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University of Oxford, Full Time Masters Degrees

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The course provides you with a strong mathematical background with the skills necessary to apply your expertise to the solution of real finance problems. … Read more

The course provides you with a strong mathematical background with the skills necessary to apply your expertise to the solution of real finance problems. You will develop skills so that you are able to formulate a well posed problem from a description in financial language, carry out relevant mathematical analysis, develop and implement an appropriate numerical scheme and present and interpret these results.

The course lays the foundation for further research in academia or for a career as a quantitative analyst in a financial or other institution.

You will take three introductory courses in the first week. The introductory courses cover partial differential equations, probability and statistics and MATLAB.

The first term focuses on compulsory core material, offering 80 hours of lectures and 40 hours of classes/practical. The core courses are as follows:

  • Stochastic Calculus
  • Financial Derivatives
  • Numerical Methods I - Monte-Carlo
  • Numerical Methods I - Finite Differences
  • Statistics and Financial Data Analysis
  • Financial Programming with C++ 1

In the second term, three streams are offered; each stream consists of 32 hours of lectures and 16 hours of classes/practical. The Tools stream is mandatory and you will also take either the Modelling stream or the Data-driven stream.

Modelling stream

  • Exotic derivatives
  • Stochastic volatility, jump diffusions
  • Commodities
  • Fixed income

Data-driven stream

  • Asset pricing and inefficiency of markets
  • Market microstructure and trading
  • Algorithmic trading
  • Advanced financial data analysis
  • Machine learning
  • Python

Tools stream

  • Numerical methods 2 - Monte Carlo methods
  • Numerical methods 2 - Finite differences
  • Calibration
  • Optimisation
  • Introduction to stochastic control

As well as the streams, the course includes a compulsory one-week (24 hours of lectures) intensive module on quantitative risk management which is to be held in/around the week before the third term.

The third term is dedicated to a dissertation project which is to be written on a topic chosen in consultation with your supervisor.

The second component of the financial computing course, Financial Computing with C++ 2 (24 hours of lectures and practicals in total), is held shortly after the third term.

The examination will consist of the following elements:

  • two written examinations and one take-home project, each of two hours' duration - the written examinations will cover the core courses in mathematical methods and numerical analysis
  • a written examination on the Modelling stream or a written examination and a computer-based practical examination on the Data-driven stream
  • a written examination assessing the Tools stream
  • a take-home project assessing the course in quantitative risk management
  • two practical examinations assessing two courses in financial computing with C++.

Graduate destinations

MSc graduates have been recruited by prominent investment banks and hedge funds. Many past students have also progressed to PhD-level studies at leading universities in Europe and elsewhere.



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The course is run jointly by the. Mathematical Institute. and the. Department of Physics. It provides a high-level, internationally competitive training in mathematical and theoretical physics, right up to the level of modern research. Read more

The course is run jointly by the Mathematical Institute and the Department of Physics. It provides a high-level, internationally competitive training in mathematical and theoretical physics, right up to the level of modern research. It covers the following main areas:

  • quantum field theory, particle physics and string theory
  • theoretical condensed matter physics,
  • theoretical astrophysics, plasma physics and physics of continuous media
  • mathematical foundations of theoretical physics

The course concentrates on the main areas of modern mathematical and theoretical physics: elementary-particle theory, including string theory, condensed matter theory (both quantum and soft matter), theoretical astrophysics, plasma physics and the physics of continuous media (including fluid dynamics and related areas usually associated with courses in applied mathematics in the UK system). If you are a physics student with a strong interest in theoretical physics or a mathematics student keen to apply high-level mathematics to physical systems, this is a course for you.

The course offers considerable flexibility and choice; you will be able to choose a path reflecting your intellectual tastes or career choices. This arrangement caters to you if you prefer a broad theoretical education across subject areas or if you have already firmly set your sights on one of the subject areas, although you are encouraged to explore across sub-field boundaries.

You will have to attend at least ten units' worth of courses, with one unit corresponding to a 16-hour lecture course or equivalent. You can opt to offer a dissertation as part of your ten units. Your performance will be assessed by one or several of the following means: 

  • invigilated written exams
  • course work marked on a pass/fail basis
  • take-home exams
  • mini-projects due shortly after the end of the lecture course.

