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Goldsmiths, University of London, Full Time Masters Degrees

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The Department of Anthropology offers supervision in a wide range of areas for research degrees. In addition to the particular research interests of each member of staff, we have a number of postgraduate students undertaking research of contemporary social and political relevance in Britain and Europe. Read more
The Department of Anthropology offers supervision in a wide range of areas for research degrees.

In addition to the particular research interests of each member of staff, we have a number of postgraduate students undertaking research of contemporary social and political relevance in Britain and Europe. http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-anthropology/

Current students are engaged in research projects covering a broad range of subjects, located in Africa, Europe, Latin America, and the Middle East.

How do I choose between MRes and MPhil?

Normally research students register for the MRes in order to complete the requisite training for carrying out a doctoral research project. You then transfer to MPhil status after completing your MRes dissertation in September (or in your second year if you are part-time).

However, if you already have a substantial background, it is possible to register directly for the full-time MPhil, provided the Department and your future supervisor(s) agree. MPhil-registered students do exactly the same research training as MRes students, but they present a student dissertation in May, in order to fast-track to fieldwork or other forms of data-collection.

Whether you start registered as MRes or MPhil, upgrading to PhD status takes place at a later date.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Prof Sophie Day.

First year
In the week before the beginning of the academic year in mid-September there is an Induction Programme for all new research postgraduates at Goldsmiths. You will be introduced to College and Departmental facilities and procedures, and attend workshops on what is involved in doing a research degree.

For the first year you are normally registered for the MRes. It is a training year, in which work on your own research project is coupled with general training in Anthropological and Social Science Methods - run both within the Department and by the Goldsmiths College Research Office - as follows:

Methods in Anthropological Research (20 weeks x 2 hrs)
Research Design (20 weeks x 2.5 hrs)
Quantitative Methods in Social Science
Department of Anthropology Research Seminar

You may also take other modules depending on your specific training needs, such as learning a language, or auditing an MA course, either in the Department or elsewhere, of particular relevance to your research project. You are also encouraged to attend seminars in other parts of the University of London, attend conferences, and go on outside modules such as those organised by GAPP (Group for Anthropology in Policy and Practice). There are Departmental funds to enable you to attend such events.

At the end of the first year, MRes students present a 15,000-word dissertation in September, which discusses in depth their proposed research topic and the relevant literature. Students registered for the MPhil present a 10,000-word dissertation in May. You need formal approval from the Department before you can start your fieldwork or other forms of data-collection.

Fieldwork and writing up your thesis

Whether you are doing fieldwork down the road or data collection on the other side of the world, it is important that you submit regular reports to your supervisor/s. At the end of the data-collection period when you return to the Department, you join the Writing-Up seminar, which meets weekly to discuss students' draft chapters.

Some time after you return from data-collection (after about 8 months for full-time students, and 16 months for part-time students) you are required to present a detailed thesis outline and 2 draft chapters for consideration by your Advisory Committee. Students normally upgrade to PhD status at this point.

Thesis

An MPhil thesis should be completed within 3 years (full-time) or 4 years (part-time). Some students move between full-time and part-time modes. For example, they may do their training on a part-time basis and then seek funding for a year's full-time fieldwork, reverting once more to part-time mode for the writing-up period. We are happy to encourage such flexibility.

Department

Anthropology at Goldsmiths is ranked 6th in the UK for the quality of our research**

**Research Excellence Framework 2014, Times Higher Education research intensity subject rankings

Investigate a variety of fascinating areas that have real relevance to modern life.

As a department we’re interested in pushing the discipline forward. We’re known for pioneering new fields including visual anthropology and the anthropology of modernity. And we tackle other contemporary issues like urban planning, development, emotions and aesthetics, and new social movements.

How to apply

Before you apply for a research programme, we advise you to get in touch with the programme contact, listed above. It may also be possible to arrange an advisory meeting.

Before you start at Goldsmiths, the actual topic of your research has to be agreed with your proposed supervisor, who will be a member of staff active in your general field of research. The choice of topic may be influenced by the current research in the department or the requirements of an external funding body.

