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SOAS University of London, Full Time Masters Degrees

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The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision.

Course detail

You will develop a thorough and specialist knowledge of comparative law, human rights, environmental law and international law. You will also gain a range of skills valued by many employers including: critical judgment skills; problem-solving skills; the ability to formulate sound arguments; and the ability to interpret and explain complex information.
You will have access to a wealth of study resources including the SOAS Library, one of the world's most important academic libraries, attracting scholars from across the globe.

A global perspective

Studying law at SOAS University of London enhances your learning experience by giving you a global perspective. We offer a truly international experience, with students from every continent studying English law alongside comparative, regional and international law. You can choose from a wide range of modules that include Islamic Law, International Criminal Law and Human Rights in the Developing World.

SOAS law graduates are highly sought after by some of the world's leading law firms and NGOs such as Amnesty International, governments and international bodies such as the UN.

Expert at where the world is changing

We have unrivalled expertise in comparative law across the globe, complemented by specialists in international and transnational law, human rights, transnational commercial law, environmental law and socio-legal method.
Many of our academics are experienced advisors to governments, international organisations and NGOs and have professional experience as qualified lawyers and members of regulatory bodies.

Format and assessment

With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language module. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed.

It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law. It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Postgraduate Open Evenings

You’ll be able to have one-to-one discussions with academics and current students. You can also attend specialist subject talks and take a tour of our campus.

Book now: http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/openevenings/

Webinars

Our webinars give you an opportunity to hear and ask questions about the subject you’re interested in studying. We also cover topics such as making an application, Tier 4 Visa entry, fees and funding, scholarships, accommodation options as well as career related information.

Book now: https://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/webinars/

How to apply

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision.

With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed.

It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law. It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmchineselaw/

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Courses or the following modules associated with the Chinese Law specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Chinese Commercial Law - 15PLAC106 (1 Unit)
- Modern Chinese Law and Institutions - 15PLAC139 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- Chinese Constitutionalism - 15PLAH043 (0.5 Unit)
- Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Human Rights in China - 15PLAH054 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Society in Southeast Asia - 15PLAH049 (0.5 Unit)
- Law, Rights and Society in Taiwan - 15PLAH058 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.
- Chinese Commercial Law - 15PLAD106 (1 Unit)
- Modern Chinese Law and Institutions - 15PLAD139 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision.

With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed.

It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law. It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmdispconfres/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three or four years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Dispute and Conflict Resolution specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Alternative Dispute Resolution - 15PLAC104 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration- 15PLAC153 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit)
- Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian Case - 15PLAC133 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- EU Law in Global Context - 15PLAH051 (0.5 Unit)
- Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Unit)
- International Criminal Law - 15PLAH055 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Policy of International Courts and Tribunals - 15PLAH026 (0.5 Unit)
- The Law of Armed Conflict - 15PLAH022 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

- Alternative Dispute Resolution - 15PLAD104 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAD153 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAD123 (1 Unit)
- Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian Case - 15PLAD133 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
The LLM in Environmental Law provides a unique specialisation in one of the most rapidly developing areas of law. Environmental law is one of the most challenging fields that has grown very rapidly over the past four decades and is now one of the key areas of both domestic and international law. Read more
The LLM in Environmental Law provides a unique specialisation in one of the most rapidly developing areas of law. Environmental law is one of the most challenging fields that has grown very rapidly over the past four decades and is now one of the key areas of both domestic and international law. At SOAS, we understand the environment in a broad sense which includes not only environmental issues strictly speaking but also all the links that they have with other areas such as natural resources, human rights, economic development trade or intellectual property rights.

The SOAS degree offers a distinct mix of modules that covers all the main areas of environmental law in their international and national dimensions. The international and global nature of many environmental issues makes the international law component a key part of the LLM in Environmental Law. We offer all the general topics that make up the core of international environmental law. Additionally, we focus specifically on the North-South dimension of international environmental issues given the key role this plays in most international environmental negotiations.

The LLM in Environmental Law specifically seeks to put international environmental law in its national context and examines the broad legal frameworks negotiated at the international level in the context of their implementation in selected countries of the South. It thus provides a much more grounded context to the study of environmental law.

Further, we also study the legal regimes of individual countries of the South to provide much more specific analysis of the discipline at the level of its implementation in specific contexts. The LLM in Environmental Law gives specific emphasis to different regions of the South, including South Asia, China and sub-Saharan Africa.

For further information about the general LLM at SOAS and a list of all the modules, please visit the General LLM description (http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llm/).

