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London Metropolitan University, Full Time Masters Degrees

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This MSc in Applied Psychology offers a broad curriculum in psychology as is designed for non-psychology graduates and graduates with non-accredited psychology degrees who wish to qualify for Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) with the British Psychological Society (BPS). Read more
This MSc in Applied Psychology offers a broad curriculum in psychology as is designed for non-psychology graduates and graduates with non-accredited psychology degrees who wish to qualify for Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) with the British Psychological Society (BPS). In the most recent (2014-15) Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 100% of graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

More about this course

Take the first step to becoming a chartered psychologist with this accredited postgraduate degree in applied psychology. It's been specifically designed for non-psychology graduates and graduates with non-accredited psychology degrees.

It's for graduates who have completed our University Certificate in Psychology for Graduates (By Distance Learning) course or who have obtained 60 credits in any combination of biological, cognitive, developmental, personality and social psychology and research methods (including statistics) with another institution.

It covers the British Psychological Society's GBC (Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership) curriculum and offers option modules in applied psychology.

Assessments are made through essays, practical reports, a dissertation and end-of-module examinations.

Professional accreditation

Successful completion of this British Psychological Society (BPS) accredited degree will make you eligible for Graduate Membership and Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC).

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Cognitive and Developmental Psychology (core, 30 credits)
-Dissertation (core, 60 credits)
-Further Research Methods (core, 10 credits)
-Individual Differences and Social Psychology (core, 30 credits)
-Research Methods and Biological Psychology (core, 30 credits)
-Forensic Psychology (option, 10 credits)
-Psychopathology (option, 10 credits)
-Work and Business Psychology (option, 10 credits)

After the course

This course is designed specifically for non-psychology graduates who have already obtained 60 credits in core areas of psychology and who wish to acquire Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) with the BPS before progressing to other postgraduate programmes in professional areas of psychology.

Timetable information

Full-time study requires two full days attendance per week in autumn and two-and-a-half days attendance per week in spring and submission of an MSc dissertation at the end of the academic year. Part-time study (over two years) requires one full day of attendance per week in the first part-time year and in autumn of the second part-time year and one-and-a-half days attendance per week in spring of the second part-time year and submission of an MSc dissertation at the end of the second part-time year.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

Read less
Accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS), this 9-month conversion course is designed for non-psychology graduates who wish to acquire Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) with the BPS. Read more
Accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS), this 9-month conversion course is designed for non-psychology graduates who wish to acquire Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) with the BPS. In the most recent (2014-15) Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 100% of graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

More about this course

Accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS), this 9-month 120-credit course is designed for non-psychology graduates who wish to become professional, chartered psychologists.

It is for graduates who have completed our University Certificate in Psychology for Graduates (By Distance Learning) course or who have obtained 60 credits in any combination of biological, cognitive, developmental, personality and social psychology and research methods (including statistics) with another institution.

It covers the British Psychological Society’s GBC (Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership) curriculum and offers option modules in applied psychology.

Assessments are made through essays, practical reports, project report and end-of-module examinations.

Professional accreditation

Successful completion of this course confers eligibility for Graduate Membership and Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) with the British Psychological Society.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Cognitive and Developmental Psychology (core, 30 credits)
-Further Research Methods and Project (core, 20 credits)
-Individual Differences and Social Psychology (core, 30 credits)
-Research Methods and Biological Psychology (core, 30 credits)
-Forensic Psychology (option, 10 credits)
-Psychopathology (option, 10 credits)
-Work and Business Psychology (option, 10 credits)

After the course

This course is designed specifically for non-psychology graduates who have already obtained 60 credits in core areas of psychology and who wish to acquire Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) with the BPS before progressing to other postgraduate programmes in professional areas of psychology.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

Read less
This design-based course, open to architects and designers, will give you a strong platform from which to develop your own MA thesis. Read more
This design-based course, open to architects and designers, will give you a strong platform from which to develop your own MA thesis.

More about this course

This course builds on the established strengths of The Cass in the two major disciplines, their common interest in spatial design and a critical theoretical framework. It is open to architects and interior designers and is taught in parallel with the Professional Diploma in Architecture. The course offers a rare opportunity for high-level joint study. The different elements are coherent and testing. The course is design-based and research-orientated. It will enable you to focus your skills and develop excellence in your work. The coursework provides a strong design platform from which you can develop your thesis creatively and intellectually. The main subject areas are in design, history and theory, each taught through a wide choice of tutors, studios and interest groups with a strong emphasis on self-directed study.

Professor Florian Beigel and Professor Philip Christou have made a video that introduces the Architectire Research Unit.

The design projects are assessed through an end-of-year portfolio presentation. The history and theory coursework is assessed through a written dissertation. Optional modules are assessed according to the nature of the module.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Design Research (core, 40 credits)
-Design Thesis (core, 60 credits)
-Design: Concept and Proposition (core, 40 credits)
-Advanced Digital Design Techniques (option, 20 credits)
-Architectural Publication and Journalism (option, 20 credits)
-Changing Places (option, 20 credits)
-Cinema and the City (option, 20 credits)
-Concepts of Space (option, 20 credits)
-Critical Transformations (option, 20 credits)
-Digital Design Techniques (option, 20 credits)
-Energy Comfort and Buildings (option, 20 credits)
-Forgetting of Air (option, 20 credits)
-Histories (option, 20 credits)
-Interior Contexts (option, 20 credits)
-Interpretation (option, 20 credits)
-Media Voices (option, 20 credits)
-Poetry and Architecture (option, 20 credits)
-The Problem of Irony (option, 20 credits)
-The Question of Technology (option, 20 credits)
-The Soundscape of Modernity (option, 20 credits)
-Theories (option, 20 credits)
-Writing About Architecture (option, 20 credits)

After the course

The course provides a practical and theoretical understanding of both architecture and interior design. Graduates generally work within architecture and interior design and in fields allied to both. Students wishing to develop their research are encouraged to apply to undertake a PhD.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

Read less
This course is designed for biology, medicine, biomedical and life sciences graduates, keen to develop their knowledge in a city renowned for its medical landmarks. Read more
This course is designed for biology, medicine, biomedical and life sciences graduates, keen to develop their knowledge in a city renowned for its medical landmarks.