If you wish to study on a part-time basis, you should also indicate how many hours a week you intend to devote to research, whether this will be at evenings or weekends, and for how many hours each day.

Research proposals

Along with your application and academic reference, you should also upload a research proposal at the point of application.

This should be in the form of a statement of the proposed area of research and should include:

delineation of the research topic
why it has been chosen
an initial hypothesis (if applicable)
a brief list of major secondary sources

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

Read less
The MA in Anthropology and Cultural Politics is an interdisciplinary programme in anthropology, directed at students from a wide range of disciplines in the humanities, social and political sciences, artists, and professionals in the media and cultural sectors. Read more
The MA in Anthropology and Cultural Politics is an interdisciplinary programme in anthropology, directed at students from a wide range of disciplines in the humanities, social and political sciences, artists, and professionals in the media and cultural sectors. http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-anthropology-cultural-politics/

The objective of the MA is to address contemporary issues in culture and politics from an anthropological perspective, drawing on the commitment of the Department of Anthropology at Goldsmiths to build a public anthropology.

The MA is organised around a critical investigation of the central thematic concepts of its title: 'culture', 'power', and 'politics', as well as 'anthropology' itself.

Each of these terms are posited in this programme as questions for critical reflection and students are encouraged to pursue independent research projects that investigate the meanings attributed to these terms in contemporary social contexts.

The programme is particularly interested in the intersections of 'culture' and 'power', and the consideration of what may be called 'cultural politics'.

- How and when does 'culture' become apprehensible as 'political'?
- How and when does 'power' operate upon or within 'culture'? Is it even tenable to uphold and retain this distinction?
- If so, what are the analytical or interpretive benefits?
- What may be the disadvantages or pitfalls?
- If not, what is implicated in the politicisation of 'culture' or the culturalisation of 'power' and 'politics'?
- How can these concerns be studied in the ongoing struggles over 'culture' in everyday life?

In addition to the core modules, options can be selected from several departments and centres.

See the website http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-anthropology-cultural-politics/

Core Modules

The MA is made up of four parts:
- Anthropology and Cultural Politics (30 credits)
- Anthropology Theory (30 credits)
- Option modules [within the Department of Anthropology, or the Departments of English and Comparative Literature, Media & - Communications, Politics, Sociology, or Centre for Cultural Studies] (60 credits)
- Dissertation (60 credits)

- Anthropology and Cultural Politics:

What is the relationship between culture and power?; How is power manifested or articulated 'culturally'?; In what ways may culture be understood to be 'political'?

This module is centrally preoccupied with social and political theories organised around the question of 'culture' and its relation to 'power', and vice versa, and with comprehending what may be the stakes of the politics of 'culture'. The module elaborates upon the problem of 'politics' and its always complex configuration with respect to what comes to be deemed to be 'cultural', specifically in relation to creative and productive labour, alienation, capitalism and commodification, the state, ideology, and hegemony.

We also consider the concepts of the critique of everyday life, the society of the spectacle, and the production of space. While principally concerned with a series of theoretical problems, the module will nonetheless also marshal the insights that may be gleaned from ethnography, in the effort to situate the discipline of socio-cultural anthropology in relation to the problems posed by or for 'cultural politics'.

- Anthropological Theory:

The aims and objectives of this module are to introduce you to major subfields of modern anthropology and to do so in a broadly historical and comparative framework.

The lectures will enable you to see how different anthropologists approach a number of central contemporary issues. The topics chosen will focus upon some of the theoretical developments and methodological strategies pursued in response to profound and widespread social transformations. Each week the module will focus on a single technique, methodology or strategy in anthropology in the work of a specific anthropologist.

Assessment

Dissertation – a thorough critical discussion of existing knowledge in a relevant area; reports; take-home papers. Options may require a presentation or production of visual material.

Department: Anthropology

Investigate a variety of fascinating areas that have real relevance to modern life.

As a department we’re interested in pushing the discipline forward. We’re known for pioneering new fields including visual anthropology and the anthropology of modernity. And we tackle other contemporary issues like urban planning, development, emotions and aesthetics, and new social movements.

