Cultural Trust
  • Wide range of research options
  • Opportunity to take a work placement

Human Osteology and Funerary Studies at Winchester gives you the opportunity to study the practical and theoretical aspects of human remains and funerary studies in archaeology, and what they tell us about the life, health and death of past populations. The course includes taught components on a wide range of practical and theoretical aspects of the study of human remains in archaeology, with some modules focusing on the study of funerary beliefs and rituals throughout prehistory and history.

You study and undertake research from a particular archaeological period or geographical area, such as The Palaeolithic of Western Europe, The Roman Period, The Post-Medieval Period in Europe, or North America and the Caribbean. The practical teaching on the course uses skeletons from the St Mary Magdalen Leprosy Hospital, curated in the Department of Archaeology.

You complete core modules in Human Skeletal Anatomy and Fundamentals of Skeletal Analysis, Palaeopathology, Concepts of Funerary Archaeology, and Funerary Studies, along with Research Methods and Skills, which is designed to help you complete your final dissertation.

The dissertation allows you to apply your knowledge and research skills in the production of a substantive piece of research of 15,000 words on a relevant topic of your choice, supervised by a member of staff with relevant research interests. Departmental staff have expertise in themes and approaches including Medieval Hospitals, Leprosy in the Medieval Period, Skeletal Trauma, Deviant Burials, Disability in Prehistory, Commingled and Disarticulated Remains and Cremated Remains.

Collections available for dissertations include material in the Novium Collections at Fishbourne and the extensive holdings of the Hampshire Cultural Trust. You also choose a module from a wide range of options including Issues in Global Cultural Heritage, Byzantium and Beyond, The Archaeology of Africa, and The Archaeology of Buddhism.

MSc Human Osteology and Funerary Studies acts as a basis for a career within archaeology or a related discipline, or as preparation for undertaking an MRes, MPhil or PhD.

Careers

MSc Human Osteology and Funerary Studies acts as a basis for a career within archaeology, or related discipline, or as preparation for undertaking an MRes, MPhil or PhD.

Subject to Validation/ReValidation

*subject to validation

'Validation' is the process by which the University approves a new programme to ensure that it provides a distinct, high quality academic experience for students, that enables them to acquire the necessary academic knowledge, understanding, general and subject-specific skills required to pursue a graduate level career. In the unlikely event that a programme is not validated then we will do our best to find you an alternative programme within the University.

ABOUT THIS COURSE

Suitable for applicants from:

UK, EU, World

Learning and teaching

The course is taught through a combination of lectures, presentations and practical laboratory sessions, and attendance at departmental/research centre seminars enables students to share their experiences.

Collections available for dissertations include material in the Novium Collections at Fishbourne and the extensive holdings of the Hampshire Cultural Trust.

Location

Taught elements of the course take place on our King Alfred Campus (Winchester) or at our West Downs Campus (Winchester)

Assessment

Assessment is by means of a series of essays, reports and exams. The dissertation module allows students to apply the knowledge and research skills developed in the production of a substantive piece of research of 15,000 words on a Human Osteology and/or Funerary Studies topic of their choice, supervised by a member of staff with relevant research interests.

Our validated courses may adopt a range of means of assessing your learning. An indicative, and not necessarily comprehensive, list of assessment types you might encounter includes essays, portfolios, supervised independent work, presentations, written exams, or practical performances.

We ensure all students have an equal opportunity to achieve module learning outcomes. As such, where appropriate and necessary, students with recognised disabilities may have alternative assignments set that continue to test how successfully they have met the module's learning outcomes. Further details on assessment types used on the course you are interested in can be found on the course page, by attending an Open Day or Open Evening, or contacting our teaching staff.

Feedback

We are committed to providing timely and appropriate feedback to you on your academic progress and achievement in order to enable you to reflect on your progress and plan your academic and skills development effectively. You are also encouraged to seek additional feedback from your course tutors.

Further information

For more information about our regulations for this course, please see our Academic Regulations, Policies and Procedures.



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Classical Studies at Winchester explores the civilisation of ancient Greece and Rome, and its legacy that has fundamentally shaped all later civilisations including that of today. Read more
Classical Studies at Winchester explores the civilisation of ancient Greece and Rome, and its legacy that has fundamentally shaped all later civilisations including that of today. It is a multidisciplinary course that melds History, Archaeology, Art, Drama, Literature and Philosophy.