More about this course

You will carry out studies of biomedical science, develop a high level of scientific knowledge and understanding of disease processes and enhance intellectual development throughout research projects.

The team delivering the course have an exceptional research profile, particularly in oncology, molecular medicine, immunology and virology. Specialist guest lecturers will add their own enlightenment and passion to a fascinating schedule.

The course aims to:
-Provide you with advanced study of biomedical science, which underpins professional progression and development
-Provide a high level of scientific knowledge and understanding of disease processes
-Develop an informed and critical appreciation of recent scientific developments in relation to diagnostic laboratory pathology
-Enable you, where options are available, to gain additional specialist knowledge in areas such as ageing, epidemiology and medical genetics
-Enhance your intellectual development throughout the research project and dissertation

Students undertake a variety of assessment methods including case studies, literature evaluations, self diagnostic testing, debates, group work, presentations, coursework, essays, and cumulative exams.

Practical skills are summatively assessed through the coursework assignments, including those in the final Project module.

Data handling skills are assessed by, practical reports, problem solving exercises, information abstracting and reviewing exercises, poster presentations, exams and seminar presentations.

Professional accreditation

Accredited by the Institute of Biomedical Science (IBMS), the professional body of Biomedical Scientists.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Advanced Immunology (core, 20 credits)
-Biomedical Diagnostics (core, 20 credits)
-Integrated Pathology (core, 20 credits)
-Research Project (core, 60 credits)
-Scientific Frameworks for Research (core, 20 credits)
-Biomedical Informatics (option, 20 credits)
-Clinical Biochemistry (option, 20 credits)
-Epidemiology of Emerging Infectious Disease (option, 20 credits)
-Ethical Issues in Biomedical Science (option, 20 credits)
-Haematology (option, 20 credits)
-Medical Genetics (option, 20 credits)
-Transfusion Science (option, 20 credits)

After the course

Career opportunities include employment in NHS hospital laboratories and other health-related areas. Graduates will also be well placed to apply for research studentships.

This course allows students to be considered for promotion at work. It also allows them to be eligible to sit the Institute of Biomedical Science (IBMS) higher specialist diploma leading to fellowship of the IBMS (FIBMS).

Scholarships

A number of partial scholarships are available for international students from outside the EU: http://www.londonmet.ac.uk/applying/funding-your-studies/postgraduate-international-students/

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

Read less
The area of cancer immunotherapy considers how to use conventional therapies including surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. Read more
The area of cancer immunotherapy considers how to use conventional therapies including surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. Whilst these treatment have served well and new drugs will continue to be designed, clinical trials over the last five years have shown that boosting the body’s immune system, whose main task is to deal with invading pathogens, can help our immune system to destroy tumour cells. Many of the new immunotherapies may be tested in combination with more conventional treatments or tested alone, but investigators and oncologists now believe immunotherapy, initially combined with pharmacological treatments, will soon provide curative therapies and certainly give many patients a new lease of life.

More about this course

Worldwide the incidence of cancer is increasing, and is expected to reach 22 million new cases per year by 2030. In addition to treatments such as radiotherapy and surgery, chemotherapy has a vital role to play in prolonging the lives of patients.

The aims of the Cancer Immunotherapy MSc are to:
-Provide an in-depth understanding of the molecular targets at which the different classes of anticancer drugs are aimed, and of how drug therapies are evolving
-Review the biology of cancer with respect to genetics, pathological considerations, and the molecular changes within cells which are associated with the progression of the disease
-Enhance intellectual and practical skills necessary for the collection, analysis, interpretation and understanding of scientific data
-Deliver a programme of advanced study to equip students for a future career in anti-cancer drug and immunotherapy development
-Cover new areas in immunotherapy (some of which may enhance existing pharmacological therapies including: History of immunotherapy and review of immune system; Monoclonal antibodies in cancer therapy and prevention; DNA vaccines against cancer; Adoptive T cell therapy; Dendritic cell vaccines; Antibodies that stimulate immunity; Adjuvant development for vaccines; Epigenetics and cancer: improving immunotherapy; Immuno-chemotherapy: integration of therapies; Exosomes and Microvesicles (EMVs) in cancer therapy and diagnosis; Dendritic cell vaccine development and Pox virus cancer vaccine vectors; Microbial causes of cancer and vaccination

Students will have access to highly qualified researchers and teachers in pharmacology and immunology, including those at the Cellular and Molecular Immunology Research Centre. Skills gained from research projects are therefore likely to be highly marketable in industry, academia and in the NHS. Students will be encouraged to join the British Society of Immunology and the International Society of Extracellular Vesicles.

