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Creative research in humanities has become an important part of postgraduate study at Masters and Doctoral level. It has helped performers and practitioners remediate their work as research, and allowed practitioners to reflect on the processes of practice as much as its ramifications. Read more
Creative research in humanities has become an important part of postgraduate study at Masters and Doctoral level. It has helped performers and practitioners remediate their work as research, and allowed practitioners to reflect on the processes of practice as much as its ramifications. Like all our courses, the DMus reflects the mission and values of University of West London. It enhances progression and quality in education, and encourages widening participation.

Its emphasis on creative research, and its 'submission pathway' attracts recently qualified postgraduates and professional musicians who want doctoral recognition of their skills and experience - and this is sympathetic with the School's academic plan to attract mature and part-time students, together with the University's vision to reach out to students of all ages through flexible education.

The DMus extends the rich and eclectic musical experience our students enjoy at undergraduate and Masters level, to doctoral level, and enhances the London College of Music's growing postgraduate community. The DMus also maximises our research strengths in composition, performance and music technology.

Course detail

The DMus is a practice-led doctorate, and an alternative to the traditional PhD for experienced practitioners who wish to show an outstanding and innovative contribution a specific area of expertise.

MPhil

After a year of full-time study or two years of part-time study, You will have completed:

• a portfolio of notated music composition, 30 to 40 minutes in performance duration - you may submit a recording of the portfolio piece, but this is not compulsory

• a critical commentary of at least 5,000 words.

The MPhil portfolio may comprise several pieces to show a range of contrasting abilities, or just one structurally ambitious work. It may be part of an even larger work, which you can use for the DMus portfolio. Your portfolio piece should be innovative, and show a new technique within, or an extension to, an existing practice.

DMus

After approximately three years of full-time study or six years' part-time study, you will have completed:

• a portfolio of notated music composition, 75 to 90 minutes in performance duration - of which the MPhil portfolio forms the first 30 to 40 minutes. You may submit a recording of the portfolio piece, but this is not compulsory

• a critical commentary of at least 20,000 words, of which the first 5,000 words will be your MPhil critical commentary.

The DMus portfolio may comprise several pieces to show a range of contrasting abilities, but must include one structurally ambitious work lasting 20 to 30 minutes. Alternatively, you may submit just one extended structurally ambitious piece, which your MPhil portfolio may be part of. Your portfolio piece should be innovative, and show a new technique within, or an extension to, an existing practice.

Proposal

Your proposal must not exceed 4,500 words. Unless you are studying for your DMus by Direct Entry or Submission, you will complete this proposal as part of the assessment regime for the Level 7 Research Methods module.

The proposal for the MPhil/DMus in Composition is different from a proposal for a PhD. The core of the proposal will be a list of works you intend for portfolio submission. It should also include the anticipated duration of and instrumentation for each piece. Proposals for DMus by Submission should also append the compositions, and you may choose to discuss the artistic ambition of each work. You must indicate, through backdated registration, the pieces intended for inclusion.

Although most of the pieces will be based on original ideas, you can also submit works developed from pre-existing material - for example, a folk-song arrangement or a fantasia on a theme.

Your proposal may discuss current musical or extra-musical influences on your work, and should explain how your portfolio constitutes an original and substantial contribution to the area of practice. For this, you should include:
• a 'literature review' of contemporary practice in the same field
• an analysis and explanation of existing techniques in the field
• an explanation of how the creative work represents an extension of, or reaction to, contemporary practice.

Your proposal should also include a timescale for each part of the project, and append an outline bibliography. You may also identify areas of technical development, analysing how your portfolio pieces might enable this transition.

You may also include a CV with your proposal.

Assessment

This will involve an oral examination, conducted in much the same way as a traditional PhD. A viva voce will also be necessary when you 'exit' with the MPhil qualification.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/how-apply

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/scholarships-and-bursaries

Read less
Creative research in humanities has become an important part of postgraduate study at Masters and Doctoral level. It has helped performers and practitioners remediate their work as research, and has allowed practitioners to reflect on the processes of practice, as much as its ramifications. Read more
Creative research in humanities has become an important part of postgraduate study at Masters and Doctoral level. It has helped performers and practitioners remediate their work as research, and has allowed practitioners to reflect on the processes of practice, as much as its ramifications. Like all our courses, the DMus reflects the mission and values of University of West London. It enhances progression and quality in education, and encourages widening participation.

Its emphasis on creative research, and its 'submission pathway' attracts recently qualified postgraduates and professional musicians who want doctoral recognition of their skills and experience - and this is sympathetic with the School's academic plan to attract mature and part-time students, together with the University's vision to reach out to students of all ages through flexible education.

Course detail

The possible routes for the course are:
• MPhil leading to DMus
• DMus by Direct Entry
• DMus by Submission

The DMus extends the rich and eclectic musical experience our students enjoy at undergraduate and Masters level, to doctoral level, and enhances London College of Music's growing postgraduate community. The DMus also maximises our research strengths in composition, performance and music technology.

