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The master of arts programs in advertising and public relations are intended for those who wish to acquire advanced understanding of and skills in the development of highly effective persuasive communication. Read more
The master of arts programs in advertising and public relations are intended for those who wish to acquire advanced understanding of and skills in the development of highly effective persuasive communication. The programs focus on prevailing communication theories, current research findings, and advanced practical techniques. The faculty seeks to educate highly competent, focused students who will be recognized for their leadership qualities: the ability to discern issues both in the practice of their profession and in their role in society; the ability to develop and execute successful communication programs; and the ability to lead others effectively.

Two programs are offered: (1) a two-year thesis program with specialization in advertising or public relations (Plan I), and (2) a one-year professional program combining advertising and public relations (Plan II).

Visit the website https://apr.ua.edu/gradinfo/

Degree Requirements

- Plan I, the Two-Year Research Program -

The two-year master's degree program is intended for students seeking a strong research emphasis in their study of advertising and public relations. The Plan I program focuses on important problems and questions, gathering evidence, and setting standards for inference. The program specifically prepares students in the areas of (a) mastering the body of scholarly knowledge of advertising and public relations, and (b) contributing to the advancement of knowledge in these fields through basic and applied research. Students may decide to continue their studies, pursuing doctorates in advertising or public relations. Students in the Plan I program specialize in either advertising or public relations, learn the concepts and methods involved in productive scholarship, and collaborate with faculty members in conducting research.

Plan I requirements. Plan I is normally a two-year program and requires (a) a minimum of 30 hours of approved graduate courses, (b) demonstration of proficiency in research skills, (c) passing of a comprehensive written examination, and (d) completion and successful defense of a master's thesis. Students admitted to the program with little or no previous coursework in advertising or public relations may be required to take one or more undergraduate courses in the department to supplement their graduate studies.

Plan II, the One-Year Professional Program

The professional program is an intensive, professionally oriented, one-year program that combines advertising and public relations. Recognizing the increasingly close links between the advertising and public relations professions, the Plan II program provides advanced preparation in both disciplines. The program provides intensive training to meet specific objectives. Graduates will be prepared to:

- develop a thorough understanding of the institutions and processes involved in advertising and public relations, through a combined program of study

- use research both to generate communication strategies and to evaluate the success of communication programs

- write idea-driven persuasive communication

- plan, implement, and evaluate media plans for advertising and public relations programs and campaigns

The Plan II program is for recent college graduates who see the advantages of having advanced skills in advertising and public relations. The students will recognize that preparation in the liberal arts, business administration, or communication has provided them with important knowledge but has not sufficiently prepared them in the communication concepts and skills needed to be a leader.

Speaking and writing skills are emphasized in all courses, with frequent papers and presentations. One course each semester emphasizes writing skills involved in the advertising and public relations professions.

Plan II requirements. The one-year Plan II program requires (a) completion of a specific 33-hour program of graduate courses, (b) demonstration of proficiency in research skills, (c) passing of a comprehensive written examination, and (d) completion of a master's project in the course APR 598 Communication Workshop. Students admitted to the program will receive a list of critical readings and will be expected to become familiar with these materials before beginning the program. The program starts with a series of orientation sessions aimed at evaluating each student's grasp of the critical readings and ability to proceed with the program without further background study.

APR Graduate Course Descriptions

Note: Plan I and Plan II programs have different course requirements.

ADVERTISING & PUBLIC RELATIONS COURSES

APR 522. Media Planning: Three hours. Development of media objectives, strategies, and budgets and implementation of media plans for advertising and public relations. Each student prepares and presents a media plan.

APR 550. Communication Research Methods: Three hours. A survey of qualitative and quantitative methods in communication research.

APR 551. Seminar in Communication Theory*: Three hours. A study of the development of selected theories of communication as they pertain to interpersonal, public, and mass communication.

APR 570. Contemporary Advertising and Public Relations: Three hours. An advanced survey of the academic and professional literature underlying the contemporary practice of advertising and public relations.

APR 572. Persuasive Communication: Three hours. The practice of creating, writing, editing, and producing persuasive communication for advertising and public relations. Writing skills are exercised extensively in this course.

APR 582. Advertising and Public Relations Management: Three hours. Problems and decision-making processes involved in the management of advertising and public relations programs and organizations.

APR 583. Research Applications in Advertising and Public Relations: Three hours. Prerequisite: MC 550. Application of research methods and procedures for problem solving and impact assessment in advertising and public relations programs.

APR 590. Visual Communication: Three hours. The practice of developing ideas and creative strategies for professional evaluations about design and its application. Each student prepares a portfolio.

APR 592. Integrated Communication Project. A message-oriented course. Students conceptualize and execute integrated communication programs. Topics vary.

APR 596. Independent Study or Research: One to three hours. Prerequisite: consent of the academic adviser and instructor.

597. Communication Campaign Workshop I: Three hours. Research to develop an advertising and public relations campaign for a specific organization. This is the preparation stage for the major case study prepared by the student in APR 598.

598. Communication Campaign Workshop II (Master’s Project): Three hours. Development and presentation of a complete advertising and public relations plan and proposal for the specific organization studied in APR 597. Integration of theory, concepts, and techniques in a complete communication program.

599. Thesis Research: Three hours. Prerequisite: consent of the academic adviser.

Find out how to apply here - https://apr.ua.edu/gradinfo/applicationadmission/

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The Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics offers a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree via an on-campus program and an off-campus (distance learning - http://bamabydistance.ua.edu/) program through the College of Continuing Studies (http://continuingstudies.ua.edu/). Read more
The Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics offers a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree via an on-campus program and an off-campus (distance learning - http://bamabydistance.ua.edu/) program through the College of Continuing Studies (http://continuingstudies.ua.edu/).

An MSAEM can be earned by coursework only or by a combination of coursework and an approved thesis. Most distance learning students elect to complete the coursework only degree option. On-campus students supported by assistantships are expected to complete an approved thesis. Learn more about admission requirements (http://aem.eng.ua.edu/graduate/admissions-and-financial-assistance/).

Visit the website http://aem.eng.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

MSAEM – THESIS (PLAN I) OPTION

Credit Hours
A total of 30 semester credit hours is required for a masters of science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree. For the MSAEM Plan I option, these credit hours consist of:

- 6 hours of Core coursework
- 6 hours of Mathematics coursework, including GES 554
- 12 hours of Elective coursework
- 6 hours of AEM 599 Thesis Research

Elective coursework must be approved by the student’s advisor. Of the 24 coursework credit hours, at least 18 must have an AEM designation.

- Core Course Requirements -

All students must complete a minimum of one (1) class from the Aerospace Core listing of classes and one (1) class from the Mechanics Core listing of classes.

Aerospace Core:
AEM 567 Orbital Mechanics
AEM 582 Space Systems
AEM 614 Airfoil and Wing Theory
AEM 668 Advanced Dynamics of Flight*

Mechanics Core:
AEM 500 Intermediate Fluid Mechanics
AEM 530 Continuum Mechanics
AEM 562 Intermediate Dynamics
AEM 637 Theory of Elasticity

* For those without a BSAE degree, this course has the pre-requisite of AEM 568.

- Mathematics Requirement -

A total of six credit hours of mathematics is required. GES 554 Partial Differential Equations, which is 3 credit hours, is required and counts toward the six-credit hour mathematics requirement. The remaining three credit hours of mathematics coursework must be approved by the advisor.

- Elective Coursework Requirement -

A student must complete at least 12 hours of elective coursework. These courses are typically AEM courses, but other approved courses are acceptable. The specific courses must be approved by the student’s advisor.

- Thesis Requirement -

The student is required to submit a written thesis and defend in front of a thesis committee for approval by the committee and the graduate school.

- Test Pilot School -

Students that seek credit for Test Pilot School completed through the United States Air Force may send official transcripts from the TPS to the UA Graduate School for transfer credit. The student must receive a grade of at least a B in TPS for the credit to transfer. Additionally, the transfer of credit from TPS is subject to the restrictions placed on the transfer of credit by the Graduate School and the AEM Department. A maximum of six hours may be transferred. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

- Transfer Credit -

With approval of the UA Graduate School, a maximum of 12 hours of graduate credit for coursework completed at another institution may be applied toward the 24 credit hour coursework requirement for the MSAEM Plan I degree. The maximum of 12 hours of graduate transfer credit includes the six hours of credit transferred from TPS, if applicable.

