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History & Archaeology×

University of Dundee, Full Time Masters Degrees in History & Archaeology

We have 6 University of Dundee, Full Time Masters Degrees in History & Archaeology

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Forensic archaeology is the application of archaeological skills to the location and recovery of human remains and forensic evidence. Read more
Forensic archaeology is the application of archaeological skills to the location and recovery of human remains and forensic evidence. Forensic anthropology is the analysis of human remains for the medico-legal purpose of establishing identity.

Our MSc Forensic Archaeology and Anthropology course provides students with training in both disciplines in dedicated laboratory areas. You will have exclusive access to the unique skeletal collections in the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification (CAHID).

You will develop the skills and knowledge required by those who undertake searches for missing people and will be involved in the recovery of remains from clandestine burials. You will also gain the skills required to present evidence as an expert witness in court.

What's so good about this course at Dundee?

Our staff are amongst the most experienced in the UK in the fields of human identification, forensic anthropology, forensic archaeology cranio-facial reconstruction and the study of the human body. We are regularly contacted for advice and input in high-profile forensic cases both at home and abroad. Staff are able to bring this experience into their teaching.

Our students and staff are also involved in forensic research which is informed by casework and is thus relevant and current to modern practice.

Our student feedback reflects the outstanding facilities and teaching collections that are available to support their learning experience.

You will be supervised by a research active member of staff and have the opportunity to pursue an area of research that is of specific interest to you.

Top 10 reasons to study Forensic Archaeology and Anthropology at the University of Dundee

1 - Only institution in the UK to offer a career progression pathway in Forensic Anthropology
2 - Opportunity to review forensic case work undertaken by CAHID staff
3 - Teaching by world leading forensic practitioners
4 - Access to several unique skeletal collections
5 - Opportunity to act as an expert witness in simulated courtroom exercises
6 - We teach and train towards both the standards set by the RAI accreditation standards following the approved Forensic Anthropology curriculum
7 - Multidisciplinary approach with excellent links across subject boundaries
8 - Access to cases from CAHID's virtual anthropology communication service
9 -Regular programme of seminars delivered by invited speakers from the UK and abroad
10 - Diversity of career opportunities – our graduates work in a variety of related fields

Teaching & Assessment

- How you will be taught

Content delivery will be by a mixture of lectures, tutorials and practical based work, both in the lab and externally. All of the subjects taught have a practical component and the ability to apply theory to practice has always been a strong tradition for all CAHID courses, equipping those attending for the skills for future employment.

Expert witness experience is gained through involvement in a mock trial presided over by skilled legal practitioners.

- How you will be assessed

in-course essays
paper appraisal
practical exercises
final degree examinations
MSc research dissertation

What you'll study

The research dissertation can be in the form of original laboratory research in an area pertinent to forensic archaeology and forensic anthropology.

- Forensic Human Osteology (10 credits)
- Trauma and Taphonomy (10 credits)
- Forensic Archaeology I (20 credits)
- Disaster Victim Identification (20 credits)
- Forensic Human Identification (20 credits)
- Forensic Archaeology 2 (20 credits)
- Forensic Science and the Law (20 credits)
- Research Project (60 credits)

Employability

There is a significant international requirement for forensic archaeologists and forensic anthropologists who are competent in dealing with body recovery and identification in order to fulfil the requirements of Disaster Victim Identification deployment. This course will greatly increase the professional employment characteristics of any student undertaking it who seeks a career in forensic anthropology, forensic archaeology or DVI.

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This course will examine the diverse ways in which twentieth century British history has been understood, and will offer specialist study linked to your own interests. Read more
This course will examine the diverse ways in which twentieth century British history has been understood, and will offer specialist study linked to your own interests. You will also have the opportunity to develop relevant research skills.

Why study Greater Britain in the Twentieth Century?

