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University of Kent, Full Time Masters Degrees

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Designed for international students who wish to familiarise themselves with academic learning in the UK before undertaking rigorous study in their chosen subject. Read more
Designed for international students who wish to familiarise themselves with academic learning in the UK before undertaking rigorous study in their chosen subject. Students undertake a preparatory year of English language and undergraduate modules in the subject area before embarking on Master's level modules in the second year.

*This course will be taught at the Canterbury campus*

Visit the website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/332/two-year-masters-in-methods-of-social-research

Course detail

You gain a clear, confident and advanced understanding of the subject while receiving coaching in academic study and writing. Language and study support are also given in the first year to help you achieve your full potential. The skills you develop on this programme include critical thinking, data analysis and presentation of key findings as well as transferable skills such as time management, IT and problem solving.

Purpose

You will gain exceptional skills in advanced research methodologies, learning the techniques and approaches that social researchers use to organise, structure and interpret data. You will learn about the process of research and how the analysis and presentation of evidence is influenced and can be influential in social policy. You will become adept at using and understanding a range of frameworks and methodologies and will be able to assess the most appropriate to use in a given scenario.

Format

As well as taking core modules, you will choose from a range of optional modules; typical optional modules may include:

• Globalisation and development
• The sociology of risk
• Drugs, culture and control
• The family, parenting culture and parenting policy
• Sociology of health, illness and medicine
• Politics and sociology of the environment

Careers

Recent graduates have pursued careers in academia, journalism, local and central government, charities and NGOs.

How to apply: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Why study at The University of Kent?

- Shortlisted for University of the Year 2015
- Kent has been ranked fifth out of 120 UK universities in a mock Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) exercise modelled by Times Higher Education (THE).
- In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, Kent was ranked 17th* for research output and research intensity, in the Times Higher Education, outperforming 11 of the 24 Russell Group universities
- Over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2014 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.
Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

Postgraduate scholarships and funding

We have a scholarship fund of over £9 million to support our taught and research students with their tuition fees and living costs. Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/scholarships/postgraduate/

English language learning

If you need to improve your English before and during your postgraduate studies, Kent offers a range of modules and programmes in English for Academic Purposes (EAP). Find out more here: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international/english.html

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Criminology has a long and distinguished tradition at Kent with its research base in the Crime, Culture and Control Cluster. Aimed at international students, this programme provide an introduction to high-level academic study leading to a recognised postgraduate qualification. Read more
Criminology has a long and distinguished tradition at Kent with its research base in the Crime, Culture and Control Cluster. Aimed at international students, this programme provide an introduction to high-level academic study leading to a recognised postgraduate qualification.

*This course will be taught at the Canterbury campus*

Visit the website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/331/two-year-masters-in-criminology

Course detail

Criminology is an important part of the activities of the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research (SSPSSR), which is one of the four top institutions of its kind in the UK as ranked by the 2001 and 2008 Research Assessment Exercises. In 2012 we were awarded the first National Award for Excellence in Teaching Criminology by the British Criminology Society in recognition of our innovative approach.

Purpose

You gain a clear, confident and advanced understanding of the subject while receiving coaching in academic study and writing. Language and study support are also given in the first year to help you achieve your full potential.

The skills you develop on this programme include critical thinking, data analysis and presentation of key findings as well as transferable skills such as time management, IT and problem solving.

Format and assessment

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation:

- Academic Skills for Humanities (15 credits)
- Sociology of Crime and Deviance (30 credits)
- Gender, Crime and Criminal Justice (15 credits)
- Terrorism and Modern Society (15 credits)
- Drugs, Culture and Control (15 credits)
- Theories of Crime (20 credits)
- Research Methods in Criminology (20 credits)
- Drugs, Culture and Control (20 credits)
- Cultural Criminology (20 credits)
- Young People, Crime and Place (20 credits)

Careers

Building on Kent’s success as the region’s leading institution for student employability we place considerable emphasis on you gaining specialist knowledge in your chosen subject alongside core transferable skills. We ensure that you develop the skills and competences that employers are looking for including: research and analysis; policy development and interpretation; independent thought; writing and presentation as well as time management and leadership skills. You also become fully involved in the professional research culture of the School. A postgraduate degree in the area of Criminology is a particularly valuable qualification that can lead to many exciting opportunities and professions.

Recent graduates have gone on to pursue careers across the criminal justice system, encompassing areas such as counter-terrorism, advocacy, probation, social policy and research. Our graduates have found positions in organisations such as the Civil Service, the Ministry of Justice, various police services and the Probation Service.

How to apply: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Why study at The University of Kent?

- Shortlisted for University of the Year 2015
- Kent has been ranked fifth out of 120 UK universities in a mock Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) exercise modelled by Times Higher Education (THE).
- In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, Kent was ranked 17th* for research output and research intensity, in the Times Higher Education, outperforming 11 of the 24 Russell Group universities
- Over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2014 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.
Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

Postgraduate scholarships and funding

We have a scholarship fund of over £9 million to support our taught and research students with their tuition fees and living costs. Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/scholarships/postgraduate/

English language learning

If you need to improve your English before and during your postgraduate studies, Kent offers a range of modules and programmes in English for Academic Purposes (EAP). Find out more here: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international/english.html

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Developed for international students, the Two Year Master's in International Social Policy MA provides an introduction to high-level academic study leading to a recognised postgraduate qualification. Read more
Developed for international students, the Two Year Master's in International Social Policy MA provides an introduction to high-level academic study leading to a recognised postgraduate qualification.

*This course will be taught at the Canterbury campus*

Visit the website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/333/two-year-masters-in-international-social-policy

Course detail

Studying the pathway of International Social Policy enables you to apply theories and methods of comparative social policy in exploring specific fields such as health, migration, pensions, education, social care, poverty and social exclusion, urban development and family policy. You learn advanced research techniques becoming equipped to think critically about the development of social welfare systems in a global age.

Purpose

You will learn to think critically, analyse data and present key findings as well as developing key transferrable skills such as time management, presentation skills, IT skills and problem solving. At Kent, students are supported by experienced academics delivering a quality learning experience.

Students develop highly transferrable skills including time management, team work, research and analytic methods, problem-solving and IT skills. Teaching is student-centred through a combination of taught classes, lectures, seminars, group work and independent study.

You will gain exceptional skills in advanced research methodologies, learning the techniques and approaches that social researchers use to organise, structure and interpret data. You will learn about the process of research and how the analysis and presentation of evidence is influenced and can be influential in social policy. You will become adept at using and understanding a range of frameworks and methodologies and will be able to assess the most appropriate to use in a given scenario. You will use these skills to look at the ways in which different countries organise social policy and welfare systems.

Format and Assessment

In the first year, you take 45 credits of academic skills and English, and a 30 credit core module in your chosen pathway. In addition, you select 45 credits from a wide range of optional modules at higher or intermediate level.

In the second year you take 120 credits of modules at Master's level and a 60 credit dissertation in a topic of your choosing. The core modules of the second year (80 credits) are: Comparative Social Policy; Design of Social Research; Key Issues in Comparative Social Policy and Critical Social Research: Truth, Ethics and Power.

