• University of York Featured Masters Courses
  • Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • Regent’s University London Featured Masters Courses
  • Leeds Beckett University Featured Masters Courses
  • Imperial College London Featured Masters Courses
  • Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
Queen’s University Belfast Featured Masters Courses
University of St Andrews Featured Masters Courses
University of Sussex Featured Masters Courses
Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
0 miles

University of York, Full Time Masters Degrees

  • University of York×
  • Full Time×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 257
Order by 
This specialist Masters degree is intended to build on your existing knowledge of accounting and finance. Read more
This specialist Masters degree is intended to build on your existing knowledge of accounting and finance. The programme concentrates on the role of accounting and finance in organisational management and will provide you with a thorough grounding in accounting, finance, financial management, financial reporting, financial markets and investment and risk.

The programme will provide you with the knowledge and skills you will need for a career in the financial service industry or financial consultancy.

Course Structure

Term 1
-Critical Perspectives in Accounting (10 credits)
-Advanced Financial Accounting (20 credits)
-Managerial Economics (10 credits)
-Advanced Management Accounting (20 credits)

Term 2
-Financial Strategy and Governance (20 credits)
-Qualitative Research Methods (10 credits)

Example Options - Choice of 1 from:
-Social and Environmental Accounting (20 credits)
-Financial Markets and Investment (20 credits)
-Managing Public Finances (20 credits)
-Accounting and Risk (20 credits)

Term 3
-Quantitative Methods and Data Analysis (10 credits)

Summer
-Dissertation (60 credits)

Where you’ll go from here

York Masters students have been successful in developing careers in a range of organisations in many parts of the world. Common destinations on leaving are:
-Investment Banking
-Accountancy and Audit
-Computing
-Education (Further and Higher)
-Finance and Banking
-Political Organisation
-Retail

A small number of students each year are keen to continue their studies, enrolling on specialists masters programmes elsewhere in the UK or moving on to The York Management School’s Doctoral programme.

Read less
We believe that nurses have an essential contribution to make to modern healthcare and its delivery. Read more
We believe that nurses have an essential contribution to make to modern healthcare and its delivery. We aim to support you to become an exceptional registered nurse working in partnership with the public to promote health, and able to provide sensitive, evidence-based care and emotional support to clients, patients and their carers across the lifespan.

Our staff

Our approachable, available and supportive staff, work collaboratively with clinical practitioners to support our nursing students. They are committed to providing a vibrant, challenging and supportive learning environment which will enable students to fulfil their potential.

Our students

We regard nursing students as the potential nursing leaders of the future. We support students to become proactive, self-directed learners who will develop empathy, insight and intellectual independence enabling them to deliver care to the highest standards.

Theory

The Post Graduate Diploma prepares you for your future role as a skilled and reflective adult nurse, able to use sound clinical judgement to deliver thoughtful, compassionate, evidence-based care to enhance the future health and well-being of the communities you serve.

During your studies you will learn alongside students on other nursing programmes. You will be taught via lectures, seminars and co-operative learning groups. You will stay in the same CLG with other Post Graduate nursing students for the whole of your programme. This will provide you with the opportunity to form co-operative learning relationships with your peers.

Modules you will study include: Principles of professional identity; Knowledge and skills for nursing practice; Patient and client experience and contemporary nursing practice; Safety and risk in adult nursing care; Evidence-based practice and the nurse-patient or client relationship; Caring for the individual with long term conditions; Individual and public health policy; Supporting the individual with acute and complex adult care needs; Ethics and philosophy for nursing.

Practice

Practice experiences will take place across the beautiful North Yorkshire Region offering you experiences of delivering care with diverse communities in a range of health and social care environments. You will begin your practical experience three months into the programme. You are required to undertake a total of four periods of assessed practice over the two years.

The Department of Health Sciences has adopted a base and spoke model of practice experience to ensure your practice experience focusses on the learning outcomes you need to achieve. You will be allocated to a base practice experience area, which may be a day unit, clinic, community nursing team or hospital ward. From there, through negotiation, you will access spoke areas which will support and supplement your learning. This will provide you with some flexibility to follow the journeys of patients, clients, service users and carers.

Support

The programme is designed to ensure that you are well supported throughout the two years. In practice you have access to nurse mentors and link lecturers who will help to ensure you maximize your opportunities for learning. In theory you are allocated personal supervisors who will provide you with support for your academic work. Additionally Student Services acts as a first point of contact if you need information or assistance with a problem.

MSc in Nursing Practice

After successfully completing the Postgraduate Diploma with Professional Registration (Adult) you may, at a later stage, top up your qualification to an MSc in Nursing Practice through the RPL (Recognition of Prior Learning) route by undertaking a 60 credit Service Improvement Project. If you do decide to top up to the MSc, the fees for this additional element of study will need to be paid either by you or your employer.

Read less
Research in Computer Science at York is carried out at the frontiers of knowledge in the discipline. This course gives you the chance to study a range of advanced topics in Computer Science, taught by researchers active in that area. Read more
Research in Computer Science at York is carried out at the frontiers of knowledge in the discipline. This course gives you the chance to study a range of advanced topics in Computer Science, taught by researchers active in that area. This means you will be learning current research results, keeping you at the forefront of these areas. You will also learn a range of theories, principles and practical methods.

The MSc in Advanced Computer Science is a full time, one year taught course, intended for students who already have a good first degree in Computer Science, and would like to develop a level of understanding and technical skill at the leading edge of Computer Science.

You can choose modules on a range of topics, including Cryptography, Functional Programming, Interactive Technologies, Natural Language Processing, Quantum Computation and Model-Driven Engineering.