This degree offers flexible study, either full-time (1 year) or part-time (2 years), of key aspects of the history of Britain and Ireland in the twentieth century. It is taught by leading researchers in their fields, and students attracted to this degree pathway will benefit from the latest research and historiography. You will also have the opportunity to gain research skills in areas such as historical data basing, historical statistics and oral history.

The dissertation will provide an opportunity for you to further develop and demonstrate advanced research skills, particularly important if you are interested in doctoral study.

The MLitt in Greater Britain in the Twentieth Century is also a pathway on the MLitt in Humanities with Specialisation programme.

What's great about Greater Britain in the Twentieth Century?

As the leading History department in Scotland for research output at international standard (RAE2008 results), we offer students an unparalleled opportunity to experience teaching at the sharp end of current research scholarship. Postgraduate students participate in many aspects of our programme including our regular research seminars.

"Study at Dundee was a rewarding experience in a welcoming academic community"
Blair Smith, postgraduate student.

Who should study this course?

As well as being a research preparation degree for students who intend to proceed to a PhD, this course also caters directly for students who wish to take their first degree to a higher level of advanced study, for either career development or merely general interest.

The course starts in September each year and lasts for 12 months on a full time basis or 24 months on a part time basis.

How you will be taught

All the core teaching is conducted 5.30-7.30pm to allow attendance by part-time and full-time students alike. Other classes are scheduled for the mutual convenience of staff and students. A variety of teaching methods will be used, including: small group teaching, supervised study, seminars and presentations.

Learning methods will include oral and written presentations, as well as research essays and a dissertation. One-to-one supervision of a dissertation is designed to promote continuity in the learning experiences provided and students with the opportunity to work on a topic of their own choosing (subject to approval by the tutor).

What you will study

The course is made up of the following modules:

Approaches to the Study of Twentieth Century Britain (semester 1)
History Skills & Sources (semesters 1 & 2)
our flexible Taught History MLitt module, (semester 2)

plus a History dissertation (summer).

How you will be assessed

Assessment includes essays, skills tests, a presentation and a dissertation. Students whose dissertation fails to satisfy the examiners will be awarded the PG Diploma, provided that the taught elements of the course have been successfully completed

Careers

Students who take this course will gain a solid foundation from which they can proceed to doctoral research.

However, due to the non-vocational nature of a History degree many students also enter jobs unrelated to their course of study. For these students this course provides them with an opportunity to further develop their written presentation skills, as well as the ability to work independently and plan independent research and study.

For those wishing to use their studies more directly, for example in heritage, museum or archivist work, the job market is competitive, and the MLitt will provide students with a chance to further their knowledge and understanding of History and to demonstrate advanced research skills necessary for work in archives or heritage.

Learn more about careers related to the Humanities on our Careers Service website.

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Our History MLitt course offers you detailed investigation into the periods of history that interest you the most, together with thorough research training. Read more
Our History MLitt course offers you detailed investigation into the periods of history that interest you the most, together with thorough research training. You will gain skills in various historical approaches as well as practical skills in areas such as oral history or historical databases.

Why study History at Dundee?

This degree offers flexible study, either full-time (1 year) or part-time (2 years), in wide areas of the history of Britain, Scotland, Europe, Russia and North America. Themes range across political, cultural, military, religious, economic and social history, taught within a department of research specialists. You will also have the opportunity to gain research skills in areas such as palaeography, historical data basing, historical statistics and oral history.

The dissertation will provide an opportunity for you to develop and demonstrate advanced research skills, particularly important if you are interested in doctoral study.

Students can choose either a generic MLitt in History, or named pathways in:
Global Empires
Greater Britain in the Twentieth Century
Scottish History

The MLitt in History is also a pathway on the MLitt in Humanities with Specialisation programme.

What's so good about History at Dundee?

As the leading History department in Scotland for research output at international standard (RAE2008 results), we offer students an unparalleled opportunity to experience teaching at the sharp end of current research scholarship. Postgraduate students participate in many aspects of our programme including our regular research seminars.