Proposal

Your proposal must not exceed 4,500 words. Unless you are studying for your DMus by Direct Entry or Submission, you will complete this proposal as part of the assessment regime for the Level 7 Research Methods module.

The proposal for the MPhil/DMus in Electronic/Electro-acoustic Composition is different from a proposal for a PhD. The core of the proposal will be a list of works you intend for portfolio submission. It should also include the anticipated duration of each piece. Proposals for DMus by Submission should also append the compositions.

You should explain in your proposal how your portfolio constitutes an original and substantial contribution to the area of practice. For this, you should include:
• a 'literature review' of contemporary practice in the same field
• an analysis and explanation of existing techniques in the field
• an explanation of how the creative work represents an extension of, or reaction to, contemporary practice. This may be as an extended technique or something more philosophical, ontological or aesthetically grounded - or preferably a combination of the two.

Your proposal should also include a timescale for each part of the project, and append an outline bibliography.

You may also identify areas of technical development, analysing how your portfolio pieces might enable this transition. You must indicate in your proposal, any pieces you intend to include through backdated registration.

You may also include a CV.

Assessment

This will involve an oral examination, conducted in much the same way as a traditional PhD. This will also be necessary when you 'exit' with the MPhil qualification.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/how-apply

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/scholarships-and-bursaries

Read less
Creative research in humanities has become an important part of postgraduate study at Masters and Doctoral level. It has helped performers and practitioners remediate their work as research, and allowed practitioners to reflect on the processes of practice as much as its ramifications. Read more
Creative research in humanities has become an important part of postgraduate study at Masters and Doctoral level. It has helped performers and practitioners remediate their work as research, and allowed practitioners to reflect on the processes of practice as much as its ramifications. Like all our courses, the DMus reflects the mission and values of University of West London. It enhances progression and quality in education, and encourages widening participation.

Its emphasis on creative research, and its 'submission pathway' attracts recently qualified postgraduates and professional musicians who want doctoral recognition of their skills and experience - and this is sympathetic with the School's academic plan to attract mature and part-time students, together with the University's vision to reach out to students of all ages through flexible education.

The DMus extends the rich and eclectic musical experience our students enjoy at undergraduate and Masters level, to doctoral level, and enhances the London College of Music's growing postgraduate community. The DMus also maximises our research strengths in composition, performance and music technology.

MPhil

After a year of full-time study or two years of part-time study, you will have completed:
• a portfolio of recorded music, 60 to 80 minutes in duration, with optimised session files included
• a critical commentary of at least 5,000 words.

The MPhil portfolio may comprise pieces by several artists, or several by the same artist. It may be part of an even larger work, which you can use for the DMus portfolio. Your portfolio piece should be innovative, and show a new technique within, or an extension to, an existing practice.

DMus

After approximately three years of full-time study or six years' part-time study, you will have completed:
• a portfolio of recorded music, 120 to 140 minutes long - of which the MPhil portfolio forms the first 60 to 80 minutes. The portfolio should include optimised session files of your recordings.
• a critical commentary of at least 20,000 words, of which the first 5,000 words will be your MPhil critical commentary.

The DMus portfolio may comprise several pieces by one artist, or by several different ones, and your MPhil portfolio can be part of this extended work. Your portfolio piece should be innovative, and show a new technique within, or an extension to, an existing practice.

Proposal

Your proposal must not exceed 4,500 words. Unless you are studying for your DMus by Direct Entry or Submission, you will complete this proposal as part of the assessment regime for the Level 7 Research Methods module.

The proposal for the MPhil/DMus in Music Production is different from a proposal for a PhD. The core of the proposal will be a list of works you intend for portfolio submission. It should also include the anticipated duration of each piece. Proposals for DMus by Submission should also append the compositions. You should explain in your proposal how your portfolio constitutes an original and substantial contribution to the area of practice. For this, you should include:
• a 'literature review' of contemporary practice in the same field
• an analysis and explanation of existing techniques in the field
• an explanation of how the creative work represents an extension of, or reaction to, contemporary practice (see pathway appendices), which may be as an extended technique or something more philosophical, ontological or aesthetically grounded - or preferably a combination of the two.

Your proposal should also include a timescale for each part of the project, and an appended outline bibliography.

You may also identify areas of technical development, analysing how your portfolio pieces might enable this transition. You must indicate in your proposal, any pieces you intend to include through backdated registration.

You may also include a CV.

Assessment

Assessment of the submission will involve an oral examination conducted in much the same way as a traditional PhD. A viva voce will also be necessary when a student 'exits' with the MPhil degree.

Career and study progression

The DMus may lead to a career in teaching and research in higher education.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/how-apply

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/scholarships-and-bursaries

Read less
Creative research in humanities has become an important part of postgraduate study at Masters and Doctoral level. It has helped performers and practitioners remediate their work as research, and allowed practitioners to reflect on the processes of practice as much as its ramifications. Read more
Creative research in humanities has become an important part of postgraduate study at Masters and Doctoral level. It has helped performers and practitioners remediate their work as research, and allowed practitioners to reflect on the processes of practice as much as its ramifications. Like all our courses, the DMus reflects the mission and values of University of West London. It enhances progression and quality in education, and encourages widening participation.