Programme Content

Students may wish to pursue the three year BA (Hons) Classical Studies pathway or the four year MClass (Hons) Classical Studies pathway.

Study begins by establishing a framework of Classical history, both chronologically and geographically. It introduces Classical archaeology, art and architecture (for example temples, sculpture and inscriptions); Classical drama (comedy and tragedy); literature (epics and lyrics); and philosophy (Socrates and Plato). It explores the nature of each discipline and how each is best studied as the foundation for the rest of the degree. Classical languages are introduced in Year 2.

Students take a range of modules in Years 2, 3 and 4 such as Civilisation, Theme, Depth and Comparative Studies that further develop understanding of the Classical world.

Theme Studies explore continuity and change in the Roman household or depictions in film. Civilisation Studies explore one sub-period (for example, Fifth Century Athens) in the round, covering mythology and drama, democracy and war.

Students take two Depth Studies that establish a comprehensive knowledge of a particular period through primary and secondary sources. It is the Comparative Studies that particularly explore the Classical legacy in art and literature in subsequent centuries.

The two culminations of the degree are the dissertation in Year 3 and the summative paper paving the way for more advanced research in Year 4.

See the website http://www.winchester.ac.uk/Studyhere/Pages/mclass-hons-classical-studies.aspx

Learning and Teaching

The University aims to shape 'confident learners' by enabling students to develop the skills to excel in their studies here and be transferable to further studies or the employment market. Staff and students form a community of learners who, together and independently, seek to generate and exchange knowledge. Over the duration of the course, students develop independent and critical learning, building confidence and expertise progressively through independent and collaborative research, problem solving, and analysis with the support of staff. Students take responsibility for their own learning and are encouraged to make use of the wide range of available learning resources available.

In addition to the formally scheduled contact time (ie lectures, seminars etc), students are encouraged to access academic support from staff within the course team, personal tutors and the wide range of students within the university.

Key features of the student experience are:

The opportunity to undertake the University of Winchester's Research Apprenticeship Programme (WRAP) which engages students in work with academics on a genuine research project (e.g. categorising inscriptions), so that they engage first-hand in cutting-edge scholarly activity and build vital transferable skills for the future

Established exchanges with partner institutions in the USA and Europe (including the American University in Bulgaria)

Field trips to enhance student's knowledge and understanding with practical experiences (for example, to Fishbourne Roman palace)

Variety of work and volunteer placements to both national and local institutions (for example, art galleries, the British Museum)

Assessment

At the University of Winchester validated programmes may adopt a range of means of assessing your learning. An indicative, and not necessarily comprehensive, list of assessment types you might encounter includes essays, portfolios, supervised independent work, presentations, written exams, or practical performances. The University is committed to ensuring that all students have an equal opportunity to achieve module learning outcomes. As such, where appropriate and necessary, students with recognised disabilities may have alternative assignments set that continue to test how successfully they have met the module's learning outcomes. Further details on assessment types used in the programme you are interested in can be found on the course page, by attending an Open Day/Evening, or contacting our teaching staff.

Careers

Graduates work in museums or art galleries, whilst others work in teaching, retailing, the arts, marketing and local, regional and national government.

At the University of Winchester, we are committed to ensuring all our students gain employability skills to enable you to enter graduate level jobs and pursue the profession of your choice.

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COURSE OVERVIEW . Join a supportive, research-active department. Enhance your skills in research techniques from GIS to ceramic petrology. Read more

COURSE OVERVIEW 

  • Join a supportive, research-active department
  • Enhance your skills in research techniques from GIS to ceramic petrology
  • Develop your own research interests with full supervisory support 

Archaeology at Winchester offers an intensive research-training programme with a high level of supervisorial contact. This programme is ideal if you have a clear idea of an archaeological research topic which you may wish to follow to PhD, and need to prepare for this by acquiring new research skills or honing existing ones. It is also appropriate if you are already working in the archaeology, heritage or environment sector and wish to enhance your research experience in preparation for career progression. 