Careers

Recent graduates have pursued careers in academia, journalism, local and central government, charities and NGOs.

How to apply: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Why study at The University of Kent?

- Shortlisted for University of the Year 2015
- Kent has been ranked fifth out of 120 UK universities in a mock Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) exercise modelled by Times Higher Education (THE).
- In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, Kent was ranked 17th* for research output and research intensity, in the Times Higher Education, outperforming 11 of the 24 Russell Group universities
- Over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2014 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.
Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

Postgraduate scholarships and funding

We have a scholarship fund of over £9 million to support our taught and research students with their tuition fees and living costs. Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/scholarships/postgraduate/

English language learning

If you need to improve your English before and during your postgraduate studies, Kent offers a range of modules and programmes in English for Academic Purposes (EAP). Find out more here: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international/english.html

Read less
Designed for international students who wish to familiarise themselves with academic learning in the UK before undertaking rigorous study in their chosen subject. Read more
Designed for international students who wish to familiarise themselves with academic learning in the UK before undertaking rigorous study in their chosen subject. Students undertake a preparatory year of English language and undergraduate modules in the subject area before embarking on Master's level modules in the second year.

*This course will be taught at the Canterbury campus*

Visit the website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/329/two-year-masters-in-sociology#!overview

Course detail

You will learn to think critically, analyse data and present key findings as well as developing key transferrable skills such as time management, presentation skills, IT skills and problem solving. At Kent, students are supported by experienced academics delivering a quality learning experience.

Our 2-year Master's programmes offer a structured and supportive environment in which students can develop both academic and language skills while undertaking postgraduate study at a renowned UK university. You will benefit from being taught and mentored by experienced academics within the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research. The School is recognised worldwide for its research quality and was ranked 2nd for research power in the UK by the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF). The School was also placed 3rd for research intensity, 5th for research impact and 5th for research quality (GPA).

Purpose

Students develop highly transferrable skills including time management, team work, research and analytic methods, problem-solving and IT skills. Teaching is student-centred through a combination of taught classes, lectures, seminars, group work and independent study.

You will gain exceptional skills in advanced research methodologies, learning the techniques and approaches that social researchers use to organise, structure and interpret data. You will learn about the process of research and how the analysis and presentation of evidence is influenced and can be influential in social policy. You will become adept at using and understanding a range of frameworks and methodologies and will be able to assess the most appropriate to use in a given scenario.

Format

As well as taking core modules, you will choose from a range of optional modules; typical optional modules may include:

• Globalisation and development
• The sociology of risk
• Digital culture
• Terrorism and modern society
• Sociology of health, illness and medicine
• Politics and sociology of the environment

Careers

Recent graduates have pursued careers in academia, journalism, local and central government, charities and NGOs.

How to apply: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Why study at The University of Kent?

- Shortlisted for University of the Year 2015
- Kent has been ranked fifth out of 120 UK universities in a mock Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) exercise modelled by Times Higher Education (THE).
- In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, Kent was ranked 17th* for research output and research intensity, in the Times Higher Education, outperforming 11 of the 24 Russell Group universities
- Over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2014 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.
Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

Postgraduate scholarships and funding

We have a scholarship fund of over £9 million to support our taught and research students with their tuition fees and living costs. Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/scholarships/postgraduate/

English language learning

If you need to improve your English before and during your postgraduate studies, Kent offers a range of modules and programmes in English for Academic Purposes (EAP). Find out more here: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international/english.html

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2016 Postgraduate Tizard programmes will close to applicants at 23:59 hrs on Thursday 21 April 2016. Applications received after this time will be held for consideration for 2017 entry. Read more
2016 Postgraduate Tizard programmes will close to applicants at 23:59 hrs on Thursday 21 April 2016. Applications received after this time will be held for consideration for 2017 entry. The final tranche of interviews for 2016 will be held during the week of 23 May 2016. Applicants unable to make themselves available this week (in person or via skype or telephone) will be considered for 2017 entry.

This programme is an advanced professional development programme involving some or all of the following: distance learning; study workshops; service placement visits; and a clinical placement (which can be in your home area).

Coursework is taught through a mixture of web-based resources, directed reading, videos, lectures, seminars and practical sessions, supported by a number of workshops, where you work with skilled professionals and have the opportunity to share ideas and experiences with fellow students.

You work in two different placements during the course of the programme: a service placement based at the Tizard Centre and an individual clinical placement based in a community learning disability team or social care service. You complete a dissertation which must be based on empirical research in services.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/94/analysis-and-intervention-in-intellectual-and-developmental-disabilities

About the Tizard Centre

The Tizard Centre is part of the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research (SSPSSR) and has excellent links with health and social care organisations, and other relevant establishments.

The Centre is at the forefront of learning and research in autism, intellectual disability and community care, and in 2013 received a Queen’s Anniversary Prize in recognition of its outstanding work in these areas.

The Centre has excellent links with health and social care organisations, and other relevant establishments. Our primary aims, through research, teaching and consultancy, are:

- to find out more about how to effectively support and work with people with learning disabilities

- to help carers, managers and professionals develop the values, knowledge and skills that enable better services

- to aid policymakers, planners, managers and practitioners to organise and provide enhanced services.

The Tizard Centre is recognised as leading the field in deinstitutionalisation and community living, challenging behaviour, quality of staff support, sexuality and autism, and has had a significant impact on national policies in these areas. We are committed to addressing issues arising from social inequality.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

TZ830 - Research Methods (15 credits)
TZ861 - Social Psychology of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (10 credits)
TZ862 - Behaviour Analysis and Intervention (10 credits)
TZ863 - Service issues in Intellectual and Development Disabilities (10 credits)
TZ864 - Practical Placements (60 credits)
TZ865 - Extended Essay (15 credits)
TZ994 - Research Project in Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (60 credits)

Assessment

Each of the four taught modules is assessed by a one-hour, web-based, multiple-choice exam and an extended essay. In addition, the Research Methods module involves short assignments and a worked problem. Placements are assessed by two 2,000-word service reports and one 4,000-word case report, plus feedback by placement supervisors.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- enable psychology/social science graduates to undertake analysis and intervention with individuals and intellectual disability services.

Research areas

Current research areas include: social inequalities and community care; intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Careers

Our postgraduate courses improve employability prospects for both those with established careers and new entrants to the field. Many of our students already work with people with intellectual and developmental disabilities in professional, management or supporting capacities.

Our programmes support their continuing professional development and enhance their opportunities for career advancement. Other students, who are at the beginning of their careers, move on to a range of professional roles in health and social care including working as psychologists in learning disability or behavioural specialists in community learning disability teams; service management of development roles; clinical psychology training or a PhD.

Career destinations include working as a consultant behaviour analyst, carer co-ordinator, service care manager, special needs teacher, quality officer, ABA tutor and research assistant in various health care organisations such as Dimensions UK Ltd, Care Management Group, Consensus Support Services, Mencap and Ambitious About Autism.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The MA in Ancient History has a focus on research training that will place you in a strong position for further study for a PhD or for careers outside academia that require research skills. Read more
The MA in Ancient History has a focus on research training that will place you in a strong position for further study for a PhD or for careers outside academia that require research skills.