All credit toward the MSAEM degree, including transfer credit, must have been earned during the six years (18 fall, spring and summer semesters) immediately preceding the date on which the MSAEM degree is to be awarded. Students who have earned post-baccalaureate course credit are encouraged to explore transfer credit opportunities. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

MSAEM – NON-THESIS (PLAN II) OPTION

Credit Hours
A total of 30 semester credit hours is required for a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree. For the MSAEM Plan II option, these credit hours consist of:

- 6 hours of Core coursework
- 6 hours of Mathematics coursework (including GES 554)
- 18 hours of Elective coursework

Elective coursework must be approved by the student’s advisor. Of the 30 coursework credit hours, at least 18 must have an AEM designation.

- Core Course Requirements -

All students must complete a minimum of one (1) class from the Aerospace Core listing of classes and one (1) class from the Mechanics Core listing of classes.

Aerospace Core:
AEM 567 Orbital Mechanics
AEM 582 Space Systems
AEM 614 Airfoil and Wing Theory
AEM 668 Advanced Dynamics of Flight*

Mechanics Core:
AEM 500 Intermediate Fluid Mechanics
AEM 530 Continuum Mechanics
AEM 562 Intermediate Dynamics
AEM 637 Theory of Elasticity

* For those without a BSAE degree, this course has the pre-requisite of AEM 568.

- Mathematics Requirement -

A total of six credit hours of mathematics is required. GES 554 Partial Differential Equations, which is three credit hours, is required and counts toward the six-credit hour mathematics requirement. The remaining three credit hours of mathematics coursework must be approved by the advisor.

- Elective Coursework Requirement -

A student must complete a least 18 hours of elective coursework. These courses are typically AEM courses, but other approved courses are acceptable. The specific courses must be approved by student’s advisor.

- Comprehensive Examination or Culminating Experience -

Students pursuing the MSAEM Plan II degree option have the choice of completing one of the following options to satisfy the requirement of a comprehensive examination or culminating experience:

- Pass one of the Ph.D. qualifying examinations that serves as the comprehensive examination or

- Complete a culminating experience and receive faculty advisor approval for the written report detailing the culminating experience. MSAEM Plan II students may, but are not required to, enroll in AEM 594 Special Projects, three credit hours, complete the culminating experience, and submit the written report detailing the culminating experience as part of the AEM 594 course requirements.

The student must have completed at least 18 hours of coursework prior to submitting the written report for the culminating experience. The approved written report for the culminating experience must be submitted no later than the thesis deadline date during the semester in which the student intends to graduate. The comprehensive examination option may only be attempted twice.

- Test Pilot School -

Students that seek credit for Test Pilot School completed through the United States Air Force may send official transcripts from the TPS to the UA Graduate School for transfer credit. The student must receive a grade of at least a B in TPS for the credit to be transferable. Additionally, the transfer of credit from TPS is subject to the restrictions placed on the transfer of credit by the Graduate School and the AEM Department. A maximum of six hours can be transferred. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

- Transfer Credit -

With approval of the UA Graduate School, a maximum of 12 hours of graduate credit for coursework completed at another institution may be applied toward the 30 credit hour coursework requirement for the MSAEM Plan II degree. The maximum of 12 hours of graduate transfer credit includes the six hours of credit transferred from TPS, if applicable.

All credit toward the MSAEM degree, including transfer credit, must have been earned during the six years (18 fall, spring, and summer semesters) immediately preceding the date on which the MSAEM degree is to be awarded. Students who have earned post-baccalaureate course credit are encouraged to explore transfer credit opportunities. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

Read less
The Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics offers a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree via an on-campus program and an off-campus (distance learning - http://bamabydistance.ua.edu/) program through the College of Continuing Studies (http://continuingstudies.ua.edu/). Read more
The Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics offers a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree via an on-campus program and an off-campus (distance learning - http://bamabydistance.ua.edu/) program through the College of Continuing Studies (http://continuingstudies.ua.edu/).

An MSAEM can be earned by coursework only or by a combination of coursework and an approved thesis. Most distance learning students elect to complete the coursework only degree option. On-campus students supported by assistantships are expected to complete an approved thesis. Learn more about admission requirements (http://aem.eng.ua.edu/graduate/admissions-and-financial-assistance/).

Visit the website http://aem.eng.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

MSAEM – THESIS (PLAN I) OPTION

Credit Hours
A total of 30 semester credit hours is required for a masters of science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree. For the MSAEM Plan I option, these credit hours consist of:

- 6 hours of Core coursework
- 6 hours of Mathematics coursework, including GES 554
- 12 hours of Elective coursework
- 6 hours of AEM 599 Thesis Research

Elective coursework must be approved by the student’s advisor. Of the 24 coursework credit hours, at least 18 must have an AEM designation.

- Core Course Requirements -

All students must complete a minimum of one (1) class from the Aerospace Core listing of classes and one (1) class from the Mechanics Core listing of classes.

Aerospace Core:
AEM 567 Orbital Mechanics
AEM 582 Space Systems
AEM 614 Airfoil and Wing Theory
AEM 668 Advanced Dynamics of Flight*

Mechanics Core:
AEM 500 Intermediate Fluid Mechanics
AEM 530 Continuum Mechanics
AEM 562 Intermediate Dynamics
AEM 637 Theory of Elasticity

* For those without a BSAE degree, this course has the pre-requisite of AEM 568.

- Mathematics Requirement -

A total of six credit hours of mathematics is required. GES 554 Partial Differential Equations, which is 3 credit hours, is required and counts toward the six-credit hour mathematics requirement. The remaining three credit hours of mathematics coursework must be approved by the advisor.

- Elective Coursework Requirement -

A student must complete at least 12 hours of elective coursework. These courses are typically AEM courses, but other approved courses are acceptable. The specific courses must be approved by the student’s advisor.

- Thesis Requirement -

The student is required to submit a written thesis and defend in front of a thesis committee for approval by the committee and the graduate school.

- Test Pilot School -

Students that seek credit for Test Pilot School completed through the United States Air Force may send official transcripts from the TPS to the UA Graduate School for transfer credit. The student must receive a grade of at least a B in TPS for the credit to transfer. Additionally, the transfer of credit from TPS is subject to the restrictions placed on the transfer of credit by the Graduate School and the AEM Department. A maximum of six hours may be transferred. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

- Transfer Credit -

With approval of the UA Graduate School, a maximum of 12 hours of graduate credit for coursework completed at another institution may be applied toward the 24 credit hour coursework requirement for the MSAEM Plan I degree. The maximum of 12 hours of graduate transfer credit includes the six hours of credit transferred from TPS, if applicable.

All credit toward the MSAEM degree, including transfer credit, must have been earned during the six years (18 fall, spring and summer semesters) immediately preceding the date on which the MSAEM degree is to be awarded. Students who have earned post-baccalaureate course credit are encouraged to explore transfer credit opportunities. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

MSAEM – NON-THESIS (PLAN II) OPTION

Credit Hours
A total of 30 semester credit hours is required for a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree. For the MSAEM Plan II option, these credit hours consist of:

- 6 hours of Core coursework
- 6 hours of Mathematics coursework (including GES 554)
- 18 hours of Elective coursework

Elective coursework must be approved by the student’s advisor. Of the 30 coursework credit hours, at least 18 must have an AEM designation.

- Core Course Requirements -

All students must complete a minimum of one (1) class from the Aerospace Core listing of classes and one (1) class from the Mechanics Core listing of classes.

Aerospace Core:
AEM 567 Orbital Mechanics
AEM 582 Space Systems
AEM 614 Airfoil and Wing Theory
AEM 668 Advanced Dynamics of Flight*

Mechanics Core:
AEM 500 Intermediate Fluid Mechanics
AEM 530 Continuum Mechanics
AEM 562 Intermediate Dynamics
AEM 637 Theory of Elasticity

* For those without a BSAE degree, this course has the pre-requisite of AEM 568.

- Mathematics Requirement -

A total of six credit hours of mathematics is required. GES 554 Partial Differential Equations, which is three credit hours, is required and counts toward the six-credit hour mathematics requirement. The remaining three credit hours of mathematics coursework must be approved by the advisor.