Its emphasis on creative research, and its 'submission pathway' attracts recently qualified postgraduates and professional musicians who want doctoral recognition of their skills and experience - and this is sympathetic with the School's academic plan to attract mature and part-time students, together with the University's vision to reach out to students of all ages through flexible education.

The DMus extends the rich and eclectic musical experience our students enjoy at undergraduate and Masters level, to doctoral level, and enhances the London College of Music's growing postgraduate community. The DMus also maximises our research strengths in composition, performance and music technology.

MPhil

After a year of full-time study or two years of part-time study, you will have completed:
• a 30 to 90 minute performance accompanied by performance notes and a biography
• a critical commentary of at least 5,000 words.

The MPhil portfolio may comprise several contrasting pieces, or just one longer, structurally ambitious piece. The nature of your performance will determine its duration. For example, most romantic and modern concerts are between 30 and 40 minutes, while a solo piano recital might last between 50 and 90 minutes, depending on whether it is a daytime or evening performance. The supervisor must approve your repertoire and total performance duration, and will then notify the principal assessor in cases where that role is taken by another academic.

Your portfolio piece should be innovative, and show a new technique within, or an extension to, an existing practice. Examiners will attend the performance.

DMus

After approximately three years of full-time study or six years' part-time study, you will have completed:
• five performances, each between 30 and 90 minutes long, accompanied by programme notes and a biography, of which the first performance can be your work from the MPhil requirement
• a critical commentary of at least 20,000 words, of which the first 5,000 words can be from your MPhil requirement.

As with the MPhil, your DMus portfolio performances may comprise several contrasting pieces, or just one longer, structurally ambitious piece. You may wish to explore a range of roles and repertoire, or stick with just one concerto performance. The nature of your performance will determine its duration. For example, most romantic and modern concerts are between 30 and 40 minutes, while a solo piano recital might last between 50 and 90 minutes, depending on whether it is a daytime or evening performance. The supervisor must approve your repertoire and total performance duration, and will then notify the principal assessor in cases where that role is taken by another academic.

Your portfolio piece should be innovative, and show a new technique within, or an extension to, an existing practice. Examiners will attend the performance.

Proposal

Your proposal must not exceed 4,500 words. Unless you are studying for your DMus by Direct Entry or Submission, you will complete this proposal as part of the assessment regime for the Level 7 Research Methods module.

The proposal for the MPhil/DMus in Music Production is different from a proposal for a PhD. The core of the proposal will be a list of works you intend for portfolio submission. It should also include the anticipated duration of, and instrumentation for, each piece. Proposals for DMus by Submission should also append the compositions. You should explain in your proposal the current musical and extra-musical influences on your work, and how your portfolio constitutes an original and substantial contribution to the area of practice. For this, you should include:
• a 'literature review' of contemporary practice in the same field
• an analysis and explanation of existing techniques in the field
• an explanation of how the creative work represents an extension of, or reaction to, contemporary practice.

Your proposal should also include a timescale for each part of the project, and append an outline bibliography.

Full-time and part-time candidates - you may also identify areas of technical development, analysing how your portfolio pieces might enable this transition. You must indicate in your proposal any pieces you intend to include through backdated registration.

You may also include a CV.

Assessment

This will involve an oral examination, conducted in much the same way as a traditional PhD. A viva voce will also be necessary when you ‘exit’ with the MPhil qualification.

Career and study progression

The DMus may lead to a career in teaching and research in higher education.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/how-apply

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/scholarships-and-bursaries

Read less
The Graduate Diploma in Psychology offers a fast route to eligibility for Graduate Basis for Chartered membership (GBC) of the British Psychological Society (BPS) - the first step towards becoming a Chartered Psychologist. Read more

Course Summary

The Graduate Diploma in Psychology offers a fast route to eligibility for Graduate Basis for Chartered membership (GBC) of the British Psychological Society (BPS) - the first step towards becoming a Chartered Psychologist.

Course details

The Graduate Diploma in Psychology comprises seven modules that make up 160 credits in total. The course therefore provides you with a thorough grounding in the theory, themes, issues and practical skills that are central to any undergraduate psychology course. You will also be allowed to participate in up to one additional module per semester free of charge; but will not be assessed in such modules.

The 2006 British Psychological Society (BPS) regulation for Graduate Diploma students means that if you APL for any of the 20 credit modules you are required to take a substitute module at level 6. However, you can APL only 50% of the level 5 modules, and not the dissertation.

You will conduct and submit a research project as part of this course, and must achieve 160 credits with an overall mark of at least 50 percent, to be eligible for Graduate Basis for Chartered membership with the BPS.