Skills & Careers

The programme is great preparation for any role that involves research and communication. Graduates have pursued opportunities in journalism, other media, policy, education and public debate; they have also gone on to research degrees, either at Goldsmiths or elsewhere.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/apply/

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

Read less
This MA is the first of its kind in the country, combining academic and professional qualifications. Read more
This MA is the first of its kind in the country, combining academic and professional qualifications. By bringing together Community Development and Youth Work practice with the research methods and theoretical preoccupations of Anthropology, it offers a stimulating synthesis of theory and practice- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-applied-anthropology-community-youth-work/

Taught jointly by the Departments of Anthropology, and Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies, the programme reflects the common concerns of lecturers in both disciplines. The MA fits the spirit of the academic profile of Goldsmiths both in its interdisciplinary and multi-cultural character, and by bringing together academic and practical fields of study.

This Master’s degree is aimed at graduates interested in working in Community Development and Youth Work. We offer two alternative pathways:

* The MA in Applied Anthropology & Community and Youth Work (this programme) results in a qualification in the fields of Community and Youth Work and Anthropology that is fully endorsed by the National Youth Agency and the Joint Negotiating Committee for Youth and Community Workers for pay and qualification purposes

* The MA in Applied Anthropology & Community Development is aimed at applicants who don't have the required level of work experience to apply for the professionally validated programme, and offers students an opportunity to develop community-based theoretical interests and practice

What you study

The MA reflects the common concerns of Social Anthropology and Community and Youth Work, and offers a stimulating synthesis of theory and practice. It consists of an academic programme of lectures, seminars and tutorial assignments, and practical experience. Modules are taken over one academic year if you are studying full-time, and two years if you are studying part-time (part-time study only available to home/EU students). Please note that all modules are compulsory.

The Research Methods in Anthropology module covers the research methods of anthropology, the collection of different types of data including surveys, in-depth interviews, participant observation and participatory research, its uses by subjects, and conflicts of interest. It combines weekly lectures and seminar-based work with the completion of a small individual project in the second term. Assessment is by essay, combining project material with theoretical literature.

Contemporary Social Issues consists of four themes:

* First World/Third World Anthropological Perspectives
* Gender, Race and Class
* Community
* Youth Cultures

It is taught through lectures/seminars, and assessment is by one three-hour examination paper.

Two supervised community and youth work fieldwork placements (totaling 47 days). These are supported by seminars, lectures, workshops and tutorials. Both fieldwork assignments are assessed by your 5,000 word report on each and your agency supervisor's reports. Overall, at least 50% of all fieldwork must be face-to-face with the 13-19 year age group.

Block fieldwork. For all students there is a six-week block fieldwork assignment (30 working days) focused on any aspect of management in a community and youth work agency, negotiable with your tutor. Assessment is based on your agency supervisor's report and a 5,000 word report on the placement submitted by you.

Full-time students attend on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 10.00am to 4.00pm and spend the rest of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies. Part-time students attend on Thursdays in one year and Tuesdays in the other.

Assessment: Essay; individual project; take-home paper; fieldwork evaluation and reports; dissertation.

Careers:

Our graduates have gone on to develop their professional careers in community and youth work - for example as Connexions personal advisors, youth officers, community development workers, substance misuse workers, youth workers in a range of settings, and some have gone on to work with people who have disabilities.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

Read less
Taught jointly by the Departments of Anthropology, and Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies, this MA offers a stimulating synthesis of theory and practice. Read more
Taught jointly by the Departments of Anthropology, and Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies, this MA offers a stimulating synthesis of theory and practice. In short, it is at the heart of what Goldsmiths is all about- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-applied-anthropology-community-arts/

This Masters, launched in 2015, is the third of three related pathways. The first, the MA in Applied Anthropology and Community and Youth Work, started in 1992 and is aimed at students who wish to pursue a career in youth and community work and who need a professional qualification. A second pathway, the MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Development, was launched in 2012 as an option for international or home students who do not need an NYA qualification and for those who want to specialise in community development. This third pathway has been created in response to a growing number of applicants with an arts background and arts interests, and is aimed at students who wish to work in community arts. The three pathways entail different placements but are taught together, providing much opportunity for exchange of ideas and collaboration amongst students.