- Elective Coursework Requirement -

A student must complete a least 18 hours of elective coursework. These courses are typically AEM courses, but other approved courses are acceptable. The specific courses must be approved by student’s advisor.

- Comprehensive Examination or Culminating Experience -

Students pursuing the MSAEM Plan II degree option have the choice of completing one of the following options to satisfy the requirement of a comprehensive examination or culminating experience:

- Pass one of the Ph.D. qualifying examinations that serves as the comprehensive examination or

- Complete a culminating experience and receive faculty advisor approval for the written report detailing the culminating experience. MSAEM Plan II students may, but are not required to, enroll in AEM 594 Special Projects, three credit hours, complete the culminating experience, and submit the written report detailing the culminating experience as part of the AEM 594 course requirements.

The student must have completed at least 18 hours of coursework prior to submitting the written report for the culminating experience. The approved written report for the culminating experience must be submitted no later than the thesis deadline date during the semester in which the student intends to graduate. The comprehensive examination option may only be attempted twice.

- Test Pilot School -

Students that seek credit for Test Pilot School completed through the United States Air Force may send official transcripts from the TPS to the UA Graduate School for transfer credit. The student must receive a grade of at least a B in TPS for the credit to be transferable. Additionally, the transfer of credit from TPS is subject to the restrictions placed on the transfer of credit by the Graduate School and the AEM Department. A maximum of six hours can be transferred. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

- Transfer Credit -

With approval of the UA Graduate School, a maximum of 12 hours of graduate credit for coursework completed at another institution may be applied toward the 30 credit hour coursework requirement for the MSAEM Plan II degree. The maximum of 12 hours of graduate transfer credit includes the six hours of credit transferred from TPS, if applicable.

All credit toward the MSAEM degree, including transfer credit, must have been earned during the six years (18 fall, spring, and summer semesters) immediately preceding the date on which the MSAEM degree is to be awarded. Students who have earned post-baccalaureate course credit are encouraged to explore transfer credit opportunities. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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The Master of Fine Arts in the Book Arts Program began in 1985, and emphasizes the art and craft of making books by hand. Read more
The Master of Fine Arts in the Book Arts Program began in 1985, and emphasizes the art and craft of making books by hand. We are located in the College of Communication and Information Sciences, School of Library and Information Studies, at The University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa; a verdant, traditional campus located on the banks of the mighty Black Warrior River.

Visit the website https://bookarts.ua.edu/

The program leading to the M.F.A. in the Book Arts degree is a 60-credit hour course of study comprising four basic areas: printing/publishing, bookbinding, papermaking, and the history of the book. These areas do not work in isolation. Connections between them are made as often as possible. Our emphasis is on the book as an integrated unit, although there is opportunity for a student who wishes to pursue a specific interest in one or more of these areas after the initial general year of study. We are interested in developing craft skills based on historical principles and techniques, and the artistic expression that follows.

The M.F.A in the Book Arts Program develops book artists who have well-honed technical knowledge of the various facets of contemporary bookmaking, and who have an understanding of the historical evolution of the book including its materiality, and the role of the book in society. Courses explore the reconciliation of modern sensibilities with historic craft. It is to be remembered that the M.F.A. degree, and the 2.5-3 years leading to it, is a starting point in what is a lifelong process of acquiring skills and sensibilities in the art and craft of making books.

We accept up to eight new students each year. Our students are highly motivated, and come from various undergraduate backgrounds and work experiences. We have four graduate assistantships available yearly, on a competitive basis, plus three Windgate Fellowships.

The general goal for the M.F.A. program is to develop professional artisans who are technically proficient in the book arts and cognizant of the historical background in which these various crafts evolved and of the professional environment in which our graduates will work. To reach this goal, the school has created the following two specific goals and enabling objectives.

1. To provide students with an education that inculcates craft skills required for proficiency in the book arts, and that develops a sound foundation for the aesthetics and methodology of these arts:

a. Provide each student with fundamental technical skills in each of the crafts comprised by the book arts

b. Ready each student to apply these skills and techniques in the marketplace

c. Provide advanced technical skills in each student’s area of professional specialization

d. Create in each student a desire to acquire and upgrade skills beyond the formal program

e. Provide and reinforce in each student an appreciation for the aesthetics of the crafts

f. Facilitate the choice by the end of the first semester of an initial professional specialization in either printing or binding

g. Maintain a faculty whose members are recognized leaders in their fields

2. To enhance the professional status of artisans engaged in the book arts:

a. Acquaint students with the heritage, responsibilities, trends, and standards of the profession

b. Instill in students a concept of the interrelationship of the book arts

c. Enlist faculty to assist the book arts community by helping to establish standards, by supporting professional organizations, by offering continuing educational opportunities, and by serving as consultants and lecturers

d. Encourage faculty to publish and exhibit original works whenever appropriate

e. Encourage faculty to conduct research and disseminate findings to practitioners and teachers in the book arts community

Applicants are required to submit either the general portion of the Graduate Record Examination or the Miller Analogies Test in support of the application for admission. Ideally, prospective students should submit a portfolio of their work (in their area of experience), and if at all possible be interviewed by the book arts faculty. For detailed information about the application process please see the Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/).

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All graduate students in chemical and biological engineering are required to pass the following core graduate courses. - CHE 551 Advanced Thermodynamics I. Read more
All graduate students in chemical and biological engineering are required to pass the following core graduate courses:

- CHE 551 Advanced Thermodynamics I
- CHE 552 Transport Phenomena
- CHE 553 Computation in Chemical Engineering
- CHE 554 Chemical Reaction Engineering

Visit the website http://che.eng.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

MASTER OF SCIENCE–THESIS OPTION (PLAN I):

30 CREDIT HOURS
Candidates for the master’s degree under Plan I must earn a minimum of 24 semester hours of credit in coursework and write a thesis (a minimum of 6 semester hours of thesis research required).

- A minimum of 24 credit hours of coursework is required.
- A minimum of 6 hours of thesis research is required.
- A student’s curriculum and thesis must be approved by the student’s graduate advisory committee. The student must pass a final comprehensive examination, which is typically a presentation and defense of the thesis. In addition, the student must satisfy all University requirements defined in the current edition of The University of Alabama Graduate Catalog.

MASTER OF SCIENCE–NON-THESIS OPTION (PLAN II):

30 CREDIT HOURS
Candidates for the master’s degree under Plan II must earn a minimum of 30 semester hours of credit and complete a culminating or “capstone experience” as described below.

- A minimum of 30 credit hours of coursework is required.
- A student’s curriculum must be approved by the student’s graduate advisory committee. The graduate advisory committee must also approve the submission of a manuscript, authored or co-authored by the candidate, to a refereed journal or conference proceeding. This publication submission shall constitute The University of Alabama Graduate School culminating experience requirement for an MS Plan II degree in chemical and biological engineering.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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Students work closely with their graduate advisor and supervisory committee to define an appropriate plan of study that meets all degree requirements, including any prerequisite or preparatory work and a specified set of core courses. Read more
Students work closely with their graduate advisor and supervisory committee to define an appropriate plan of study that meets all degree requirements, including any prerequisite or preparatory work and a specified set of core courses.