Assessment is a combination of coursework, which includes tests and essays, the research project and its oral defence and examination.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Advanced Immunology (core, 20 credits)
-Cancer Immunotherapy (core, 20 credits)
-Cancer Pharmacology (core, 20 credits)
-Cancer: Diagnosis and Therapy (core, 20 credits)
-Molecular Oncology (core, 20 credits)
-Research Project (core, 60 credits)
-Scientific Frameworks for Research (core, 20 credits)

After the course

Students will have many opportunities to work in industry. There are established industries working hard to develop cancer immunotherapies including Bristol-Myers Squibbs, MERCK, AstraZeneca and Roche. There are also an innumerate number of start-up companies appearing including Omnis Pharma, UNUM Therapeutics and Alpine Immune Sciences.

Students will also have ample opportunity for future postgraduate study either within the School of Human Sciences and the Cellular and Molecular Immunology Centre at the MPhil/PhD level or beyond, even with some of our research partners within the UK, Europe and beyond.

Read less
The use of chemotherapeutic agents to target and kill cancer cells is a central strategy in the treatment of cancers. This course describes the nature of the disease at the systems, cellular and molecular levels, and focuses on the drugs which are used to treat different cancers and on how they work. Read more
The use of chemotherapeutic agents to target and kill cancer cells is a central strategy in the treatment of cancers. This course describes the nature of the disease at the systems, cellular and molecular levels, and focuses on the drugs which are used to treat different cancers and on how they work.

More about this course

Worldwide the incidence of cancer is increasing, and is expected to reach 22 million new cases per year by 2030. In addition to treatments such as radiotherapy and surgery, chemotherapy has a vital role to play in prolonging the lives of patients.

The aims of this course are to:
-Provide you with an in-depth understanding of the molecular targets at which the different classes of anticancer drugs are aimed, and of how drug therapies are evolving;
-Review the biology of cancer with respect to genetics, pathological considerations, and the molecular changes within cells which are associated with the progression of the disease;
-Enhance intellectual and practical skills necessary for the collection, analysis, interpretation and understanding of scientific data;
deliver a programme of advanced study to equip you for a future career in anti-cancer drug development.

Assessment is a combination of coursework, which includes tests and essays, the research project and its oral defence and examination.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Cancer Pharmacology (core, 20 credits)
-Cancer: Diagnosis and Therapy (core, 20 credits)
-Medical Genetics (core, 20 credits)
-Molecular Oncology (core, 20 credits)
-Research Project (core, 60 credits)
-Scientific Frameworks for Research (core, 20 credits)
-Advanced Drug Formulation Technologies (option, 20 credits)
-Bioinformatics and Molecular Modelling (option, 20 credits)
-Drug Discovery Technology (option, 20 credits)

After the course

This course is primarily designed for those wishing to pursue a career in anti-cancer drug development, whether in academia or within the pharmaceutical industry. The programme provides an excellent basis for further research or study.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

Read less
This is an intensive postgraduate conversion course designed for graduates in subjects other than law who wish to qualify to take either the Legal Practice Course (to become solicitors) or the Bar Vocational Course (to become barristers). Read more
This is an intensive postgraduate conversion course designed for graduates in subjects other than law who wish to qualify to take either the Legal Practice Course (to become solicitors) or the Bar Vocational Course (to become barristers). In the most recent (2014-15) Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 100% of graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

More about this course

The course aims to develop an understanding of the English legal system, to provide a thorough grounding in the foundations of legal knowledge and to train you in the professional skills of legal research, analysis and presentation in a friendly and nurturing environment. You may choose your own title for your research dissertation, subject to approval, which gives you the early opportunity to specialise in an area of particular interest to you.

Assessment includes an examination in each of the seven foundation subjects (each worth 10% of the total assessment); a research essay in a legal area entirely of the student's own choice. (worth 10%); four short essays covering different areas of the foundation subjects (worth a total of 10%); and a case and statute analysis exercise (worth 10%).

There is also a test on the English legal system, which you must pass but which does not normally count towards your final assessment.

Modular structure

Following a two-week induction, the course comprises seven taught modules plus a research dissertation in a subject of your own choice. There are additional coursework essays and a case and statute analysis test.

The seven taught modules are the foundation subjects prescribed by the Joint Academic Stage Board on behalf of the Law Society and General Council of the Bar:
-Criminal Law
-Obligations A (Contract)
-Obligations B (Tort)
-Property Law A (Land Law)
-Property Law B (Equity and Trusts)
-UK Public Law and Human Rights
-Law of the European Union
-Eighth Area of legal Study (dissertation)

In the first year, part-time students for the following examinations:
-Obligations A (Contract)
-Obligations B (Tort)
-UK Public Law and Human Rights
-Law of the European Union

After the course

On graduation you will be eligible to undertake either the Legal Practice Course or the Bar Vocational Course, and from there to proceed either to a training contract with a firm of solicitors or a pupillage in a barrister's chambers.

The CPE is a well-recognised route to a legal career, and many employers in the legal field actively favour postgraduate students who have a proven expertise outside the area of law.

Success on the CPE will also enable you to apply to take an LLM if you wish to pursue an academic career or simply to expand your legal knowledge.

Read less
The MSc Computer Networking and Cyber Security is designed for those wishing to pursue in a career Computer Networking and Cyber Security. Read more
The MSc Computer Networking and Cyber Security is designed for those wishing to pursue in a career Computer Networking and Cyber Security. In this course, you will develop the ability to design and manage robust networking and cyber security systems and at the same time, gain Cisco accreditation. Security of our systems is one of the most challenging topics of our time. The MSc provides knowledge of the very latest security principles, tools and techniques taught by specialist staff in a dedicated IT security laboratory, and an understanding of the principles underpinning effective approaches to cyber defence in response to a cyber attack. Guest speakers from industry will complement the teaching staff and enhance and challenge your knowledge of computer networking and cyber security.