The major civilisations of the ancient world, including those of Egypt, Greece and Rome, still shape global culture today. Our MA in Ancient History enables you to gain an advanced understanding of ancient culture, whether you focus on literature, thought, art or religion. The MA gives you an opportunity explore the history, political and social organisation, or material artefacts of ancient cultures, to demonstrate a critical engagement and develop an informed sense of the similarities and differences between them and our own culture.

The programme allows you to develop your research skills and to become by the end of the degree an independent researcher, well equipped for future work for a PhD or to undertake research outside academia. The programme begins by focusing on research skills, which you study alongside either an option module or a language module (in ancient Greek or Latin). For the Spring Term, you choose two option modules that reflect the research interests of staff within the Department of Classical and Archaeological Studies (http://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/classics/index.html).

In the summer, you write a dissertation of up to 15,000 words with advice from one of our experts to demonstrate the skills that you will have gained during your 12 month MA.

This is an ideal programme for graduates of history, ancient history, classics or the wider humanities, wanting to gain practical experience in applying their expertise.

This programme is taught at our Canterbury campus. There is also a version of this programme which allows you to spend a term in Rome. This gives you direct access to Roman sites, museums and architecture, in order to see how the Roman Empire has shaped the city to this day.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/classics/postgraduate/taught-ancient-history.html

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

CL900 - Research Skills in Ancient History - Understanding the City in Antiquit (30 credits)
CL898 - Rome: The Myth of the Eternal City (30 credits)
CL311 - Latin for Beginners (30 credits)
CL356 - Beginners' Greek for MA Students (30 credits)
CL719 - Later Greek Prose in the Original (15 credits)
CL720 - Later Greek Prose in the Original (15 credits)
CL721 - Later Greek Verse in the Original (15 credits)
CL722 - Later Greek Verse in the Original (15 credits)
CL727 - Later Latin Prose in the Original (15 credits)
CL728 - Later Latin Prose in the Original (15 credits)
CL729 - Later Latin Verse in the Original (15 credits)
CL730 - Later Latin Verse in the Original (15 credits)
CL820 - The Political, Social and Economic History of the Hellenistic World:An (30 credits)
CL821 - Ancient Greek Science: Astronomy and Medicine (30 credits)
CL897 - CL Dissertation (60 credits)
hristianity and the World of Late A (30 credits)
CL897 - CL Dissertation (60 credits)

Assessment

The programme is assessed by coursework for each of the modules, an examination in Latin or ancient Greek, if these modules are taken, and by the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide research training in the subject area of ancient history

- expand your depth of knowledge of key subject areas in ancient history

- attract outstanding students, irrespective of race, background, gender or physical disability from both within the UK, and EU, and also from overseas

- develop new areas of postgraduate teaching in response to the advance of scholarship

- provide you with the skills to equip you for a further career either for doctoral research in ancient history, or in employment, with the use of these transferable skills

- develop your competence in applying skills to analysis of a diverse body of ancient evidence

- develop your critical and analytical powers in relation to the ancient material

- provide you with the skills to adapt and respond positively to change

- develop critical, analytical problem-based learning skills and the transferable skills to prepare you for graduate employment

- enhance the development of your interpersonal skills

- provide you with opportunities for shared multidisciplinary learning with archaeology, religious studies and philosophy

- assist you to develop the skills required for both autonomous practice and team-working.

Careers

Our MA programmes include much scope for vocational training, skills acquisition and guided project work, often with use of our extensive facilities. These aspects of our programmes have been praised by external assessors in recent years. Recent graduates have progressed to careers in a wide range of related professional and leadership areas, including national and local museums, teaching and senior roles with archaeological organisations (national government institutions, contracting units and trusts). A large proportion of completing Master’s students have progressed onto PhD study.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Anthropology prides itself on its inclusive and interdisciplinary focus. It takes a holistic approach to human society, combining biological and social perspectives. Read more
Anthropology prides itself on its inclusive and interdisciplinary focus. It takes a holistic approach to human society, combining biological and social perspectives.

All of our Anthropology Master’s programmes are recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as having research training status, so successful completion of these courses is sufficient preparation for research in the various fields of social anthropology. Many of our students go on to do PhD research. Others use their Master’s qualification in employment ranging from research in government departments to teaching to consultancy work overseas.

We welcome students with the appropriate background for research. If you wish to study for a single year, you can do the MA or MSc by research, a 12-month independent research project.

If you are interested in registering for a research degree, you should contact the member of staff whose research is the most relevant to your interests. You should include a curriculum vitae, a short (1,000-word) research proposal, and a list of potential funding sources.

About the School of Anthropology and Conservation

Kent has pioneered the social anthropological study of Europe, Latin America, Melanesia, and Central and Southeast Asia, the use of computers in anthropological research, and environmental anthropology in its widest sense (including ethnobiology and ethnobotany).

Our regional expertise covers Europe, the Middle East, Central, Southeast and Southern Asia, Central and South America, Amazonia, Papua New Guinea, East Timor and Polynesia. Specialisation in biological anthropology includes forensics and paleopathology, osteology, evolutionary psychology and the evolutionary ecology and behaviour of great apes.

Course structure

The first year may include coursework, especially methods modules for students who need this additional training. You will work closely with one supervisor throughout your research, although you have a committee of three (including your primary supervisor) overseeing your progress. If you want to research in the area of applied computing in social anthropology, you would also have a supervisor based in the School of Computing.

Research areas

- Social Anthropology

The related themes of ethnicity, nationalism, identity, conflict, and the economics crisis form a major focus of our current work in the Middle East, the Balkans, South Asia, Amazonia and Central America, Europe (including the United Kingdom), Oceania and South-East Asia.

Our research extends to inter-communal violence, mental health, diasporas, pilgrimage, intercommunal trade, urban ethnogenesis, indigenous representation and the study of contemporary religions and their global connections.

We research issues in fieldwork and methodology more generally, with a strong and expanding interest in the field of visual anthropology. Our work on identity and locality links with growing strengths in customary law, kinship and parenthood. This is complemented by work on the language of relatedness, child health and on the cognitive bases of kinship terminologies.

A final strand of our research focuses on policy and advocacy issues and examines the connections between morality and law, legitimacy and corruption, public health policy and local healing strategies, legal pluralism and property rights, and the regulation of marine resources.

- Environmental Anthropology and Ethnobiology

Work in these areas is focused on the Centre for Biocultural Diversity. We conduct research on ethnobiological knowledge systems and other systems of environmental knowledge as well as local responses to deforestation, climate change, natural resource management, medical ethnobotany, the impacts of mobility and displacement and the interface between conservation and development. Current projects include trade in materia medica in Ladakh and Bolivia, food systems, ethno-ornithology, the development of buffer zones for protected areas and phytopharmacy among migrant diasporas.