Semester 1 (Level 5)

Biological and Atypical Psychology (20 Credits)

The overall aim of Biological and Atypical Psychology is to introduce students to the study of the brain and its interaction with the environment (e.g. behaviour). The module covers the structure and function of the nervous system from the micro (genetics and neurons) to the macro (gross anatomy and function of the nervous system) as well as applied aspects such as the biological psychology of mental health, addiction, stress and other psychologically relevant aspects of biological psychology.

Atypical psychology is embedded in each of these topics. Lectures present the background concepts, theories, and related issues while seminars involve a variety of learning activities including lab-based demonstrations of neuroanatomy, physiological measurement of behaviour, group discussions of talks by leading academics in the field, and use of online activities to self-assess and develop students’ understanding of key issues.

Students' ability to communicate knowledge and understanding of basic concepts will be assessed through a short group presentation and accompanying 500 word essay, and by a 1.5 hour unseen examination (60 multiple choice questions).

Individual Differences (20 Credits)

This module examines the concepts, theories, methods and findings in the psychology of personality and intelligence. A key component is principles of measurement and psychometric testing in the study of similarities and differences between people. A variety of learning activities, including guided reading, lectures, and seminar activities will be employed throughout the module. Students’ ability to communicate knowledge and understanding of basic concepts will be assessed through a written portfolio and by an unseen examination.

Further Research Methods (20 Credits)

This module takes students beyond the introductory level in their research methods training in psychology and will cover some more key concepts/ issues and additional methods at a more advanced level. It will cover some more complex experimental designs, survey designs, psychometrics, and more advanced qualitative methods. The lectures will provide an overview of the key concepts, issues and procedures while the workshops will provide hands on experience of the research process. As part of the process students continue to develop skills in all aspects of the research process getting closer to the goal of becoming competent in carrying out independent research projects.

Semester two (Level 5)

Lifespan Development (20 credits)

This module examines the concepts, theories, methods and findings in the field of developmental psychology. The module takes a lifespan perspective, focusing on human development from early childhood through to later developmental stages such as adolescence, adulthood and old-age. A variety of learning activities, including guided reading, lectures, and seminar activities will be employed throughout the module. Students’ ability to communicate knowledge and understanding of basic concepts will be assessed through a critical review and an unseen examination.

Cognition in Action (20 credits)

An overview of cognitive psychology is given by going through a range of classical topics such as perception, attention, imagery, memory, problem solving, decision making, thinking, language and concept formation. A variety of practical exercises are undertaken and several methodological approaches are visited.

Social Psychology (20 credits)

Social Psychology focuses on a variety of issues concerned with the social and interactive aspects of human behaviour. The module provides an overview of the main areas of study and introduces the diversity of social psychology, presenting the findings on a variety of topics central to social psychological enquiry. In addition, this module lays the foundation for subsequent study and research that may be pursued for the dissertation. It provides a basis for further academic consideration of these issues in social psychology.

Semesters 1 and 2 (Level 6)

Graduate Diploma Psychology Dissertation (40 credits)

This module helps you conceptualise and carry out a piece of empirical psychology research, to a standard suitable for submission for publication. You will learn how to present research ideas to peers and the wider academic community in verbal and poster presentations. It is the practical and theoretical realisation of what you will have learned in the Further Research Methods modules and other theory-driven modules.

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You will also develop your skills and competencies to analyse and execute business projects, synthesise and critically evaluate business information, and manage implementing strategic decisions with integrity, creativity and innovation. Read more
You will also develop your skills and competencies to analyse and execute business projects, synthesise and critically evaluate business information, and manage implementing strategic decisions with integrity, creativity and innovation. Our MBA is designed for graduates who want to develop their business acumen and competitive edge. Our MBA students all receive free annual membership to the Chartered Management Institute (CMI) and the opportunity for dual accreditation with CMI when you complete our MBA successfully. The peer relationships that develop during the course are a useful and supportive network that ensure beyond the course and many of our past students go onto to become active alumni.


Modules

Corporate Financial Management
Global Marketing
Corporate Strategy
Global Business Practice
Leading, Managing and Developing People
Research Methods
Dissertation.
Optional modules:

Corporate Responsibility
Developing Skills for Management
Logistics and Supply Chain Management
Project Management
Consumer Behaviour
Employment and Contract Law
Management Decision Making
Enterprise and Innovation.

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This course offers the appropriate experience for those looking for a career in the global economy within international corporations, investment banks, accounting firms, international law firms, international consultants and international fund management. Read more
This course offers the appropriate experience for those looking for a career in the global economy within international corporations, investment banks, accounting firms, international law firms, international consultants and international fund management. You will acquire the necessary knowledge and understanding of the legal regulations of international and national business and finance, and employment law.

The course will give you excellent employment prospects within a wide range of international organisations and multinational corporations.

