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Victoria University of Wellington, Full Time Masters Degrees

We have 66 Victoria University of Wellington, Full Time Masters Degrees

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Enhance your career with a Master of Computer Science (MCompSc). This flexible coursework and project-based programme will put you at the forefront of innovation in a rapidly developing industry. Read more

Enhance your career with a Master of Computer Science (MCompSc). This flexible coursework and project-based programme will put you at the forefront of innovation in a rapidly developing industry.

Gain specialist knowledge of computer science theories, methods and strategy, and build on your skills in computing architecture, construction, engineering and design.

Examine networks, software, tools and packages, and learn more about a range of programming languages and computer-based systems. Study emerging technology and explore concepts that will form the foundations of future innovations.

You can choose to focus on Computer Science courses or on Network Engineering or Software Engineering. Or choose a broad combination of all three to suit your interests and career goals.

Research project

You'll focus mainly on coursework but will also do an individual project that involves designing, implementing and evaluating a solution to a complex research problem. Your project is a great opportunity to showcase your skills and demonstrate your critical thinking.

Taught by the School of Engineering and Computer Science and the Faculty of Science you'll work with and learn from staff with international reputations as experts in their field.

Degree structure

The 240-point MCompSc is divided into Part 1, the first year, and Part 2, the second year. If you have enough professional experience or more than the equivalent of a three year New Zealand degree, you may be able to be exempted 60 points from part 1, enabling you to complete the qualification with 180 points. You'll need to get the approval of the head of school to do this.

In your first year you'll take an approved combination of courses totalling 120 points. Choose courses from 400-level Computer Science, Network Engineering and Software Engineering. In your second year you'll complete Part 2 as outlined below.

Part 2 is made up of a project and further coursework. You'll complete an individual 30-point project under the supervision of academic staff. You can do your project in partnership with industry, in which case you'll also have an industry supervisor. For the project you'll do a series of written reports, an oral presentation and, where needed, a practical demonstration.

You'll also take one 500-level course from Computer Science worth 15 points and a further 75 points from 400-level courses in Computer Science, Network Engineering or Software Engineering.

Duration and workload

The MCompSc 240 points can be completed in two years of full-time study, or in four years part time.

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing two courses per trimester will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.



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Industry-relevant learning. Advance your financial skills and boost your career with Victoria’s postgraduate programme in Applied Finance. Read more

Industry-relevant learning

Advance your financial skills and boost your career with Victoria’s postgraduate programme in Applied Finance.

Offered by the School of Economics and Finance and created in consultation with accrediting professional bodies, the programme is oriented towards applied knowledge so you gain the crucial industry skills you need to hit the ground running.

Finance from all angles

Explore the workings of capital markets in New Zealand and around the world. Gain a deeper understanding of valuation, financing, investment management and banking. Improve your computer skills and perfect the art of financial modelling.

Learn the principles, practice and operations of financial markets, and the management of corporate, government and financial institutions. You'll gain the practical and operational skills you need to succeed in the international world of volatile financial markets.

Study while you work

Study full-time or part-time. Most classes will be after normal working hours or on block format so you can study part-time and continue working if you wish.

A global focus

Study with students and lecturers from all over the world. You'll benefit from the experience of a global network of alumni, industry experts and respected academics.

Community

Postgraduate study at Victoria will help you build valuable relationships and networks with peers, university staff and future colleagues. And the Postgraduate Students' Association can give you information and provides a voice for you on campus.

The School of Economics and Finance hosts a range of events to enhance your learning experience. These include a Seminar Series, discipline-based workshops, conferences and research symposia. You also have the opportunity to learn from distinguished scholars through the Stephen Turnovsky Visiting Fellowships.

Qualification family structure

  • Master of Applied Finance
  • Postgraduate Diploma in Financial Analysis
  • Postgraduate Diploma in Treasury Management
  • Postgraduate Certificate in Financial Markets Analysis

Choose the qualification that suits your career goals, time constraints and financial situation.If you start with the Certificate or a Diploma, you can apply to transfer to the Master’s degree at a later stage. Both your academic performance and your professional work experience will be taken into account when assessing your application.

Or if you enrol in the Master's but can't complete it, for whatever reason, you may have enough points to be awarded a Certificate or a Diploma.

What you'll study

All the qualifications have a common theme—the principles, practice and operations of financial markets, and the management of corporate, government and financial institutions.