The course examines approaches and methodologies, theoretical underpinnings and practical applications in archaeological research, and some modules focus on the archaeology of a chosen period, theme or specialism. 

Staff at Winchester have the expertise to supervise projects on a wide range of themes and approaches, including geoarchaeology, geomatics, zooarchaeology and the archaeology of religion, death and gender. If your interests lie in researching a particular archaeological period, such as the palaeolithic, classical Greece, the medieval period or the Caribbean, we will facilitate and support your studies. 

Complete core modules in Research Methods and Skills, Analysing and Presenting Archaeological Data and Personal Research Methodology, and choose a further two options from a huge range including The Archaeology of Medieval Religion and Belief, Climate Change and People, Central Southern England in the Roman Period, and Mediterranean Landscape Studies. 

There’s a module that takes you through the process of producing a research paper to the expected academic standard. In your paper, you apply the research skills you’ve developed to produce a 20,000- to 25,000-word dissertation on your chosen topic, supervised by a member of staff with relevant research interests. 

MRes Archaeology is the ideal preparation for an MPhil or PhD or as a basis for a career in archaeology.

Careers

MRes Archaeology acts as a preparation for undertaking an MPhil or PhD or as a basis for an advanced career within archaeology or a related discipline.

Pre-approved for a Masters

If you study a Bachelor Honours degrees with us, you will be pre-approved to start a Masters degree at Winchester. To be eligible, you will need to apply by the end of March in the final year of your degree and meet the entry requirements of your chosen Masters degree.

ABOUT THIS COURSE

Suitable for applicants from:

UK, EU, World

Field trips

One optional module is a residential field trip for which accommodation and subsistence (but not travel) must be paid. Cost £80.

Learning and teaching

Modes of teaching include lectures, presentations, seminars and workshops. Attendance at departmental/research centre seminars enables students to share their experiences.

Start date: September

Teaching takes place: Daytime 

Taught elements of the course take place on our King Alfred Campus (Winchester) or at our West Downs Campus (Winchester). 

Please note the Postgraduate Diploma and Postgraduate Certificate exit qualifications have a different title to reflect the research element: PgDip Archaeological Research and PgCert Archaeological Research.

Assessment

Our validated courses may adopt a range of means of assessing your learning. An indicative, and not necessarily comprehensive, list of assessment types you might encounter includes essays, portfolios, supervised independent work, presentations, written exams, or practical performances.

Assessment is by means of a series of essays, reports and a blog/diary. One module takes the student through the process of producing an academic standard research paper. Students apply the research skills developed in the production of a substantive piece of research of 20,000-25,000 words on a topic of their choice, supervised by a member of staff with relevant research interests.

We ensure all students have an equal opportunity to achieve module learning outcomes. As such, where appropriate and necessary, students with recognised disabilities may have alternative assignments set that continue to test how successfully they have met the module's learning outcomes. Further details on assessment types used on the course you are interested in can be found on the course page, by attending an Open Day or Open Evening, or contacting our teaching staff.

Feedback

We are committed to providing timely and appropriate feedback to you on your academic progress and achievement in order to enable you to reflect on your progress and plan your academic and skills development effectively. You are also encouraged to seek additional feedback from your course tutors.

Further information

For more information about our regulations for this course, please see our Academic Regulations, Policies and Procedures.



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COURSE OVERVIEW. Huge range of research possibilities. Opportunities to discuss and debate key themes with visiting speakers. Taught by highly respected and experienced researchers. Read more

COURSE OVERVIEW

  • Huge range of research possibilities
  • Opportunities to discuss and debate key themes with visiting speakers
  • Taught by highly respected and experienced researchers

History at Winchester concentrates on different geographical scales of history, including local and global perspectives. It gives you the opportunity to engage with a range of approaches to the study of history, examining a range of historical subjects from ancient history to the present.

Start the course by exploring historical methods and research skills, followed by in-depth topic-based modules and the opportunity to devise and develop a specialist dissertation. The Approaches to the Past module, in the first semester, provides guidance on the different approaches to the study of history, including geographical scales of study and disciplinary approaches.