More about this course

This course offers a unique opportunity for students to blend networking technologies with Cyber Security and at the same time gain Cisco accreditation. Such a combination will attract employers increasingly seeking graduates and post graduates within this area. The practical 10 sessions will be housed in specialist laboratories including a specialist IT security laboratory. Guest speakers from industry will complement the teaching staff.

The Communications Technology group is one of the first in UK to be awarded the "Cisco Networking Academy" in 1998. The academy has been running short/evening courses in Cisco CCNA and CCNP certification since. These are two of the most prestigious vocational certifications valued by Networking and related industries. Some of the modules in both CCNA and CCNP are currently embedded in the above two existing MSc courses and students follow the relevant Cisco curriculum. The courses are supported by three major laboratories equipped with some of the most up to date Networking technology equipment and it is taught by qualified Cisco instructors.

Security of our systems is one of the most challenging topics of our time. There is an international consensus that the level of security skills will have to be increased in order to respond to the number and sophistication of threats we face. It is impossible to ignore the importance of cyber security which is recognised by governments, large and small organisations as a priority. Cyber Security provides knowledge of the very latest security principles, tools and techniques taught by specialist staff in a dedicated IT Security laboratory and understanding of the principles underpinning effective approaches to cyber defence in response to a cyber attack.

A range of assessment methods is employed throughout the course. The method of assessment for each module is clearly described in the individual module guide which is made available to the students at the start of the semester. Every module has dedicated Web site providing students with comprehensive learning/teaching material including workshop exercises. Module leaders use this site regularly to communicate with their students including providing general feedback, guidelines on how to write technical report/effective presentations and keeping logbooks. Modules employ a combination of the following forms of assessments:
-Case study reports and presentations
-Laboratory workbooks/logbooks
-Unseen examinations
-Part seen examinations
-Individual vivas

Professional accreditation

This course offers a Cisco accreditation.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Cyber Security Management (core, 20 credits)
-Cybercrime and Cyber Security (core, 20 credits)
-MSc Project (core, 60 credits)
-Network Routing Protocols (core, 20 credits)
-Switched Networks (core, 20 credits)
-Digital Forensics (option, 20 credits)
-Hardening Network Infrastructure (option, 20 credits)
-Network Troubleshooting (option, 20 credits)
-Security Auditing and Penetration Testing (option, 20 credits)

After the course

The employment market has an abundance of posts which incorporate the key areas of this course, for example in networking, network security and cyber security, IT security, computer forensics. Careers range from the traditional network and network security professionals to network design engineer, secured network developer, and marketing and technical support. There are many exciting graduate employment opportunities available including:
-Network Engineer
-Network Management
-Network Security and Cyber security Consultant
-Crime and Computer Forensic

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

Read less
This course is designed for those wishing to develop the ability to design and manage robust networking and cyber security systems and at the same time, gain Cisco accreditation. Read more
This course is designed for those wishing to develop the ability to design and manage robust networking and cyber security systems and at the same time, gain Cisco accreditation. Security of our systems is one of the most challenging topics of our time. The MSc provides knowledge of the very latest security principles, tools and techniques taught by specialist staff in a dedicated IT security laboratory, and an understanding of the principles underpinning effective approaches to cyber defence in response to a cyber attack. Guest speakers from industry will complement the teaching staff and work experience opportunities are available in a relevant working environment before you undertake your final project. This additional and crucial element will provide a unique student experience that will enhance your employability after graduation.

More about this course

This course offers a unique opportunity for students to blend networking technologies with Cyber Security and at the same time gain Cisco accreditation. Such a combination will attract employers increasingly seeking graduates and post graduates within this area. The practical 10 sessions will be housed in specialist laboratories including a specialist IT security laboratory. Guest speakers from industry will complement the teaching staff.

The Communications Technology group is one of the first in UK to be awarded the "Cisco Networking Academy" in 1998. The academy has been running short/evening courses in Cisco CCNA and CCNP certification since. These are two of the most prestigious vocational certifications valued by Networking and related industries. Some of the modules in both CCNA and CCNP are currently embedded in the above two existing MSc courses and students follow the relevant Cisco curriculum. The courses are supported by three major laboratories equipped with some of the most up to date Networking technology equipment and it is taught by qualified Cisco instructors.

Security of our systems is one of the most challenging topics of our time. There is an international consensus that the level of security skills will have to be increased in order to respond to the number and sophistication of threats we face. It is impossible to ignore the importance of cyber security which is recognised by governments, large and small organisations as a priority. Cyber Security provides knowledge of the very latest security principles, tools and techniques taught by specialist staff in a dedicated IT Security laboratory and understanding of the principles underpinning effective approaches to cyber defence in response to a cyber attack.

Although each of the modules taught in the above courses have a significant hands-on practical workshops the idea of introducing actual "Work Experience" in a relevant working environment is unique and we believe this additional and crucial element will provide a unique student experience that will help their employability after graduation. The course team will guarantee a paid employment opportunity for all students taking the Computer Networking and Security With Work Experience. The Cisco Academy manager has built a network of relevant employers in the past 15 years through the Networking Academy and its contacts. The academy has currently 18 smaller academies providing continuous technical and academic support as well as training their instructors according to Cisco’s regulations. These academies are mainly local and range from schools to technical colleges. It is hoped that students on this course will be able to be placed in these academies for their work experience part of the course.