- Digital Anthropology: Cultural Informatics, Social Invention and Computational Methods

Since 1985, we have been exploring and applying new approaches to research problems in anthropology – often, as in the case of hypermedia, electronic and internet publishing, digital media, expert systems and large-scale textual and historical databases, up to a decade before other anthropologists. Today, we are exploring cloud media, semantic networks, multi-agent modelling, dual/blended realities, data mining, smart environments and how these are mediated by people into new possibilities and capabilities.

Our major developments have included advances in kinship theory and analysis supported by new computational methods within field-based studies and as applied to detailed historical records; qualitative analysis of textual and ethnographic materials; and computer-assisted approaches to visual ethnography. We are extending our range to quantitative approaches for assessing qualitative materials, analysing social and cultural invention, the active representation of meaning, and the applications and implications of mobile computing, sensing and communications platforms and the transformation of virtual into concrete objects, institutions and structures.

- Biological Anthropology

Biological Anthropology is the newest of the University of Kent Anthropology research disciplines. We are interested in a diverse range of research topics within biological and evolutionary anthropology. These include bioarchaeology, human reproductive strategies, hominin evolution, primate behaviour and ecology, modern human variation, cultural evolution and Palaeolithic archaeology. This work takes us to many different regions of the world (Asia, Africa, Europe, the United States), and involves collaboration with international colleagues from a number of organisations. We have a dedicated research laboratory and up-to-date computing facilities to allow research in many areas of biological anthropology.

Currently, work is being undertaken in a number of these areas, and research links have been forged with colleagues at Kent in archaeology and biosciences, as well as with those at the Powell- Cotton Museum, the Budongo Forest Project (Uganda) and University College London.

Kent Osteological Research and Analysis (KORA) offers a variety of osteological services for human remains from archaeological contexts.

Careers

Higher degrees in anthropology create opportunities in many employment sectors including academia, the civil service and non-governmental organisations through work in areas such as human rights, journalism, documentary film making, environmental conservation and international finance. An anthropology degree also develops interpersonal and intercultural skills, which make our graduates highly desirable in any profession that involves working with people from diverse backgrounds and cultures.

Many of our students go on to do PhD research. Others use their Master’s qualification in employment ranging from research in government departments to teaching to consultancy work overseas.

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Actuaries evaluate and manage financial risk. They make financial sense of the future for their clients by applying advanced mathematical and statistical techniques to solve complex financial problems. Read more
Actuaries evaluate and manage financial risk. They make financial sense of the future for their clients by applying advanced mathematical and statistical techniques to solve complex financial problems.

Qualifying as an actuary is a passport to a wide variety of careers in insurance companies, investments, pensions, health care and banking – not just in the UK, but throughout the world. Kent is one of a very few universities in the UK to teach the subject.

Our MSc in Applied Actuarial Science is fully accredited by the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries; it also provides a fast-track route to qualifying as an actuary, because students who achieve a high enough overall mark in this programme can obtain exemptions from the professional examinations included within their studies.

The MSc is available as a full-time (one-year) or part-time (two-year) programme and is suitable for those who have completed a first degree or postgraduate diploma in Actuarial Science, or those who have studied the majority of the earlier subjects in the Core Technical Stage subjects.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/174/applied-actuarial-science

About the School of Mathematics, Statistics and Actuarial Science (SMSAS)

The School has a strong reputation for world-class research and a well-established system of support and training, with a high level of contact between staff and research students. Postgraduate students develop analytical, communication and research skills.

In 2010, the Centre for Actuarial Science, Risk and Investment (CASRI) was set up within SMSAS to reflect the widening scope of the teaching and research of the staff. Areas of research interest include economic capital and risk management for financial services firms, mortality and longevity modelling, longevity indices and markets. Other research topics include genetics and insurance, insurance economics, pensions and corporate reporting.

The Centre includes 13 professionally qualified actuaries with many years’ practical experience in insurance and pensions, and who maintain excellent links with the actuarial profession.

Course structure

The course is based on a ‘core modules plus options’ structure and exemptions can be gained from the following professional examinations in the Core Applications Stage and Specialist Technical Stage: CA1, CA3, ST2, ST4 to ST9. You can also choose the optional Financial Modelling modules, which prepare you for subject CA2 in the Core Applications Stage. Find out more about accreditation for this programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/casri/Accreditation/index.html) and the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries examinations (http://www.actuaries.org.uk/students/pages/our-exams-explained).

You must take 180 credits in order to pass the MSc. If you take fewer than 180 credits, you may be eligible for the Postgraduate Diploma in Applied Actuarial Science.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

MA909 - Enterprise Risk Management (30 credits)
MA912 - Life Insurance (30 credits)
MA914 - Pensions and Other Benefits (30 credits)
MA915 - Finance and Investment (30 credits)
MA916 - Derivative Securities (30 credits)
MA917 - General Insurance - Reserving and Capital Modelling (30 credits)
MA918 - General Insurance - Premium Rating (30 credits)
MA950 - Prophet (15 credits)
MA951 - Prophet 2 (15 credits)
MA952 - Financial Modelling (15 credits)
MA953 - Communications (15 credits)
MA921 - Actuarial Risk Management 1 (30 credits)
MA922 - Actuarial Risk Management 2 (30 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is usually by a mixture of coursework and examination; exact weightings vary from module to module.

- Accreditation
Students who are considered to have performed sufficiently well in the programme (both in examinations and coursework), as determined by an examiner appointed by the UK Actuarial Profession, will be exempt from subjects CA1, CA3 and the Specialist Technical subjects studied within the programme.

If you fail to achieve a suitable overall standard, you might still be awarded individual module exemptions as recommended by the Profession’s examiner. Please note that individual exemptions are granted based on the final written examinations only.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide successful students with eligibility for subject exemptions from the Core Application and Specialist Technical series of examinations of the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries. This means obtaining a thorough knowledge of core actuarial applications, developing the ability to apply this knowledge in a practical situation and gaining current knowledge and understanding of the practice of major areas in which actuaries are involved.

- develop your understanding, knowledge and awareness of current problems, much of which is at the forefront of current professional practice.

- ensure you are competent in the use of information technology, and are familiar with computers, together with the relevant software.

Careers

The UK Actuarial Profession

The UK Actuarial Profession is small, but influential and well rewarded. There are more than 6,500 actuaries currently employed in the UK, the majority of whom work in insurance companies and consultancy practices.

Survey results published by the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries (http://www.actuaries.org.uk/becoming-actuary/pages/what-can-actuary-earn) suggest that the average basic salary for a student actuary is £36,842 with pay and bonuses increasingly sharply as you become more experienced. The average basic salary of a Chief Actuary is £209,292.