Course aims
You will gain an in-depth knowledge of topics on the frontiers of Computer Science in order to engage in research or development and application of leading-edge research findings.

By undertaking an individual project, you will become a specialist in your selected area. You will be encouraged to produce research results of your own. This will prepare you to undertake a PhD in Computer Science should you wish to continue studying within the subject.

Learning outcomes
-A knowledge of several difference topics in Computer Science at an advanced level.
-An understanding of a body of research literature in Computer Science in your chosen topic, and the underlying principles and techniques of research in this area.
-An ability to engage in independent study at an advanced level, and develop skills in self-motivation and organisation.

Research Project

You will undertake your individual research project over the Summer term and Summer vacation. This will be a culmination of the taught modules you have taken during the course, which will allow you to focus on a specialist area of interest.

You will be allocated a personal supervisor, who will be an expert in your chosen area of research. You will be hosted by the research group of your supervisor, and you will benefit from the knowledge and resources of the whole group. Being attached to a research group also allows you to take part in their informal research seminars, and receive feedback and help from other members of the group.

You can choose from projects suggested by members of our academic staff. You also have the option of formulating your own project proposal, with the assistance from your personal supervisor.

All project proposals are rigorously vetted and must meet a number of requirements before these are made available to the students. The department uses an automated project allocation system for assigning projects to students that takes into account supervisor and student preferences.

The project aims to give you an introduction to independent research, as well as giving you the context of a research group working on topics that will be allied to your own. You will develop the skills and understanding in the methods and techniques of research in Computer Science.

As part of the assessment of the project, as well as your dissertation, you will give a talk about your work and submit a concise paper which we will encourage you to publish.

Information for Students

The MSc in Advanced Computer Science exposes you to several topics in Computer Science that are under active research at York. The material taught is preparatory to helping to continue that research, and perhaps continuing to a PhD. What we require from you are enthusiasm, hard work and enough background knowledge to take your chosen modules.

The modules on the MSc in Advanced Computer Science are mostly shared with our Stage 4 (Masters level) undergraduates. Your technical background will be different, and we acknowledge this.

During August we will send entrants a document describing the background knowledge needed for each module and, in many cases, references to where this knowledge is available (for example, widely available text books and web pages).

More generally, many of the modules expect a high level of mathematical sophistication. While the kind of mathematics used varies from module to module, you will find it useful to revise discrete mathematics (predicate and propositional calculi, set theory, relational and functional calculi, and some knowledge of formal logic), statistics and formal language theory. You should also be able to follow and produce proofs.

Careers

Here at York, we're really proud of the fact that more than 97% of our postgraduate students go on to employment or further study within six months of graduating from York. We think the reason for this is that our courses prepare our students for life in the workplace through our collaboration with industry to ensure that what we are teaching is useful for employers.

Read less
An interdisciplinary masters course covering the breadth of mathematical applications in biology. Read more
An interdisciplinary masters course covering the breadth of mathematical applications in biology.

Are you a biologically inclined mathematician or physicist, or a biologist with an keen interest in modelling and analysis? Do you want to know how to model fish population dynamics and harvests, to decipher the mathematics of viruses, or understand of the swimming behaviour of microrganisms? The new MSc in Advanced Mathematical Biology aims to provide answers to all of these questions, and more.

The MSc will provide insight into processes over a wide range of scales; from highly symmetric capsids (the cases that surround viruses) to the interactions of entire communities in oceans. Advanced statistical methods, systems biology and biological fluid dynamics will be covered, and there will be emphasis on applications to policy and industry throughout. This programme aspires to fill the language gap between technical mathematical concepts and real world applications in the biological and life sciences. Students will gain a comprehensive grounding in cutting edge theory coupled to training in the subtleties of application.

Biological concepts and mechanisms will be discussed during bespoke sessions in “Issues in modern biology,” and developed during interdisciplinary group projects. There will also be a range of challenging elective modules.

The MSc in Advanced Mathematical Biology is an intensive one year taught programme that will prepare students either for a career in industry in the quantitative life sciences or for further academic research in Mathematical Biology.

Placements

An important part of the programme is a summer work-based placement. At the end of the spring term, students will select a placement from a list of academic and industrial institutions across the sector. Students will spend a period of three months working closely with their chosen institution with a placement supervisor. Students will write a dissertation towards the end of the placement, and will be assessed by their academic supervisor who will also consult with the placement supervisor.

Read less
The MSc in Applied Forensic Psychology and MSc in Forensic Psychology Studies (for students without Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership with the British Psychological Society) are renowned for producing high calibre graduates. Read more
The MSc in Applied Forensic Psychology and MSc in Forensic Psychology Studies (for students without Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership with the British Psychological Society) are renowned for producing high calibre graduates. Feedback from employers indicates they are consistently impressed with the ability of York graduates to apply theory to practice and this is reflected in the destinations of many of our recent graduates.

The courses provide an equal balance of practice-based, methodological and theoretically driven modules designed to foster autonomy within the bounds of professional practice, independent learning and self-directed reflection. The highly specialist forensic modules, delivered by practising experts in the field, combined with generic practice-based modules, tutorials and the support of a highly experienced core course team, will provide you with the requisite practitioner-based skills, understanding, and knowledge to work effectively and increase your employability in a forensic setting. The MSc in Applied Forensic Psychology will also facilitate chartership within the British Psychological Society Division of Forensic Psychology for students who go on to undertake a further two years of forensic practice as outlined in the conditions for membership.

The MSc Applied Forensic Psychology course is formally accredited by the British Psychological Society.