A range of assessment methods is employed throughout the course. The method of assessment for each module is clearly described in the individual module guide which is made available to the students at the start of the semester. Every module has dedicated Web site providing students with comprehensive learning/teaching material including workshop exercises. Module leaders use this site regularly to communicate with their students including providing general feedback, guidelines on how to write technical report/effective presentations and keeping logbooks. Modules employ a combination of the following forms of assessments:
-Case study reports and presentations
-Laboratory workbooks/logbooks
-Unseen examinations
-Part seen examinations
-Individual vivas

Professional accreditation

This course offers a Cisco accreditation.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Cyber Security Management (core, 20 credits)
-Cybercrime and Cyber Security (core, 20 credits)
-MSc Project (core, 60 credits)
-Network Routing Protocols (core, 20 credits)
-Switched Networks (core, 20 credits)
-Work Experience (core, 20 credits)
-Digital Forensics (option, 20 credits)
-Hardening Network Infrastructure (option, 20 credits)
-Network Troubleshooting (option, 20 credits)
-Security Auditing and Penetration Testing (option, 20 credits)

After the course

The employment market has an abundance of posts which incorporate the key areas of this course:for example in Networking, Network Security and Cyber Security, IT Security, Computer Forensics. Careers range from the traditional Network and Network Security professionals to network design engineer, secured network developer, and marketing and technical support. There are many exciting graduate employment opportunities available including:
-Network Engineer
-Network Management
-Network Security and Cyber security Consultant
-Crime and Computer Forensic

[Moving to one campus]]
Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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The MSc Computing and Information Systems is designed for those wishing to pursue a career in industry related to developing complex information systems, processing of enterprise data and controlling business processes to guarantee usability, security, manageability and quality of information services according to the modern standards of the cyber age. Read more
The MSc Computing and Information Systems is designed for those wishing to pursue a career in industry related to developing complex information systems, processing of enterprise data and controlling business processes to guarantee usability, security, manageability and quality of information services according to the modern standards of the cyber age. The focus of the course is on the three recent movements within IT industry: Cloud Computing, Big Data and Internet of Things. The focus of the course is on the three recent movements within IT industry: cloud computing, big data and the internet of things.

More about this course

The course will be based on development tools and software technologies for data, system and service development, Cloud Computing, Big Data, Internet of Things and Information Security. It will also make use of new technologies for integration of embedded devices such as Arduino and Raspberry. Students will be able to choose options from Mobile application development, cybercrime and security, data and visualisation or work related learning before embarking on the project.

The course provides preparation and training which encourages students seeking positions within the financial, retail and entertainment sectors. It incorporates materials for professional training, which prepare you for professional certification in Oracle SQL, Java Enterprise and Hortonworks Data Platform.

The extensive collaboration between the School of Computing and industries in London resulted in numerous Knowledge Transfer Partnerships and Consultancy Projects. These won a number of national awards and made London Met graduates renowned for their high starting salaries. Due to the high demand for specialists in this area, students on the course can rely on help in finding jobs both in the numerous high-tech startups as well as big financial organisations in the City of London.

A range of assessment methods is employed throughout the course:
-Case study reports and presentations
-Computer laboratory workshops
-Individual and group coursework
-Unseen examinations
-In class tests
-Individual vivas

The method of assessment for each module is clearly described in the individual module guide which is made available to the students at the start of the semester. Every module has dedicated website providing students with comprehensive learning/teaching material including workshop exercises. Module leaders use this site regularly to communicate with their students including guidelines on how prepare for assessment, supporting materials, and general feedback.

Professional accreditation

This course is not currently accredited, however, students who wish to pursue professional certification will be assisted to sit the certification exams in Databases, Java Enterprise and Apache Hadoop by Oracle and Hortonworks.

Modular structure

The course has a September start with three semesters spread over one academic year. Each semester is 60 credits with the final semester dedicated to your dissertation.

Indicative core modules:
-Information Systems Development (20 credits)
-Enterprise Software Components and Systems Development (20 credits)
-Information Security (20 credits)
-Datawarehousing and Big Data (20 credits)
-Cloud Computing and Internet of Things (20 credits)
-MSc Project (60 credits)

Indicative optional modules, choose one from:
-Mobile Applications Design and Development (20 credits)
-Cyber Crime and Security (20 credits)
-Data Analysis and Visualisation (20 credits)

Detailed information about the structure and content of the course is provided in the course handbook which will be made available to the students at the start of the course.

After the course

The employment market has an abundance of posts that require skills in the three key areas of this course - Ccloud computing, big data and internet of things. There are many exciting employment opportunities available, including:
-Enterprise Component Developer and System Integrator
-Data Warehouse and Big Data Manager
-Embedded and Mobile Devices Programmer
-Network Security and Cyber Security Consultant

Additionally, the course provides skills for seeking more traditional, but high demand industry roles:
-Software Engineer
-Internet Programmer
-System Programmer
-Database Administrator
-System Administrator

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The MA Conference Interpreting is a professional master course aiming at training conference interpreters. The programme includes lectures, seminars, presentations, practical interpreting and simulated events such as mock conferences. Read more
The MA Conference Interpreting is a professional master course aiming at training conference interpreters. The programme includes lectures, seminars, presentations, practical interpreting and simulated events such as mock conferences. In the most recent (2014-15) Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 100% of graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

More about this course

The course offers a wide range of language combinations paired with English: French, German, Italian, Japanese, Mandarin (Chinese), Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Russian and Spanish. Further language combinations with English, such as Arabic, may also be available, subject to demand, staff expertise and availability of learning resources.

