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Van Hall Larenstein, University of Applied Sciences, Full Time Masters Degrees

  • Van Hall Larenstein, University of Applied Sciences×
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Commodities produced in forested landscapes such as timber, palm-oil, shea-butter, cocoa, and coffee go through a complex series of stakeholders and channels before making their way to domestic and international markets. Read more

Keeping up with international developments

Commodities produced in forested landscapes such as timber, palm-oil, shea-butter, cocoa, and coffee go through a complex series of stakeholders and channels before making their way to domestic and international markets. Stakeholders within these forest commodity chains have to work with ever changing consumer demands, market and certification regulations, technological advancements, and an increasing number of national and international laws and regulations.

Forest Chain Management specialists are equipped with the competences needed to examine each actor in the chain (including producers, smallholders, suppliers, processors, traders, retailers and consumers) and analyse the different stages from harvest to processing and consumption [from forest to floor] from various perspectives, including sustainability. They will thus enhance their ability to manage, facilitate and innovate these forest value chains.

Competences

Upon graduating, you will be able to:
• analyse rural livelihoods and food and nutrition security
• analyse the livelihoods of farmers who produce for local and regional markets and understand their coping strategies
• define the economic, commercial and marketing needs, constraints and opportunities for small-scale producers in rural communities
• develop appropriate strategies and interventions for local food security
• develop support programmes for farmers, producers and other stakeholders

Career opportunities

Rural Development and Food Security specialists explore effective responses to mal- and undernourishment, by defining needs, constraints, coping strategies and opportunities for small-scale producers in rural communities. In selecting appropriate context-specific interventions, which reflect understanding of the local context in its wider context, they consider stakeholder relationships and how collaboration could be organised to each stakeholder’s benefit while helping farmers to safeguard their ability to ensure local food security. In the face of globalisation, slow economic growth and political instability, specialists may design and implement responses for (non-)governmental organisations or partners in the private sector, in the form of projects, programmes, market structures or policies.

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Like other products in the horticultural production chain, fruit, vegetables and flowers reach domestic and international markets through many channels. Read more

Keeping pace with developments

Like other products in the horticultural production chain, fruit, vegetables and flowers reach domestic and international markets through many channels. Stakeholders in the chain have to respond not only to the changes brought by technology, they also have to deal with an ever-greater number of national and international laws and regulations, such as those governing international food quality standards. Designed to increase your ability to anticipate and exploit these developments, this programme examines each stakeholder in the chain (suppliers, farmers, processors, traders, retailers and consumers), particularly in the stages from input to processing. It also approaches the overall chain from the perspective of logistics, economics, quality control, marketing channels, and information flows.

The programme is primarily aimed for mid-career horticulture professionals involved in management or co-ordination. Typically, they will currently be working in a commercial role or in a ministerial section or department. Others may be involved in regional development policies or development projects. Yet others may be lecturers at institutes of higher education.

Competences

In line with the educational principles at Dutch Universities of Applied Sciences, this programme ensures that participants develop competences with regard to:
• facilitating the governance of sustainable value chains
• initiating innovative chain processes and projects
• supporting business service entrepreneurs
• demonstrating a professional attitude in a changing international business environment
• conducting applied research that contributes to an efficient and sustainable value chain
• developing policies for inclusive value chains
• effectively communicate value chain developments to specialists and non-specialists

Career benefits

Managers and advisors of programmes and companies related to horticulture chains will gain specialised competences that enable them to improve the management and innovative capacity of the organisation. One would be able to function effectively in the areas of logistic efficiency, provision of information, quality control, reducing production cost and improved profitability, managing chain innovation or chain differentiations. The graduate will be able to identify and connect the relevant stakeholders in the value
chain to meet the goals of the organisation.

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Milk, meat, eggs and their various derivatives find their way to domestic and international markets through a complex series of people and channels. Read more

Staying in step with international developments

Milk, meat, eggs and their various derivatives find their way to domestic and international markets through a complex series of people and channels. Stakeholders in these livestock production chains have to respond to the changes brought by technology and they also have to deal with an ever increasing number of national and international laws and regulations, such as those governing international food-quality standards and sustainable labels.

As primary producers are affected by international trade agreements, local livestock production can no longer be seen in isolation from such developments, which is precisely what this programme is designed to anticipate. It therefore examines each actor in the chain (suppliers, farmers, processors, traders, retailers and consumers), particularly in the stages from input to processing. It also approaches the overall chain aspects from the perspective of economics, logistics, quality control, certification, marketing channels, and information flows.

The programme is meant for mid-career livestock professionals in the public or private sector involved in management or consultancy. Others may be involved in regional development policies or development projects or they may be lecturers at institutes of higher education. These managers have the task to facilitate the actors and supporters of the chain or to mainstream the concept of value chain development.