Content

The MSc in Applied Forensic Psychology and MSc in Forensic Psychology Studies are full-time (51-week), 180-credit programmes divided into seven modules (6 taught, 1 independent study):

The practitioner skills modules will facilitate confidence in your ability to work as a practitioner in a forensic setting and will also provide you with leading edge information technology, presentation and communication skills required for a wide variety of roles.
The research evidence and theory modules will provide a grounding in theory, research methods and statistics that will provide the key skills for employment in a variety of settings (e.g., prisons, secure units, the police, prison and probation services) and the key skills for those who wish to pursue a research degree in a forensic or a related field.

The empirical research project will provide the academic grounding for those wishing to pursue an academic career or gain more specialist knowledge in a particular topic area.

Assessment

Students on both courses are encouraged to write concisely to a high academic standard for a range of different audiences. Hence, assessment methods are varied and include assessed coursework and closed exams:
-Short answer paper
-Briefing paper
-Case formulation
-Open essay
-Research protocol
-Multiple choice paper
-Practical reports
-Empirical research project

Students will be allocated a personal supervisor to monitor their progress throughout the academic year and provide support and guidance if necessary.

Placements

The MSc in Applied Forensic Psychology course does not include a placement component. However, some students may be able to obtain voluntary work experience in forensic settings to complement their studies. In addition, the course team is sometimes able to help secure placements for students who have little or no forensic experience, although this cannot be guaranteed. As well as receiving supervision from the provider, students will also be assigned to a member of the course team who will oversee their performance throughout the placement. Since they are not a required or essential component of the MSc course, placements are not assessed.

You are advised to contact local organisations at the start of the Autumn Term if you are considering undertaking work experience during your studies. Please also be aware that some placement providers (particularly charities) may require volunteers to commit for a full year and this should be borne in mind when arranging accommodation.

Our students have succeeded in securing placements with the following establishments/organisations:
-HMP Doncaster
-HMP Full Sutton
-Durham and Tees Valley Probation Trust
-The Farndon Unit
-Strength to Change, Hull
-Stockton Hall Hospital, York
-North Yorkshire Probation
-Rampton Secure Hospital

In the 2015/16 academic year, students have undertaken work experience with:
-Stockton Hall Hospital, York
-Circles of Support and Accountability
-The Petros Organisation, York
-NSPCC
-The University of York (supporting PhD students)
-YACRO
-Springwood Lodge Hospital, Leeds

On some occasions, students have managed to secure full or part-time employment with the placement provider after graduating from the MSc programme.

Read less
Developing, testing, evaluating and implementing evidence-based healthcare in highly complex situations is becoming increasingly important. Read more
Developing, testing, evaluating and implementing evidence-based healthcare in highly complex situations is becoming increasingly important. Our MSc in Applied Health Research will equip you with the skills necessary to develop a career in the health sector or to design, implement and publish healthcare research.

It offers an excellent grounding in applied health research methods, including quantitative and qualitative methodologies, systematic reviews, randomised controlled trials, epidemiology and health economics.

Our expertise

When you join our department you are joining one of the UK's top health services research, health economics and public health research teams. Our world leading experts help improve human health and prevent illness through the analysis and delivery of leading research.

Course content

The MSc in Applied Health Research involves a one-year full-time or two-year part-time Masters programme (180 credits). You will take taught modules worth a total of 120 credits. The compulsory modules worth 70 credits are:
-Introduction to Regression Analysis (10 credits)
-Epidemiology (10 credits)
-Randomised Controlled Trials (10 credits)
-Systematic Reviews (10 credits)
-Qualitative Health Research (10 credits)
-Health Economics (10 credits)
-Introduction to Health Statistics (10 credits)

In addition you will choose modules worth 50 credits from the following:
-Health and Social Behaviour (20 credits)
-Health Policy - Principles, Practice and the Evidence Base (10 credits)
-Further Regression Analysis (10 credits)
-Understanding Clinical Statistics (10 credits)
-Measurement in Health and Disease (10 credits)
-Infection and Disease (20 credits)*
-Public Health Foundations in Practice (20 credits)*
-Health Research in Practice (10 credits)

* Please note Applied Health Research students can only take either Infection and Disease or Public Health Foundations and Practice

Read less
The Postgraduate Diploma in Applied Health Research provides an excellent grounding in health research for anyone wishing to develop a career in the health sector, where the ability to take a critical, evidence-based approach to health problems and solutions is increasingly valued. Read more
The Postgraduate Diploma in Applied Health Research provides an excellent grounding in health research for anyone wishing to develop a career in the health sector, where the ability to take a critical, evidence-based approach to health problems and solutions is increasingly valued.

The course offers students an excellent grounding in core health research methods including systematic reviews, RCTs, epidemiology, applied statistics, qualitative methods and health economics. Teaching is led by senior staff in the department who are acknowledged experts in their fields and the large majority of teaching sessions take place in small groups.

The Postgraduate Diploma can be undertaken over one year (full-time) or two years (part-time). You will focus on the production, critical appraisal and use of scientifically rigorous research evidence, applied to a range of health-related areas. It is ideally suited to students who do not wish to go on to conduct their own research project.