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmenvlaw/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three or four years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Environmental Law specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Climate Change and Energy Law and Policy - 15PLAC154 (1 Unit)
- Law, Environment and Sustainable Development in a Global Context - 15PLAC118 (1 Unit)
- Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAC126 (1 Unit)
- Water Law and Development: Conflicts, Governance and Justice - 15PLAC177 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- Water and Development: conflict and governance - 15PDSH049 (0.5 Unit)
- Water Law: justice and governance - 15PLAH044 (0.5 Unit)

Examples of non-Law module options:
- Global Energy and Climate Policy - 15PFFC017 (1 Unit)
- Energy Policy in the Asia-Pacific - 15PFFH011 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

- Climate Change and Energy Law and Policy - 15PLAD154 (1 Unit)
- Law, Environment and Sustainable Development in a Global Context - 15PLAD118 (1 Unit)
- Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAD126 (1 Unit)
- Water Law and Development: Conflicts, Governance and Justice - 15PLAD177 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. the assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision.

With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed.

It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law. It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmhrconfjust/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three or four years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Human Rights, Conflict and Justice specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
Human Rights and Islamic Law - 15PLAC150 (1 Unit)
Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAC111 (1 Unit)
Human Rights of Women - 15PLAC112 (1 Unit)
International Human Rights Clinic - 15PLAC145 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
International Protection of Human Rights - 15PLAC119 (1 Unit)
Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit)
Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAC131 (1 Unit)
Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAC133 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Units)
Foundations of International Law - 15PLAH021 (0.5 Units)
International Criminal Law - 15PLAH055 (0.5 Unit)
International Refugee and Migration Law - 15PLAH057 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Human Rights in China - 15PLAH054 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Policy of International Courts and Tribunals - 15PLAH026 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Post-Colonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Society in Southeast Asia - 15PLAH049 (0.5 Unit)
Law, Rights and Society in Taiwan - 15PLAH058 (0.5 Unit)
The Law of Armed Conflict - 15PLAH022 (0.5 Unit)

Examples of non-Law module options:
Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Units)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below.

Human Rights and Islamic Law - 15PLAD150 (1 Unit)
Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAD111 (1 Unit)
Human Rights of Women - 15PLAD112 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD169 (1 Unit)
International Protection of Human Rights - 15PLAD119 (1 Unit)
Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAD123 (1 Unit)
Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAD131 (1 Unit)
Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAD133 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The dissertation must be linked to a course offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the course will be treated as being part of the process of supervision.

With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each course may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed. It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law. It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmintcompcomlaw/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three or four years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the International and Comparative Commercial Law specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
Banking Law - 15PLAC105 (1 Unit)
Chinese Commercial Law - 15PLAC106 (1 Unit)
Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAC175 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAC115 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAC116 (1 Unit)
International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAC153 (1 Unit)
Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAC140 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
International Trade Law - 15PLAC120 (1 Unit)
Law of International Finance - 15PLAC135 (1 Unit)
Law of Islamic Finance - 15PLAC159 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
EU Law in Global Context - 15PLAH051 (0.5 Unit)
Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Unit)
Foundations of International Corporate Law - 15PLAH059 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

Banking Law - 15PLAD105 (1 Unit)
Chinese Commercial Law - 15PLAD106 (1 Unit)
Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAD175 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAD115 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAD116 (1 Unit)
International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAD153 (1 Unit)
Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAD140 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD169 (1 Unit)
International Trade Law - 15PLAD120 (1 Unit)
Law of International Finance - 15PLAD135 (1 Unit)
Law of Islamic Finance - 15PLAD159 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
The SOAS LLM degree is a postgraduate qualification for those who hold an undergraduate degree in law. A specialist LLM in International Economic Law will be of interest to those who wish to focus on legal aspects of international economic activity. Read more
The SOAS LLM degree is a postgraduate qualification for those who hold an undergraduate degree in law.

A specialist LLM in International Economic Law will be of interest to those who wish to focus on legal aspects of international economic activity.

Students following the SOAS International Economic Law LLM are immersed in one of the youngest and most dynamic fields of international legal theory and practice.

The questions they confront are difficult, urgent and compelling:
- When we regulate international trade, do we sometimes do more harm than good?
- What impact do bureaucracy and corruption have on foreign investment levels?
- What might international institutions do to prevent a future global economic crisis?
- What changes are China and India bringing to international economic law?
- What is the impact of economic liberalization on labour law and social welfare ?