Visit the website http://cce.eng.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/civil-engineering/

Research Thesis Option (Plan I)

The thesis option is a research-focused program that includes conducting original research, writing a research thesis and defending the thesis to the student’s graduate supervisory committee. The research thesis option degree requirements are as follows:

A minimum of 30 credit hours, including:

21 credit hours of approved coursework, including
- 9 credit hours of core graduate coursework

- A maximum of 6 hours of approved 400-level courses

- A minimum of 15 hours of CE-prefix courses

3 hours of CE 593 or CE 693 Practicum
- Taken with permission under the supervision of the student’s graduate advisor

6 hours of CE 599 Thesis Research
- Taken with permission under the supervision of the student’s graduate advisor

- The graduate advisor must be a full member of the department’s graduate faculty

- Once taken, CE 599 must be taken every term until graduation

Paper/Report Option (Plan II)

The paper/report, or non-thesis, option requires a research paper, a policy and practice paper, or equivalent culminating experience, which is graded by the student’s graduate advisor. The paper/report option requirements are as follows:

A minimum of 30 credit hours, including:

27 credit hours of approved coursework:
- 9 credit hours of core graduate coursework

- A maximum of 6 hours of approved 400-level courses

- A maximum of 3 hours of CE 593 or CE 693 Practicum

- A minimum of 18 hours of CE-prefix courses

3 credit hours of CE 501 Masters Capstone Project – Plan II
- Taken with permission under the direction of the student’s graduate advisor

- The graduate advisor must be a full member of the department’s graduate faculty

- Requires completion a research paper, a policy and practice paper, or equivalent report with the topic, scope, and format pre-approved by the student’s advisor

- Must be taken the semester the student plans to graduate

Core Graduate Course Requirements

The faculty has defined core course requirements in four areas. Each student’s plan of study is required to include one of the following sets of core graduate courses:

- Construction Engineering and Management Core Coursework (MSCivE, Ph.D.):

CE 573 Statistical Applications in Civil Engineering
CE 567 Construction Accounting and Finance
CE 568 Construction Scheduling

- Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Core Coursework (MSCivE, MSEnvE, Ph.D.):

CE 573 Statistical Applications in Civil Engineering
CE 575 Hydrology
CE 626 Physical and Chemical Processes

- Structural Engineering and Materials Core Coursework (MSCivE, Ph.D.):

CE 573 Statistical Applications in Civil Engineering
CE 534 Advanced Structural Mechanics
CE 531 Structural Dynamics

- Transportation Systems Engineering Core Coursework (MSCivE, Ph.D.):

CE 573 Statistical Applications in Civil Engineering
CE 559 Pavement Design and Rehabilitation
CE 655 Sustainable Transportation

Notes

- University Scholars (BS/MS) students are allowed 9 credit hours of coursework to double count between the BS and MS degrees.

- Students on graduate assistantships must register for a minimum of 1 credit hour of CE 593/693 each semester they are supported.

- Only 400-level courses without 500-level counterparts are allowed and must be approved prior to taking the class.

- Students are responsible for all forms and must route all forms through the Department prior to submission to UA’s Graduate School.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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A graduate degree in apparel and textiles enables students to pursue careers in higher education, business, and government. The program prepares students for careers in college teaching, research, extension, education administration, marketing, consumer service, product development/evaluation, and entrepreneurship. Read more

GRADUATE STUDY IN APPAREL AND TEXTILES

A graduate degree in apparel and textiles enables students to pursue careers in higher education, business, and government. The program prepares students for careers in college teaching, research, extension, education administration, marketing, consumer service, product development/evaluation, and entrepreneurship. Emphasis is placed on the development of analytical skills and problem-solving skills and equips graduate students for continued intellectual and career growth. Graduates receive the degree of Master of Science in human environmental sciences, with a major in clothing and textiles.

Visit the website http://www.ctd.ches.ua.edu/graduate-program.html

PROGRAM OF STUDY

Students in the graduate program may concentrate in the behavioral aspects of clothing; the international aspects of textiles and apparel; or historic costume and textiles. The faculty assists each graduate student in planning an individualized program suited to the student’s career goals. The program requires a minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate courses. A graduate course in statistics must be completed successfully. Graduate students are encourages to participate in research and service activities of the faculty as a means of developing direction for the graduate program. Since graduate courses in the department have prerequisites, students should contact the Department of Clothing, Textiles and Interior Design for information about minimum preparation for graduate study.

PROGRAM FACULTY

At present, we have faculty doing research in the following areas:

- Dr. Marcy Koontz has been exploring the scholarship of engagement in higher education for the several years. Her work focuses on the implementation and assessment of meaningful sustainable projects that engage students in the local community - from preservation of cultural heritage resources to helping develop and implement innovative programs that address community issues from a design perspective. Her previous research focused on emerging technologies with an emphasis on the application of advanced computer graphics software in the field of apparel and textiles, and developing and constructing advanced computer-based curricula for apparel and textiles instruction.

- Dr. Amanda J. Thompson's topics of research include textile science issues, historic and archaeological textile analysis, and cultural interpretation of textiles and the crafts that support textiles. She also is working with alternative fibers and 3D printing and its use in textiles.

- Dr. Michelle (Xiao) Tong's current research interests include soft-goods branding management, E-commerce, international marketing and international trade of textiles and apparel products.

- Dr. Virginia Wimberley's research deals with application of microscopy and other analytical methodology to the analysis of pre-historic, historic and contemporary dress and textiles for their contributions to the material culture. She has worked on Native American prehistoric collections from Ohio, Georgia and Alabama. Currently she is starting an investigation of the role of clothing in sex role stereotyping by preschool children.

FACILITIES

The Department of Clothing, Textiles and Interior Design maintains the Carolyn Stewart Historic Costume Collection and the Comer Historic Textiles Collection for use in teaching and research. The University’s research facilities include the Mary Harmon Bryant Hall which is the repository for the department’s historic costume and textile collections with the Mary Harmon Moman Doll Collection and the Wade Hall and Greg Swem Quilt Collection, as well as other University collections; Amelia Gayle Gorgas Library, which belongs to the selective Association of Research Libraries; Central Analytical Facility; and the Seebeck Computer Center. Excellent computing capabilities exist within the College. Campus agencies that foster interdisciplinary research include the Small Business Development Center, the Capstone International Center, the Hess Institute, and the Institute for Social Science Research.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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The Graduate Certificate in College Teaching is a 12-credit (4-course) sequence designed to help graduate students in a variety of professional settings and disciplines who seek to enhance their understanding of teaching and learning issues for adult learners, particularly at institutions of higher education. Read more
The Graduate Certificate in College Teaching is a 12-credit (4-course) sequence designed to help graduate students in a variety of professional settings and disciplines who seek to enhance their understanding of teaching and learning issues for adult learners, particularly at institutions of higher education. Students who participate in the certificate program will have exposure to theory, research, and practice related to the professoriate and to teaching and learning in higher education. The intent of the Graduate Certificate is to assist professionals in responding to the increasingly complex and diversifying social and cultural contexts for adult learners. Students who complete the Certificate will have it listed on their transcripts.

Visit the website http://education.ua.edu/academics/elpts/hea/college-teaching-certificate/

The Graduate Certificate in College Teaching is designed to help you:

- Clarify your goals related to student learning

- Develop knowledge of and skills for using effective instructional methods

- Improve your capacity for assessing student learning

- Understand the characteristics of the United States professoriate and what it means to be a member of it.

Course Requirements

The Graduate Certificate in College Teaching involves coursework in The United States Professoriate and in College and University Teaching. Moreover, students take an elective related to a specific area of interest. Finally, students participate in a mentored teaching experience. The coursework is as follows:

- AHE 603 College and University Teaching. This is an intensive graduate seminar that provides an overview of the issues, principles, and practices associated with effective college teaching. Topics include learning and diversity; teaching models and strategies including assessment; teacher and student behaviors and learning outcomes; and instructional improvement strategies.

- AHE 602 Problems in Higher Education: The United States Professoriate. In this seminar the student studies the current issues and trends related to higher education. Students will examine the history of the professoriate and then focus on recent trends in regard to such matters as expectations about teaching and research, the growth of non-tenure track lines, diversity, and the various institutional types and forms of public and private control.

- Elective. Students will select an elective related to college teaching, such as AHE 607 Student Development Theory 1, AHE 610 Academic Cultures and Learning in Academe, or AHE 644 Academic Program Development and Evaluation in Higher Education. Upon prior approval by the program director of the Teaching Certificate program, a student may elect a college-teaching related course offered by another program at The University of Alabama. To be used as an elective, a course must have a clear focus on college teaching and likely be focused on teaching within a specific discipline. Several examples are PY 695 Teaching of Psychology Practicum, BER 672 Teaching Educational Research, and BEP 672 Teaching Educational Psychology. Any of these would be an acceptable substitute for the elective.

- AHE 688 Mentored Teaching in Higher Education. In this course students are immersed in a mentored experiential learning opportunity to develop competency and mastery in course construction and delivery in the higher education environment.

- Total Hours: 12

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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Students in this graduate program have a core set of requirements in theory and method courses, which provide foundations in three research areas. Read more

Program Areas

Students in this graduate program have a core set of requirements in theory and method courses, which provide foundations in three research areas: Communication and Culture, Organizational and Interpersonal Communication, and Rhetoric and Political Discourse. In addition, students complete their plans of study, with elective courses from among any graduate courses in the department (see link below) or outside of the department, with the approval of their academic advisors.