What you study

The MA combines an academic programme of lectures, seminars and tutorial assignments with practical experience.

Modules are taken over one academic year if you are studying full-time, and two years if you are studying part-time (part-time study only available to home/EU students).

Full-time students attend on Tuesdays and Thursdays and spend the rest of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies.

Part-time students attend on Thursdays in one year and Tuesdays in the other.

The Department of Anthropology teaches two of the core components of your degree: Contemporary Social Issues and Anthropological Research Methods.

The Contemporary Social Issues module runs through the Autumn and Spring Term, with lectures and student-led seminars alternating on a weekly basis. In the autumn it explores key analytical concepts in anthropology and related social sciences relevant to community development and community arts, such as class, gender, race and culture. The Spring Term addresses more specific contemporary social issues affecting communities, such as transnationalism, mental health, gentrification and new media. The module is assessed by a take-home exam in May.

Anthropological Research Methods is taught in the Spring Term. Here, you will become familiar with ethnographic research and writing. Through literature and practical research exercises (five days of fieldwork are attached to this module), you will learn about different methods of data collection including surveys, in-depth interviews, participant observation and participatory research. It combines weekly lectures and seminar-based work with the completion of a small individual project in the second term. Assessment is by essay, combining project material with theoretical literature.

In addition we strongly encourage all students, in particular those without a background in anthropology, to sit in on other MA option courses offered by the anthropology department, such as Anthropological Theory, Anthropology of Development, Anthropology of Violence, Anthropology of Art and Anthropology and the Environment. We also encourage you to audit courses run by the Art, Music and Cultural Studies departments, and in general to make the most of all the wonderful political and arts events organised by Goldsmiths staff and students every week.

The Department of Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies runs the fieldwork placements modules, which are supported by seminars, lectures, workshops and tutorials. This MA pathway entails five days attached to Anthropological Research Methods module; five days observations and 40 days of placements with community arts organisations, consisting of two placements of 20 days each. The accompanying teaching is divided into three modules. The first two of these relate to your first placement, the third to your second placement:

Fieldwork 1: Perspectives and Approaches (first 10 days of first placement)

In this module you explore key themes, principles, values and competing perspectives underlying community arts. The value of experiential learning approaches and critical pedagogy in informal learning and community arts are explored alongside group work principles, processes and theories. You consider your own values and reflect on your practice perspective.

Fieldwork 2: Critical Practice (second 10 days of first placement)

In this module you critically analyse the changing context of community arts practice, develop as critically reflective practitioners and learn how to recognise and challenge discrimination and oppression. Key themes include ethical dilemmas faced in community arts practice, youth participation and methods of engaging communities with a view to facilitating ‘empowerment’.

Fieldwork 3: Management, Enterprise and Development (20 days second placement and 5 days observations)

This module advances critical understanding of the management of projects, staff and resources, the legal context of community and youth work, how to produce funding bids, prepare budgets and grapple with the issues and processes involved in developing a social enterprise as well as monitoring and evaluation.

All three modules are assessed by a fieldwork report written by the student and a report by the placement supervisor.

The dissertation presents the culmination of your work, in that it is here that you apply anthropological methods and theories to a specific issue relevant to community arts that you are interested in. It is taught jointly by both departments.

Please note that it is possible to exit with a postgraduate diploma if you do not wish to do a dissertation.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

Read less
Taught jointly by the Departments of Anthropology and Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies, this MA offers a stimulating synthesis of theory and practice. Read more
Taught jointly by the Departments of Anthropology and Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies, this MA offers a stimulating synthesis of theory and practice. In short, it is at the heart of what Goldsmiths is all about. http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-applied-anthropology-community-arts/

This MA, launched in 2015, is the third of three related pathways. The first, the MA in Applied Anthropology and Community and Youth Work, was started in 1992 and is aimed at students who wish to pursue a career in youth and community work and who need a professional qualification.

A second pathway, the MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Development, was launched in 2012 as an option for international or home students who do not need an NYA qualification and for those who want to specialise in community development.