The aim is to equip you with the knowledge and practical skills you need to succeed in the fast-paced and changeable world of financial markets.

Depending on your choice of qualification you'll complete either three courses for the Certificate or six courses for the diplomas. If you choose to study for the Master's you'll complete nine courses.

Find out more about the courses you can study.

How you'll learn

You'll learn through weekly lectures for some courses, and in block format for others. The block courses are designed to give you the flexibility to continue working while you study.

Attending all sessions is compulsory. The block-format courses are held over two sessions, with each block consisting of two and a half days. Before the block you are responsible for completing all readings and assignments as well as attending tutorials.

As well as formal lectures, computer lab sessions, running simulations and taking tests, you'll have networking opportunities through visiting speakers, group discussions and workshops.

Workload

If you are studying full-time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing two courses per trimester will need to do around 24–28 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working full-time.

You can estimate your workload by adding up the number of points you'll be doing. One point is roughly equal to 10–12 hours work.

Duration

The Applied Finance courses require about 12–14 hours study per week each. Many students' demanding professional lives mean they choose to study part-time and only take one or two courses at a time.

The Master’s degree will take you a minimum 16 months to complete when studying full-time. Part-time may take a maximum of six years.

You have a minimum of two trimesters (eight months) and a maximum of four years for each of the two postgraduate diplomas.

For the postgraduate certificate, your minimum completion time is one trimester and your maximum is two years. Courses generally run in a cycle of 12 months, depending on the topic, and the foundation courses are generally taught in first trimester each year.

Careers

Work as a professional in major financial markets, commercial and investment banks, fund management, energy providers, other large private companies and government departments—both in New Zealand and overseas.

If you work in any of the following areas, or hope to do so, then the Applied Finance programme is for you:

  • corporate and bank treasury staff
  • fund managers, investment advisers
  • corporate bankers
  • investment bankers
  • corporate financial planners
  • stockbrokers, commodity and futures brokers
  • financial communications and data specialists
  • government and local body financial controllers
  • management consultants, lawyers and accountants
  • board directors
  • industry regulators

The programme also gives you the educational requirements you need to join the following professional finance bodies:

  • Institute of Finance Professionals New Zealand Inc (INFINZ)
  • Finance and Treasury Association Ltd (FTA)
  • Financial Services Institute of Australasia (FINSIA).

The School is continuously working to develop and foster ties with national and international professional finance bodies.



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Statisticians are in demand. The huge variety and quantity of data generated today means more people are needed who can analyse it and make sense of it. Read more

Statisticians are in demand. The huge variety and quantity of data generated today means more people are needed who can analyse it and make sense of it.

Victoria's Master of Applied Statistics (MAppStat) is designed to train you in a range of advanced statistical methods and give practical experience in the variety of work professional statisticians are involved in.

Develop your research, analytical, and client communication and consultancy expertise. You'll gain a toolbox of skills so you can solve real-life problems. Graduate prepared for a career with many different types of workplace including government agencies, science institutions and businesses.

To enrol in the MAppStat you'll need to have a degree in Statistics, Mathematics or another relevant discipline, with an average grade of B+ or better.

Practical experience

Your programme will be made up of both coursework at the University and practical training in the field. The MAppStat has a professional focus and you'll complete a consultancy project and work experience practicum. This will give you a unique experience among applied statistics programmes internationally.

Work alongside other students in a consulting role with real clients such as clinicians or academics. You'll learn how to talk to clients about technical issues in a language they'll understand, and you'll make an oral presentation and write a report.

During your practicum you'll gain valuable professional work experience with a host organisation such as the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment, Statistics New Zealand and NIWA, or data science companies like Dot Loves Data or Harmonic Analytics. You'll be matched to an environment that suits your goals.

One year duration

Complete your Master's in one year full time over three trimesters (March–June, July–October, November–February), or in up to three years part time. Normally, students start the programme in either March or July.

If you complete only the coursework you may be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma in Science in Statistics.

Workload

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing two courses per trimester will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.



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Delve deeper into the history and theory of architecture with the research and thesis-based Master of Architecture. . This qualification will be of interest to you if you are already working in the profession and want to deepen your understanding of a particular aspect of architecture. Read more

Delve deeper into the history and theory of architecture with the research and thesis-based Master of Architecture. 