Course detail

The LLM International Banking and Finance Law course is aimed at students seeking to understand and work as a legal expert in the area of multinational corporations. Covering topics including syndicate loans, bond issuances and derivatives markets, the course will equip you with the skills and knowledge that are in high demand in the banking and finance sector. The course will also allow you to tailor the course to meet your personal and professional needs.

Modules

• Legal Aspects of International Finance
• Securities Regulations
• International Banking Law
• International Commercial Arbitration and Mediation Law
• Research Methodology
• Dissertation.

Format

The course is taught through a combination of lectures, tutorials, seminars, small group sessions, practical experience and workshops. We teach two modules each week, over four hours of teaching time. In addition, students will complete a 15,000 word dissertation, which will be supported by a Research Methodology module.

Assessment

The taught modules adopt a standardised and consistent approach. In each of these modules, there will be a formative assessment, which will not count towards your final module mark. Following this, there will be two assessments – a piece of coursework of 3,000 words and an end of semester (pre-release) exam. Both will count towards your final mark. Normally, you will receive feedback within two weeks of submitting coursework and within three weeks of sitting exams.

Career and study progression

Our aim is to produce graduates who have employment prospects with multinational corporations, because they understand the legal regulations and constraints of international business, as well as the financial world of international trade agencies and multinational corporations.

You can seek employment opportunities in careers with investment, law, consultancy and accounting firms, especially those focusing on international practice. Practising legal professionals and human resource professionals can use their qualification and the skills and knowledge they have gained on the course to progress in their chosen field.

On completing this course successfully, you can choose to continue your studies with Ealing Law School and progress on to a PhD.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/how-apply

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/scholarships-and-bursaries

Read less
This course is designed to introduce to you the theory and practice of international business regulation in the context of globalisation. Read more
This course is designed to introduce to you the theory and practice of international business regulation in the context of globalisation. London is the centre for global banking, finance and trade; you will therefore be well placed to take advantage of the excellent links with the major corporations.

The LLM International Business and Commercial Law course is aimed at students seeking to understand and work as a legal expert in the area of multinational corporations. Covering laws on business structure, corporate process, taxation, intellectual property, dispute resolution and legal aspects of international finance, the course will equip you with the skills and knowledge that are in high demand in the banking and finance sector. The course will also allow you to tailor the course to meet your personal and professional needs.

Course detail

This course focuses on international business law from a global perspective, identifying key characteristics of doing business in an international environment, main sources of regulation, key concepts of contract and corporate law.

You will also be introduced to business dispute resolution and explore the concepts of corporate social responsibility and, in particular, doing business in developing countries. The course also touches on other common law and civil law jurisdictions, and gives students a critical comparative law approach to international commercial law.

Modules

• International Commercial Law
• Legal Aspects of International Finance
• Laws on International Business?Structures
• International Commercial Arbitration and Mediation
• Research Methodology
• Dissertation.

Format

The course is taught through a combination of lectures, tutorials, seminars, small group sessions, practical experience and workshops. We teach two modules each week, over four hours of teaching time. In addition, students will complete a 15,000 word dissertation, which will be supported by a Research Methodology module.

Assessment

The taught modules adopt a standardised and consistent approach. In each of these modules, there will be a formative assessment, which will not count towards your final module mark. Following this, there will be two assessments – a piece of coursework of 3,000 words and an end of semester (pre-release) exam. Both will count towards your final mark. Normally, you will receive feedback within two weeks of submitting coursework and within three weeks of sitting exams.

Career and study progression

Our aim is to produce graduates who have employment prospects with multinational corporations, because they understand the legal regulations and constraints of international business, as well as the financial world of international trade agencies and multinational corporations.

You can seek employment opportunities in careers with investment, law, consultancy and accounting firms, especially those focusing on international practice. Practising legal professionals and human resource professionals can use their qualification and the skills and knowledge they have gained on the course to progress in their chosen field.

On completing this course successfully, you can choose to continue your studies with Ealing Law School and progress on to a PhD.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/how-apply

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/scholarships-and-bursaries

Read less
Intellectual Property (IP) is a fast growing area of the law, requiring highly qualified multilingual specialists who can deal with IP rights across national borders. Read more
Intellectual Property (IP) is a fast growing area of the law, requiring highly qualified multilingual specialists who can deal with IP rights across national borders. The new LLM International Studies in Intellectual Property Law course offers a specialised programme of study, which will enable you to meet the requirements of a future career in this area. The course covers copyright, trade mark and patent law, along with its European and international aspects, as well as legal questions associated with new technologies, multimedia and cyberspace.

This course is designed for law graduates, practising lawyers and business professionals from anywhere in the world who want to develop a specialist legal and commercial expertise in technology and IP law.

Course detail

You will study the most important components of international intellectual property law such as copyright, patents and trademarks and how these forms of intellectual property are protected in the digital age.

The course is therefore designed for law graduates, practising lawyers and business professionals from anywhere in the world who wish to develop a specialist legal and commercial expertise in intellectual property law and technology. In addition to specialised courses, they will also study international commercial law and other subjects, which will help put intellectual property into the context of modern international business relations.