All simultaneous interpreting activities take place in the fully digital Interpreting Suite which also offers the latest multimedia facilities for virtual classes, recording of interpreting performances, as well as original speeches for student practise. Students will also benefit from guest speakers and conference interpreting professionals who visit the course and provide additional opportunities for practice and individual and group feedback to students.

You will be assessed by a variety of essays, presentations, practical interpreting performance, self and peer evaluation, case study, reflective portfolio and research project or dissertation.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Conference Interpreting (EU/UN Context) (core, 20 credits)
-Conference Interpreting 1 (core, 20 credits)
-Conference Interpreting 2 (core, 20 credits)
-Interpreting Theory and Research for Interpreters (core, 20 credits)
-MA Research Project (core, 60 credits)
-The Interpreter's Professional Environment (core, 20 credits)
-The Interpreter's Skills and Tools (core, 20 credits)

After the course

The course modules are designed to prepare students to work as professional conference interpreters on the private market, for commercial organisations or large international organisations such as the European institutions or the United Nations. Work placement is the key element of the course, as well as site visits and dummy booth practice in the European Commission, European Parliament, European Court of Justice and United Nations headquarters. Students who complete the course automatically fulfil the requirement to access the EU/UN interpreting accreditation test to work as conference interpreters. Graduates can continue to come to London Metropolitan University to practise conference interpreting thanks to our short courses and events (CPD).

Graduates are also fully qualified to work as conference interpreters on the private market in the UK and abroad, and to continue onto further study with a PhD.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

Read less
London Met has won several prestigious awards for corporate social responsibility (CSR) and environmental sustainability, and with this course, we aim to train sustainability managers of the future with a focus on employee engagement, environmental law, supply chain and environmental economics. Read more
London Met has won several prestigious awards for corporate social responsibility (CSR) and environmental sustainability, and with this course, we aim to train sustainability managers of the future with a focus on employee engagement, environmental law, supply chain and environmental economics.

More about this course

The work to be undertaken at London Metropolitan University through the “One Campus One Community” project provides a unique opportunity to create a “living lab” where you’ll be taught through actual projects.

The involvement of the Estates Department will create opportunities for you to undertake work placements and further enhance employment skills.

As well as being delivered by experienced staff at London Met, you’ll also be taught by guest lecturers with knowledge and experience of corporate social responsibility.

Assessment will include a mixture of coursework, practical projects, presentations, and seen and unseen exams.

The dissertation is a 60 credit research project based on an area of your own interest.

Modular structure

This course consists of 180 credits.

Modules include:
-Fundamentals of CSR and Sustainability
-Human and Ethical Perspectives in Organisations (Employee Engagement)
-Consultancy Project
-Environmental Law
-Environmental Economics and Finance
-Practical Sustainability (including ashes to ashes)
-RM & Dissertation

After the course

CSR is an umbrella term that many companies use to describe a variety of activities and can permeate through many roles in an organisation. Potential careers can be in all aspects of an organisation and we would expect our graduates to become managers and future leaders in business with an interest in implementing CSR. Successful graduates could also be consulting or advising corporations on their CSR efforts.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of- the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

Read less
This excellent course enables you to gain the wide range of counselling psychology competencies needed to be eligible to apply for chartered status with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). Read more
This excellent course enables you to gain the wide range of counselling psychology competencies needed to be eligible to apply for chartered status with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC).

In the most recent (2014-15) Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 100% of graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

More about this course

The Professional Doctorate in Counselling Psychology is a three-year full-time, four-year part-time taught doctoral programme leading to a doctoral qualification that automatically confers professional registration with the Health Care Professions Council (HCPC), accreditation as a fully qualified chartered counselling psychologist with the British Psychological Society (BPS), and recognition within the UK and the EU as a chartered counselling psychologist eligible to practice.

The programme offers a sound and marketable model, combining in-depth competency in cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), strong humanistic values, and psychodynamic awareness. The course was re-accredited by the HCPC and the BPS in 2012. It was commended for the depth and breadth of the modules offered; a number of our modules were described as cutting-edge and very well suited to the current zeitgeist and employment market. These modules include a first-year module devoted to working with difference and diversity, and a third-year service evaluation research exercise.

Run by a dedicated team of HCPC registered and BPS accredited chartered counselling and clinical psychologists, this course offers wide-ranging and high quality clinical and research expertise to trainees. Course team members have between one and 11 years of post-qualification clinical experience, and two thirds hold PhD or professional doctoral titles. Two thirds of the staff are academically published authors.

While student numbers are growing, the team prides itself on retaining a small cohort each year of no more than 20 students. This enables us to offer you a relatively high volume of individual attention from staff. All students are assigned a personal tutor and two research supervisors. You are offered a relatively high proportion of research supervision (10 hours in Year 1 and 20 hours each year in Years 2 and 3); safe spaces for clinical group supervision and skills practice; and an experiential and workshop style of teaching and learning. Trainees and staff develop collaborative relationships in relation to learning and personal development.

The programme has a dedicated placements coordinator, and an extensive online placement provider database, accessible prior to training commencement. We offer a comprehensive placements induction in the first week of training, and we encourage and support you to be in placement or at interview stage with placement providers by the beginning of your training.