As an actuary, your work is extremely varied and can include: advising companies on the amount of funds to set aside for employee pension payments; designing new insurance policies and setting premium rates; pricing financial derivatives and working in fund management and quantitative investment research; advising life insurance companies on he distribution of surplus funds; and estimating the effects of possible major disasters, such as earthquakes or hurricanes, and setting premium rates for insurance against such disasters. For more information about the actuarial profession, see http://www.actuaries.org.uk

- Employability support

Helping our students to develop strong employability skills is a key objective within the School and the University. We provide a wide range of services and support to equip you with transferable vocational skills that enable you to secure appropriate professional positions within industry. Within the School we run specialist seminars and provide advice on creating a strong CV, making job applications and successfully attending interviews and assessment centres.

Our graduates have gone on to successful careers in the actuarial, finance, insurance and risk sectors.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This programme seeks to develop a critical understanding of concepts and principles of applied behaviour analysis. 2016 Postgraduate Tizard programmes will close to applicants at 23:59 hrs on Thursday 21 April 2016. Read more
This programme seeks to develop a critical understanding of concepts and principles of applied behaviour analysis.

2016 Postgraduate Tizard programmes will close to applicants at 23:59 hrs on Thursday 21 April 2016. Applications received after this time will be held for consideration for 2017 entry. The final tranche of interviews for 2016 will be held during the week of 23 May 2016. Applicants unable to make themselves available this week (in person or via skype or telephone) will be considered for 2017 entry.

It provides you with a detailed knowledge of intellectual and developmental disabilities and experience of practice or conducting research in this field. The programme is for both recent graduates and experienced practitioners. Benefits include academic and professional support from some of the UK’s leading applied behaviour analysts and intellectual and developmental disability researchers. The programme also provides the necessary coursework to apply to sit the international examination for certification as a behaviour analyst.

Please note, the PCert cannot be studied on a part-time basis but the PDip and MSc can be studied either full-time or part-time.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/105/applied-behaviour-analysis

About the Tizard Centre

The Tizard Centre is part of the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research (SSPSSR) and has excellent links with health and social care organisations, and other relevant establishments.

The Centre is at the forefront of learning and research in autism, intellectual disability and community care, and in 2013 received a Queen’s Anniversary Prize in recognition of its outstanding work in these areas.

The Centre has strong links with health and social care organisations, and other relevant establishments. Our primary aims, through research, teaching and consultancy, are:

- to find out more about how to effectively support and work with people with learning disabilities
- to help carers, managers and professionals develop the values, knowledge and skills that enable better services
- to aid policymakers, planners, managers and practitioners to organise and provide enhanced services.

The Tizard Centre is recognised as leading the field in deinstitutionalisation and community living, challenging behaviour, quality of staff support, sexuality and autism, and has had a significant impact on national policies in these areas. We are committed to addressing issues arising from social inequality.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

TZ830 - Research Methods (15 credits)
TZ861 - Social Psychology of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (10 credits)
TZ862 - Behaviour Analysis and Intervention (10 credits)
TZ863 - Service issues in Intellectual and Development Disabilities (10 credits)
TZ868 - Values, Ethics and Professional Practice (15 credits)
TZ869 - Concepts of Applied Behaviour Analysis (15 credits)
TZ870 - Observation and Analysis of Behaviour (15 credits)
TZ871 - Developing and implementing interventions (15 credits)
TZ872 - Work-Based Learning in Applied Behaviour Analysis (60 credits)
TZ865 - Extended Essay (15 credits)

Assessment

Modules are assessed by examination, essay, practical assignment, video. Dissertation of 10,000 words or, for work-based learning option, 7,000-word case report and video.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- develop a critical understanding of the concepts and principles of applied behaviour analysis

- encourage values- and evidence-based, ethically stringent practice or research in applied behaviour analysis

- provide you with detailed knowledge of intellectual and developmental disabilities and experience of practice or conducting research in this field

- produce graduates equipped to play a leading role in public services for children and adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Research areas

Current research areas include: social inequalities and community care; intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Careers

Our postgraduate courses improve employability prospects for both those with established careers and new entrants to the field. Many of our students already work with people with intellectual and developmental disabilities in professional, management or supporting capacities. Our programmes support their continuing professional development and enhance their opportunities for career advancement. Other students, who are at the beginning of their careers, move on to a range of professional roles in health and social care including working as psychologists in learning disability or behavioural specialists in community learning disability teams; service management of development roles; clinical psychology training or a PhD.

Our Applied Behaviour Analysis programme includes a course sequence approved by the Behavior Analyst Certification Board. Its completion, therefore, meets two of the requirements for certification as a Behaviour Analyst. Successful students will need to obtain appropriate supervised experience and pass the BACB exam. Many of our ABA students hope to take this career path, applying their skills either in work with children or adults with autism (ie early intervention programmes or in schools using an ABA approach) or with children/adults with learning disabilities whose behaviour is described as challenging. Every week we are asked to notify our students of opportunities in these fields. Our ABA programme is also suitable for parents of children/adults with autism or learning disability, who are looking to increase their own understanding of ABA.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The MSc in Applied Health Research equips you with the skills necessary to design, implement and publish healthcare research. You gain an in-depth understanding of qualitative and quantitative research methods in the healthcare context. Read more
The MSc in Applied Health Research equips you with the skills necessary to design, implement and publish healthcare research.

You gain an in-depth understanding of qualitative and quantitative research methods in the healthcare context. You also learn the principles and practices of evaluating health services and understand the theories and application of health economics. You acquire the skills necessary to critically understand the concepts, theories and empirical application of epidemiology. The programme is set in a multi-disciplinary context and promotes best practice and interdisciplinary collaboration in healthcare research.

The programme is for practising health professionals or managers wanting to develop their analytical and research skills, or recent graduates looking for a career in health and social care research.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/754/applied-health-research

About the Centre for Health Services Studies (CHSS)

CHSS is a funded research centre in Kent's School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research (SSPSSR). CHSS is a centre of research excellence which undertakes high quality research into a wide range of health systems and health services issues at local, national and international levels.

CHSS also supports and advises health care staff to develop and undertake research projects. CHSS collaborates with a wide range of partners in Kent, the UK and in other countries to improve the links between research, policy and practice. Led by Stephen Peckham, CHSS’s key strength is the diverse expertise and skills of our researchers. Our staff carry out research in the fields of Primary Care, Public Health, Public Policy, Health Psychology, Palliative Care, Statistics, Public Engagement, Clinical Trials and Health Economics.

Course structure

The MSc in Applied Health Research is designed to be studied over one year full-time or two years part-time. There are three compulsory modules, plus four optional modules. To be awarded a MSc in Applied Health Research students are required to obtain 180 M level credits including the dissertation module which comprises 60 credits.

The programme is divided into 2 stages.

Stage 1 comprises taught modules totalling 120 credits. Postgraduate students are required to obtain 60 credits of core modules, and 60 credits from a choice of optional modules.

Stage 2 students are required to obtain 60 credits through a compulsory dissertation module. You must successfully complete each module in order to be awarded the specified number of credits for that module. One credit corresponds to approximately ten hours of 'learning time' (including all classes and all private study and research). Thus obtaining 180 credits in an academic year requires 1,800 hours of overall learning time.

- Compulsory modules are currently:

Introduction to Applied Health Research; Quantitative Methods in Health Research and Qualitative Methods in Health Research.