"Study at Dundee was a rewarding experience in a welcoming academic community"
Blair Smith, postgraduate student.

Who should study this course?

As well as being a research preparation degree for students who intend to proceed to a PhD, this course also caters directly for students who wish to take their first degree to a higher level of advanced study, for either career development or merely general interest.

How you will be taught

The course starts in September each year and lasts for 12 months on a full time basis or 24 months on a part time basis. All the core teaching is conducted 5.30-7.30pm to allow attendance by part-time and full-time students alike. Other classes are scheduled for the mutual convenience of staff and students. Due to this a variety of teaching methods will be used, including: small group teaching, supervised study, seminars and presentations.

Learning methods will include oral and written presentations, as well as research essays and a dissertation. One-to-one supervision of a dissertation is designed to promote continuity in the learning experiences provided and students with the opportunity to work on a topic of their own choosing (subject to approval by the tutor).

What you will study

All our History MLitt degrees have a common core module (40 credits):

History Skills and Sources (semesters 1 & 2)
If you are enrolled on the general History degree, you then choose two further modules, either specialist modules:

Global Empires (semester 1)
Approaches to the Study of Twentieth Century Britain (semester 1)
Interpretations in Scottish History (semester 1)
History of the Book (semester 2)
or one or two of our flexible modules, where you choose the topic:

Taught History MLitt module, (semester 1)
Taught History MLitt module, (semester 2)
All students then complete a History dissertation (summer).

If you are enrolled on a specialist degree, then you replace the semester 1 flexible module with the relevant specialist module. Visit the course webpage for full details:

Global Empires
Greater Britain in the Twentieth Century
Scottish History

How you will be assessed

Assessment includes essays, skills tests, a presentation and a dissertation. Students whose dissertation fails to satisfy the examiners will be awarded the PG Diploma, provided that the taught elements of the course have been successfully completed.

Careers

Students who take this course will gain a solid foundation from which they can proceed to doctoral research.

However, due to the non-vocational nature of a History degree many students also enter jobs unrelated to their course of study. For these students this course provides them with an opportunity to further develop their written presentation skills, as well as the ability to work independently and plan independent research and study.

For those wishing to use their studies more directly, for example in heritage, museum or archivist work, the job market is competitive, and the MLitt will provide students with a chance to further their knowledge and understanding of History and to demonstrate advanced research skills necessary for work in archives or heritage.

Learn more about careers related to the Humanities on our Careers Service website.

Read less
This course will provide you with an understanding of the diverse forces at work in Scottish history since the early modern period, with a special focus on social, cultural and political development, and Scottish connections with the wider world. Read more
This course will provide you with an understanding of the diverse forces at work in Scottish history since the early modern period, with a special focus on social, cultural and political development, and Scottish connections with the wider world.

Why study Scottish History at Dundee?

This degree offers flexible study, either full-time (1 year) or part-time (2 years), of Scotland's history from the Reformation to the present. It is taught by leading researchers in their fields, and students attracted to this degree pathway will benefit from the latest research and historiography. You will also have the opportunity to gain research skills in areas such as historical data basing, historical statistics and oral history.

The dissertation will provide an opportunity for you to further develop and demonstrate advanced research skills, particularly important if you are interested in doctoral study.

The MLitt in Scottish History is also a pathway on the MLitt in Humanities with Specialisation programme.

What's so good about Scottish History at Dundee?

As the leading History department in Scotland for research output at international standard (RAE2008 results), we offer students an unparalleled opportunity to experience teaching at the sharp end of current research scholarship. Postgraduate students participate in many aspects of our programme including our regular research seminars.

"Study at Dundee was a rewarding experience in a welcoming academic community"
Blair Smith, postgraduate student.

Who should study this course?

As well as being a research preparation degree for students who intend to proceed to a PhD, this course also caters directly for students who wish to take their first degree to a higher level of advanced study, for either career development or merely general interest.