Modules

• Intellectual Property in the Digital Economy
• Commercial Intellectual Property Law
• International Commercial Arbitration and Mediation
• International Commercial Law
• Research Methodology
• Dissertation.

Format

The course is taught through a combination of lectures, tutorials, seminars, small group sessions, practical experience and workshops. We teach two modules each week, over four hours of teaching time. In addition, students will complete a 15,000 word dissertation, which will be supported by a Research Methodology module.

Assessment

The taught modules adopt a standardised and consistent approach. In each of these modules, there will be a formative assessment, which will not count towards your final module mark. Following this, there will be two assessments – a piece of coursework of 3,000 words and an end of semester (pre-release) exam. Both will count towards your final mark. Normally, you will receive feedback within two weeks of submitting coursework and within three weeks of sitting exams.

Career and study progression

Our aim is to produce graduates who have employment prospects with multinational corporations, because they understand the legal regulations and constraints of international business, as well as the financial world of international trade agencies and multinational corporations.

You can seek employment opportunities in careers with investment, law, consultancy and accounting firms, especially those focusing on international practice. Practising legal professionals and human resource professionals can use their qualification and the skills and knowledge they have gained on the course to progress in their chosen field.

On completing this course successfully, you can choose to continue your studies with Ealing Law School and progress on to a PhD.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/how-apply

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/scholarships-and-bursaries

Read less
Whether you are a graduate of the Postgraduate Diploma in Legal Practice (LPC) or a practising solicitor looking to specialise further, this course will enable you to 'top up' your education to a Masters degree level. Read more
Whether you are a graduate of the Postgraduate Diploma in Legal Practice (LPC) or a practising solicitor looking to specialise further, this course will enable you to 'top up' your education to a Masters degree level. The course provides practice-relevant study on aspects of substantive law or legal practice and enables you to develop the analytical and research skills necessary to write a detailed piece of research relevant to law practice.

The course will be assessed by dissertation and you can choose to complete this either by undertaking an extended piece of research or a self-directed work-based learning portfolio. This will enable working lawyers to critically reflect on their own legal practice throughout the course.

Research Methodology

The research and methodology module is more detailed and provides more teaching hours than similar courses from other providers. The module bridges the much needed gap between most LLM and MPhil/PhD research methods, and will enable you to write a research proposal that will eventually underpin your dissertation.

The module is divided into four parts.
• Undertaking Postgraduate Research
• Process and Demographics of Research
• Data Collection, Analysis and Dissemination Methods
• The Writing Up and Dissemination of Research.

The module is delivered through a blended mix of taught and online lectures, practical case studies and seminars and takes place over one semester. The assessment is designed so as to test both breadth and depth of knowledge in legal and related research.

Dissertation

The dissertation is an original piece of research into legal practice of between 10,000 to 12,000 words. Research undertaken must be self-managed though you will be assigned a dissertation supervisor either from staff at the University of West London with similar research interests or from within the legal profession.

Format

Teaching methods include lectures, tutorials, seminars, small group work and workshops. The emphasis is on developing your research skills to enable you to undertake a piece of self-managed research.

Assessment

The Research Methodology module includes a formative assessment, comprising a summary research proposal of approximately 1,000 words. This will not count towards your final module mark. You will also need to complete a summative assessment comprising a detailed research proposal of no more than 2,000 words.

Career and study progression

The LLM in Legal Practice complements the compulsory vocational stage of learning required to embark on a law career. The course will enhance your career opportunities by providing potential employers with evidence of your understanding and detailed knowledge of a particular area of legal practice, improving your employability in an increasingly specialised sector of the market.

On completion of the LLM Legal Practice (Top up) course, students may continue on to a PhD with the Ealing Law School.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/how-apply

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/scholarships-and-bursaries

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The MA Advanced Music Technology course aims to provide students with a higher level of understanding of the practical techniques and theory that underpin traditional and contemporary audio technology. Read more
The MA Advanced Music Technology course aims to provide students with a higher level of understanding of the practical techniques and theory that underpin traditional and contemporary audio technology.

The course boasts an enviable range of studio facilities and staff who are actively engaged in the music industry. It focuses on cutting edge topics from ambient recording through advanced non-linear techniques, to the evolving arena of surround sound mixing and recording, and encompassing multi-media work and interface design. Graduates from the MA will enjoy an augmented skill-set that will place them at a distinct advantage upon entry into this fast paced, competitive and constantly evolving market place.

Course detail

The course is based in studios of fully professional specification, and students will work on both digital and analogue consoles with access to state-of-the-art Pro Tools systems with hi-end plug-ins, along with other advanced technology such as analogue modular synthesizers, Kyma and Ambisonics.

Modules

• Advanced Recording Techniques
• Digital Audio Interface Design for Music
• Developing your Career
• Research Methods
• Multi-track Recording and Mixing for Surround
• Interactive Music Technology
• Advanced Non-linear Recording
• Masters Level Project.