This qualification will be of interest to you if you are already working in the profession and want to deepen your understanding of a particular aspect of architecture. Or you may have recently completed a Bachelor of Architectural Studies (BAS) or Postgraduate Diploma in Architecture History and Theory (PDGipAHT), and want to continue on to do research.

You'll further develop your critical thinking and discussion skills with in-depth study into your area of interest. Increase your understanding of how architectural history and theory are applied to design, so you can express your own ideas and conclusions within a theoretical framework.

Expertise through research

Choose a thesis that reflects your current knowledge of the intellectual, technical, aesthetic and cultural conditions of architecture. Your research topic must have a basis in theory as well as method.

You'll get quality supervision and support from staff with international reputations for teaching, research and publishing.

You may be able to include media such as a drawing portfolio or video with your thesis submission. If you choose to use design as your primary research method in your thesis, it must be explained within a theoretical context.

Past research topics include:

  • architectural and urban design processes
  • sustainability in architecture
  • architectural history, theory and criticism
  • energy and environmental design of buildings, including sustainable design

The MArch does not qualify you for registration as an architect.

Duration and workload

The MArch can be completed within three trimesters or one calendar year of full-time study, or in a minimum of six trimesters if you're studying part time. You have a maximum of three years from enrolment to complete and present your thesis.

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.

Community

Postgraduate study at Victoria will help you build valuable relationships and networks with peers, university staff and future colleagues. You'll have opportunities to attend events, seminars, workshops and social functions.

The Postgraduate Students' Association can also give you information on study at Victoria and provides a voice for you on campus.

Careers

If you are already working in the profession, you'll add a new level of expertise to your practice.

The skills and knowledge you gain will open doors to a range of other jobs including architectural conservator, archivist or museum researcher. You might also find work as a critic or writer, curator, historian or librarian.



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Get prepared to work as a professional architect. Hone your skills as a designer, develop your ability to think visually and in three dimensions and learn how to best meet your clients' needs through practical, real-life experiences. Read more

Get prepared to work as a professional architect. Hone your skills as a designer, develop your ability to think visually and in three dimensions and learn how to best meet your clients' needs through practical, real-life experiences.

Learn through a combination of taught courses and a written thesis or research portfolio that involves self-directed, design-led research. You'll graduate with a range of design projects that demonstrate mastery in your area of interest.

Professional accreditation

Your MArch(Prof) from Victoria will be recognised by the New Zealand Registered Architects Board (NZRAB) as fulfilling the academic requirements for registration to practise as an architect. You'll need to spend two to three years gaining practical experience before you can apply to register. The Board will then assess your professional competence.

The MArch(Prof) is also accepted by the Commonwealth Association of Architects (CAA) as fulfilling their academic requirements for membership and registration. However, you will have to meet some other requirements such as evidence of coursework and practical experience.

You'll also meet the academic requirements for professional registration as a practising architect with the industry organisation, the New Zealand Institute of Architects (NZIA).

What you'll study

In your first year, or Part 1, you'll do seven taught courses. Study advanced architectural design and advanced construction theory and practice including the integration of technology. You'll explore contemporary architectural theories and learn about professional practice. You'll also study advanced research techniques, including historical and theoretical approaches.

Research

During the second year, or Part 2, you'll complete a research portfolio or thesis under supervision from academic staff in the School.

Current research areas and topics include:

  • architecture and dystopia
  • housing and public infrastructure
  • parametric design and digital agency
  • contextual shifts
  • responsive environments and robotics
  • people and designed environments
  • corporate spheres and community spaces
  • public ecologies
  • settling regional landscapes
  • indigenous materials
  • history and theory.

You'll be part of a strong culture of research and work with experienced staff who have published a variety of scholarly articles, books and conference papers.

Duration and workload

The Master of Architecture (Professional) can be completed in two years of full-time study or in up to four years part time.

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.

Community

Postgraduate study at Victoria will help you build valuable relationships and networks with peers, university staff and future colleagues. You'll have opportunities to attend events, seminars, workshops and social functions.

The Postgraduate Students' Association can also give you information on study at Victoria and provides a voice for you on campus.

Careers

You'll graduate ready for a career in mainstream architecture in a private practice or a government organisation.

However, your broad range of skills will be adaptable to many related careers so you will also find opportunities outside the mainstream profession. These might include urban planner or urban designer, interior designer, stage or movie set designer, property developer, project manager, teacher or researcher or work in construction law.