Training

The Postgraduate Diploma in Applied Health Research involves a one-year full-time or two-year part-time programme. You will take taught modules worth a total of 120 credits. The compulsory modules worth 70 credits are:
-Introduction to Regression Analysis (10 credits)
-Epidemiology (10 credits)
-Randomised Controlled Trials (10 credits)
-Systematic Reviews (10 credits)
-Qualitative Health Research (10 credits)
-Health Economics (10 credits)
-Introduction to Health Statistics (10 credits)

In addition you will choose modules worth 50 credits from the following:
-Health and Social Behaviour (20 credits)
-Health Policy - Principles, Practice and the Evidence Base (10 credits)
-Further Regression Analysis (10 credits)
-Understanding Clinical Statistics (10 credits)
-Measurement in Health and Disease (10 credits)
-Infection and Disease (20 credits) *
-Public Health Foundations and Practice (20 credits) *
-Health Research in Practice (10 credits)

* Please note Applied Health Research students can only take either Infection and Disease or Public Health Foundations and Practice

There may be some flexibility to attend further modules where the timetable allows.

Read less
The MA focuses on the use of rights discourse and tools within the human rights mainstream and in a range of related fields (development, humanitarianism, conflict transformation, the environment, public health etc.). Read more
The MA focuses on the use of rights discourse and tools within the human rights mainstream and in a range of related fields (development, humanitarianism, conflict transformation, the environment, public health etc.).

As such, it is designed for practitioners and would-be practitioners across this spectrum who wish to engage with applied human rights.

Overview

Our MA in Applied Human Rights is distinctive in five main ways:
-Tt is uniquely applied, exploring how human rights can advance social justice in law, policy and social activism
-It is interdisciplinary and holistic (integrating knowledge of human rights, development, conflict, and more)
-Students will acquire relevant knowledge but also skills that are vital for a career in human rights e.g. project management skills
-The lecturers are both academics and experienced practitioners, and the international human rights defenders hosted by the Centre will attend and lead classes
-An international field trip to South Africa takes place in the first term (student numbers permitting), enabling students to work alongside local NGOs and human rights defenders on concrete projects

Course content

The MA structure has two components: compulsory modules, and optional modules. In total, students need to complete five modules (two compulsory, in the first term; one compulsory, running over two terms; two options in the second term). A dissertation will fulfill the requirements for an MA. This structure has been chosen so as to maximize the choice available to students, but to guide the selection process in a constructive way eg: indicating where modules are practice-based and where they are not.

Continuous assessment of applied skills is a feature of the programme.

Compulsory modules
-Defending human rights (40 credits; terms 1-2)
-Social sciences and human rights practice (20 credits; term 1)
-International human rights law and advocacy (20 credits, term 1)
-Dissertation (60 credits, terms 3-4)

Optional modules
In the second term students will be able to take two options. Those offered by CAHR will share the characteristics of the MA (practice based and interdisciplinary) and will explore areas where rights are being used in new and innovative ways. Students may also select from optional modules listed below taught by other departments.
Optional modules taught at CAHR:
-Asylum, migration and trafficking
-Culture and protest
-Development Alternatives: Development, Rights, Security
-Truth, justice and reparations after violence

Optional modules taught in other departments
-Conflict and development (Politics)
-Globalisation and social policy (Social Policy and Social Work)
-Global social problems (Social Policy and Social Work)
-International organisations (Politics)
-New security challenges (Politics)
-Teaching and learning citizenship and global education (Education)
-Women, citizenship and conflict (Centre for Women's Studies)

*Please note that optional modules may not run if the lecturer is on leave or there is insufficient demand.

Careers

Our MA provides career advice, networking opportunities, hands-on experience, and personalised reference letters to help our graduates find good jobs with human rights NGOs, humanitarian and development organisations, policy think-tanks, national governments, and UN agencies.

Recent graduates have secured work with:
-Government departments, e.g. working on health equality and trafficking in the UK, Finnish Centre for Human Rights (NHRI)
-Human rights organisations, e.g. Freedom House, the Terrence Higgins Trust, the Afghanistan Human Rights and Democracy Organisation, the Gay & Lesbian Victory Institute (Washington, DC), Freedom from Torture (Yorkshire & Humberside), International Services and Brave New Films (USA)
-Development and humanitarian organisations, e.g. Norwegian People's Aid and Merlin
-Inter-governmental agencies, e.g. the Unrepresented Nations and Peoples Organisation in The Hague, UNDP in Bangladesh, UNRIC in Brussels and Quaker UN Office in Geneva
-Research posts, e.g. PhD positions and Research Assistant on Corporate Social Responsibility at the American University, Beirut
-Think-tanks, e.g. Involve, London
-Businesses, e.g. Ethical Trade Coordinator at New Look Retailers

Read less
The Department of Education, in collaboration with the Centre for English Language Teaching, offers a one-year (12-month) taught full-time MA in Applied Linguistics for English Language Teaching (MAALELT). Read more
The Department of Education, in collaboration with the Centre for English Language Teaching, offers a one-year (12-month) taught full-time MA in Applied Linguistics for English Language Teaching (MAALELT). Applicants' first degree should be in a related subject, such as language, linguistics or education, with a substantial component of English.

MAALELT is for those who are interested in pursuing an MA relating to TESOL and who will have the equivalent of at least one year's full-time English teaching experience by the time the course starts; this experience of teaching can be with any age of learner, and any stages of learning.This teaching experience is normally after you have obtained your first degree. Teacher training internships, casual private tutoring and holiday camps are not normally sufficient.

You must indicate clearly on the main application form that you have this experience, giving all of the following information:
-The start date and finish date of your teaching experience. If you will be teaching until the MA starts, please write 'on going until MA starts'
-The type of establishment you have taught in (e.g. primary, secondary, university, private language school, etc.)
-Whether you were full or part time. If part time, tell us how much you taught per week.

You will also need to provide formal evidence of your teaching experience, for example a professional reference.