The first year of training is the equivalent of a Master’s year. Students who exit at the end of Year 1 are eligible for an MSc in Psychological Therapies. This MSc offers eligibility to register with the British Association of Counselling and Psychotherapy (BACP), leading to clinical practice in either in public, private or third sector organisations. However, the course has high student retention rates, with the majority of students continuing from the MSc level into the doctoral level of training in Years 2 and 3. Student satisfaction within the programme is very high; feedback forms regularly comment on the high quality and breadth of teaching, the clinical and research expertise of the lecturers, and the dedication of the staff, both at a personal and professional level. Our students feel valued and attended to by the teaching team because the size of each cohort allows for a more tailored experience for each student.

Through postgraduate teaching and workshops across the wider applied psychology subject area, London Met counselling psychology trainees develop advanced levels of knowledge and skills in a broad range of qualitative and quantitative psychological research methods. The course emphasises criticality, epistemological critique and reflexivity across all research teaching and learning. Extensive support in the form of individual and group supervision and teaching is offered, alongside methodology learning, to support trainees in undertaking a piece of doctoral level research that will make an original contribution to the professional practice of counselling psychology, and more widely.

As trainees you will develop a wide range of intellectual and practical skills and knowledge. The training has a solid track record of trainees emerging as robust, sophisticated, and highly employable practitioners of counselling psychology. In recent years, we are proud that a number of our trainees have won BPS Division of Counselling Psychology trainee prizes for written assignments and research poster presentations.

The principle aims and achievements of the course are to produce graduates who are:
-Competent, informed, reflective, ethical and professionally sound practitioners of counselling psychology who are able to work in a range of settings and are committed to their own on-going personal and professional development
-Able to understand, develop and apply models of advanced psychological inquiry and research that enable the creation of new knowledge and which recognise the complex nature of human experience and relationships
-Able to adopt a questioning and evaluative approach to the philosophy, practice, research and theory that constitutes counselling psychology and aware of the wider social, cultural and political domains within which counselling psychology operates
-In possession of a set of skills and competencies that are transferable to a wide variety of professional contexts and which enhance employability
-Able to demonstrate the range of counselling psychology competencies needed to be eligible to apply for chartered status with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC)

Many students are conducting research in collaboration with National Health Service (NHS) Trusts or non-governmental organisations (NGOs). Graduates find permanent employment within a few months post-qualification, with many trainees holding part-time clinical employment whilst they are in the final year of the training because their clinical skills and knowledge are of such a high standard. Other graduates from the programme find work in academia in visiting or permanent teaching posts or as research fellows.

The course is involved in on-going in-house events and conferences such as CultureShock, and in research and clinical collaborations with five NHS trusts. The programme is also involved in research and in the training of clinical staff with the Freedom from Torture Foundation and Khulisa, both community based organisations close to the Holloway Campus. The programme is also collaborating with the School of Social Sciences and School of Social Professions to link interpreters with clinicians and to establish training inside and outside the University on working with interpreters in mental health settings.

Assessment

A wide range of assessment methods is used on the programme. In Year 1 you'll complete seven master's level assignments, including a reflective essay, case formulation, process report, examination and two short research assignments using qualitative and quantitative methodologies.

You'll also complete a 7,000-word reflexive critical literature review and a 3,000-word proposal towards the end of Year 1. Your proposal must demonstrate an adequate basis for a doctoral level research project for you to proceed into Year 2 of the programme. Year 1 is the most intensive period of assessment on the programme.

If you progress to Year 2 you'll complete an extended clinical case study, integrative process analysis and theoretical essay at the end of the year, reflecting cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and psychodynamic learning. At the end of Year 3 a similar assignment is completed, reflecting a trans-theoretical, pluralistic perspective. You should complete your research project by the end of Year 3, submitting a 25,000 word thesis and subsequently participating in a viva voce examination.

You'll receive research supervision to guide your research throughout the programme. Research progress is formally monitored and evaluated through the submission of annual reports to the Research and Postgraduate Office in Years 2 and 3.

You are required to complete a minimum of 450 clinical hours in a range of placements under supervision over the duration of the programme, as well as a minimum of 60 hours of your own personal therapy.

Supervisors complete six-monthly practice competency evaluations, which enable bidirectional feedback and reflection on your progress and continuing professional development in your practice placements. Your personal and professional development is individually monitored and supported throughout the programme via annual reviews and appraisals with a tutor from the programme team.

Professional accreditation

The Professional Doctorate in Counselling Psychology leads to a doctoral qualification that automatically confers professional registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and accreditation as a fully qualified chartered counselling psychologist with the British Psychological Society.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Advanced Research Design and Analysis for Psychology (core, 20 credits)
-Counselling Psychology Practice and Development (core, 20 credits)
-Professional and Ethical Issues (core, 20 credits)
-Psychological Knowledge and Models of Therapy (core, 20 credits)
-Research Project and Critical Skills (core, 60 credits)
-Therapeutic and Reflective Skills (core, 20 credits)
-Working with Difference and Diversity (core, 20 credits)

Year 2 modules include:
-Advanced Psychological Research (core, 160 credits)
-Advanced Psychological Theory and Practice 1 (core, 100 credits)
-Advanced Psychological Theory and Practice 2 (core, 100 credits)

After the course

Career opportunities for counselling psychologists include posts in a variety of areas. These include National Health Service (NHS) settings such as primary care, Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) services, community mental health, drug and alcohol, rehabilitation, eating and personality disorder services, as well as the prison service, voluntary sector, private practice, academia, training, supervision, management and consultancy.