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Study your specialist subject in detail and take the opportunity to contribute to the world's knowledge in that area. Enhance your critical thinking, communication and problem-solving abilities and learn to create and assess new ideas. Read more

Study your specialist subject in detail and take the opportunity to contribute to the world's knowledge in that area. Enhance your critical thinking, communication and problem-solving abilities and learn to create and assess new ideas.

Working alongside some of New Zealand’s leading academic staff, you'll complete a research thesis of up to 40,000 words and emerge as an expert in your subject with highly developed research skills.

Victoria's MA is offered in more than 40 subjects. Most programmes are by thesis only but some include coursework and require a shorter thesis, and others you can complete doing mainly coursework and a research project.

A Master of Arts will give your career prospects a boost and open doors to new opportunities. Be a leader in a humanities or social science field and help make New Zealand a better place.

Available subjects

Duration

If you are doing an MA by thesis you'll normally need to complete it within 12 months, or two years if you're studying part time.

If you are doing your MA by coursework and thesis you'll normally be able to complete your degree within 12 months, but you can take up to one year and six months. Part-time students can take up to four years to complete this MA.

Workload

If you are studying full time you can expect a workload of a minimum of 30 hours a week for much of the year. If you can't commit this many hours you should enrol as a part-time student.



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Take a detailed look at your specialist area and open doors to new opportunities in language-related careers. You can complete the 180-point MA programme in TESOL, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics and Second Language Learning and Teaching. Read more

Take a detailed look at your specialist area and open doors to new opportunities in language-related careers.

You can complete the 180-point MA programme in TESOL, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics and Second Language Learning and Teaching. You'll need at least a B average in your major subject in your undergraduate degree to enrol.

You'll complete a mix of coursework and research working with some of New Zealand’s leading academic staff. Study alongside students from around the world and emerge as an expert in your subject.

Available subjects

Flexible options

Take advantage of flexible study options to tailor your studies to your needs. You can choose from a range of courses, and TESOL, Applied Linguistics and Second Language Learning and teaching students can study either on campus or by distance. You can complete your Master's in one year of full-time study or over two or three years part time. And for most programmes, you're also able to start studying at the beginning of any of the three trimesters during the year.

Distance learning support

If you're learning off campus, web-based resources will help ensure you have a rich learning experience and that you can be in regular contact with your lecturers.

Workload

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing two courses per trimester will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.



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Deepen your knowledge of your specialist field in biomedical science. Choose from the outstanding range of biomedical subject areas and courses offered by the School of Biological Sciences, and tailor your programme to your career or research goals. Read more

Deepen your knowledge of your specialist field in biomedical science. Choose from the outstanding range of biomedical subject areas and courses offered by the School of Biological Sciences, and tailor your programme to your career or research goals.

Take your research skills to a professional level. Depending on your programme, your research will range from carrying out and documenting novel experiments to a full research thesis where you contribute to knowledge in your field of biomedical science.

Join a community of dedicated and innovative researchers and learn from staff who have international reputations in their fields.

Master of Biomedical Science by coursework and thesis—240 points

Gain advanced skills in biomedical research. If you have a Bachelor of Biomedical Science or similar degree, you can apply to complete the 240-point Master of Biomedical Science. You'll need a B+ average in your 300-level courses in your undergraduate degree for entry into this two-year programme, which includes both coursework and a full Master's project and thesis.

In your first year, or Part 1 of the programme, you'll complete around four courses of your choice worth a total of 90 points, and also do the Research Preparation course (BMSC 580).

This will prepare you for your second year, Part 2, which is when you'll do a full-time research project, leading to a thesis. You'll need to arrange a thesis topic with a supervisor before you enrol in Part 1 of the Master's programme.

Master of Biomedical Science by thesis—120 points

Complete a full research project and thesis and become an expert in your specialist subject area. If you have done well in your Bachelor of Biomedical Science with Honours degree, you may enrol in the 120 point Master's. This programme is the same as Part 2 of the 240-point Master's above.

You'll need to arrange a thesis topic with a supervisor before you enrol.

Postgraduate Diploma in Biomedical Science

Improve your career options with this one-year programmme designed for students who have completed a Bachelor of Biomedical Science or equivalent Bachelor's degree.