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llminteconlaw/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three of fours years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the International Economic Law specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information

Full Module Units (1.0):
Banking Law - 15PLAC105 (1 Unit)
Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAC175 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAC115 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAC116 (1 Unit)
International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAC153 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
International Trade Law - 15PLAC120 (1 Unit)
Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAC131 (1 Unit)
Law of International Finance - 15PLAC135 (1 Unit)
Law of Islamic Finance - 15PLAC159 (1 Unit)
Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAC140 (1 Unit)
Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAC126 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
EU Law in Global Context - 15PLAH051 (0.5 Unit)
Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Unit)
Foundations of International Corporate Law - 15PLAH059 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

Banking Law - 15PLAD105 (1 Unit)
Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAD175 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAD115 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAD116 (1 Unit)
International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAD153 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD169 (1 Unit)
International Trade Law - 15PLAD120 (1 Unit)
Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAD131 (1 Unit)
Law of International Finance - 15PLAD135 (1 Unit)
Law of Islamic Finance - 15PLAD159 (1 Unit)
Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAD140 (1 Unit)
Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAD126 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation.

The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision. With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission by during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed. It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law.

It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmintlaw/

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the International Law specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Climate Change Law and Policy - 15PLAC154 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAC111 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAC153 (1 Unit)
- International Environmental Law - 15PLAC118 (1 Unit)
- International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
- International Protection of Human Rights - 15PLAC119 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit)
- Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAC126 (1 Unit)
- Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAC133 (1 Unit)
- Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAC140 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- Colonialism, Empire and International Law - 15PLAH025 (0.5 Unit)
- Foundations of International Corporate Law - 15PLAH059 (0.5 Unit)
- Foundations of International Law - 15PLAH021 (0.5 Unit)
- Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Unit)
- International Criminal Law - 15PLAH055 (0.5 Unit)
- International Refugee and Migration Law - 15PLAH057 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Human Rights in China - 15PLAH054 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Postcolonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Policy of International Courts and Tribunals - 15PLAH026 (0.5 Unit)
- Law, Rights and Society in Taiwan - 15PLAH058 (0.5 Unit)
- The Law of Armed Conflict - 15PLAH022 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

- Climate Change Law and Policy - 15PLAD154 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAD111 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAD153 (1 Unit)
- International Environmental Law - 15PLAD118 (1 Unit)
- International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD167 (1 Unit)
- International Protection of Human Rights - 15PLAD119 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAD123 (1 Unit)
- Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAD126 (1 Unit)
- Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAD133 (1 Unit)
- Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAD140 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation.

The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision. With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed.

It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law. It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmislamiclaw/

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Islamic Law specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Critical Jurisprudence in Islamic Law and Society - 15PLAC176 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights and Islamic Law - 15PLAC150 (1 Unit)
- Islamic Law - 15PLAC121 (1 Unit)
- Law of Islamic Finance - 15PLAC159 (1 Unit)
- Law and Society in South Asia - 15PLAC129 (1 Unit)
- Law and Society in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAC130 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Unit)
- Gender, Law and Society in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAH056 (0.5 Unit)
- Religion & Comparative Constitutionalism - 15PLAH052 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below.

- Critical Jurisprudence in Islamic Law and Society - 15PLAD176 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights and Islamic Law - 15PLAD150 (1 Unit)
- Islamic Law - 15PLAD121 (1 Unit)
- Law of Islamic Finance - 15PLAD159 (1 Unit)
- Law and Society in South Asia - 15PLAD129 (1 Unit)
- Law and Society in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAD130 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
The development of this LLM specialisation will capitalise on the Centre for Gender Studies as a multi-faculty centre from 2012, allowing students to engage with contemporary gender theories alongside existing PG Law modules that engage issues in gender and women's rights. Read more
The development of this LLM specialisation will capitalise on the Centre for Gender Studies as a multi-faculty centre from 2012, allowing students to engage with contemporary gender theories alongside existing PG Law modules that engage issues in gender and women's rights.

Students are required to take a core module in Feminist Legal Theory, alongside units on the human rights of women, gender and migration and gender and armed conflict.

Students combine the study of units specifically focused on gender and/or women's rights with the modules from the large list of law options available to LLM students at SOAS, allowing the student to tailor their programme to suit future goals.

In taking this module, students should hope to develop an understanding of the role of gender as a tool for analysis and critical analytical skills in feminist legal methods.