With the agreement of the programme director, students will be able to take an elective/wild module as an optional module from across the School (with the appropriate credit volume).

At Stage 2, students are required to complete a 12-15,000 word dissertation on a subject of their choice.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

SO900 - Introduction to Applied Health Research (20 credits)
SO954 - Qualitative Methods in Health Research (20 credits)
SO955 - Quantitative Methods in Health Research (20 credits)
SO813 - Sociology of health, illness and medicine (20 credits)
SO950 - Evaluation and Research in Health Services (20 credits)
SO951 - Epidemiology and Public Heath (20 credits)
SO952 - Statistics in Applied Health Research (20 credits)
SO953 - Introduction to Health Economics (20 credits)
SO998 - Dissertation (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment for Stage 1 is through: oral presentations; written assignments; seminar contribution; online discussion; reflective learning logs; coursework assignments.

Stage 2 will be assessed by the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- foster the intellectual and professional development of health practitioners and trainee health researchers to develop their knowledge, equip them with analytical and research skills, and extend and deepen their reasoning capabilities to undertake applied research in the NHS and other health care settings

- provide a challenging, high-quality focused learning environment that is competitive with other universities within the region

- offer the opportunity to develop multidisciplinary approaches within an ethical framework that supports best practice within applied health research

- attract outstanding students from within the region, irrespective of race, background, gender and physical disability

- help students develop links from outside of the region and work collaboratively in health research to support their professional practice and in their research careers

- equip students with research skills to strengthen local health and social care economies

- where feasible, give students the opportunity to develop and enhance their knowledge and skills of health and social care settings within Europe and elsewhere

- enable health practitioners and health researchers to develop skills in higher level reflection in relation to work-based practice

- provide experienced health practitioners and health researchers with opportunities to gain interdisciplinary perspectives through collaborative inter/ multidisciplinary exchange

- develop the critical and analytical capabilities of health practitioners and health researchers in relation to project management, data analysis and interpretation of data

- provide supervision for health practitioners and health researchers to undertake research that builds a culture of critical evaluation and enquiry in the practice environment

- develop opportunity for self-directed learning and reflection

- enable health practitioners and health researchers from a diverse range of educational backgrounds to access and participate in learning which seeks to capture reflection on experience gained in every day organisational practice.

Careers

Completion of the MSc Applied Health Research will provide you with the skills and practical experience necessary to develop your career in advanced research in the health and social care research context.

Building on Kent’s success as the region’s leading institution for student employability, we place considerable emphasis on you gaining specialist knowledge in your chosen subject alongside core transferable skills. We ensure that you develop the skills and competences that employers are looking for including: research and analysis; policy development and interpretation; independent thought; writing and presentation, as well as time management and leadership skills. You also become fully involved in the professional research culture of the School. A postgraduate degree in the area of social and public policy is a particularly flexible and valuable qualification that can lead to many exciting opportunities and professions.

Recent graduates have pursued careers in academia, journalism, local and central government, charities and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Applied Linguistics is for teachers who are at the beginning of their careers and those who have more experience but would like to develop, deepen and enhance their knowledge, skills and practice. Read more
Applied Linguistics is for teachers who are at the beginning of their careers and those who have more experience but would like to develop, deepen and enhance their knowledge, skills and practice.

The programme covers the areas of linguistics that inform classroom practice (such as syntax, morphology, semantics, pragmatics and phonetics), raising awareness of these fields and applying them to Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL).

Practical teaching opportunities are a feature of the programme, including teaching to your peer group and international students from other programmes. There is also the opportunity to visit a local language college and observe classes.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/357/applied-linguistics-and-teaching-english-to-speakers-of-other-languages-tesol

About the Department of English Language and Linguistics

English Language and Linguistics (ELL), founded in 2010, is the newest department of the School of European Culture and Languages (SECL). ELL is a dynamic and growing department with a vibrant research culture. We specialise in experimental and theoretical linguistics. In particular, our interests focus on quantitative and experimental research in speech and language processing, variation and acquisition, but also cover formal areas such as syntax, as well as literary stylistics. In addition to English and its varieties, our staff work in French, German, Greek, Romani, Korean, Spanish and Russian.

Staff and postgraduates are members of the Centre for Language and Linguistic Studies (CLLS), a research centre that seeks to promote interdisciplinary linguistic research. We also have links with research networks outside Kent, and are involved with national and international academic associations including the Linguistics Association of Great Britain, the British Association of Academic Phoneticians, the Linguistic Society of America, the Association for French Language Studies and the Poetics and Linguistics Association.

Course structure

The programme starts with three linguistics modules (Sounds, Structure and Meaning) and a module on language awareness for teachers (Language Awareness and Analysis) so that you have a firm grasp of the linguistic bases of language teaching and how to apply them to the classroom.

In the spring term the focus is on how languages are learned (Second Language Acquisition), how you can improve classroom technique (The Practice of TESOL), plan for your students’ needs (Course and Syllabus Design) and provide them with materials which will be interesting, effective and motivating (Materials Evaluation and Development).

The dissertation will be an opportunity to plan and develop a piece of empirical research which can be of direct relevance to your current or planned teaching situation.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

LL832 - Meaning (15 credits)
LL833 - Structure (15 credits)
LL834 - Second Language Acquisition (15 credits)
LL838 - Sounds (15 credits)
LL840 - Course and Syllabus Design for TESOL (15 credits)
LL841 - Language Awareness and Analysis for TESOL (15 credits)
LL842 - Materials Evaluation and Development for TESOL (15 credits)
LL843 - The Practice of TESOL (15 credits)
LL899 - Research Dissertation (60 credits)

Assessment

Modules are typically assessed by a 3-4,000-word essay, but assessment patterns can include practical/experimental work, report and proposal writing, critiques, problem solving and seminar presentations. You also complete a 12-15,000-word research dissertation on a topic agreed with your supervisor.

Programme aims

- Provide TESOL practitioners with advanced knowledge of linguistics related to language pedagogy, informed by research and scholarship, which will enhance, develop and inform their understanding of language learning and classroom practice.

- To produce graduates who will contribute locally, nationally and internationally to the TESOL community.

- To prepare students to be more effective in the TESOL classroom.

- To provide students with teaching and training which is informed by research, scholarship, practice and experience.

Research areas

Alongside our research centre below, we also have links with research networks outside Kent, and are involved with national and international academic associations including the Linguistics Association of Great Britain, the British Association of Academic Phoneticians, the Linguistic Society of America, the Association for French Language Studies and the Poetics and Linguistics Association.

- Linguistics Lab

The newly established Linguistics Lab is currently housed in Rutherford College and has facilities for research in acoustics, sociophonetics and speech and language processing. English Language and Linguistics (ELL) members also have access to the School of European Culture and Language (SECL) recording studio and multimedia labs which can be used both for research and teaching.