Visit the website https://comstudies.ua.edu/graduate-program/

COMMUNICATION STUDIES (COM)

COM 500 Introduction to Graduate Studies. One hour.
The primary goal is to orient new graduate students to the expectations and procedures of graduate study in the department. Topics covered include developing the plan of study, thesis prospectus, comprehensive examination, and choosing advisors and committees.

COM 501 Introduction to Teaching Public Speaking. No hours.
The primary goal of this course is to facilitate the instruction of COM 123 Public Speaking. Students enrolled in this course will provide lesson plans for their classes and discuss options for improving classroom learning.

COM 513 Communication and Diversity. Three hours.
Study and analysis of issues of diversity as they relate to groups in society and in communication fields. Emphasis is on the media's treatment of various groups in society. Approved as a communication and cultural diversity elective.

COM 515 African American Rhetoric. Three hours.
A historical-critical investigation of African American public discourse from the Revolutionary era to the present, exploring rhetorical strategies for social change and building community.

COM 521 Political Communication. Three hours.
An exploration of rhetorical, media, and cross-disciplinary theories and literature related to political communication as expressed in campaigns and institutional governance.

COM 525 Gender and Political Communication. Three hours.
Study of the impact of gender on political communication activities. Topics include gender differences in political messages and voter orientation, masculine ideals of leadership, women’s roles and advancement in the political sphere, and media representations.

COM 536 Independent Study. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Written permission.
Students who want to count this course toward their Plans of Study must complete the official request form and submit it for the approval of their faculty advisor and the Graduate Program Director.

COM 541 Contemporary Rhetorical Theory. Three hours.
A survey of major contributions to rhetorical theory from the 20th century up to the present.

COM 545 Classical Rhetorical Theory. Three hours.
A systematic inquiry into the development of Greek and Roman rhetorical theory during the classical period (ca. 480 B.C.E.–400 C.E.).

COM 548 Seminar in Rhetorical Criticism. Three hours.
An examination of various methodological perspectives of rhetorical criticism. Specifically, the course aims to familiarize students with both traditional and alternative critical methods and to encourage students to perceive the rhetorical dimensions of all manner of public discourse, ranging from speeches, advertising, film, popular music to discursive forms in new media and the Internet.

COM 560 Group Leadership. Three hours.
An advanced study of small-group behavior, examining in detail theories of leadership as they relate to problem solving in group situations.

COM 550 Qualitative Research Methods. Three hours.
An introduction to qualitative research methods in communication, including data collection and analysis. The goals of the course are to provide exposure to a broad array of qualitative methods, help students learn to use some of these methods, and to help them to understand the role of research in our field. The course is designed to help student actually conduct research, resulting in two conference-worthy papers.

COM 555 Conflict and Negotiation. Three hours.
Negotiation is fundamentally a communicative activity. The main objective of this course is to understand processes of formal conflict management in mixed motive settings. Students will apply negotiation theory and skills to simulated negotiation cases that include buyer-seller transactions, negotiating through an agent or mediator, salary negotiations, deal making, resolution of workplace disputes, multiparty negotiations, international and intercultural negotiations, and ethical decision making and communication in negotiation. The skills and theory introduced in this course will help students manage integrative and distributive aspects of the negotiation process to achieve individual and collective goals.

COM 561 Human Communication Theory. Three hours.
A detailed review of selected theories of speech communication with a focus on the critical examination of the foundation of social scientific theories.

COM 562 Theories of Persuasion. Three hours.
A critical review of social-influence theories in the area of persuasion and human action.

COM 563 Relational Communication. Three hours.
Prerequisite: COM 220 or permission of the instructor.
Focused investigation of to communication in close personal relationships, with primary emphasis on contemporary concepts and theories of romantic relationships and friendships.

COM 565 Intercultural Communication. Three hours.
Survey and analysis of major concepts, theories, and research dealing with communication between people of different cultural backgrounds in multicultural and international settings.

COM 567 Seminar: Public Address. Three hours.
A topical consideration of individual case studies from public discourse, designed to probe problems of the nature of the audience, the ethics of persuasion, and the power of public advocacy in mass society. Topics may vary.

COM 569 Communication and Gender. Three hours.
Explores the role of communication in the construction of gender. Covers feminist theoretical approaches in communication and other disciplines, the intersections of gender with other marginalities, and the role of gender in various communication contexts. Approved as a communication and cultural diversity elective.

COM 571 Seminar in Organizational Communication. Three hours.
An introductory examination of historical and contemporary issues in organizational communication scholarship from a variety of theoretical and methodological perspectives.

COM 572 Organizational Assessment and Intervention. Three hours.
Examines the theoretical issues inherent in the study of organizational communication, the primary factors requiring assessment and intervention, the impact of on-going changes and new information techniques, current challenges facing the organizational consultant, and the practical application of communication processes for improving organizations.

COM 575 Technology, Culture, and Human Communication. Three hours.
Study of the complexity of technologically-mediated communication across cultures. This course combines literature and concepts from intercultural communication with human communication and technology and addresses the challenges of interacting with others via technology, working in global virtual teams and organizations, and participating as a citizen and consumer in the technology age.

COM 590 Internship in Communication Studies. One to three hours.
Prerequisite: Written permission from the graduate program director.
Proposal for supervised field experience in communication studies must be submitted and approved.

COM 595 Special Topics. Three hours. Topics vary by instructor.

COM 598 Professional Project. Three hours.

COM 599 Thesis Research. One to three hours.

Career Options

A Master of Arts degree in Communication Studies can offer many career options. Communication skills — oral, written, electronic — are now recognized as critical aspects in all major professions in the United States. Both in education and in the work force, there is a growing need for those who not only understand how human communication functions in its various forms, but also can analyze and advise others on ways to improve human communication. Graduates typically pursue one of three career paths: teaching public speaking, working in professional communication positions, or continuing with advanced academic study, such as in doctoral or law degree programs.

Find out how to apply here - https://comstudies.ua.edu/graduate-program/admissions/

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Computer Science Departmental degree requirements for the master’s degree, which are in addition to those established by the College of Engineering and the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/), are as follows for Plan I and Plan II students. Read more
Computer Science Departmental degree requirements for the master’s degree, which are in addition to those established by the College of Engineering and the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/), are as follows for Plan I and Plan II students.

- Master of Science–Thesis Option (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#thesis)
- Master of Science–Non-Thesis Option (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#nonthesis)
- Timetable for the Submission of Graduate School Forms for an MS Degree (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#timetable)

Visit the website http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

MASTER OF SCIENCE–THESIS OPTION (PLAN I):

30 CREDIT HOURS
Each candidate must earn a minimum of 24 semester hours of credit for coursework, plus a 6-hour thesis under the direction of a faculty member. Unlike the general College of Engineering requirements, graduate credit may not be obtained for courses at the 400-level.

Degree Requirements Effective Fall 2011

Credit Hours
The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- 24 hours of CS graduate-level course work

- 6 hours of CS 599 Master’s Thesis Research: Thesis Research.

- Completion of at least one 500-level or 600-level course in each of the four core areas (applications, software, systems and theory). These courses must be taken within the department and selected from the following:
Applications: CS 528, CS 535, CS 557, CS 560, CS 609, CS 615
Software: CS 503, CS 507, CS 515, CS 516, CS 534, CS 600, CS 603, CS 607, CS 614, CS 630
Systems: CS 526, CS 538, CS 567, CS 606, CS 613, CS 618
Theory: CS 500, CS 570, CS 575, CS 601, CS 602, CS 612

- No more than 12 hours from CS 511, CS 512, CS 591, CS 592, CS 691, CS 692 and non-CS courses may be counted towards the coursework requirements for the master’s degree. Courses taken outside of CS are subject to the approval of the student’s advisor.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will select a thesis advisor and a thesis committee. The committee must contain at least four members, including the thesis advisor. At least two members are faculty of the Computer Science department, and at least one member must be from outside the Department of Computer Science.

- The student will develop a written research proposal. This should contain an introduction to the research area, a review of relevant literature in the area, a description of problems to be investigated, an identification of basic goals and objectives of the research, a methodology and timetable for approaching the research, and an extensive bibliography.

- The student will deliver an oral presentation of the research proposal, which is followed by a question-and-answer session that is open to all faculty members and which covers topics related directly or indirectly to the research area. The student’s committee will determine whether the proposal is acceptable based upon both the written and oral presentations.