There are four core modules: Approaches to the Past, Research Methods and Skills, an Independent Study Presentation, and a dissertation. You also choose three special study modules from a long and varied list of options. Examples include Sport and Leisure in Victorian Britain; Reading and Writing the Holocaust: Historiography, Memory and Representation, 1945 to the Present; Public Health and Medicine in Modern Japan 1868–1952; and Female Agency and Rule in the Premodern Mediterranean 700–1700.

During the final summer of studies you write a 20,000-word dissertation, with specialist supervision. Research training for the dissertation is provided in a specialist module through a blend of electronic learning and face-to-face contact, which helps you complete a range of research tasks associated with the development of your dissertation. This leads to a Day Conference (Independent Study Presentation), in which you showcase your dissertation plans and their development, and debate themes in the study of history with external speakers.

Graduates of the course work in academia, teaching, archives, libraries, government and civil service, museums and conservation, as well as in a range of professions in the private sector, including financial consulting. The course provides a firm foundation for undertaking a postgraduate research degree or further training.

Careers

Graduates work in teaching, archives, libraries, government and civil service, museums and conservation. The programme provides a firm foundation for undertaking a postgraduate research degree or further training.

ABOUT THIS COURSE

Suitable for applicants from:

UK, EU, World

Learning and teaching

Students attend lectures, seminars, workshops, tutorials, a day conference and excursions. The teaching team is made up of highly respected and experienced researchers.

Teaching takes place: Evenings/ weekends, with some individual tutorials during the day.

Location

Taught elements of the course take place on our King Alfred Campus (Winchester) or at our West Downs Campus (Winchester)

Assessment

Assessment on the programme is largely by written assignments, usually a 4,000 word essay, and this applies to most modules. The dissertation is a substantial piece of independent research with full tutorial support. For this, students are required to write around 20,000 words on a subject of their choice covered by their study.

Our validated courses may adopt a range of means of assessing your learning. An indicative, and not necessarily comprehensive, list of assessment types you might encounter includes essays, portfolios, supervised independent work, presentations, written exams, or practical performances.

We ensure all students have an equal opportunity to achieve module learning outcomes. As such, where appropriate and necessary, students with recognised disabilities may have alternative assignments set that continue to test how successfully they have met the module's learning outcomes. Further details on assessment types used on the course you are interested in can be found on the course page, by attending an Open Day or Open Evening, or contacting our teaching staff.

Feedback

We are committed to providing timely and appropriate feedback to you on your academic progress and achievement in order to enable you to reflect on your progress and plan your academic and skills development effectively. You are also encouraged to seek additional feedback from your course tutors.

Further information

For more information about our regulations for this course, please see our Academic Regulations, Policies and Procedures



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MTh Orthodox Studies at Winchester gives students from a variety of backgrounds, who have an interest in Orthodox Christianity, the. Read more
MTh Orthodox Studies at Winchester gives students from a variety of backgrounds, who have an interest in Orthodox Christianity, the
opportunity to develop and expand their range of theological skills and knowledge at a higher level.

Programme Content

The programme offers a wide-ranging study of Orthodox Christian tradition and practice including theology, history, ecclesiology, tradition, liturgy and art. It draws on a variety of academic disciplines and discourses to enable students to reflect critically on the entirety of the Orthodox faith, tradition and practice. Students with a background in Orthodox studies have the opportunity to develop their knowledge and understanding at a higher academic level. Those of different backgrounds are enabled to approach Orthodox thought and tradition critically and connect, compare and contrast it with their own theological background.

Study enables students to research the Orthodox, early Christian and patristic tradition, and connect it to broader areas of human life and understanding in contemporary multicultural societies. Students explore and critically reflect upon Orthodox experience, developing an informed awareness of the dynamic nature of the Orthodox Christian tradition and the theological task of subjecting this tradition to a process of testing and renewal.

See the website http://www.winchester.ac.uk/Studyhere/Pages/mth-orthodox-studies.aspx

Modules

Core modules:
- Introduction to Orthodox Theology
- Research Methods

Optional modules:
- Orthodox Ascetic Mysticism
- Dionysios the Areopagite
- The Experience of Orthodox Monasticism
- Modern Orthodox Theology
- Icons: Theology in Colour
- Orthodox Canon Law
- Pilgrimage
- Supervised Research Project

Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered by distance learning through the University's Learning Network (limited residential teaching is also available). A wide range of resources are available and a high level of tutorial support and supervision is provided by academic staff.