- Centre for Language and Linguistics

English Language and Linguistics is the main contributor to the Centre for Language and Linguistics. Founded in 2007, the Centre promotes interdisciplinary collaboration in linguistic research and teaching. Membership embraces not just the members of English Language and Linguistics but also other SECL members with an interest in the study of language, as well as researchers in philosophy, computing, psychology and anthropology, reflecting the many and varied routes by which individuals come to a love of language and an interest in the various disciplines and subdisciplines of linguistics.

Careers

Postgraduate work in English Language and Linguistics prepares you for a range of careers where an in-depth understanding of how language functions is essential. These include speech and language theory, audiology, teaching, publishing, advertising, journalism, public relations, company training, broadcasting, forensic and computational work, and the civil or diplomatic services.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The Centre offers excellent opportunities for full or part-time research in intellectual disability and community care leading to higher degrees. Read more
The Centre offers excellent opportunities for full or part-time research in intellectual disability and community care leading to higher degrees.

The Tizard Centre has a strong track record of attracting University and ESRC research studentship funding.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/106/applied-psychology

About the Tizard Centre

The Tizard Centre is part of the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research (SSPSSR) and has excellent links with health and social care organisations, and other relevant establishments.

The Centre is at the forefront of learning and research in autism, intellectual disability and community care, and in 2013 received a Queen’s Anniversary Prize in recognition of its outstanding work in these areas.

The Centre has excellent links with health and social care organisations, and other relevant establishments. Our primary aims, through research, teaching and consultancy, are:

- to find out more about how to effectively support and work with people with learning disabilities

- to help carers, managers and professionals develop the values, knowledge and skills that enable better services

- to aid policymakers, planners, managers and practitioners to organise and provide enhanced services.

The Tizard Centre is recognised as leading the field in deinstitutionalisation and community living, challenging behaviour, quality of staff support, sexuality and autism, and has had a significant impact on national policies in these areas. We are committed to addressing issues arising from social inequality.

Study support

All teaching takes place at the Tizard Centre. Postgraduate research students have a shared office space with a computer and telephone.

- Acclaimed active department

The Tizard Centre runs an annual seminar series where staff or guest lecturers present the results of research or highlight recent developments in the field of social care. The Jim Mansell Memorial Lecture invites public figures or distinguished academics to discuss topics that could interest a wider audience. The Centre also publishes the Tizard Learning Disability Review (in conjunction with Emerald Publishing) to provide a source of up-to-date information for professionals and carers.

The Tizard Centre provides consultancy to organisations in the statutory and independent sectors, both nationally and internationally, in diversified areas such as service assessment, person-centred approaches, active support and adult protection. The Centre also teaches a range of short courses, often in conjunction with other organisations.

- Dynamic publishing culture

Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. Among others, they have recently contributed to: Journal of Mental Health; Journal of Applied Research and Intellectual Disabilities; American Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities; and Journal of Intellectual Disability Research.

- Researcher Development Programme

Kent's Graduate School co-ordinates the Researcher Development Programme for research students, which includes workshops focused on research, specialist and transferable skills. The programme is mapped to the national Researcher Development Framework and covers a diverse range of topics, including subjectspecific research skills, research management, personal effectiveness, communication skills, networking and teamworking, and career management skills.

Research areas

Current research areas include: social inequalities and community care; intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Careers

Our postgraduate courses improve employability prospects for both those with established careers and new entrants to the field. Many of our students already work with people with intellectual and developmental disabilities in professional, management or supporting capacities.

Our programmes support their continuing professional development and enhance their opportunities for career advancement. Other students, who are at the beginning of their careers, move on to a range of professional roles in health and social care including working as psychologists in learning disability or behavioural specialists in community learning disability teams; service management of development roles; clinical psychology training or a PhD.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The MA in Archaeology at Kent introduces you to the archaeology of selected periods and regions, through a distinctive programme that relates this to wider spheres of evidence and understanding in archaeology. Read more
The MA in Archaeology at Kent introduces you to the archaeology of selected periods and regions, through a distinctive programme that relates this to wider spheres of evidence and understanding in archaeology.

Archaeology involves the material study of past human activity across a range of time periods, though a variety of techniques such excavation and artefact examination. This MA provides you with a robust grounding in theories, methods and approaches within contemporary archaeology (covering, for instance, phenomenology and post-processualism) through a core taught module. You can then specialise in selected periods (such as later prehistory or the Roman era) and regions through a range of taught and directed study modules provided by the Department of Classical & Archaeological Studies (http://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/classics/index.html).

The programme gives you the opportunity to engage directly with first-hand archaeological evidence, exploring areas such as the relationship of sites to their wider landscape and cultural setting, processes of continuity and change within the archaeological record, and the interpretation of material culture. The teaching is geared towards students’ interests and career needs where possible and is especially geared to skills acquisition and preparation for PhD study. In the summer, you write a 15,000-word dissertation with advice from one of our experts to demonstrate the skills that you will have gained during your MA.

This is an ideal programme for graduates of history, ancient history, classics or the wider humanities, wanting to gain practical experience in applying their expertise.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/297/archaeology

Course structure

This programme includes day and longer visits to view sites and material, to undertake practical work, and to attend seminars and lectures at partner institutions such as the other universities in the Transmanche partnership, the Flemish Heritage Institute, University of Ghent and the Institut National de Recherches Archéologiques Préventives.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

CL805 - Contemporary Archaeology: Theories, Methods and Issues (30 credits)
CL901- Practical Archaeology Report (30 Credits)
MT864 - Reading the Medieval Town: Canterbury, an International City (30 credits)
CL898 - Rome: The Myth of the Eternal City (30 credits)
CL807 - Roman Archaeology: Northern Provinces of the Empire from their Iron Age (30 credits)
CL821 - Ancient Greek Science: Astronomy and Medicine (30 credits)
CL897 - CL Dissertation (60 credits)

Assessment

The programme is assessed by coursework for each of the modules and by the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- introduce you to the archaeology of selected periods and regions, through a distinctive and unique programme, relating this to wider spheres of evidence and understanding in archaeology

- provide you with a robust grounding in theories, methods and approaches within contemporary archaeology (covering, for instance, phenomenology, materiality), examining too areas of controversy and differing expression

- explore a range of types of evidence appropriate to the periods and regions studied.

- establish the relationship of sites to their wider landscape and cultural setting

- identify processes of continuity and change with the archaeological record and to examine explanations for such trends

- confirm the extent of participation in broad European processes through time

- firmly develop your practical archaeological abilities, for instance in handling, characterising, assessing and reporting types of material culture finds (artefacts) and other classes of evidence of the past

- enable you to engage critically with a selected theme or topic within the field of archaeology and history.

- assist you to acquire the critical and organisational skills necessary for successful completion of research for your supervised dissertation and other project work (this work being on an approved topic/s or theme of your choice)

- assist you to develop the necessary range of generic and subject-specific skills – in research, in data handling, in writing, and in the communication of ideas, using both traditional resources and the full range of contemporary IT resources.