Students will also study the work of gender experts in contemporary institutions and situate contemporary legal reforms on women's rights and gender perspectives within feminist histories, while analysing the role of non-Western feminist actors and theories in leading future legal reform and gender perspectives.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llm-in-law-and-gender/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three of fours years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Law and Gender:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Feminist Legal Theory - 15PLAC155 (1 Unit) as a core course.
- Human Rights of Women - 15PLAC112 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- Gender, Law and Society in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAH056 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Postcolonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit)
- Migration, Gender and the Law in South East Asia and Beyond - 15PLAH023 (0.5 Unit)

Examples of non-Law module options:
- Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Unit)
- Childhood, Politics and Law - 15PPOH037 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

- Feminist Legal Theory - 15PLAD155 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights of Women - 15PLAD112 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation.

The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision. With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed.

It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law. It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmlawmena/

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Law in the Middle East and North Africa specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Critical Jurisprudence in Islamic Law and Society - 15PLAC176 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights and Islamic Law - 15PLAC150 (1 Unit)
- Islamic Law - 15PLAC121 (1 Unit)
- Law and Society in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAC130 (1 Unit)
- Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAC133 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Unit)
- Gender, Law and Society in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAH056 (0.5 Unit)
- Religion & Comparative Constitutionalism - 15PLAH052 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

- Critical Jurisprudence in Islamic Law and Society - 15PLAD176 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights and Islamic Law - 15PLAD150 (1 Unit)
- Islamic Law - 15PLAD121 (1 Unit)
- Law and Society in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAD130 (1 Unit)
- Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAD133 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation.

The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision. With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission by during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed. It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law.

It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmlawcultsoc/

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Law, Culture and Society specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Critical Jurisprudence in Islamic Law and Society - 15PLAC176 (1 Unit)
- Feminist Legal Theory - 15PLAC155 (1 Unit)
- International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAC115 (1 Unit)
- International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
- Islamic Law - 15PLAC121 (1 Unit)
- Law and Society in South Asia - 15PLAC129 (1 Unit)
- Law and in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAC130 (1 Unit)
- Law, Institutions and Political Economy of Transition - 15PLAC134 (1 Unit)
- Modern Chinese Law and Institutions - 15PLAC139 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- Chinese Constitutionalism - 15PLAH043 (0.5 Unit)
- Comparative Constitutional Law - 15PLAH046 (0.5 Unit)
- Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Unit)
- Foundations of International Law - 15PLAH021 (0.5 Unit)
- Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Unit)
- Law & Critique - 15PLAH053 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Postcolonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Society in Southeast Asia - 15PLAH049 (0.5 Unit)
- Migration, Gender and the Law in South East Asia and Beyond - 15PLAH023 (0.5 Unit)
- Religion & Comparative Constitutionalism - 15PLAH052 (0.5 Unit)

Examples of non-Law module options:
- Childhood, Politics and Law - 15PPOH037 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

- Critical Jurisprudence in Islamic Law and Society - 15PLAD176 (1 Unit)
- Feminist Legal Theory - 15PLAD155 (1 Unit)
- International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAD115 (1 Unit)
- International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD169 (1 Unit)
- Islamic Law - 15PLAD121 (1 Unit)
- Law and Society in South Asia - 15PLAD129 (1 Unit)
- Law and in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAD130 (1 Unit)
- Law, Institutions and Political Economy of Transition - 15PLAD134 (1 Unit)
- Modern Chinese Law and Institutions - 15PLAD139 (1 Unit)

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three or four years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation.

The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision. With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules.

A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject. Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed.

It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law. It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmlawdevgov/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three or for years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Law, Development and Governance specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAC175 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAC111 (1 Unit)
- International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAC115 (1 Unit)
- International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAC116 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAC153 (1 Unit)
- International Environmental Law - 15PLAC118 (1 Unit)
- International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit)
- Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAC131 (1 Unit)
- Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAC126 (1 Unit)
- Law, Institutions and Political Economy of Transition - 15PLAC134 (1 Unit)
- Multinational Enterprises and the Law- 15PLAC140 (1 Unit)
- Water Law and Development: Conflicts, Governance and Justice - 15PLAC177 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- Colonialism, Empire and International Law - 15PLAH025 (0.5 Unit)
- EU Law in Global Context - 15PLAH051 (0.5 Unit)
- Foundations of International Law - 15PLAH021 (0.5 Unit)
- International Refugee and Migration Law - 15PLAH057 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Human Rights in China - 15PLAH054 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Postcolonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Society in Southeast Asia - 15PLAH049 (0.5 Unit)
- Migration, Gender and the Law in South East Asia and Beyond - 15PLAH023 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

- Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAD175 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAD111 (1 Unit)
- International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAD115 (1 Unit)
- International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAD116 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAD153 (1 Unit)
- International Environmental Law - 15PLAD118 (1 Unit)
- International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD169 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAD123 (1 Unit)
- Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAD131 (1 Unit)
- Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAD126 (1 Unit)
- Law, Institutions and Political Economy of Transition - 15PLAD134 (1 Unit)
- Multinational Enterprises and the Law- 15PLAD140 (1 Unit)
- Water Law and Development: Conflicts, Governance and Justice - 15PLAD177 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take courses equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation.