The modes of assessment for a given course are decided by the course lecturer and will be published at the beginning of each academic year. As a general rule, foundational courses will be offered with an invigilated exam while some of the more advanced courses will typically be relying on the other assessment methods mentioned above. In addition, you will be required to give an oral presentation towards the end of the academic year which will cover a more specialised and advanced topic related to one of the subject areas of the course. At least four of the ten units must be assessed by an invigilated exam and, therefore, have to be taken from lecture courses which provide this type of assessment. A further three units must be assessed by invigilated written exam, take-home exam or mini-project. Apart from these restrictions, you are free to choose from the available programme of lecture courses.

The course offers a substantial opportunity for independent study and research in the form of an optional dissertation (worth at least one unit). The dissertation is undertaken under the guidance of a member of staff and will typically involve investigating and write in a particular area of theoretical physics or mathematics, without the requirement (while not excluding the possibility) of obtaining original results.



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This one-year master's course provides training in the application of mathematics to a wide range of problems in science and technology. Read more

This one-year master's course provides training in the application of mathematics to a wide range of problems in science and technology. Emphasis is placed on the formulation of problems, on the analytical and numerical techniques for a solution and the computation of useful results.

By the end of the course students should be able to formulate a well posed problem in mathematical terms from a possibly sketchy verbal description, carry out appropriate mathematical analysis, select or develop an appropriate numerical method, write a computer program which gives sensible answers to the problem, and present and interpret these results for a possible client. Particular emphasis is placed on the need for all these parts in the problem solving process, and on the fact that they frequently interact and cannot be carried out sequentially.

The course consists of both taught courses and a dissertation. To complete the course you must complete 13 units.

There are four core courses which you must complete (one unit each), which each usually consist of 24 lectures, classes and an examination. There is one course on mathematical methods and one on numerical analysis in both Michaelmas term and Hilary term. Each course is assessed by written examination in Week 0 of the following term.

Additionally, you must choose at least least one special topic in the area of modelling and one in computation (one unit each). There are around twenty special topics to choose from, spread over all three academic terms, each usually consisting for 12 to 16 lectures and a mini project, which culminates in a written report of around 20 pages. Topics covered include mathematical biology, fluid mechanics, perturbation methods, numerical solution of differential equations and scientific programming. 

You must also undertake at least one case study in modelling and one in scientific computing (one unit each), normally consisting of four weeks of group work, an oral presentation and a report delivered in Hilary term.

There is also a dissertation (four units) of around 50 pages, which does not necessarily need to represent original ideas. Since there is another MSc focussed on mathematical finance specifically, the MSc in Mathematical and Computational Finance, you are not permitted to undertake a dissertation in this field.

You will normally accumulate four units in core courses, three units in special topics, two units in case studies and four units in the dissertation. In addition, you will usually attend classes in mathematical modelling, practical numerical analysis and additional skills during Michaelmas term.

In the first term, students should expect their weekly schedule to consist of around seven hours of core course lectures and seven hours of modelling, practical numerical analysis and additional skills classes, then a further two hours of lectures for each special topic course followed. In addition there are about three hours of problem solving classes to go through core course exercises and students should expect to spend time working through the exercises then submitting them for marking prior to the class. There are slightly fewer contact hours in the second term, but students will spend more time working in groups on the case studies.

In the third term there are some special topic courses, including one week intensive computing courses, but the expectation is that students will spend most of the third term and long vacation working on their dissertations. During this time, students should expect to work hours that are equivalent to full-time working hours, although extra hours may occasionally be needed. Students are expected to write special topic and case study reports during the Christmas and Easter vacations, as well as revising for the core course written examinations.



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The MSc in Mathematics and Foundations of Computer Science, run jointly by the. Mathematical Institute. and the. Department of Computer Science. Read more

The MSc in Mathematics and Foundations of Computer Science, run jointly by the Mathematical Institute and the Department of Computer Science, focuses on the interface between pure mathematics and theoretical computer science. 

The mathematical side concentrates on areas where computers are used, or which are relevant to computer science, namely algebra, general topology, number theory, combinatorics and logic. Examples from the computing side include computational complexity, concurrency, and quantum computing. Students take a minimum of five options and write a dissertation.