How you will be taught

The course starts in September each year and lasts for 12 months on a full time basis or 24 months on a part time basis. All the core teaching is conducted 5.30-7.30pm to allow attendance by part-time and full-time students alike. Other classes are scheduled for the mutual convenience of staff and students. A variety of teaching methods will be used, including: small group teaching, supervised study, seminars and presentations.

Learning methods will include oral and written presentations, as well as research essays and a dissertation. One-to-one supervision of a dissertation is designed to promote continuity in the learning experiences provided and students with the opportunity to work on a topic of their own choosing (subject to approval by the tutor).

What you will study

The course is made up of the following modules:

Interpretations in Scottish History (semester 1)
History Skills & Sources (semesters 1 & 2)
our flexible Taught History MLitt module, (semester 2)

plus a History dissertation (summer).

How you will be assessed

Assessment includes essays, skills tests, a presentation and a dissertation. Students whose dissertation fails to satisfy the examiners will be awarded the PG Diploma, provided that the taught elements of the course have been successfully completed.

Careers

Students who take this course will gain a solid foundation from which they can proceed to doctoral research.

However, due to the non-vocational nature of a History degree many students also enter jobs unrelated to their course of study. For these students this course provides them with an opportunity to further develop their written presentation skills, as well as the ability to work independently and plan independent research and study.

For those wishing to use their studies more directly, for example in heritage, museum or archivist work, the job market is competitive, and the MLitt will provide students with a chance to further their knowledge and understanding of History and to demonstrate advanced research skills necessary for work in archives or heritage.

Learn more about careers related to the Humanities on our Careers Service website.

Read less
Much contemporary debate relates to global patterns and global change, and also to the history of the European empires which were a key part of 'globalization' from the fifteenth to the twentieth centuries. Read more
Much contemporary debate relates to global patterns and global change, and also to the history of the European empires which were a key part of 'globalization' from the fifteenth to the twentieth centuries. This course addresses issues of growing concern, and builds on the current expertise within our department to offer a distinctive programme which is not found in any other Scottish university.

Why study Global Empires at Dundee?

This degree programme is designed to provide you with an understanding of the development of the major European empires from the early modern period to the present. The course provides an opportunity for you to examine issues such as the impact of empires on the rest of the world, their rivalries, and the economic consequences of their imperial activity.

The course is taught by leading specialists in American, Spanish, Dutch and British history and utilises archival and digital resources held at the university and in nearby collections.

As the leading History department in Scotland for research output at international standard (RAE2008 results), we offer students an unparalleled opportunity to experience teaching at the sharp end of current research scholarship. The MLitt in Global Empires is a pathway on the MLitt in Humanities with Specialisation programme.

"Study at Dundee was a rewarding experience in a welcoming academic community"
Blair Smith, postgraduate student.

Who should study this course?

This course is suitable for all students who wish to gain a grounding in, and a deeper appreciation of, the major topics and historiography of the major European global empires and the historical origins of modern globalisation. It is also suitable if you are interested in gaining additional skills and knowledge to further your employment prospects. If you wish to proceed to further study for a PhD, this course will also provide you with the necessary research skills.

Research Skills:
You will gain skills in various historical approaches as well as practical skills in areas such oral history or historical databases. The dissertation will provide an opportunity for you to develop and demonstrate advanced research skills, particularly important if you are interested in doctoral study.

Aims of the Programme

The central aim of this course is to examine the many different interpretations of aspects of imperial and global history and you will be encouraged to think critically about the various ways in which historians have viewed these developments over the past five centuries.

In addition the course aims to equip you with the core competencies, knowledge and skills required to understand and interpret sources and historiography in the context of your own research and to gain experience in using those skills in independent research. Finally the course aims to further develop your written communication and presentation skills.

How is the course taught?

The course starts in September each year and lasts for 12 months on a full time basis or 24 months on a part time basis. The modules are taught through mixtures of introductory lectures, seminars, involving students in weekly journals, and group work.