You'll complete 120 points, choosing from the full range of level-four courses in Biomedical Science that may include the 30-point Research Preparation course (BMSC 580).

Workload and duration

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing two courses per trimester will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.

You can estimate your workload by adding up the number of points you'll be doing. One point is roughly equal to 10–12 hours work.



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Become an expert in the science behind buildings and increase your understanding of the connections between architecture, engineering, testing and building research. Read more

Become an expert in the science behind buildings and increase your understanding of the connections between architecture, engineering, testing and building research.

You'll explore building construction and performance, how building materials function, sustainability in the industry and the relationship between buildings and their environment. Learn to question, test and explain these elements and become confident in your knowledge as a building scientist.

You'll also get a practical grounding in how buildings impact on the natural world through their design, construction, operation and maintenance.

Learn through a combination of taught courses and a written thesis that involves self-directed research.

The Master of Building Science is professionally recognised by the New Zealand Institute of Building (NZIOB).

What you'll study

In your first year, you'll take courses exploring advanced construction theory, practice and technology integration, the principles of project management and sustainable engineering systems.

You'll also look at green building assessment systems and the use of energy within buildings, the interaction of buildings and the environment, and advanced research techniques, including historical and theoretical approaches.

Research year

In the second year, you'll complete a written thesis under supervision from the academic staff in the School of Architecture. You can extend your undergraduate specialisation in Project Management or Sustainable Engineering Systems, or explore another area of interest.

Current research topics in the School include:

  • digital craft in architecture multimedia, the internet and the building production process
  • daylight, productivity and health
  • digital simulation of building energy, thermal and lighting performance
  • monitoring energy use and personal satisfaction in work environments
  • sustainability of inner-city communities
  • seismic design of buildings
  • earthquake engineering in developing countries
  • fire engineering
  • integration of building structures with architecture
  • alternative, low-cost building construction technologies.

You'll be part of a strong culture of research and work with experienced staff who have published a variety of scholarly articles, books and conference papers.

Duration and workload

The MBSc will take you two years to complete if you're studying full time or you can take up to four years part time.

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.

Community

Postgraduate study will help you build valuable relationships and networks with peers, university staff and future colleagues. Make the most of opportunities to attend events, seminars, workshops and social functions.

You'll also benefit from the expertise of working professionals through the Faculty's connections with local industry.

Careers

A Master of Building Science can open doors to a career in mainstream architecture. You might start your own practice or work as an employee in a firm or government organisation. You could work as a construction project manager, a sustainable systems engineer or as a consultant. Other jobs might be a lighting adviser or designer, building consent adviser, fire design and regulations analyst, acoustic engineer and quantity surveyor.



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Take your career to the next level. Based in Victoria University's . School of Management. , New Zealand’s capital city MBA offers a broad foundation in modern business administration and management. Read more

Take your career to the next level

Based in Victoria University's School of Management, New Zealand’s capital city MBA offers a broad foundation in modern business administration and management.

You'll master tools and models that improve strategic thinking, decision making and leadership, through a family of professional programmes that let you choose the qualification that suits.

Learn from academic and professional leaders and build powerful networks with your fellow students. You’ll develop practical skills that you can immediately put to use in your professional life. You'll have opportunities to focus on areas of interest to maximise the benefits to your career.

International recognition

Victoria's MBA programme is accredited to the British-based Association of MBAs (AMBA), an internationally recognised global standard for all MBA programmes.

The Victoria Business School is among a small group of business schools worldwide that hold the 'Triple Crown' of international business education accreditations. You can be confident your qualification will stand up against the best around the world.

Find out more about accreditations and what they mean for you.

Qualification family structure

The MBA is part of a tiered family of qualifications. These are staircased so that courses completed for each qualification can count towards the next step.

  • A Certificate in Management Studies can lead into:
  • A Postgraduate Diploma in either Business Administration, Human Resource Management or Marketing can lead into:
  • A Master of Business Administration.

Choose the qualification with the entry requirements, time commitment and career benefits that suit you.

What you'll study

MBA

Your courses are grouped into five parts—four sets of taught courses and a professional development programme.

Core Courses—Get a grounding in commercial law, economics and markets, how organisations work, technology and information systems, problem solving and decision making, and accounting for managers.

Contemporary Management—Designed to draw attention to issues in management, these courses cover corporate finance, marketing, human resources and how to manage the operations of manufacturing and service organisations.