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The two-year language pathway is directed at students who want to engage with the Arab Middle East in a professional as well as academic way, as the intensive language course would enable them to reach a near proficient knowledge of the language. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The two-year language pathway is directed at students who want to engage with the Arab Middle East in a professional as well as academic way, as the intensive language course would enable them to reach a near proficient knowledge of the language.

In the two-year pathway, students can take intensive Arabic language with either MA Islamic Societies and Cultures, MA Near and Middle Eastern Studies, or MA Palestine Studies, therefore making these programmes unique in Europe. The student will be provided with a near proficient ability in the Arabic language.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/nme/programmes/ma-and-intensive-language-arabic/

May be combined with

- MA Islamic Societies and Cultures
- MA Near and Middle Eastern Studies
- MA Palestine Studies
- MA History
- MA History of Art and Archaeology of East Asia
- MA Religions of Asia and Africa
- MA Medical Anthropology
- MA Anthropological Research Methods
- MA Migration and Diaspora Studies

Once you have checked the structure for this programme via the structure tab, please click into the above discipline that you would like to study. You will then see the full list of optional courses available to you.

Structure

In the two-year language pathway, students take two units of Arabic and one discipline unit in their first year. During the summer, they will participate in a summer school in Jordan. Upon their return, they will take one unit of Arabic in their second year and two discipline units. They would also be expected to choose a Major in which to write the dissertation. In the intensive-language pathway, the same rules apply as for the usual MA.

For the part-time four year pathway, please refer to the programme specification (attached below) of your preferred discipline.

The intensive language courses will be assessed by a combination of exams and continuous assessment, involving in-class tests. The assessment in the summer school is handed over to the partner university but will be counted as one unit.

- Intermediate Arabic/English Translation Project (PG) - 15PNMC418 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017
- Higher Intermediate Arabic/English/Arabic Translation Project (PG) - 15PNMC419 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017
- Advanced Arabic/English/Arabic Translation Project (PG) - 15PNMC420 (1 Unit) - Full Year
- Intensive Advanced Summer Arabic (PG) - 15PNMC416 (1 Unit) - Full Year

Teaching & Learning

Learning outcomes will vary depending on the combination of courses chosen by individual students. Learning outcomes for each course can be found under the information provided on the relevant list of postgraduate courses on the departmental page of the SOAS website. In general, by the end of the course students will have learnt the following:

Knowledge:

- How to assess data and evidence critically from manuscripts and digital sources, solve problems of conflicting sources and conflicting interpretations, locate materials, use research-sources (particularly research-library catalogues) and other relevant traditional sources.
- Subject-specific skills are an amalgam of the skills described for each of the three options chosen by candidates from the cross-department/faculty choices available in the relevant course-descriptors.

Intellectual (thinking) skills:

- Students will learn to become precise and cautious in their assessment of evidence and should also come to understand through practice what documents can and cannot tell us.
- Students will learn to question interpretations, however authoritative, and reassess evidence for themselves.
- Communicate effectively in writing subject-based practical skills.
- Language-students will learn the chosen language at the appropriate level.
- Present seminar-papers.
- Listen and discuss ideas introduced during seminars.
- Practise research-techniques in a variety of specialised research-libraries and institutes.

Transferable skills:

- Writing good essays and dissertations.
- Structure and communicate ideas effectively, both orally and in writing.
- Study a variety of written and digital materials in libraries and research-institutes of a kind they will not have used as undergraduates.
- Present (non-assessed) material orally.
- To acquire/develop skills in Arabic language to Effective Operational Proficiency level.
- To demonstrate awareness of the conceptual and communicative underpinnings of Arabic and through this interlinguistic and intercultural understanding.
- Communicate in written and spoken medium in contemporary Arabic.
- Engage with people from different linguistic and cultural backgrounds, understand the role of different frames of reference.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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