If by the time the MA at York begins, you will not have the equivalent of at least one year's full time experience, please consider applying for the MATESOL instead.

Aims

The aim of the programme is to provide a broad-based Masters in English (TESOL) language education informed by theoretical and practical concerns. The programme does not offer a language teaching qualification; it does offer advanced inquiry into the processes of language learning, with specific reference to second language learning. Applications are welcome from both home and international students.

Applicants are strongly advised to ensure that they submit applications no later than 1 September if they wish to begin a course of study beginning in the same year. No guarantee can be offered that applications received after this date will be processed for a September start date.

Overseas applicants are also advised to check how long it is likely to take for their visa to be processed and to allow sufficient time in order that they are able to begin their programme of study on time.

Programme Content

Term 1
-Language for education (20 credits)
-Research methods in language learning and teaching (20 credits)

One option module (20 credits). The options available are likely to include:
-Bilingualism
-Citizenship education
-Cross-linguistic influences in second language acquisition
-Discourse analysis & language teaching
-Education and social justice
-Evaluating ESOL classroom practice
-Intercultural communication in education
-Learning and Teaching Second Language Reading
-Motivation in education
-Teaching and assessing speaking skills
-Teaching and assessing writing skills
-Teaching and learning in schools
-Teaching World English
-Topics in second language acquisition

Term 2
-Teaching and learning language (20 credits)
-Language curriculum design and evaluation (20 credits)

Term 3
-Planning and Communicating Research (20 credits.) These classes are spread over Terms 2 and 3

The third term and the summer is devoted to writing a dissertation (60 credits) based on a small-scale research study to be submitted by early September.

Careers

Our graduates find employment in a wide range of sectors within education, but also in journalism, information management, human resources and other careers.

Many become English language teachers all around the world, in private language schools, state schools, universities and other organisations requiring English language instruction.

Others find employment opportunities in areas of course and syllabus design, and materials writing in large and small scale publishing houses.

Our postgraduate courses can be used to complement teacher training/development programmes and voluntary or paid roles which focus on the more practical elements of teaching. However, other than our PGCE, our courses are not teacher training programmes in themselves.

Read less
The Department of Education, in collaboration with the Centre for English Language Teaching, offers a one-year (12-month) taught full-time MA in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (MAALLT). Read more
The Department of Education, in collaboration with the Centre for English Language Teaching, offers a one-year (12-month) taught full-time MA in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (MAALLT). Applicants' first degree should be in a related subject, such as language, linguistics or education.

To be eligible for this MA, you must have the equivalent of at least one year's teaching experience by the time the course starts; this can involve any language, any age of learner and any stages of learning. This teaching experience is normally after you have obtained your first degree. Teacher training internships, casual private tutoring and holiday camps are not normally sufficient.
You must indicate clearly on the main application form that you have this experience, giving all of the following information:
-The start date and finish date of your teaching experience,
If you will be teaching until the MA starts, please write 'on going until MA starts'
-The type of establishment you have taught in (e.g. primary, secondary, university, private language school, etc.)
-Whether you were full or part time. If part time, tell us how much you taught per week.

You will also need to provide formal evidence of your teaching experience, for example a professional reference.

If by the time the MA at York begins, you will not have the equivalent of at least one year's full time experience, please consider applying for the MA in TESOL instead.

Aims

The aim of the programme is to provide a broad-based Masters in language education informed by theoretical and practical concerns. The programme does not offer a language teaching qualification; it does offer advanced inquiry into the processes of language learning, with specific reference to second language learning. Applications are welcome from both home and international students.

Applicants are strongly advised to ensure that they submit applications no later than 1 September if they wish to begin a course of study beginning in the same year. No guarantee can be offered that applications received after this date will be processed for a September start date.

Overseas applicants are also advised to check how long it is likely to take for their visa to be processed and to allow sufficient time in order that they are able to begin their programme of study on time.

Programme Content

Term 1
-Language for education (20 credits)
-Research methods in language learning and teaching (20 credits)

One option module (20 credits). The options available are likely to include:
-Bilingualism
-Citizenship education
-Cross-linguistic influences in second language acquisition
-Discourse analysis & language teaching
-Education and social justice
-Evaluating ESOL Classroom Practice
-Intercultural communication in education
-Learning and Teaching Second Language Reading
-Motivation in Education
-Teaching and assessing speaking skills
-Teaching and assessing writing skills
-Teaching and learning in schools
-Teaching World English
-Topics in second language acquisition

Term 2
-Teaching and learning language (20 credits)

One option module (20 credits). The options available are likely to include:
-Approaches to English language teaching
-Contemporary issues in teaching
-Cross-cultural perspectives on language and discourse
-Developmental psycholinguistics
-Gender, Sexuality and Education
-Higher Education in the 21st Century
-Learning and teaching grammar in a second language
-Pragmatics: language, meaning and communication
-Psychology of language and language learning
-Qualitative and quantitative data analysis
-Teaching and learning citizenship and global education
-Teaching English for academic purposes
-Testing and assessment in English language teaching

Term 3
-Planning and Communicating Research (20 credits.) These classes are spread over Terms 2 and 3

The third term and the summer is devoted to writing a dissertation (60 credits) based on a small-scale research study to be submitted by early September.

Careers

Our graduates find employment in a wide range of sectors within education, but also in journalism, information management, human resources and other careers.

Many become language teachers all around the world, in private language schools, state schools and universities.

Others find employment opportunities in areas of course and syllabus design, and materials writing in large and small scale publishing houses.

Our postgraduate courses can be used to complement teacher training/development programmes and voluntary or paid roles which focus on the more practical elements of teaching. However, other than our PGCE, our courses are not teacher training programmes in themselves.