Strategic Capstone—Develop a strategic perspective through courses on leading change, innovation and entrepreneurship, and strategic management. Research an area of management that interests you.

Elective Courses—Choose two courses from a range of options that allow you to focus in more detail on areas that most interest you and most benefit your career (the courses you can do depend on demand, faculty resources and timetabling).

Professional Development—Apply what you’ve learnt to real-world problems through 120 hours of professional development activities, including a Dragon’s Den consultancy challenge, a not-for-profit advisory project, MBA Business Lab strategy workshops and an international study tour.

Certificate and postgraduate diplomas

For the certificate you'll study four of the Core Courses. The diplomas also include four of the Core Courses along with four courses from Contemporary Management and Strategic Capstone.

How you'll learn

You'll learn on-campus through lectures and class discussions. You'll also tackle projects and assignments based on real businesses and real issues in after-class study groups. These group exercises let you tap the collective knowledge of a diverse and experienced group in a supportive environment.

Study while you work

Study part time while working. You can get entry to the programmes based on your professional experience and your qualifications, and all courses are either on weekday evenings or weekends.

Workload and duration

For the MBA, full-time students are likely to need to put in 40 hours a week to complete the course in 16–20 months (four–five trimesters). Part-time students are likely to need to put in 20 hours each week to complete it in two and a half years.

For all qualifications, your average workload for each course will be about 10–12 hours per week, including lectures, tutorials and workshops. This will vary from week to week depending on your readings, assignments and workshops.

You’ll need to be motivated and committed to complete these programmes but we promise the results will more than justify the effort!

Where you'll study

You'll be based in Pipitea campus, in Wellington's CBD.

Community

You'll kick off your study with a detailed programme orientation.

You'll also have opportunities to attend events, workshops, social functions and seminars. The Postgraduate Students' Association can give you information and provides a voice for you on campus.

Careers

Set your sights on roles like chief executive, chief operating officer, chief financial officer, chief marketing officer, chief information officer and general manager.

Many Victoria MBAs are now C suite business and public sector executives, both in New Zealand and overseas.

The performance lift and opportunities for promotion that the MBA offers can significantly increase your earning power.



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Help improve human health. Prepare for a career researching and developing new clinical treatments such as vaccines and drug therapies, or take your skills into health policy or management. Read more

Help improve human health. Prepare for a career researching and developing new clinical treatments such as vaccines and drug therapies, or take your skills into health policy or management.

You'll study advanced immunological theory and techniques and train in clinical trial design and practice. Develop your oral and written communication skills while you study and produce a research paper intended for publication.

The Master of Clinical Immunology (MClinIm) is taught in collaboration with the highly regarded Malaghan Institute of Medical Research, the largest private medical research institute in New Zealand. You'll also learn from practising clinicians from the local district health boards, the Medical Research Institute of New Zealand and other research institutions.

You'll complete your MClinIm in one calendar year over three trimesters.

Workplace and research experience

You can choose to complete either your own research project or a work experience practicum. Both will give you the opportunity to be placed in a clinical or research environment to gain relevant experience. You might work or carry out research in a hospital, research institute or other medical organisation.

You'll graduate with the skills you need to assess, analyse and undertake clinical research in immunology in real-world settings.

What you'll study

In your first trimester you'll complete three core courses introducing you to clinical research, experimental trial design and clinical immunology. In the second trimester you'll study two more core courses and do your research project or practicum, or choose other elective courses.

If you achieve a B average or better, you'll be able to go on to study the two final courses in your last trimester. These will advance your clinical immunology knowledge and science communication skills, and you'll complete an individually mentored research proposal.

If you successfully complete the first part of the programme but for whatever reason are unable to complete the second, you may be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma in Biomedical Science.

Workload

If you are studying full time you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. It is possible to study part time, but you'll need to discuss this with the programme director. Part-time students doing one or two courses per trimester will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.

Careers

The MClinIm will prepare you for a range of senior roles in health research. You might work in a hospital, private research institute, diagnostic laboratory or pharmaceutical company, or for a government agency involved in health policy or delivery.