Format

Modules comprise a combination of lectures, workshops, seminars and tutorials. There are also masterclasses from staff, visiting lecturers and practitioners.

Assessment

We assess modules in a variety of ways. Written work is usually in the form of essays, critical self-reflections and learning journals. Practical assessment varies according to the nature of the practice - for example, DVDs for surround recordings, CDs for audio, and some live installations or electro-acoustic performances. There are often at least two assignments for each module. There are no exams currently in the MA Advanced Music Technology course.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/how-apply

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/scholarships-and-bursaries

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As a student in the MA Advertising, Branding and Communication course at the University of West London, you will become a strategic thinker and communicator to create cutting edge advertising, brand and design campaigns. Read more
As a student in the MA Advertising, Branding and Communication course at the University of West London, you will become a strategic thinker and communicator to create cutting edge advertising, brand and design campaigns. We build your understanding of brand communication, professional graphic design, advertising strategy and creativity to help prepare you for your future career.

Communication is at the centre of the way we live our lives. Today's communication systems and tools are complex, sophisticated and extremely powerful. However, the usefulness of these systems and tools depends on those who know how best to use them creatively and strategically.

As consumers become more knowledgeable and knowing, we must create the right kind of conversation. Advertising, Branding and Communication is lightning fast - responding to consumer needs, aspirations, and trends, in highly innovative relational and meaningful ways.

This course has a vocational focus, giving you the professional experience required to kick-start your career after graduation.

Course detail

This course delivers in-depth, real time real-world real-value education. You will:
• work industry hours, at industry pace and on industry projects and internships
• learn to research, apply and present design innovation, brand narrative with mentored design partnerships/teams on industry set briefs
• have the opportunity to collaborate across other post graduate courses delivered in the London School of Film Media and Design and the London School of Music
• gain specialist skills and knowledge in your course
• gain insight and professional practice from working alongside students
• explore a range of evolutionary and revolutionary processes
• build a professional understanding of today's competitive global environments related to design, advertising processes and the management of communication
• develop your own project driven by your new knowledge.

Format

Postgraduate taught courses are taught through a range of:
• Lectures
• Seminars
• industry visits group tutorials.

Career and study progression

Upon graduation, you can work as a brand designer, account handler, graphic communication designer or idea strategist, making your creative mark in the demanding worlds of branding or advertising. You will bring your knowledge of contemporary innovation and brand strategy to a range of industry projects.

You may also wish to undertake postgraduate study to specialise in a subject you’ve already studied, or to explore something new.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/how-apply

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/scholarships-and-bursaries

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We have tailored the MA in Criminology and Criminal Justice course to meet the requirements of graduates and professionals wishing to further their studies in this vibrant and increasingly important subject. Read more
We have tailored the MA in Criminology and Criminal Justice course to meet the requirements of graduates and professionals wishing to further their studies in this vibrant and increasingly important subject.

Covering exciting contemporary issues within the criminal process, such as homicide investigation, the threat of global organised crime and fraud investigation the course will equip you with the skills and knowledge necessary to succeed in this competitive field.

The research methodology and dissertation modules aim to ensure that you receive training in a range of research skills; invaluable in both the professional and academic worlds.

Course detail

During the course, you will gain an understanding of key issues in criminal justice policy and the administration of justice.

You will study topics which will give you a specialised understanding of organised crime, the complex relationship between policing and public perception, the investigation of homicidein the UK and internationally, and you will develop a working knowledge of the techniques used in investigating fraud and money laundering.

Modules

• Contemporary Criminal Justice Issues
• Counter Terrorism Policing
• Investigating Financial Crime
• Homicide Investigation
• Organised Crime
• Research Methodology
• Dissertation.

Format

We use a wide range of teaching and learning methods to meet different learning styles and objectives. Our teaching strategy places you at the centre of the teaching and learning process in order to stimulate your interest so that you learn through involvement. We aim to encourage you to learn by your participation in well-structured learning activities.

During your MA studies, you can expect to benefit from small group lectures and workshops, class discussions with your peers and academics, and frequent formal and informal feedback on your ideas and your progress. Although postgraduate level study requires a significant amount of individual study outside of scheduled classes, you will be supported by staff, who will direct you to relevant resources and help guide your learning.

Assessment

Assessment methods vary between modules, but will comprise of a combination of coursework and examinations.

Career and study progression

A Criminology postgraduate degree can open the door to many exciting and rewarding careers. Some of the most popular careers include:
• police
• probation and prison officers
• private companies in the security industry
• in the court system
• administration of justice.

The skills you acquire on this postgraduate level course are also transferable and valued across many other sectors, such as:
• finance
• the charity sector
• the civil service
• the public sector
• the public services.