Read less
The MSc in Archaeological Information Systems course will provide you with applied practical experience and critical theoretical engagement with a full range of computing systems and technology used for publishing, archiving, analysing, visualising and presenting archaeological information today. Read more
The MSc in Archaeological Information Systems course will provide you with applied practical experience and critical theoretical engagement with a full range of computing systems and technology used for publishing, archiving, analysing, visualising and presenting archaeological information today.

The University of York’s Archaeology Department has been at the forefront of researching and developing archaeological computer applications since the early days of digital practice in the discipline and has hosted the first online peer-reviewed e-journal for archaeology since 1996. It also hosts the world-leading Archaeology Data Service, which is the UK’s national digital data archive for the historic environment.

• Gain applied practical experience in internet applications, database design and management, GIS technology, CAD and computer modelling systems.
• Build a broad foundation of expertise in archaeological computing applications.
• Access the University of York’s world-leading expertise in e-publishing and digital archiving.
• Develop IT knowledge and skills that are highly valued in heritage-sector careers.
• Access a full suite of research computing hardware and software
• Receive tailored careers advice from staff with significant experience of recruiting within the sector.

York is one of the best places to study Archaeology, Heritage or Conservation. The Department has an excellent reputation and is one of the largest Archaeology teaching centres in the UK. The historic City of York is rich in architectural and archaeological treasures and resources which you will have easy access to during your studies.

What does the course cover?

Through a combination of academic studies, practical training, research and work placements, you will:
• Develop vital knowledge of the digital and internet technologies used for disseminating, publishing and archiving archaeological information.
• Learn practical skills in 3-D modelling, GIS, CAD and other technologies used for analysing and visualising archaeological information.

The course provides a detailed introduction to the broad range of information systems used in archaeology, and provides the opportunity to apply these systems in practice. The work placement and dissertation enable you to specialise in a particular technique or approach, giving you valuable practical experience in your areas of interest.

Who is it for?

The MSc in Archaeological Information Systems is designed for people who have a basic grounding in computer literacy and an interest in archaeology and heritage, and who wish to follow vocational training in archaeological information systems.

What can it lead to?

Many of our graduates go onto careers in archaeological computing, working in contract units or county-based records organisations. Others have founded their own consultancy businesses. Some apply their computing skills in more mainstream archaeological work, in museums, or in the wider world. Others have pursued further research at doctoral level. Click on the alumni tab above to find out what our alumni and current students have to say about the course.

Content

This one-year MSc course is taught via a combination of lectures, seminars and tutorials. You will study two core modules, two optional modules and four shorter skills modules of your choice. You will also gain valuable practical experience of applying information systems in the workplace on a work placement module. Finally, in the summer term you will develop your research and presentation skills by producing a dissertation and giving an assessed lecture.

Placement

Your work placement is a key feature of the course, providing valuable experience of using IT in an archaeological work environment. The placement offers you the chance to gain practical experience in a professional, academic or heritage environment. You will be able to work on projects that help you develop new skills or put into practice skills gained from your taught courses.

Aims
-To provide experience of computer applications within a workplace in the historic environment sector.
-To consolidate knowledge and understanding of computer applications from one or more of the taught modules.

Learning outcomes
Upon completing your placement you should have:
-Gained detailed knowledge of how information technology is applied in the workplace in the historic environment sector, under the guidance of experienced professionals.
-Developed an understanding of the contexts in which IT is applied, and of real world limitations.
-Developed your IT skills in one or more of the core areas covered by the taught programme (i.e. database design, web technologies, digital archiving, electronic publication, CAD, GIS and virtual reality modelling).

Placement providers
Although the organisations offering placements change from year to year, and you have the option of proposing other providers that match your specific interests, the following list is a good indication of some of the choices available:
-Yorkshire Museums Trust
-Archaeology Data Service
-City of York Council
-Internet Archaeology
-York Archaeological Trust
-Centre for Christianity and Culture
-L-P: Archaeology
-On Site Archaeology
-Council for British Archaeology
-West Yorkshire Archaeology Service
-Historic England
-English Heritage
-National Trust

Careers

The MSc in Archaeological Information Systems offers practical, careers-focused training for many essential roles in the professional world of archaeology. By the end of the course you will:
-Have examined how computers are applied in archaeology and their impact on the development of the discipline
-Understand the concept of the internet, be able to find and use relevant information and add materials to it
-Have the skills to evaluate critically the claims made for different computer applications and select the correct application for a given problem
-Have an understanding of authoring tools and be able to create an electronic text
-Have an understanding of database design and be able to design and implement a simple relational database
-Have an understanding of CAD and GIS and be able to create effective applications in each
-Have an awareness of digital archiving principles, resource discovery and metadata

Many graduates from this course go on to careers in archaeological computing with contract and county-based records units, or found their own consultancy businesses. Some apply their computing skills to more mainstream archaeological settings, such as museums, or in a range of the others sectors and roles, including:
-Archive management
-Social media management
-Local government and development
-Computing and IT services
-Business and administration
-Marketing and public relations
-Education

Read less
Research degrees, based on the writing of a thesis, can be undertaken in three ways - for this course, it is. MA by research (one year fulltime). Read more
Research degrees, based on the writing of a thesis, can be undertaken in three ways - for this course, it is:
MA by research (one year fulltime)

Facilities

The graduate study building provides room for reading and quiet reflection. It is dedicated solely to providing facilities for postgraduate research, with individual/shared carrels, a suite of computers, and shared workspace for sorting material or laying out illustrations. The building has been designed to provide an attractive yet effective atmosphere for study and writing. It also aims to create an environment which brings together postgraduate researchers in a friendly and communal way.