Competences

In line with the educational principles at Dutch Universities of Applied Sciences, this programme ensures that participants develop competences with regard to:
• facilitating the governance of sustainable value chains
• initiating innovative chain processes and projects
• supporting business service entrepreneurs
• showing a professional attitude in a changing international business environment
• conducting applied research that contributes to an efficient and sustainable value chain
• developing policies for inclusive value chains
• effectively communicate value chain developments to specialists and non-specialists

Career opportunities

Managers and advisors of programmes and companies related to livestock chains will gain specialised competences that enable them to improve the management and innovative capacity of their organisation. By integrating livestock chain subjects with management skills and by addressing entrepreneurial and institutional aspects of agriculture, the programme will train them to anticipate changes in demand and policies at local, national and international levels. It will thus enhance their ability to manage and innovate.

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The Master IDCM focuses on farms delivering milk of sufficient quantity and excellent quality in a profitable manner while adhering to quality and safety requirements of the chain. Read more

Changes and innovations in the international dairy sector

The Master IDCM focuses on farms delivering milk of sufficient quantity and excellent quality in a profitable manner while adhering to quality and safety requirements of the chain. IDCM is suitable for candidates interested in modern and highly developed dairy chains, and the Netherlands’ dairy industry is used as example for innovations. It also focuses on milk processing from the perspective of processing companies, collaborating with stakeholders in the chain or supporting the chain. “Innovative” stands for creativity in dealing with complex situations such as: developing scenarios for farms and the sector as a whole for uncertainties as opposed to traditional advisory services; developing strategies for changing circumstances; innovative technologies in production, processing and in chain governance; and the establishment of farms in new countries or new areas.

The educational programme will make use of cases from dairy countries with a high reputation as well as from countries in transition. It is all about the international dairy industry and providing a reliable and sufficient volume of quality milk. The programme is primarily aimed at mid-career dairy professionals involved in management or co-ordination.

Competences

Upon graduating, you will be able to:
• identify innovative needs in (inter)national dairy chain projects and processes
• advise on dairy business development
• facilitate dairy chain governance towards sustainability and efficiency
• mainstream policy development for inclusive dairy value chains
• manage quality assurance in the dairy chain
• conduct applied research in a dairy value chain
• communicate effectively and convincingly in a varying multicultural sector
• apply an independent and creative learning attitude in a continuously changing international business environment

Career opportunities

The programme offers career opportunities through dairy production and chain innovations as well as capacity to facilitate processes of change in the international dairy sector. Both qualities are essential for the three job profiles for which this Master is intended: the dairy farm manager, who is responsible for overall management and supervision of employees and communication with experts; the dairy farm advisor, who advises on innovations that lead to increased governance, efficiency and sustainability of a company in the chain or of the entire chain; the dairy chain facilitator, who works for a processing enterprise. The enterprise is huge and in control of collecting quality milk from farmers and process milk for the market.

The Master of Innovative Dairy Chain Management (MSc) is taught at our VHL location in Leeuwarden. The language of instruction is English. This Master is not eligible for the NFP Scholarship.

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Food security exists when everybody has access to sufficient, nutritious and safe food at all times. However, various predictable and unpredictable challenges around the globe, including changes in climate (i.e. Read more

Local food security in a globalising world

Food security exists when everybody has access to sufficient, nutritious and safe food at all times. However, various predictable and unpredictable challenges around the globe, including changes in climate (i.e. rising/falling temperatures, droughts and floods, diseases and pests), market tendencies, insufficient access to food for households, unequal distribution of resources and opportunities and inadequate food distribution channels, prevent the realisation of this idealistic and often oversimplified term.

Despite a growing number of large-scale, high-external input farms and enough food production to feed the world, post-harvest losses result in less optimal yields and (locally) produced foods are often used for other purposes, such as animal feed or biofuel. Consequentially, 795 million1 undernourished people around the globe do not have access to this lost and wasted food.

Ensuring access to food for everyone is the key to ending hunger, which will require improved collaboration between various stakeholders - producer (organisations), the private sector, governments, traders and development organisations. Structures, policies and programmes must be continuously adapted to a variety of external factors, such as the economy, environment and current social structures. Rethinking of informal rules and habits is another essential step in attaining food security, considering even members of the same household are not guaranteed equal access to food. In light of these external factors and challenges, this specialisation presents various interventions needed to combat hunger and ensure food security for everyone.

Competences

At graduation, you will have the ability to:
• define the economic, commercial and marketing needs, constraints and opportunities of those in rural communities who produce for local and regional markets
• analyse food security at a local and global level
• apply tools for diagnosing food security
• analyse the livelihoods of farmers who produce for local and regional markets and understand farmers' coping strategies
• select, explain and design an appropriate development intervention leading to food security
• develop support programmes for farmers, producers and other groups
• mainstream food security within Agricultural and rural development programmes
• define the economic, commercoal and marketing needs, constraints and oppertunities for small-scale producers in rural communities
• formulate and recommend any organisational adjustments that are needed within service-delivery organisations.