The course is suitable for those who wish to pursue research in pure mathematics (especially algebra, number theory, combinatorics, general topology and their computational aspects), mathematical logic, or theoretical computer science. It is also suitable for students wishing to enter industry with an understanding of the mathematical and logical design and concurrency.

The course will consist of examined lecture courses and a written dissertation. The lecture courses will be divided into two sections:

  • Section A: Mathematical Foundations
  • Section B: Applicable Theories

Each section shall be divided into schedule I (basic) and schedule II (advanced). Students will be required to satisfy the examiners in at least two courses taken from section B and in at least two courses taken from schedule II. The majority of these courses should be given in the first two terms. 

During Trinity term and over the summer students should complete a dissertation on an agreed topic. The dissertation must bear regard to course material from section A or section B, and it must demonstrate relevance to some area of science, engineering, industry or commerce.

It is intended that a major feature of this course is that candidates should show a broad knowledge and understanding over a wide range of material. Consequently, each lecture course taken will receive an assessment upon its completion by means of a test based on written work. Students will be required to pass five courses, that include two courses from section B and two at the schedule II level - these need not be distinct - and the dissertation.

The course runs from the beginning of October through to the end of September, including the dissertation.



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Why should you consider the one year MBA from the University of Oxford?. The business world is currently experiencing a period of unprecedented transformation. Read more
Why should you consider the one year MBA from the University of Oxford?

The business world is currently experiencing a period of unprecedented transformation. To remain competitive, companies need to think well beyond the scope of standard business models to address world-scale social, environmental, political and economic challenges.

Success in today’s rapidly changing and complex global business environment requires a unique set of skills and knowledge. The Oxford Saïd MBA prepares future business leaders to understand and respond to world-scale problems. We teach our students to see the big picture and to appreciate the implications and opportunities for organisations and new enterprises. Our one-year full time MBA provides a solid grounding in the major business disciplines and core business skills with eight core modules in fundamental business areas, a selection of seven to nine electives and projects.

A top ranked programme embedded in a world class university

Oxford Saïd is embedded within Oxford University, allowing us to offer a curriculum that draws upon cutting edge research and knowledge from various disciplines. Our faculty’s first-hand experience and knowledge creates a dynamic learning environment in the MBA classroom, often spilling over into lively debates and discussions outside of class as well. The exchange of ideas and knowledge make the experience at Oxford truly transformative.

Community

Oxford Saïd MBA students come from diverse backgrounds and experiences and are part of a world-class community of faculty, staff, students and alumni who share a passion for ideas and learning, and who aspire to make a difference. As all Oxford students, you will be a member of one of its 44 colleges and halls, providing the opportunity to meet students with different backgrounds studying other subjects and to be part of clubs and associations outside Saïd Business School. You will attend thought-provoking events and participate in debates at the Oxford Union and, upon completion of your course, will be part of a global Alumni Network.

A year in Oxford will change your life and expand your ambitions.
For further information go to http://www.sbs.oxford.edu/mba

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Applications have closed to start the MPhil in Sociology and Demography in 2017-18. Applications to start in October 2018 will open in September. Read more

About the course

Applications have closed to start the MPhil in Sociology and Demography in 2017-18. Applications to start in October 2018 will open in September.

The MPhil introduces students to contemporary theories and research methods on the intersection of sociology and demography. This 21-month programme takes a life-course and multilevel approach, aiming to integrate micro and macro issues in analysing social problems and the causes and consequences of population change.

The MPhil Sociology and Demography will prepare you for doctoral work in sociology and demography and research-intense jobs.

The curriculum emphasises:

• population-level analysis and demographic measures
• a life course approach
• sociological analysis as the key approach to explanation
• advanced quantitative methods.

This emphasis is reflected in the compulsory papers. Optional papers and the thesis will reflect either a more specialised topical study (eg gender, family and fertility, migration and integration of migrants, health and mortality, intergenerational relationships) or methodological work.