A group of CAD machines, with digitising tablets and printers, is available, as is a range of state-of-the-art survey and geophysical equipment. Cameras can be borrowed, and there are the necessary facilities and equipment for illustration. Laboratories are available for use, including the new BioArch laboratories for biomolecular archaeology and excellent reference collections exist for environmental archaeology and conservation of materials.

Support

All research students have a supportive structure of supervision, with a main supervisor and two other members of staff who follow progress, are available for advice, and sit on the student's Thesis Advisory Panel.

Research community

Research seminars are run within the Department and at the Centres for Medieval Studies and Eighteenth Century Studies, and in the Department of Biology. Numerous special interest research groups also hold meetings and conferences at King's Manor, and this allows research students to keep in touch with latest developments in their field.

Read less
The MPhil takes two years (full time). If you are at all interested in undertaking a research degree, then you should not hesitate contacting the member/s of staff who share your research interests. Read more
The MPhil takes two years (full time).

If you are at all interested in undertaking a research degree, then you should not hesitate contacting the member/s of staff who share your research interests. We have some funded PhDs via Research Councils such as NERC and the AHRC. Also, we hope to be able to advertise individual funded PhDs, with pre-defined subject areas, each year - please watch our front page for details.

Facilities

The graduate study building provides room for reading and quiet reflection. It is dedicated solely to providing facilities for postgraduate research, with individual/shared carrels, a suite of computers, and shared workspace for sorting material or laying out illustrations. The building has been designed to provide an attractive yet effective atmosphere for study and writing. It also aims to create an environment which brings together postgraduate researchers in a friendly and communal way.

A group of CAD machines, with digitising tablets and printers, is available, as is a range of state-of-the-art survey and geophysical equipment. Cameras can be borrowed, and there are the necessary facilities and equipment for illustration. Laboratories are available for use, including the new BioArch laboratories for biomolecular archaeology and excellent reference collections exist for environmental archaeology and conservation of materials.

Support

All research students have a supportive structure of supervision, with a main supervisor and two other members of staff who follow progress, are available for advice, and sit on the student's Thesis Advisory Panel.

Research community

Research seminars are run within the Department and at the Centres for Medieval Studies and Eighteenth Century Studies, and in the Department of Biology. Numerous special interest research groups also hold meetings and conferences at King's Manor, and this allows research students to keep in touch with latest developments in their field.

Careers

All of the postgraduate Archaeology courses at York have a strong focus on employability. We aim to equip students with highly valued specialist and transferable skills, in a range of archaeological disciplines. The courses provide students with a deep understanding of relevant theories and principles, alongside extensive practical experience and access to the latest technologies and systems.

Postgraduates from our Masters’ courses have gone on to a wide range of careers in the archaeology sector and in heritage-related organisations across the UK and abroad, including:
-Historic England
-English Heritage
-The National Trust
-York Archaeological Trust
-The Council for British Archaeology
-Yorkshire Museums Trust
-Heritage consultancies
-Yorkshire Museums Trust
-Centre for Christianity and Culture
-York Civic Trust
-The Science Museum Group
-The Royal Mint Museum
-Heritage Malta
-New South Wales Government
-Highland Council

Read less
Highly respected qualification in buildings archaeology. Established more than 15 years ago, this course is one of the longest-established and most respected buildings archaeology and buildings history programmes in the UK. Read more
Highly respected qualification in buildings archaeology.

Why choose this course?

Established more than 15 years ago, this course is one of the longest-established and most respected buildings archaeology and buildings history programmes in the UK. It brings together experts in buildings survey and recording, archive research, legislation and policy, conservation, theoretical interpretation and computer modelling to deliver a dynamic course, which will equip you with the specialist skills and knowledge required for a career in researching, managing and conserving historic buildings.
-Learn the specialised skills required for researching, analysing and recording historic buildings.
-Gain experience in rectified photography, photogrammetry and other 3D recording methods, CAD drawing and computer modelling of historic buildings.
-Develop the knowledge and skills essential for careers in the architectural and archaeological sectors.
-Study in the cultural heritage capital of the UK – experience buildings archaeology in action.
-Access state-of-the-art facilities, including survey support, archives and libraries.
-Receive careers advice from staff with significant experience of recruiting within the sector.

York is one of the best places to study Archaeology, Heritage or Conservation. The Department has an excellent reputation and is one of the largest Archaeology teaching centres in the UK. The historic City of York is rich in architectural and archaeological treasures and resources which you will have easy access to during your studies.

What does the course cover?

The MA in the Archaeology of Buildings is designed to train students in the systematic research, recording, analysis and interpretation of historic buildings.

Through a combination of academic studies, practical training and research projects, the course will:
-Introduce the specialised skills required for the historical research, visual analysis and archaeological recording of buildings.
-Give you a foundational knowledge of the history of architecture in the UK, from c.1000 to the present day.
-Introduce you to current intellectual and professional research priorities in the archaeology of buildings.
-Introduce you to conservation legislation, policy and practice.
-Enable you to develop excellent research and communication skills relating to the research, analysis and interpretation of historic buildings.

Who is it for?

This course is suitable for students of Archaeology, History of Art, Architectural History and related subjects, as well as for mid-career professionals seeking to develop or enhance their professional specialism in buildings archaeology.

What can it lead to?

The discipline of buildings archaeology has grown in confidence, with new theoretical and methodological developments allowing archaeologists to record, date, model and present research in exciting new ways. There is significant demand for buildings archaeology professionals in the commercial sector and in national and local heritage organisations.