Career opportunities

Rural Development and Food Security specialists explore effective responses to mal- and undernourishment, by defining needs, constraints, coping strategies and opportunities for small-scale producers in rural communities. In selecting appropriate context-specific interventions, which reflect understanding of the local context in its wider context, they consider stakeholder relationships and how collaboration could be organised to each stakeholder’s benefit while helping farmers to safeguard their ability to ensure local food security. In the face of globalisation, slow economic growth and political instability, specialists may design and implement responses for (non-)governmental organisations or partners in the private sector, in the form of projects, programmes, market structures or policies.

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Specialists in Rural Development, Communication and Innovation are greatly needed in organizations and projects around the world, especially those offering capacity building, training, information and e-learning while addressing rural poverty, social equity, sustainability, resource scarcity and food security. Read more

Responding to changes in rural environments

Specialists in Rural Development, Communication and Innovation are greatly needed in organizations and projects around the world, especially those offering capacity building, training, information and e-learning while addressing rural poverty, social equity, sustainability, resource scarcity and food security. Communication is the key in bringing about social change and innovation. However, adapting development projects and processes to social, political, economic and environmental changes poses challenges to many organisations, which has resulted in a pressing need to facilitate innovation and communication processes. Organizations and professionals providing such services require knowledge on facilitation, public participation and innovative praxis.

To ensure appropriate responses to contemporary conditions and local circumstances, such organisations need to adapt their approaches, as well as design new operational structures, to increase the relevance of their performance and the sustainability of their actions. This programme equips mid-career professionals and their organisations with competences that will strengthen their ability to work in a range of complex multi-actor settings in his increasingly digitized world.

Competences

At graduation, you will have developed the ability to:
• analyse stakeholders’ interests and needs and outline policies that lead to social change and participation
• design processes and strategies that facilitate communication and knowledge sharing
• transform traditional extension policy and practice and develop new approaches to communication and innovation
• design and facilitate effective, appropriate and exciting learning environments

Career opportunities

When an organisation reorganises its service provision and information management, there is often a considerable need for new management styles and thus for capacity building. Various sources and activities – such as policy reforms, customer surveys and the formulation of funding conditions – suggest this applies at all organisational levels. In some cases, complex organisational problems need to be addressed; in others, staff needs to improve their ability to design and implement new strategies and activities for information and communication.

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While governments around the world have committed themselves to fighting poverty, poverty can only be eradicated once marginalised individuals and groups experience equality, regardless of their gender, race, ethnicity, disabilities or age. Read more

Linking sustainable development to social inclusion

While governments around the world have committed themselves to fighting poverty, poverty can only be eradicated once marginalised individuals and groups experience equality, regardless of their gender, race, ethnicity, disabilities or age. That is why discussions on sustainable development and reversing poverty often refer to social inclusion. Development organisations and government agencies can contribute to inclusive transformation processes that improve circumstances for marginalised people and allow them to take part in society and benefit from social services and various political, social, physical and market spaces.

Youth are particularly important drivers of innovation, entrepreneurship and prosperity in developing countries and engaging them in the agricultural sector and keeping them in the rural areas should be a priority. To ensure context-specific inclusive transformation processes, development professionals and organisations need to understand and define marginalised peoples’ needs, interests, constraints and possibilities, as well as understand their roles in decision-making processes at household, economic and societal levels.

The Rural Development, Social nclusion, Gender and Youth specialisation equips students with competences needed to understand and define these contextual factors, reduce inequities and improve social and economic conditions for everyone.

Competences

By the time you graduate, you will have developed the ability to:

• identify opportunities for systemic change and to enhance opportunities and interests of youth, men and women in rural environments
• promote social inclusion and mainstream gender and other socialequity issues in rural development
• recommend changes that will bring about gender equality in organisations
• develop a personal strategy for enhancing empowerment, social inclusion, youth involvement and gender equality in your own profession and organisation.

Career opportunities

Specialists in Rural Development, Social Inclusion, Gender and Youth contribute to inclusive transformation of social processes that improve circumstances for marginalised people to take part in society. Recognising that equal access to markets and social services, influence over decisions affecting one’s life and young people as key drivers of innovation, entrepreneurship and prosperity will increase security over livelihood and improve social economic conditions for everyone, specialists may design interdisciplinary projects to mainstream social inclusion and reduce inequities. As agents for community development, they may be managers, coordinators or consultants in a (non-)governmental organisation or in the private sector.

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