Assessment

A variety of assessment methods including essays, book reviews and shorter written exercises, are used for taught modules. The final research project is assessed by a 20,000 word dissertation presenting a piece of original research on a topic of the student's choice, done under supervision.

At the University of Winchester validated programmes may adopt a range of means of assessing your learning. An indicative, and not necessarily comprehensive, list of assessment types you might encounter includes essays, portfolios, supervised independent work, presentations, written exams, or practical performances. The University is committed to ensuring that all students have an equal opportunity to achieve module learning outcomes. As such, where appropriate and necessary, students with recognised disabilities may have alternative assignments set that continue to test how successfully they have met the module's learning outcomes. Further details on assessment types used in the programme you are interested in can be found on the course page, by attending an Open Day/Evening, or contacting our teaching staff.

Careers

MTh Orthodox Studies offers excellent training for those in a range of occupations including church leadership, pastoral work and religious education, who wish to enhance their skills and qualifications. It equips students to undertake doctoral research in preparation for a career in university or seminary teaching.

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COURSE OVERVIEW. Combine and develop a range of interests across the heritage spectrum. Complete projects and placements in the UK and abroad. Read more

COURSE OVERVIEW

  • Combine and develop a range of interests across the heritage spectrum
  • Complete projects and placements in the UK and abroad
  • Apply cultural theory and skills to real-world resources

Cultural Heritage and Resource Management considers the wider place of heritage management in contemporary society and offers you the chance to undertake your own projects on a range of different subjects. You investigate the theory and practice of cultural heritage and resource management from both a British and a global approach. Teaching comes from experts with specialisms in museums and galleries, cultural tourism, theme parks, national, local and global heritage organisations, archives, libraries, and archaeological units.

You have opportunities to participate in the department’s own research projects, which have included archaeological sites in Winchester, Cornwall, Georgia, Armenia, Corsica, Barbados, Ethiopia and Egypt, and are encouraged to use your skills in enhancing and developing existing cultural heritage strategies in these locations. The course offers a perspective which, although grounded in UK heritage practice, is also situated within a wider global context and offers industry placements and project work abroad.

Core modules include Cultural Heritage and Resource Management: An Introduction, Issues in Global Cultural Heritage, and Management in Heritage Organisations. Choose and optional module from a wide range including Mediterranean Landscape Studies, The Archaeology of Winchester, Religion, Magic and Esoteric Traditions in Post-Medieval Britain and Caribbean Peoples and Cultures. A placement module, based locally or abroad, allows you to gain practical training in the industry. Placements may involve work experience in a museum, gallery, historic property or archaeological unit/research project. There is also a dissertation, based on your original research, completed with full support and guidance from a tutor.

The course prepares you for a range of career choices. On completion, graduates often work in heritage, museums, galleries, education, outreach, libraries, archives, and archaeological units.

Careers

Graduates often work in heritage, museums, galleries, education, outreach, libraries, archives, and archaeological units.

ABOUT THIS COURSE

Suitable for applicants from:

UK, EU, World

Work placements

Students are required to undertake placement work (to the equivalent of 200 hours) in one or more heritage environments chosen in collaboration with the Programme Leader. Recent placements have included work at the Arthurian Centre in North Cornwall; Portsmouth Historic Dockyard; the Royal Palaces; Nokalakevi; and Georgia and Barbados Museums.

Learning and teaching

Start date: September

Teaching takes place: Daytime

Modules are delivered through workshops and seminars with presentations (poster and oral), reflexive learning strategies (such as blogs and diaries) and more formal essays. A placement module, based locally or abroad, allows students to gain practical training in the industry. Placements may involve work experience in a museum, gallery, historic property or archaeological unit/research project. 

Location 

Taught elements of the course take place on our King Alfred Campus or at our West Downs Campus (Winchester). 

Assessment

Our validated courses may adopt a range of means of assessing your learning. An indicative, and not necessarily comprehensive, list of assessment types you might encounter includes essays, portfolios, supervised independent work, presentations, written exams, or practical performances.