Programme content

The course is made up of the following modules:

Global Empires (semester 1)
History Skills & Sources (semesters 1 & 2)
our flexible Taught History MLitt module, (semester 2)

plus a History dissertation (summer).

Careers

Due to the non-vocational nature of a History degree many students enter jobs unrelated to their course of study. For these students this course provides them with an opportunity to further develop their written presentation skills, as well as the ability to work independently and plan independent research and study.

However, for those wishing to use their studies directly, for example in heritage, museum or archivist work, the job market is competitive, and the MLitt will provide students with a chance to further their knowledge and understanding of Scottish history and to demonstrate advanced research skills necessary for work in archives or heritage.

The course will therefore contribute to enhancing prospects in careers such as: teaching, libraries, archives, museums, heritage and tourism industries, as well as providing content relevant to the continuing professional development of employees in many public-facing roles.

Learn more about careers related to the Humanities on our Careers Service website.

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The course will provide students with the core competencies, knowledge and skills required to understand and interpret sources and historiography in the context of their research. Read more
The course will provide students with the core competencies, knowledge and skills required to understand and interpret sources and historiography in the context of their research.

The MRes offers a bespoke research and training programme that draws on the research expertise of staff in the History programme. You can structure and design your own programme to fit your own research interests and skill needs. You can gain training in areas such as oral history, databases, palaeography and archive use. You will design your own tailor-made readings programme with support from academic staff with expertise in that area, to allow you to develop a critical understanding of the work of other scholars and you will have the opportunity to present the findings of your research to other students and academics.

Programme Content

Using and interpreting Historical Sources will form a focus in Semester 1.
This will include:
- archival skills
- documentary research skills
- dissertation planning
- language and translation
- ethnohistory
- film and television

Historical Skills will form a focus in the spring. This will include a number of optional skills:
- databases
- oral history
- palaeography

The directed readings module will allow you to define your own topic and select appropriate readings to gain an historiographical knowledge of your selected topic. The 30,000 word dissertation should reflect the skills and topics that you have selected and forms the major component of this programme.

What you will learn

The Programme provides training for students at research-preparation Masters level, providing enhancement of undergraduate qualifications and preparing students for doctoral degree study. Knowledge and understanding

1. The ability to evaluate and understand the major relevant historiographies.
2. The ability to discuss and evaluate the significance the historical context of the chosen research topic.

Subject-specific practical and intellectual skills and attributes

1. The ability to construct a reasoned defence of an interpretation of an event or aspect of society in the past
2. An understanding of theoretical approaches to history and their use and relevance.
3. An understanding of the main sources available to historians.
4. An appreciation of the different historical research techniques and how they may be used.
5. The ability to construct an independent research project.

Transferable, employability and enterprise skills and attributes

1. The ability to identify and retrieve information from a wide variety of sources
2. The ability to devise and plan independent study
3. The ability to undertake critical reasoning and logical argument
4. Communication and presentational skills in a written contexts
5. The ability to manage time effectively and organise priorities

How you will be assessed

The programme is assessed entirely through continual assessment designed to provide support for developing a research project. The ability to analyse complex and sometimes contradictory information and to present that material in a coherent narrative will be assessed by essays which will also test the students’ conception of current historiographical debates. The development of the students’ ideas will be assessed through module journals which will also allow the students to maintain a dialogue with tutors. The students’ oral and presentation skills, and their ability to organise complex and partial information into a coherent and time-limited form, will be tested by the Presentation to the postgraduate conference. The ability of students to design and complete a research project will be assessed by the research dissertation which forms the majority of the assessment for the programme.

Teaching

The programme is designed to provide a bespoke and tailor-made package to develop student research skills. Students are provided with a range of opportunities to develop core research skills and to develop the historiographical context necessary to write a dissertation. All students take the core skills and sources module and design their own directed readings programme with an appropriate tutor.

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