Course alumni have successfully launched careers in key roles with organisations across the heritage sector, including English Heritage, National Trust, Historic Scotland and Historic Royal Palaces, as well as with local authorities and conservation bodies, conservation architects, archaeological units and commercial developers.

Placement

Work placements provide a valuable opportunity to gain practical experience of working in the professional buildings sector. Your placement will draw on and contribute to the knowledge and experience you have gained on your taught courses, while enabling you to develop new insights, understanding and expertise in buildings archaeology that will be extremely valuable in future employment.

Aims
-To provide students with experience of buildings archaeology in a professional working environment.
-To consolidate students’ knowledge and understanding of buildings archaeology procedures and issues gained from the taught modules.

Learning outcomes
Upon completing these placements you should have:
-Gained experience and knowledge of how building recording and research inform conservation and heritage practice, under the guidance of experienced professionals.
-Developed experience in practical applications, facilitating critical reflection on the theoretical and philosophical issues raised in both core modules.

Placement providers
Although the organisations offering placements change from year to year, according to availability, the following list is a good indication of the choices likely to be available:
-English Heritage
-National Trust
-Council for British Archaeology
-York Civic Trust
-West Yorkshire Archaeology Service
-The Churches Conservation Trust
-Purcell Architects
-Quercus Design
-City of York Council
-Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings
-York Archaeological Trust
-Cathedral and Church Buildings Division

Careers

The MA in the Archaeology of Buildings offers practical skills and research training that provide excellent preparation for a range of careers. By the end of the course you will be able to:
-Record and analyse structures of all types, selecting a level of record appropriate to the end use.
-Execute hand, metric and photographic surveys and present the results in hand drawings, photographs and CAD.
-Recognise and apply the principles of structural analysis to elucidate a building’s history.
-Draw on a sound knowledge of British architectural history and, where appropriate, that of other countries.
-Carry out research using a wide range of archival sources on buildings in the UK and integrate these critically and effectively into the interpretation of buildings.
-Discuss and debate current research agendas in buildings archaeology.
-Direct your own independent work, and also interact with others as a member of a recording or conservation team.
-Communicate the results of research effectively through oral, written and graphic forms of presentation.

Alumni from the course have been employed in a range of commercial and heritage organisations across the UK, including:
-Field Archaeology Specialists (FAS Heritage)
-Oxford Archaeology
-URS Corporation
-Purcell Architects
-AOC Archaeology Group
-Pre-Construct Archaeology
-Headland Archaeology
-Arc Heritage
-York Archaeological trust
-English Heritage
-National Trust
-Historic Scotland
-Historic Royal Palaces
-West Yorkshire Archaeology Service
-MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology)

Others have been employed as freelance building archaeologists, local authority conservation officers and museum professionals.

Read less
The MSc in Audio and Music Technology is a one-year full-time taught course for graduates who wish to enhance their skills to go on to a career or further research in the varied fields of audio processing, room acoustics, interactive music and audio applications, voice analysis and synthesis, audio programming and other music technology related areas. Read more
The MSc in Audio and Music Technology is a one-year full-time taught course for graduates who wish to enhance their skills to go on to a career or further research in the varied fields of audio processing, room acoustics, interactive music and audio applications, voice analysis and synthesis, audio programming and other music technology related areas.

The MSc is designed for:
-Graduates of courses in Music Technology or Tonmeister
-Graduates of courses in technology, mathematics, science, engineering or computing who can demonstrate music performance or music production skills
-Graduates of a related subject who can demonstrate an understanding of music theory/digital audio, skills in music production or performance and technical experience or an aptitude for the technical aspects of audio

The course aims to:
-Provide students with a thorough grounding in scientific theory and engineering techniques as applied to digital audio technology
-Develop an understanding of audio processing and acoustic analysis as it relates to speech, singing, music and room/environmental acoustics
-Provide practical experience of audio software programming in a variety of coding languages and a creative approach to audio analysis and synthesis
-Develop communication skills for academic and public engagement purposes, in a variety of writing styles, or for oral presentations

There is a particular emphasis on practical application of theoretical aspects of audio signal processing and acoustic analysis and the programme also helps students to develop other skills such as critical analysis and evaluation, synthesis of theory and practice, creative problem-solving, design and implementation and oral and written communication skills.

The course is also designed to enhance your employability and to prepare you for entering the world of work or research after graduation. Some of the ways we do this are:
-Personal Professional Practitioner module dedicated to enhancing your employability, self-promotion and transferable skills, whether you go on to work in industry or running your own business.
-Hands-on experience of event and project management including the opportunity to design and deliver two events on campus.
-Project Development module furthers your skills in promoting your work/research to the public, presenting to an audience and developing a project plan.
-A substantial piece of individual research or development project, which you undertake over the summer under supervision from a staff member.
-Student section of the Audio Engineering Society regularly runs events with external speakers from the industry - a chance to network with the professionals.
-Group work in some modules allowing you to put your team work and management skills into practice.

Facilities

The course is supported by a wide range of facilities including:
-Three recording studios and Digital Audio Workstation production rooms
-Dedicated listening space with surround sound loudspeaker array
-6-sided anechoic chamber
-Newly equipped Mac Workstation suite specifically for audio app development
-State-of-the art equipment for voice analysis and synthesis
-The opportunity to access audio facilities across campus including the 3Sixty (immersive audio visual space) and the Arthur Sykes Rymer Auditorium (Music Research Centre) as availability allows

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page


Share this page:

Cookie Policy    X