We ensure all students have an equal opportunity to achieve module learning outcomes. As such, where appropriate and necessary, students with recognised disabilities may have alternative assignments set that continue to test how successfully they have met the module's learning outcomes. Further details on assessment types used on the course you are interested in can be found on the course page, by attending an Open Day or Open Evening, or contacting our teaching staff.

Feedback

We are committed to providing timely and appropriate feedback to you on your academic progress and achievement in order to enable you to reflect on your progress and plan your academic and skills development effectively. You are also encouraged to seek additional feedback from your course tutors.

Further information 

For more information about our regulations for this course, please see our Academic Regulations, Policies and Procedures



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COURSE OVERVIEW. Combine theoretical knowledge and practical experience. Access a range of skeletal collections. Research the human bioarchaeological topic of your choice. Read more

COURSE OVERVIEW

  • Combine theoretical knowledge and practical experience
  • Access a range of skeletal collections
  • Research the human bioarchaeological topic of your choice

If there’s a human bioarchaeological research topic which you’d to follow to PhD, but you need to acquire new research skills or hone existing ones, this course is for you. It’s also suitable if you are already working in the archaeology, heritage or environment sector and would like to enhance your research experience.

Human Bioarchaeology at Winchester offers you an intensive research training programme with a high level of supervisorial contact. Examine approaches and methodologies, theoretical underpinnings and practical applications in archaeological research, with some modules focusing on the practical and theoretical aspects specific to Human Bioarchaeology. Through lectures, laboratory practicals, seminars and workshops you have opportunities to explore and discuss your experiences.

Departmental staff have particular expertise and access to skeletal collections relevant to research in The Roman Period, The Early and Later Medieval Periods, Medieval Hospitals, Leprosy in the Medieval Period, Skeletal Trauma, Deviant Burials, Commingled and Disarticulated Remains, and Cremated Remains.

You complete modules in Research Methods and Skills, Analysing and Presenting Archaeological Data, Human Skeletal Anatomy and Fundamentals of Skeletal Analysis and Palaeopathology. There is also a module that takes the you through the process of producing an academic standard research paper. You then apply your research skills in the production of a substantive piece of research of 20,000 to 25,000 words on a human bioarchaeological topic of your choice, supervised by a member of staff with relevant research interests.

MRes Human Bioarchaeology is a useful basis for an advanced career within archaeology or a related discipline, or as preparation for undertaking an MPhil or PhD.

Careers

MRes Human Bioarchaeology acts as a basis for an advanced career within archaeology, or related discipline, or as preparation for undertaking an MPhil or PhD.

ABOUT THIS COURSE

Suitable for applicants from:

UK, EU, World

Learning and teaching

Modes of teaching include lectures, laboratory practicals, seminars and workshops. Attendance at departmental/research centre seminars enables students to share their experiences.

Location

King Alfred or West Downs, University of Winchester

Assessment

Assessment is by means of a series of essays, reports, exams and a blog/diary. One module takes the student through the process of producing an academic standard research paper. Students apply the research skills developed in the production of a substantive piece of research of 20,000-25,000 words on a Human Bioarchaeological topic of their choice, supervised by a member of staff with relevant research interests.

Our validated courses may adopt a range of means of assessing your learning. An indicative, and not necessarily comprehensive, list of assessment types you might encounter includes essays, portfolios, supervised independent work, presentations, written exams, or practical performances.

We ensure all students have an equal opportunity to achieve module learning outcomes. As such, where appropriate and necessary, students with recognised disabilities may have alternative assignments set that continue to test how successfully they have met the module's learning outcomes. Further details on assessment types used on the course you are interested in can be found on the course page, by attending an Open Day or Open Evening, or contacting our teaching staff.

Feedback

We are committed to providing timely and appropriate feedback to you on your academic progress and achievement in order to enable you to reflect on your progress and plan your academic and skills development effectively. You are also encouraged to seek additional feedback from your course tutors.

Further information

For more information about our regulations for this course, please see our Academic Regulations, Policies and Procedures.

PgDip/PgCert

Please note the Postgraduate Diploma and Postgraduate Certificate exit qualifications have a different title to reflect the research element: PgDip Human Bioarchaeological Research and PgCert Human Bioarchaeological Research.



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