The MPhil programme has the following components:

• Sociological Analysis paper taught in the first year through lectures and seminars, assessed by an unseen examination
• Demographic Analysis paper taught in the first year through lectures, seminars and computer labs, assessed through a combination of examination and assignments
• Life Course Research paper taught in the first year through lectures, seminars and computer labs, assessed through a combination of methods
• Statistical Methods paper taught in the first year through lectures and computer labs, assessed through a combination of a test and assignments
• Research Design paper taught in the first year through lectures, assessed via a combination of methods
• Two optional papers over both years of the MPhil, normally taught through eight weekly classes/seminars for each paper and assessed by unseen examination or appropriate coursework
• Replication project in the second year, comprising a combination of individual and group work and assessed via assignments
• MPhil thesis, a substantial piece of original research (of up to 30,000 words) to be submitted by the end of the second year

Please note that the optional papers available may vary from year to year. For information about the optional papers available in 2016-17 please see http://www.sociology.ox.ac.uk/course-list?search=course_list&task=search.

Graduate destinations

Graduates often continue with a PhD at Oxford or doctoral studies at highly-ranked US and continental programmes. Others find placement in research-intensive occupations in the public sector (eg national statistical offices, government departments and regional/local authorities), in international organisations, think tanks, and in private sector occupations in which quantitative skills are highly valued (consulting, market research, health research, social research, and insurance companies).

Entry requirements for entry in 2017-18

Academic ability -

Proven and potential academic excellence:

Applicants are normally expected to be predicted or have achieved a first-class or strong upper second-class undergraduate degree with honours (or equivalent international qualifications), as a minimum, in a social science subject.

The department will only consider applicants who have an undergraduate degree in arts, humanities or science subjects if they can demonstrate a strong interest in sociology, as taught at Oxford.

For applicants with a degree from the USA, the minimum GPA sought is 3.7 out of 4.0.

Other appropriate indicators will include:

- References/letters of recommendation

Your references will support intellectual ability, academic achievement, motivation, a demonstrable interest in sociology as it is taught at Oxford.

Academic references are preferred, though professional references are acceptable if you have spent a significant amount of time in work.

- Written work produced by the student

Two pieces of written work of no more than 2,000 words are required. The written work must be in English and preferably about a sociological subject. Extracts from longer pieces should be prefaced by a short note which puts them in context.

This will be assessed for comprehensive understanding of the subject area; understanding of problems in the area; ability to construct and defend an argument; powers of analysis; powers of expression.

The work need not be closely related but it should have some sociological content.

- Statement of purpose/personal statement

The personal statement must be in English and should be approximately 750 words in length.

This will be assessed for:

• your reasons for applying
• evidence of motivation for and understanding of the proposed area of study
• the ability to present a reasoned case in English
• commitment to the subject, beyond the requirements of the degree course
• preliminary knowledge of research techniques; capacity for sustained and intense work
• reasoning ability
• ability to absorb new ideas, often presented abstractly, at a rapid pace.

Your statement should focus on your academic record and interests rather than personal achievements, interests and aspirations.

English language requirement:

Applicants whose first language is not English are usually required to provide evidence of proficiency in English at the higher level required by the University - https://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford/application-guide?wssl=1#content-tab--3

Funding

There are over 1,000 full graduate scholarships available for courses starting in 2016-17. Full scholarships will cover your course and college fees and provide a grant for living costs. Information about the full range of funding available can be found in the Fees and funding section - http://www.ox.ac.uk/node/17098/

For over 70% of Oxford scholarships, nothing more than the standard course application is usually required. If you fulfil the eligibility criteria and apply by the relevant January deadline, you will be automatically considered. Use the Fees, funding and scholarship search to find out whether you are eligible for scholarships which require an additional application. If you are, the tool will include links to full details of how to apply - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/fees-and-funding/fees-funding-and-scholarship-search

Divisional funding opportunities:

Oxford hosts one of 21 Doctoral Training Centres accredited by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). In 2016 approximately 65 ESRC studentships are available across the Social Sciences. See the Social Sciences Doctoral Training Centre website for details - http://researchtraining.socsci.ox.ac.uk/home-dtc

Costs

Annual fees for entry in 2017-18 - https://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/fees-and-funding/tuition-and-college-fees/fee-status?wssl=1

Home/EU (including Islands) - Tuition fee: £8,715; College fee: £3,021; Total annual fees: £11,736
Overseas - Tuition fee: £16,770; College fee: 3,021; Total annual fees: £19,791

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This unique course offers exceptional opportunities for you to combine knowledge of research, basic and applied, with the analysis of educational programmes and policy. Read more
This unique course offers exceptional opportunities for you to combine knowledge of research, basic and applied, with the analysis of educational programmes and policy. This full-time, one year course, welcomes applicants from varied backgrounds wishing to develop their knowledge of children and educational issues: primary school teachers seeking specialisation in literacy or numeracy; experienced Early Years professionals; teachers of children with special educational needs; professionals aiming to take on a leadership role in different types of services for children. Psychology graduates and professionals who wish to pursue a doctoral degree later will find the course an excellent first step.