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The MCA is typically a one-year full time Master's thesis programme, although it can be undertaken part time. The thesis requires the completion of a research study (including a literature review, data collection/analysis, findings) presented as a thesis (up to 50,000 words). Read more
The MCA is typically a one-year full time Master's thesis programme, although it can be undertaken part time. The thesis requires the completion of a research study (including a literature review, data collection/analysis, findings) presented as a thesis (up to 50,000 words). Within VMS, the MCA can be completed in Human Resource Management & Industrial Relations or Management.
Prerequisites

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Make the move into higher-level study with a degree that combines the variety and structure of classroom-based courses with opportunities for research. Read more

Make the move into higher-level study with a degree that combines the variety and structure of classroom-based courses with opportunities for research.

You'll be able to expand your expertise in one of nine subjects while taking advantage of the flexibility to study courses across a range of commerce disciplines.

Build on your Bachelor's degree to enhance your career options in business, management and government with advanced study at Victoria Business School.

International recognition

Victoria Business School is among a small group of business schools worldwide that hold the 'Triple Crown' of international business education accreditations. You can be confident your qualification will stand up against the best around the world.

Find out more about university accreditations and what they mean for you.

Available subjects

Workload

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing two courses per trimester will need to do around 24–28 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working full time.

You can estimate your workload by adding up the number of points you'll be doing. One point is roughly equal to 10–12 hours work.

Duration

This 180-point programme will take you three to four trimesters of full-time study. If you’re studying part time it usually takes six trimesters.



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Take your Honours degree or Postgraduate Diploma to the next level with a Master of Commerce (MCom). You'll take an in-depth look at an issue through completing a research thesis, gaining advanced knowledge of your subject area and thorough training in independent research. Read more

Take your Honours degree or Postgraduate Diploma to the next level with a Master of Commerce (MCom). You'll take an in-depth look at an issue through completing a research thesis, gaining advanced knowledge of your subject area and thorough training in independent research.

Once complete, you'll have the tools and capabilities you need for a career in business or public policy. You'll also be able to apply for PhD study in New Zealand or overseas.

This 120-point programme will take you 12 months to complete full time, or one and a half to two years part time. You must take at least 90 points of research. This means you'll complete a research thesis made up of a literature review, data collection and analysis, and your findings. A thesis is usually 30,000–40,000 words.

Available subjects

Workload

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students will need to do around 20–24 hours of work a week so make sure you take this into account if you are working.

Further study

At the end of your Master's you can choose to continue your research and apply to do a PhD.



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Enhance your career with a Master of Computer Science (MCompSc). This flexible coursework and project-based programme will put you at the forefront of innovation in a rapidly developing industry. Read more

Enhance your career with a Master of Computer Science (MCompSc). This flexible coursework and project-based programme will put you at the forefront of innovation in a rapidly developing industry.

Gain specialist knowledge of computer science theories, methods and strategy, and build on your skills in computing architecture, construction, engineering and design.

Examine networks, software, tools and packages, and learn more about a range of programming languages and computer-based systems. Study emerging technology and explore concepts that will form the foundations of future innovations.

You can choose to focus on Computer Science courses or on Network Engineering or Software Engineering. Or choose a broad combination of all three to suit your interests and career goals.

Research project

You'll focus mainly on coursework but will also do an individual project that involves designing, implementing and evaluating a solution to a complex research problem. Your project is a great opportunity to showcase your skills and demonstrate your critical thinking.

Taught by the School of Engineering and Computer Science and the Faculty of Science you'll work with and learn from staff with international reputations as experts in their field.

Degree structure

The 240-point MCompSc is divided into Part 1, the first year, and Part 2, the second year. If you have enough professional experience or more than the equivalent of a three year New Zealand degree, you may be able to be exempted 60 points from part 1, enabling you to complete the qualification with 180 points. You'll need to get the approval of the head of school to do this.

In your first year you'll take an approved combination of courses totalling 120 points. Choose courses from 400-level Computer Science, Network Engineering and Software Engineering. In your second year you'll complete Part 2 as outlined below.

Part 2 is made up of a project and further coursework. You'll complete an individual 30-point project under the supervision of academic staff. You can do your project in partnership with industry, in which case you'll also have an industry supervisor. For the project you'll do a series of written reports, an oral presentation and, where needed, a practical demonstration.

You'll also take one 500-level course from Computer Science worth 15 points and a further 75 points from 400-level courses in Computer Science, Network Engineering or Software Engineering.

Duration and workload

The MCompSc 240 points can be completed in two years of full-time study, or in four years part time.

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing two courses per trimester will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.



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