- The student will develop a written thesis that demonstrates that the student has performed original research that makes a definite contribution to current knowledge. Its format and content must be acceptable to both the student’s committee and the Graduate School.

- The student will defend the written thesis. The defense includes an oral presentation of the thesis research, followed by a question-and-answer session. The student’s committee will determine whether the defense is acceptable.

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/) and by the College of Engineering.

Degree Requirements Prior to Fall 2011

Credit hours

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- 6 hours of CS 599 Master’s Thesis Research

- 24 hours of CS graduate-level course work with a grade of A or B, including the following courses completed at The University of Alabama:
At least 3 hours of theory courses (CS 500 Discrete math, CS 601 Algorithms, CS 602 Formal languages, CS 612 Data structures)

At least 3 hours of software courses (CS 600 Software engineering, CS 603 Programming languages, CS 607 Human-computer interaction, CS 614 Compilers, CS630 Empirical Software Engineering)

At least 3 hours of systems courses (CS 567 Computer architecture, CS 606 Operating systems, CS 613 Networks, CS 618 Wireless networks)

At least 3 hours of applications courses (CS 535 Graphics, CS 560 or 591 Robotics, CS 591 Security, CS 609 Databases)

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will select a thesis advisor and a thesis committee. The committee must contain at least four members, including the thesis advisor. At least two members are faculty of the Computer Science department, and at least one member must be from outside the Department of Computer Science.

- The student will develop a written research proposal. This should contain an introduction to the research area, a review of relevant literature in the area, a description of problems to be investigated, an identification of basic goals and objectives of the research, a methodology and timetable for approaching the research, and an extensive bibliography.

- The student will deliver an oral presentation of the research proposal, which is followed by a question-and-answer session that is open to all faculty members and which covers topics related directly or indirectly to the research area. The student’s committee will determine whether the proposal is acceptable based upon both the written and oral presentations.

- The student will develop a written thesis that demonstrates that the student has performed original research that makes a definite contribution to current knowledge. Its format and content must be acceptable to both the student’s committee and the Graduate School.

- The student will defend the written thesis. The defense includes an oral presentation of the thesis research, followed by a question-and-answer session. The student’s committee will determine whether the defense is acceptable.

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/) and by the College of Engineering.

MASTER OF SCIENCE–NON-THESIS OPTION (PLAN II):

30 CREDIT HOURS
Each candidate must earn a minimum of 30 semester hours of credit for coursework, which may include a 3-hour non-thesis project under the direction of a faculty member. Unlike the general College of Engineering requirements, graduate credit may not be obtained for courses at the 400-level.

Degree Requirements Effective Fall 2011

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- Completion of at least one 500-level or 600-level course in each of the four core areas (applications, software, systems and theory).
Applications: CS 528, CS 535, CS 557, CS 560, CS 609, CS 615
Software: CS 503, CS 507, CS 515, CS 516, CS 534, CS 600, CS 603, CS 607, CS 614, CS 630
Systems: CS 526, CS 538, CS 567, CS 606, CS 613, CS 618
Theory: CS 500, CS 570, CS 575, CS 601, CS 602, CS 612

- No more than 12 hours from CS 511, CS 512, CS 591, CS 592, CS 691, CS 692 and non-CS courses may be counted towards the coursework requirements for the master’s degree. Courses taken outside of CS are subject to the approval of the student’s advisor.

- The student may elect to replace 3 hours of course work with 3 hours of CS 598 Research Not Related to Thesis: Non-thesis Project. This course should be proposed in writing in advance, approved by the instructor, and a copy placed in the student’s file. The proposal should specify both the course content and the specific deliverables that will be evaluated to determine the course grade.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School and by the College of Engineering.

Degree Requirements Prior to Fall 2011

Credit hours

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours of CS graduate-level course work with a grade of A or B, as follows:

- The following courses will be completed at The University of Alabama:
At least 3 hours of theory courses (CS 500 Discrete math, CS 601 Algorithms, CS 602 Formal languages, CS 612 Data structures)

At least 3 hours of software courses (CS 600 Software engineering, CS 603 Programming languages, CS 607 Human-computer interaction, CS 614 Compilers, CS630 Empirical Software Engineering)

At least 3 hours of systems courses (CS 567 Computer architecture, CS 606 Operating systems, CS 613 Networks, CS 618 Wireless networks)

At least 3 hours of applications courses (CS 535 Graphics, CS 560 or 591 Robotics, CS 591 Security, CS 609 Databases)

- The student may elect to replace 3 hours of course work with 3 hours of CS 598 Research Not Related to Thesis: Non-thesis Project. This course should be proposed in writing in advance, approved by the instructor, and a copy placed in the student’s file. The proposal should specify both the course content and the specific deliverables that will be evaluated to determine the course grade.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School and by the College of Engineering.

TIMETABLE FOR THE SUBMISSION OF GRADUATE SCHOOL FORMS FOR AN MS DEGREE
This document identifies a timetable for the submission of all Graduate School paperwork associated with the completion of an M.S. degree

- For students in Plan I students only (thesis option) after a successful thesis proposal defense, you should submit the Appointment/Change of a Masters Thesis Committee form

- The semester before, or no later than the first week in the semester in which you plan to graduate, you should “Apply for Graduation” online in myBama.

- In the semester in which you apply for graduation, the Graduate Program Director will contact you about the Comprehensive Exam.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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The certificate requires the successful completion of 15 hours of course work, in addition to the hours required for the masters in the student’s discipline. Read more

CONSUMER CONFLICT MANAGEMENT, NEGOTIATION, AND MEDIATION

The certificate requires the successful completion of 15 hours of course work, in addition to the hours required for the masters in the student’s discipline. All 15 hours may count toward the master’s degree. Students must apply and gain admission to the UA Graduate School. Students must adhere to all UA Graduate School admission policies and deadlines.

Students who wish to complete the Graduate Certificate in Conflict Management, Negotiation, and Mediation must meet admissions criteria for the Master’s degree in General Studies in Human Environmental Sciences with a 3.0 or higher GPA. If the prospective student does not have the 3.0 overall GPA or a 3.0 on the last 60 hours of course work, then the student must provide the GRE or MAT with an appropriate score. The Graduate Certificate may be completed on campus or via distance education.

Visit the website http://www.csm.ches.ua.edu/conflict-management.html

PROGRAM INFORMATION

Graduate Certificate Program Consumer Conflict Management, Negotiation, and Mediation

Workplace research indicates that managers and supervisors spend as much as forty percent of the workday resolving nonproductive conflict issues. Conflict that is poorly managed results in burdening costs for both the individual and the organization. Expanding worldwide development, the global economy, and population growth and associated social issues drive the intermingling of cultures and practices that increase the incidence of workplace conflict and destructive disagreement. Interest in and demand for conflict management has consequently risen.

The Graduate Certificate in Conflict Management, Negotiation, and Mediation provides students with the tools to manage, resolve, negotiate, and mediate conflict and to develop intrapersonal and interpersonal skills for living and earning. Conflict management training actively engages the student in self-exploration regarding issues of perception, bigotry, bias, values, beliefs, differences, and culture. The student will learn how to verbally and physically converse without allowing differences to interfere with collaboration. Business, government, and community agencies value these skills to increase productivity and to maximize a positive workplace climate. The ability to creatively manage conflict is a skill that most employers value.

The certificate requires the successful completion of 15 hours of course work, in addition to the hours required for the masters in the student’s discipline. All 15 hours may count toward the master’s degree. Students must apply and gain admission to the UA Graduate School (graduate.ua.edu). Students must adhere to all UA Graduate School admission policies and deadlines. See Section 4.3 (services.graduate.ua.edu/catalog/14200.html) of the UA Graduate Catalog.

Application and Admission Criteria

Students who wish to complete the Graduate Certificate in Conflict Management, Negotiation, and Mediation must meet admissions criteria for the Master’s degree in General Studies in Human Environmental Sciences with a 3.0 or higher GPA. If the prospective student does not have the 3.0 overall GPA or a 3.0 on the last 60 hours of course work, then the student must provide the GRE or MAT with an appropriate score. The Graduate Certificate may be completed on campus or via distance education.