Graduates from the programme frequently go on work in one or more of these areas. Some have gone on to provide practice placements or to supervise or teach students on the programme. The range of advanced clinical and research skills and abilities gained through the course prepare graduates to undertake work in a variety of fields of activity.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

Read less
Do you love writing but also want to earn a living? The MA in Creative, Digital and Professional Writing is an exciting and innovative new course that will… Read more
Do you love writing but also want to earn a living? The MA in Creative, Digital and Professional Writing is an exciting and innovative new course that will allow you to develop your creative writing abilities while equipping you with the multimedia, digital skills required by professional writers working in the creative industries – media, journalism, film,publishing, e-books, marketing and the communications industry. You will be taught by lecturers who are academics and award-winning professionals, with the skills, contacts and profile in these industries to help you develop a distinctive and individual writing voice that is also attractive to employers. This MA benefits from an advisory, industry-based panel, connecting the degree with the latest professional knowledge, innovation and changes.

More about this course

This innovative MA will help students develop cutting-edge, flexible writing skills that they can apply to a wide range of professional settings and literary modes, allowing them to develop their own creative ideas while also equipping them with the abilities necessary for the creative industries.

Making use of both the University's £100,000 newsroom, its award-winning staff, guest lecturers from the industry and a professional advisory panel, students will develop an understanding of the demands and opportunities of a professional writing career.

They will benefit from work placements and the activities organised by the University's Centre for Research into Media, Identity and Culture (MiC).

Assignments, coursework, media artefacts, and portfolios made up of written/visual/audio original work.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Creative Writing (core, 20 credits)
-Creative, Digital and Professional Writing Project / Dissertation (core, 60 credits)
-Digital Storytelling (core, 20 credits)
-Feature Journalism (core, 20 credits)
-Researching Media, Communication and the Creative Industries (core, 20 credits)
-Accredited Work-Based Learning in the School of MCC (option, 20 credits)
-Advanced English for Masters Studies (option, 20 credits)
-Advertising (option, 20 credits)
-Creative Nonfiction (option, 20 credits)
-Digital Video Production (option, 20 credits)
-Multimedia Journalism (option, 20 credits)
-Principles of Digital Media (option, 20 credits)
-Routes into Publishing (option, 20 credits)
-Scriptwriting (option, 20 credits)

After the course

The Creative, Digital and Professional Writing MA will give you the skills you need to forge a successful career in the media and creative industries. Key areas in these industries include media, creative writing, editing, journalism, marketing, publishing and PR, the arts and arts management, the music industry, web design, software design, curating, fine art consultancy, arts and cultural sector management and administration, events management, and other creative and cultural professions. Almost every commercial and public company now has a communications manager and graduates of this MA would have specialist skills that they could bring to such a role. They could also combine roles in creative writing and journalism, editing and marketing.

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This course will appeal to practitioners and students interested in careers in a range of professions such as policing, probation, prison service work, social work and many new areas in third sector and private sector security and outsourced support for offenders, vulnerable adults and young people. Read more
This course will appeal to practitioners and students interested in careers in a range of professions such as policing, probation, prison service work, social work and many new areas in third sector and private sector security and outsourced support for offenders, vulnerable adults and young people. A broad based masters programme in public protection would enable students to pursue their particular interest be it in domestic violence, terrorism, dangerous offenders or child protection.

More about this course

The course encourages you to look critically at public protection, a key practitioner concept for professionals working in socially responsible professions.

You'll explore applied and theoretical critical understanding of public protection and other aspects of risk, which will transform the professional practice of participants or enhance their future employability.

Modules draw on the research expertise of staff, and aim to create a virtuous circle, where contacts generated through students/staff on the course and via the London Practitioner Forum will enable and assist their further research.

Including critical approaches to the understanding of risk within hard to reach groups and incorporating issues of diversity, the programme draws upon the University's established Criminology MSc degree and utilises the existing module provision.

Two additional modules are offered, Public Protection and Risk Awareness, and Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism.

There is a special emphasis on a sound grasp of the relevant academic literature, including substantial use of key scholarly journals in the field of criminology and criminal justice. There is also a focus on how theory relates to and enhances good practice.

This is assessed through a variety of summative assessments including essays, examinations (seen), practical research methodology assignments, an extended thesis (12-15,000 words), and various formative presentations to class peers.

Modular structure

This course consists of five core modules: Understanding Public Protection and Risk, Crime Control and Community Safety, Criminological Research Methods, Crime and Offender Patterns and the Criminological Dissertation on a topic of students choice.

There are opportunities to specialise in areas of your interest when choosing the two optional designates: topics range from Terrorism/Counter Terrorism, Domestic Violence, Critical Issues in Criminal Justice, Psychology and Crime and other more specialist research modules.

The course also provides a unique opportunity to enhance professional practice and critical understanding.

After the course

The course will help prepare students for employment in the criminal justice sector (including the police, probation, prison, youth offending and community safety departments), as well as academic or government research posts. It is hoped that some students will progress to doctoral studies after successful completion of the MSc.

It is the intention that students already engaged in a related occupation will benefit markedly from the course, in that the latter will provide the academic contextualisation with which to understand and evaluate the complexity of, and reciprocity between, varied agencies, departments and policies related to crime, criminology and criminal justice.

Criminology itself is an increasingly strong and prevalent academic discipline. The analytic and research skills acquired on the MSc are, of course, transferable to other jobs and areas of expertise. Previous students from this course have joined the police service either as police officers or civil investigation officers, some have embarked upon training to equip them to join the probation service or become social workers working with young offenders.

Other students have joined the voluntary sector working in residential or drugs/alcohol units. Still others have entered research jobs within the public or private sector and finally a number have progressed on to PhD studies.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

Read less

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