Careers

Our MA programmes include much scope for vocational training, skills acquisition and guided project work, often with use of our extensive facilities. These aspects of our programmes have been praised by external assessors in recent years. Recent graduates have progressed to careers in a wide range of related professional and leadership areas, including national and local museums, teaching and senior roles with archaeological organisations (national government institutions, contracting units and trusts). A large proportion of completing Master’s students have progressed onto PhD study.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This programme is an advanced professional development programme involving some or all of the following. distance learning; study workshops; service placement visits; and a clinical placement (which can be in your home area). Read more
This programme is an advanced professional development programme involving some or all of the following: distance learning; study workshops; service placement visits; and a clinical placement (which can be in your home area). Autism Studies can be completed mainly by distance learning.

2016 Postgraduate Tizard programmes will close to applicants at 23:59 hrs on Thursday 21 April 2016. Applications received after this time will be held for consideration for 2017 entry. The final tranche of interviews for 2016 will be held during the week of 23 May 2016. Applicants unable to make themselves available this week (in person or via skype or telephone) will be considered for 2017 entry.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/95/autism-studies

About the Tizard Centre

The Tizard Centre is part of the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research (SSPSSR) and has excellent links with health and social care organisations, and other relevant establishments.

The Centre is at the forefront of learning and research in autism, intellectual disability and community care, and in 2013 received a Queen’s Anniversary Prize in recognition of its outstanding work in these areas.

The Centre has excellent links with health and social care organisations, and other relevant establishments. Our primary aims, through research, teaching and consultancy, are:

- to find out more about how to effectively support and work with people with learning disabilities

- to help carers, managers and professionals develop the values, knowledge and skills that enable better services

- to aid policymakers, planners, managers and practitioners to organise and provide enhanced services.

The Tizard Centre is recognised as leading the field in deinstitutionalisation and community living, challenging behaviour, quality of staff support, sexuality and autism, and has had a significant impact on national policies in these areas. We are committed to addressing issues arising from social inequality.

Course structure

Coursework is taught through a mixture of web-based resources, directed reading, videos, lectures, seminars and practical sessions, supported by a number of workshops, where you work with skilled professionals and have the opportunity to share ideas and experiences with fellow students.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

TZ830 - Research Methods (15 credits)
TZ862 - Behaviour Analysis and Intervention (10 credits)
TZ863 - Service issues in Intellectual and Development Disabilities (10 credits)
TZ865 - Extended Essay (15 credits)
TZ866 - Social Psychology of Autism by Distance Learning (10 credits)
TZ867 - Case Study and Intervention Project (DistanceLearning) (60 credits)
TZ994 - Research Project in Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (60 credits)
TZ995 - Extended Research Project in Intellectual andDevelopment Disabilities (120 credits)

Assessment

Each of the four taught modules is assessed by a one-hour, web-based, multiple-choice exam and an extended essay. In addition, the Research Methods module involves short assignments and a worked problem. Placements are assessed by two 2,000-word service reports and one 4,000-word case report, plus feedback by placement supervisors.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide you with a detailed knowledge of autism and other developmental disabilities

- provide you with experience of conducting research or intervention in the field of autism.

Research areas

Current research areas include: social inequalities and community care; intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Careers

Our postgraduate courses improve employability prospects for both those with established careers and new entrants to the field. Many of our students already work with people with intellectual and developmental disabilities in professional, management or supporting capacities.

Our programmes support their continuing professional development and enhance their opportunities for career advancement. Other students, who are at the beginning of their careers, move on to a range of professional roles in health and social care including working as psychologists in learning disability or behavioural specialists in community learning disability teams; service management of development roles; clinical psychology training or a PhD.

Career destinations include working as a clinical specialist, special needs advisor, autism teacher and ABA tutor for various health and special needs organisations such as the Step by Step School, Special Help 4 Special Needs and WA Health.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This programme is an advanced professional development programme involving some or all of the following. distance learning; study workshops; service placement visits; and a clinical placement (which can be in your home area). Read more
This programme is an advanced professional development programme involving some or all of the following: distance learning; study workshops; service placement visits; and a clinical placement (which can be in your home area). Autism Studies can be completed mainly by distance learning.

2016 Postgraduate Tizard programmes will close to applicants at 23:59 hrs on Thursday 21 April 2016. Applications received after this time will be held for consideration for 2017 entry. The final tranche of interviews for 2016 will be held during the week of 23 May 2016. Applicants unable to make themselves available this week (in person or via skype or telephone) will be considered for 2017 entry.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/98/autism-studies-distance-learning

About the Tizard Centre

The Tizard Centre is part of the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research (SSPSSR) and has excellent links with health and social care organisations, and other relevant establishments.

The Centre is at the forefront of learning and research in autism, intellectual disability and community care, and in 2013 received a Queen’s Anniversary Prize in recognition of its outstanding work in these areas.

The Centre has excellent links with health and social care organisations, and other relevant establishments. Our primary aims, through research, teaching and consultancy, are:

- to find out more about how to effectively support and work with people with learning disabilities

- to help carers, managers and professionals develop the values, knowledge and skills that enable better services

- to aid policymakers, planners, managers and practitioners to organise and provide enhanced services.

The Tizard Centre is recognised as leading the field in deinstitutionalisation and community living, challenging behaviour, quality of staff support, sexuality and autism, and has had a significant impact on national policies in these areas. We are committed to addressing issues arising from social inequality.

Course structure

Coursework is taught through a mixture of web-based resources, directed reading, videos, lectures, seminars and practical sessions, supported by a number of workshops, where you work with skilled professionals and have the opportunity to share ideas and experiences with fellow students.

Note: Workshop one and exam attendance is compulsory for all postgraduate distance learning students on this course.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

TZ830 - Research Methods by Distance Learning (15 credits)
TZ862 - Behaviour Analysis and Intervention by Distance Learning (10 credits)
TZ863 - Service Issues in Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities by Distan (10 credits)
TZ865 - Extended Essay (15 credits)
TZ866 - Social Psychology of Autism by Distance Learning (10 credits)
TZ867 - Case Study and Intervention Project (DistanceLearning) (60 credits)
TZ994 - Research Project in Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (60 credits)
TZ995 - Extended Research Project in Intellectual andDevelopment Disabilities (120 credits)

Assessment

Each of the four taught modules is assessed by a one-hour, web-based, multiple-choice exam and an extended essay. In addition, the Research Methods module involves short assignments and a worked problem. Placements are assessed by two 2,000-word service reports and one 4,000-word case report, plus feedback by placement supervisors.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide you with a detailed knowledge of autism and other developmental disabilities

- provide you with experience of conducting research or intervention in the field of autism.

Research areas

Current research areas include: social inequalities and community care; intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Careers

Our postgraduate courses improve employability prospects for both those with established careers and new entrants to the field. Many of our students already work with people with intellectual and developmental disabilities in professional, management or supporting capacities.

Our programmes support their continuing professional development and enhance their opportunities for career advancement. Other students, who are at the beginning of their careers, move on to a range of professional roles in health and social care including working as psychologists in learning disability or behavioural specialists in community learning disability teams; service management of development roles; clinical psychology training or a PhD.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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