The required courses for the certificate are as follows:

• CSM 525 Introduction to Consumer Conflict Resolution
• CSM 527 Consumer Mediation, Negotiation and Management/Advanced I/Emotional Intelligence
• CSM 528 Consumer Conflict Mediation, Management, & Negotiation/Advanced II
• CSM 559 Techniques of Consumer Counseling
• CSM 586 Consumer Human Capital Management/Advanced III

Find out how to apply here - https://studentaccounts.ua.edu/

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A master of science degree is offered through the College of Human Environmental Sciences where students may specialize in the Consumer Sciences (CSM) program or the Family Financial Planning and Counseling program. Read more
A master of science degree is offered through the College of Human Environmental Sciences where students may specialize in the Consumer Sciences (CSM) program or the Family Financial Planning and Counseling program.

The College also offers a Master of Science in Human Environmental Sciences with the following areas of specialization: Consumer Conflict Management, Negotiation, and Mediation (also available as a graduate certificate), Consumer Quality Management, Interactive Technology, and Sports Business Management.

More information can be found on the Graduate Required Courses page (http://www.csm.ches.ua.edu/graduate-required-courses.html).

Visit the website http://www.csm.ches.ua.edu/graduate-programs.html

CONSUMER SCIENCES

Students must complete 30 hours of coursework. A minimum of 24 semester hours of course credit, including HES 509, two courses in statistics, and 15 hours in courses in the area of specialization are required. Students must complete 6 credit hours of thesis research and write a thesis. A final oral examination is required upon completion of the thesis, and a manuscript of publishable quality based on the thesis research is expected of each Plan I degree candidate.

FAMILY FINANCIAL PLANNING AND COUNSELING

In the financial planning specialty within the 30-hour Master of Science degree program, students will study economic and social influences on the family and learn how to help individuals and families achieve their financial goals. Coursework includes 24 hours of financial planning coursework and 6 hours of electives in the area of specialization. By taking two courses each semester, students may complete this M.S. degree in less than two years. The program is offered both in Tuscaloosa and by distance.

- Financial Planning Website (http://financialplanning.ches.ua.edu/)

CONSUMER CONFLICT MANAGEMENT, NEGOTIATION, AND MEDIATION

The certificate requires the successful completion of 15 hours of course work, in addition to the hours required for the masters in the student’s discipline. All 15 hours may count toward the master’s degree. Students must apply and gain admission to the UA Graduate School. Students must adhere to all UA Graduate School admission policies and deadlines. See Section 4.3 of the UA Graduate Catalog.

Students who wish to complete the Graduate Certificate in Conflict Management, Negotiation, and Mediation must meet admissions criteria for the Master’s degree in General Studies in Human Environmental Sciences with a 3.0 or higher GPA. If the prospective student does not have the 3.0 overall GPA or a 3.0 on the last 60 hours of course work, then the student must provide the GRE or MAT with an appropriate score. The Graduate Certificate may be completed on campus or via distance education (http://www.csm.ches.ua.edu/conflict-management.html).

CONSUMER QUALITY MANAGEMENT

Prepare yourself to become a quality management leader by earning your Master of Science in Human Environmental Sciences with a specialization in Consumer Quality Management from The University of Alabama. This 30-hour program is offered completely online to make earning a degree convenient for working adults. If you currently work or would like to work in quality management and would like to develop a deeper understanding of the field, this degree program can help you reach your goals. The CQM specialization will provide you with a comprehensive study of the facilitation skills necessary to lead an organization in continuous improvement.

INTERACTIVE TECHNOLOGY

The Institute for Interactive Technology offers a 30-hour asynchronous Master’s degree specialization in Interactive Technology focused on computer-mediated communications (General HES Degree). Students work with professors in adapting course projects to a particular profession. The focus is on how individuals and organizations interact with technology and might be described as “the difference between doing work and going to work,” reflecting the computer-mediated nature of the program.

- Interactive Technology Website (http://iit.ches.ua.edu/)

SPORTS BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

Faculty members from the College of Human Environmental Sciences (CHES) have developed a 30 hours graduate level emphasis in Sports Business Management (Sport, Hospitality, and Entertainment Operations) at The University of Alabama. The CHES Sports Business Management program, preparing students for employment and careers in the sport, hospitality and entertainment operation settings, can be viewed on-line at sportmanagement.ches.ua.edu. The mission of this master’s degree program is to provide students with a quality graduate education and fellowship experiences for entry and career employment in the sport industry. CHES Sports Business Management program is designed to educate students to manage in a wide variety of sport arenas (sport, hospitality and entertainment operation). The Keys to “Success in the Sport Industry” is quality fellowship experiences, advanced level knowledge, and ability to connect the theory to practice.

- Sports Business Management Website (http://www.sportmanagement.ches.ua.edu/)

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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All Counselor Education Master’s degree programs have a planned program of study. The plan follows the appropriate requirements for accreditation in that area. Read more
All Counselor Education Master’s degree programs have a planned program of study. The plan follows the appropriate requirements for accreditation in that area. Once an academic advisor has been assigned for your program of study, you should make an appointment to discuss your preferences and career aspirations. The program of study that you accept when you enter the program will be the one you will follow until you graduate. If there are any changes, they need to be approved by your advisor.

Visit the website http://education.ua.edu/academics/esprmc/counseling/macmhc/

The master’s degree in Clinical Mental Health Counseling is designed to prepare students for employment and practice in public and private mental-health settings. The curriculum offers course work and applied experiences for students’ specialty interests to include areas such couple/family counseling, addictions counseling, play therapy, and similar specialty practice with unique populations or using unique methods of counseling. The clinical mental health counseling program is 60 credit hours and meets accreditation criteria put forward by Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP).

Clinical Mental Health Counseling Program: Select Courses

While the majority of your courses will be offered through the Program in Counselor Education (designated as BCE) many required courses will be offered by affiliated programs. During your academic career, you will likely enroll for courses in Educational Psychology (designated as BEP), Educational Research (designated as BER), School Psychology (designated as BSP), and other areas. These courses afford the opportunity to take advantage of the expertise of faculty in other programs in the College of Education. Please refer to the Program Planning Record for Clinical Mental Health Counseling.

BCE 512 – Counseling: Theory and Process. Three hours. Introduction to counseling, counseling theories, and the counseling relationship; and an overview of the counseling process.

BCE 513 – Career Development. Three hours. An introduction for counselors and teachers to career development concepts, labor force information, and other resources needed to help persons with career planning and decision making.

BCE 514 – Counseling Skills. Three hours. An experiential course involving applied elements of theoretical models and customary helping skills to orient and prepare students for their initial supervised work with counseling clients.

BCE 515 – Practicum in Counseling I. Three hours. Prerequisite: BCE 514 and permission of the faculty. Laboratory training in attending, listening, and influencing skills. Supervised experience in counseling.

BCE 516 – Practicum in Counseling II. Three hours. Prerequisites: BCE 515 and permission of the faculty. Supervised practice in counseling.

BCE 518 – Introduction to Clinical Mental Health Counseling. Three hours. Seminar and fieldwork designed to acquaint the student with the functions and roles of the counselor in various community and agency settings.

BCE 521 – Group Procedures in Counseling and Guidance. Three hours. Prerequisite: Permission of the faculty. Background in group methods, including group guidance, group counseling, and group dynamics. One-half of class time is spent in a laboratory experience during which each student is provided an opportunity to function in a group.

BCE 522 – Individual and Group Appraisal. Three hours. Prerequisite: BER 540. An overview of measurement methods, practice in administration and interpretation of standardized tests, and evaluation of tests and testing programs for counseling and guidance.

BCE 525 – Internship in School and Clinical Mental Health Counseling. Three to twelve hours. Prerequisite: Permission of the faculty. Supervised field experience in an appropriate job setting.

BCE 528 – Advanced Seminar in Clinical Mental Health Counseling. Three hours. Prerequisite: BCE 518. Advanced study and discussion of a variety of agency-specific issues and topics.

BCE 611 – Multicultural Counseling. Three hours. This course is designed to introduce students to multicultural issues unique to counseling and other helping professions.

BCE 650 – Counseling Strategies for Family Relationships. Three hours. Prerequisite: BCE 512 or permission of the instructor. Examination of theoretical and applied elements of systemic intervention with troubled families.

BER 500 – Introduction to Educational Research. Three hours. An overview of the research process, primarily for master’s students.