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The course consists of three main themes. Policy discourses and historical perspectives in higher education. Student experiences and changing academic practice. Read more
The course consists of three main themes:

• Policy discourses and historical perspectives in higher education
• Student experiences and changing academic practice
• Foundations of educational research

The course aims to:

• provide the knowledge, skills and understanding necessary to evaluate and discuss current debates in higher education research and its implications for policy and practice.
• develop the ability to critically assess the historical development and philosophical underpinnings of different models of higher education.
• develop the ability to define and formulate research problems and questions in the field of higher education.

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The MSc in E-learning provides a stimulating, research-focused exploration of theory and practice across the field of e-learning activities. Read more
The MSc in E-learning provides a stimulating, research-focused exploration of theory and practice across the field of e-learning activities. The course is intended for students and professionals with an interest in e-learning at all levels of education:
• e-learning specialists and co-ordinators
• researchers in a range of educational contexts
• teachers and lecturers
• policy makers & managers

You should consider this course if you want to develop your knowledge, expertise and research skills in using digital technologies to enhance educational provision in contexts such as schools, further education and universities, as well as settings outside formal education.

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Welcome to the Oxford MSc in Financial Economics. Primary tabs. View published(active tab) New draft Moderate. Read more
Welcome to the Oxford MSc in Financial Economics

Primary tabs
View published(active tab) New draft Moderate

The Oxford MSc Financial Economics (MFE) is a full-time nine-month programme that will provide you with outstanding training in the tools of financial economics sought by many financial institutions, companies, and public organisations. It combines a rigorous academic core with tailored practical applications, designed in consultation with leading financial recruiters.

The MFE is run jointly by Saïd Business School’s finance faculty and the University’s Department of Economics. The finance faculty at the Business School is one of the fastest growing and most prestigious in Europe and they work closely alongside the most diverse and well-known groups of economists in the world.

This unique programme is delivered through the Business School which means that, unlike other graduate courses, it features interactive classes, use of case studies, practitioner teaching, and proactive careers support. The programme is currently ranked first in the UK and seventh in the world by the FT ranking for Masters in Finance 2014.

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The M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition is a popular course which introduces students to key issues within the field of Applied Linguistics with a focus on topics relating to second language learning. Read more
The M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition is a popular course which introduces students to key issues within the field of Applied Linguistics with a focus on topics relating to second language learning. The topics represented within the course draw from some of the related disciplines within Applied Linguistics such as Psycholinguistics, Education (Language Teaching/Learning), Linguistics, and Sociolinguistics. It can be taken either full–time (1 year) or part-time (2 years). The full time course consists of 8 taught modules (4 modules in each of the two years if students choose the part-time route) and 1 research dissertation.

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This one year, residential, taught M.Sc. Read more

This one year, residential, taught M.Sc. provides graduate students, scientists and clinicians with highly advanced theoretical and practical understanding of human reproductive biology, embryology, infertility and assisted reproductive technology (ART) along with intensive ‘hands-on’ practical training in essential laboratory skills and the sophisticated gamete micromanipulation techniques associated with ART. The MSc course is based alongside Oxford Fertility in purpose-built premises, the Institute of Reproductive Sciences, with dedicated state-of-the-art teaching and research facilities.

Course Aims

Our broad intention is to inspire, motivate and train a network of future leaders in clinical embryology throughout the world. Additionally, our students benefit from intensive training in a range of laboratory skills highly suitable for a research career in reproductive science.

Course Structure

The course runs over a period of one year, from October to September, incorporating the three University terms: Michaelmas, Hilary and Trinity. Fundamental reproductive science and laboratory methods/practical skills are taught in the first term (Michaelmas) over five discrete modules. Applied and clinical aspects are delivered in the second term (Hilary) over a further set of five modules. Each module is delivered over a period of one to three weeks and together, the ten modules comprise the ‘core content’ of the course. The third term (Trinity) is extended to allow sufficient time for a high quality research project.