Research study enables you to specialise in the field you are passionate about.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/how-apply

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/scholarships-and-bursaries

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On the MA Film Production, the learning experience is built around practical production modules, underpinned by theory that explores key developments in the history of cinema.Our aim is to nurture filmmakers who can critically reflect on the form and content of both their own work, and the work of others in the field. Read more
On the MA Film Production, the learning experience is built around practical production modules, underpinned by theory that explores key developments in the history of cinema.Our aim is to nurture filmmakers who can critically reflect on the form and content of both their own work, and the work of others in the field

Course detail

The course is predominantly practical, with almost 70% of learning geared towards enabling you to produce documentary and experimental films. For those whose interest is academic, there is also the possibility to replace the double project practice module with a dissertation. The course closely tracks contemporary developments in digital cinematography and sound design, actively encouraging students to create transformative cinematic responses which cross the boundaries between documentary, experimental and fictive forms. This includes:
• lyrical
• Montage
• self-reflexive
• guerrilla
• poetic
• drama-documentary
approaches which challenge the existing output of broadcast, festival and on-line exhibition. Students produce several video sequences, plus two short films and one longer film.

The course examines the 'founding' traditions of documentary and experimental fiction associated with the Lumiere Brothers and Melies and explores overlaps and points of contact between them. The learning experience is built around practical production modules, underpinned by theory exploring key developments in the history of cinema. Our aim is to nurture filmmakers who can also critically reflect on the form and content of both their own work and the work of others in the field.

Modules

• Documentary Practice
• Film Theory
• Experimental Film and Video Practice
• Film and Media Cultures
• Project or Dissertation.

Format

The course blends theory and practice and is designed to help you build creative and critical bridges between the two, so each area of study informs and supports your other learning.

Almost 70% of the course is made up of practical workshops. These typically combine an examination of relevant film clips and approaches with discussions relating to their pros and cons. You will receive regular feedback with discussion on work in progress, test viewings with peers and staff, exhibition visits, and production of a final major piece of work. Throughout these modules, you will receive regular technical input and support.

Theory modules combine a range of approaches, including lectures, visits to the London Film Festival, student-led seminars, presentations and class discussions.

Assessment

The course combines elements of formative assessment with summative approaches, so you can draw insights from peers and tutors.

Career and study progression

Our alumni have gone on to showcase work and win awards in film festivals in the UK and internationally and secure broadcasts of their work in a range of territories.

In recent years many alumni from the course found work with production companies, broadcasters or as independent filmmakers, either in the UK, in their own country or elsewhere. We encourage our alumni to be involved with students and staff on the course and have developed a detailed database of student and alumni production expertise, to facilitate networking and the formation of crews for professional and student productions.

We also offer students the opportunity to pursue more in-depth research interests by undertaking a PhD with us.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/how-apply

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/scholarships-and-bursaries

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The MA Food Business Management course creates links between academic theory and practice and leading food and hospitality businesses. Read more
The MA Food Business Management course creates links between academic theory and practice and leading food and hospitality businesses. These connections will be established in the classroom, on field trips and in interactions with a range of distinguished external speakers from the industry.

The course will enable you to approach business challenges from a global perspective, integrating academic and technical knowledge, and assess situations from financial, commercial, societal and cultural standpoints. You will be able to create innovative solutions to champion food businesses and develop action plans based on rigorous theoretical frameworks that you can use in your professional careers’ to effectively manage change.

Course detail

The MA Food Business Management course creates links between academic theory and practice and leading food and hospitality businesses. These connections will be established in the classroom, on field trips and in interactions with a range of distinguished external speakers from the industry (who are all closely connected with the School). The course will empower you to personalise your learning through making choices as to the contexts of your assessments.

These contexts could include for example:
• food service providers
• manufacturing and food product development businesses
• environmental and societal pressure groups
• food and health organisations
• media and communication businesses.

The above will assist you towards fulfilling specific career ambitions. The course will also enable you to approach business challenges from a global perspective, integrating academic and technical knowledge, and assess situations from financial, commercial, societal and cultural standpoints. You will be able to create innovative solutions to champion food businesses and develop action plans based on rigorous theoretical frameworks that you can use in your professional careers' to effectively manage change. By working in teams you will learn how to build commitment and develop the communication and organisational skills that secures team 'buy-in' and successful management practices.

Modules

• Designing the Customer Experience
• Business Performance Analysis
• Responsible Value Chain Management
• Applied Food Science and Product Development
• Food and Society
• Foodservice Operations Analysis
• Research methods
• Dissertation.

Format

The course combines, academic rigor with contemporary managerial and strategic issues in food and hospitality management and enhances students' employability in the growing and dynamic food and hospitality industries.

Career and study progression

This course will deliver unique professional development opportunities to senior managers. It provides enhanced promotion prospects, new career opportunities and greater career security. Career benefits will also accrue from being part of a strong professional network and experiencing coaching and mentoring opportunities. For sponsoring organisations it serves as a basis for developing senior staff as thought leaders and also assists in senior staff retention.

On successful completion of the Master’s degree you can Progress onto an MPhil or a PhD Research degree.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/how-apply

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/scholarships-and-bursaries

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