BER 540 – Statistical Methods in Education. Three hours. Descriptive and basic inferential statistics, including graphs, frequency distributions central tendency, dispersion , correlation, and hypothesis testing. Computer applications are included.

BEP 550 – Life span Development. Three hours. A study of principles and concepts of physical, cognitive personality, and social development from conception through death.

BSP 660 – Psychopathology. Three hours. Thorough examination of the history, scope, and understanding of abnormal behavior through the life span, with emphasis on educational and clinical implications. The most recent classification system is used to structure topics and issues in the course.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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The master’s degree in Rehabilitation Counseling is designed to prepare rehabilitation counselors to serve persons with disabilities in a variety of work settings. Read more
The master’s degree in Rehabilitation Counseling is designed to prepare rehabilitation counselors to serve persons with disabilities in a variety of work settings. The rehabilitation counseling program is 48 credit hours and is fully accredited by the Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE).

Mission

Professional rehabilitation counselors encourage and support persons with disabilities and their families to fully participate in their community by providing individual and group counseling, vocational assessment, case management, advocacy, assistive technology, and consultation services to help meet their personal, social, vocational, psychological, independent living, and quality of life goals. The mission of the Rehabilitation Counselor Education (RCE) distance-based program at the University of Alabama is to prepare professional rehabilitation counselors who will provide quality rehabilitation counseling services for persons with disabilities from diverse backgrounds and their families.

Visit the website http://education.ua.edu/academics/esprmc/counseling/marehab/

In addition to objective of the Program in Counselor Education, the RCE Program has the following objectives:

Objectives

1. To introduce the philosophy and historical tenets of rehabilitation counseling through new literacies of technology and interpersonal communication.

2. To deliver a 21st century, distance-based curriculum of didactic and clinical experiences that encourages active learning and adheres to the Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE) standards.

3. To prepare qualified rehabilitation counselors to work in both public and private settings located in rural and urban communities to facilitate the needs of all persons with disabilities and their families.

4. To recruit, select, and matriculate rehabilitation counseling graduate students who represent minorities, women, and individuals with disabilities.

5. To provide our rehabilitation counseling graduate students with the knowledge and skills necessary to develop a philosophical orientation and approach reflective of their commitment to meeting the needs of persons with disabilities and their families, as well as employer and community needs.

6. To foster our university’s mission in advancing the intellectual and social condition of the people by communicating to our rehabilitation graduate counseling students the need for advocacy, community integration, and social responsibility.

7. To prepare our rehabilitation counseling graduate students to become ethical rehabilitation counselors by understanding and following the Code of Professional Ethics for rehabilitation counselors.

8. To promote the involvement of our rehabilitation counseling graduate students in rehabilitation counseling professional associations (e.g., National Rehabilitation Association, National Rehabilitation Counseling Association, American Rehabilitation Counseling Association, National Rehabilitation Counselors and Educators Association) to enhance awareness of professional issues and service that are important to the growth of our field.

The RCE master’s program is 48 semester hours in length. However, a 60-semester hour option is available for students who wish to pursue 60 hours of graduate coursework. The curriculum provides both didactic and experiential learning and culminates in a 600 hour internship under the supervision of a Certified Rehabilitation Counselor. The RCE program is fully accredited by the Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE). Students completing the RCE program are eligible to become Certified Rehabilitation Counselors (CRC). For more information about becoming a CRC, visit the Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification website: http://www.crccertification.com/

The RCE program is an on-line program. Distance students must meet criteria for full or conditional admission. Distance students who can enroll for 9 hours (fall and spring) and 6 hours (summer) may complete the degree program in two calendar years. Distance students may take more or fewer hours each semseter with advisor approval. Some rehabilitation courses are offered as synchronous courses and will require weekly participation via live virtual classroom.

In most states, program graduates are eligible to begin the process of becoming a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC). The following link provides a listing of counselor licensure boards in all of the states: http://www.counseling.org/Counselors/LicensureAndCert/TP/StateRequirements/CT2.aspx

Employment Outlook

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook (2009), jobs for rehabilitation counselors are expected to grow by 19%, which is faster than the average for all occupations. Rehabilitation counselors serve persons with disabilities in a variety of work settings including, but not limited to, state-federal vocational rehabilitation agencies, non-profit community rehabilitation programs, private-for-profit rehabilitation companies, rehabilitation hospital settings, community mental health and substance abuse programs, correctional facilities, and private practice.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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All Counselor Education Master’s degree programs have a planned program of study. The plan follows the appropriate requirements for accreditation in that area. Read more
All Counselor Education Master’s degree programs have a planned program of study. The plan follows the appropriate requirements for accreditation in that area. Once an academic advisor has been assigned for your program of study, you should make an appointment to discuss your preferences and career aspirations. The program of study that you accept when you enter the program will be the one you will follow until you graduate. If there are any changes, they need to be approved by your advisor.

Visit the website http://education.ua.edu/academics/esprmc/counseling/maschool/

The master’s degree in School Counseling is designed to provide prospective school counselors with the skills necessary to establish and conduct effective developmental guidance and counseling programs in schools, pre-kindergarten through twelfth grade. Students preparing for positions in School Counseling are provided experiences qualifying them for work at all levels of school counseling. The school counseling program is 48 hours and meets accreditation criteria of National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP).

School Counseling Program: Select Courses

While the majority of your courses will be offered through the Program in Counselor Education (designated as BCE) many required courses will be offered by affiliated programs. During your academic career, you will likely enroll for courses in Educational Psychology (designated as BEP), Educational Research (designated as BER), School Psychology (designated as BSP), and other areas. These courses afford the opportunity to take advantage of the expertise of faculty in other programs in the College of Education. Please refer to the Program Planning Record for School Counseling.

BCE 511 – Principles of Guidance. Three hours. Explores the rationale for guidance by examining human development and sociological, psychological, and philosophical bases for guidance. Provides awareness of services by surveying components of guidance programs.

BCE 512 – Counseling: Theory and Process. Three hours. Introduction to counseling, counseling theories, and the counseling relationship; and an overview of the counseling process.

BCE 513 – Career Development. Three hours. An introduction for counselors and teachers to career development concepts, labor force information, and other resources needed to help persons with career planning and decision making.

BCE 514 – Pre-practicum in Counseling. Three hours. An experiential course involving applied elements of theoretical models and customary helping skills to orient and prepare students for their initial supervised work with counseling clients.

BCE 515 – Practicum in Counseling I. Three hours. Prerequisite: BCE 514 and permission of the faculty. Laboratory training in attending, listening, and influencing skills. Supervised experience in counseling.

BCE 516 – Practicum in Counseling II. Three hours. Prerequisites: BCE 515 and permission of the faculty. Supervised practice in counseling.

BCE 521 – Group Procedures in Counseling and Guidance. Three hours. Prerequisite: Permission of the faculty. Background in group methods, including group guidance, group counseling, and group dynamics. One-half of class time is spent in a laboratory experience during which each student is provided an opportunity to function in a group.

BCE 522 – Individual and Group Appraisal. Three hours. Prerequisite: BER 540. An overview of measurement methods, practice in administration and interpretation of standardized tests, and evaluation of tests and testing programs for counseling and guidance.

BCE 523 – Program Development and Management. Three hours. An examination of the organization and implementation of the guidance functions of schools and the guidance responsibilities of counselors, teachers, and administrators.

BCE 525 – Internship in School and Community Counseling. Three to twelve hours. Prerequisite: Permission of the faculty. Supervised field experience in an appropriate job setting.

BCE 650 – Counseling Strategies for Family Relationships. Three hours. Prerequisite: BCE 512 or permission of the instructor. Examination of theoretical and applied elements of systemic intervention with troubled families.

BCE 611 Multicultural Approaches to Counseling. Three hours.

Prerequisites: Majors only or with instructor permission. This course is designed to introduce students to multicultural issues unique to counseling and other helping professions.

BER 500 – Introduction to Educational Research. Three hours. An overview of the research process, primarily for master’s students.

BER 540 – Statistical Methods in Education. Three hours. Descriptive and basic inferential statistics, including graphs, frequency distributions central tendency, dispersion , correlation, and hypothesis testing. Computer applications are included.

BEP 550 – Life span Development. Three hours. A study of principles and concepts of physical, cognitive personality, and social development from conception through death.

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