Application Deadline

The deadline for applications for the MSc in Clinical Embryology starting in October 2018 is 12 noon (midday) GMT on Monday 8th January 2018. Please see our Graduate Admissions page for further details: http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/courses/msc-clinical-embryology



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This is the course for graduates in all relevant disciplines who are looking for an introduction to the twin fields of comparative and international education. Read more
This is the course for graduates in all relevant disciplines who are looking for an introduction to the twin fields of comparative and international education. It is concerned with both the developing and the developed world, with a focus throughout on research of a comparative and international nature and its methods.

The programme leads to a post-experience degree in Comparative and International Studies in Education. The course consists of three papers: Theoretical, Methodological and Systemic Studies; Education in Developing Countries; and Foundations of Educational Research, and a research-based dissertation.

This is a popular course and early application is advised.

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The MSc in Educational Research Methodology is recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as providing the high quality and comprehensive training that is required for educational research and seeks to provide students with the knowledge and skills to undertake their own research and to evaluate the research of others. Read more
The MSc in Educational Research Methodology is recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as providing the high quality and comprehensive training that is required for educational research and seeks to provide students with the knowledge and skills to undertake their own research and to evaluate the research of others. The course provides a comprehensive training in quantitative and qualitative research methods, and a two-week ‘internship’ where they work in a research group within the department on ongoing research projects. Oxford University and the Department of Education provide a stimulating academic and social environment for study.

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The MSc in Global Health Science and Epidemiology is a one-year full-time degree that provides core training in the basic skills of epidemiology and statistics, followed by detailed lectures on the global burden and determinants of disease. Read more

The MSc in Global Health Science and Epidemiology is a one-year full-time degree that provides core training in the basic skills of epidemiology and statistics, followed by detailed lectures on the global burden and determinants of disease. The course is open to graduates in medicine, biomedical science and other numerate disciplines. 

The course is now open to applications for admission in October 2018. All applications received by the deadline of Monday 8th January 2018 will automatically be considered for all relevant competitive University funding opportunities, including the Clarendon Fund, Medical Research Council funding, and various College funds.

For further details about eligibility and the application process, please contact our Graduate Studies Office via .

Course structure

The course will provide advanced training in epidemiological principles and procedures and the statistical analysis of epidemiological data, critical appraisal, study design and protocol development together with advanced knowledge and understanding of the global burden of disease and its determinants. This is an intensive course with 15-20 hours of contact time per week throughout the taught component of the course.

The curriculum consists of thirteen compulsory modules:

•            Introduction to Global Health Science

•            Principles of Epidemiology

•            Principles of Statistics

•            Non-communicable Diseases

•            Communicable Diseases

•            Maternal and Child Health

•            Health Economics

•            Clinical Trials and Meta-analysis

•            Nutritional Epidemiology

•            Implementation Strategies

•            Genetic Epidemiology

•            Record Linkage and Bio-informatics

•            International Research Ethics

In addition a series of weekly 'masterclasses' is scheduled in which internationally-recognised senior scientists in population health from Oxford, and elsewhere, will give seminars on selected topics. These sessions will be outside of the structure of the core modules, and are intended to provide the students with stimulating materials to integrate population health thinking and perspectives.

Pattern of teaching, learning and supervision

The teaching is delivered through a range of methods, including lectures, seminars, workshops, student presentations, self-directed learning and study.

During the first two terms there are a series of formative assessments designed to enable teaching staff to monitor student progress. These marks do not contribute to the final marks. All students are provided with detailed feedback that will enable them to improve their learning by helping them identify their strengths and weaknesses.

There are four summative assessments in total. At the end of the Easter break this includes the submission of a data set analysis and report, and an extended essay. At the beginning of the third term there are two examinations involving two written papers comprising multi-component questions.

Following the written examinations students will undertake a research placement, leading to a dissertation. The purpose of the research placement and dissertation is to develop and deepen an appreciation and understanding of epidemiological concepts and skills learned during the course and to apply to a real world situation through independent study.



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