This third pathway has been created in response to a growing number of applicants with an arts background and arts interests, and is aimed at students who wish to work in community arts. The three pathways entail different placements but are taught together, providing much opportunity for exchange of ideas and collaboration amongst students.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Pauline Von Hellermann or Dr Kalbir Shukra

Modules & Structure

The MA combines an academic programme of lectures, seminars and tutorial assignments with practical experience.

Modules are taken over one academic year if you are studying full-time, and two years if you are studying part-time (part-time study only available to home/EU students).

Full-time students attend on Tuesdays and Thursdays and spend the rest of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies.

Part-time students attend on Thursdays in one year and Tuesdays in the other.

Increasing employment prospects are central to this programme.

Careers

Our graduates find work directly or indirectly related to the disciplines relatively quickly after graduating, or even while on the programme. The majority of our students gain work in youth work or community work. Examples of recent graduate employment include:

Full-time health youth worker for a London Borough, leading on LGBTQ awareness and homophobic bullying
Community Centre based youth worker
Mentoring and Befriending Co-ordinator at a civil society equalities organisation
Community Development Worker in a social work team in Hong Kong
Some seek and gain work in a wide range of other settings, often shaped by the particular interests that they develop during their time with us, such as working with refugees or with disability groups. Others join social enterprises to bid for contracts, join newly developing cooperatives or established NGOs in the UK and abroad.

We have many alumni who have gone on to teaching at university themselves. One of our former students who is now a senior lecturer fed back:

“Studying on the Applied Anthropology, Youth and Community Work Masters provided me with an experience and opportunity to validate 20 years of practice and to consider a wide range of theoretical and disciplinary perspectives. Immediately this impacted on my ability to better articulate a more nuanced and evidence-based understanding of the context that surrounds practice. Before completing the MA I was promoted to a management post, overseeing six trainee community development posts, and three senior workers (the obvious impact of the course on my work was specifically highlighted during post-interview feedback)... It is clear to me that the course delivered positive outcomes in terms of career progression.”

Students from the past recommend the programme to others and recognise the combination of disciplines as unique:

“Put simply, I honestly believe I would not have got any of my three jobs since completing the course in 2003 without the MA. This is mostly reputation. The course has a cachet amongst managers in the voluntary sector, and the assumption is that students are able not only to do development work but also to do it in the right way, with values and processes embedded.”

Placements

Placement experiences and networks developed while on the programme often produce new job opportunities. As one recent graduate explained:

“I actually managed to find paid employment as a result of making a good impression during my second placement. My third placement was a job that I was able to progress effectively in and was a real step up in terms of experience and responsibility. I eventually became a line manager there, and was working on a payment by results programme, which really reflected the new political climate. It also made for a very interesting and topical research essay that I scored really well on. I know that employers look upon my CV and applications favourably due to the fact that I have an MA in Community and Youth Work from Goldsmiths.”

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

Read less
This is a pathway of the MA in Applied Anthropology & Community and Youth Work, aimed both at international applicants who may not need a British National Youth Agency qualification and those who want to become specialists in community development. Read more
This is a pathway of the MA in Applied Anthropology & Community and Youth Work, aimed both at international applicants who may not need a British National Youth Agency qualification and those who want to become specialists in community development. http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-applied-anthropology-community-development/

This MA is a second pathway to the MA in Applied Anthropology and Community and Youth Work. It was launched in 2012 as an option for international or home students who do not need an National Youth Agency qualification and for those who want to specialise in community development. A third pathway, the MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Arts started in 2015.

The three pathways entail different placements but are taught together, providing much opportunity for exchange of ideas and collaboration amongst students.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Pauline von Hellerman

Overview

The MA consists of an academic programme of lectures, seminars and tutorial assignments, and practical experience.

Modules are taken over one academic year if you are studying full-time, and two years if you are studying part-time (part-time study only available to home/EU students).

Full-time students attend on Tuesdays and Thursdays and spend the rest of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies.

Part-time students attend on Thursdays in one year and Tuesdays in the other.

Skills and Careers

Increasing employment prospects are central to this programme.

Our graduates find work directly or indirectly related to the disciplines relatively quickly after graduating, or even while on the programme. The majority of our students gain work in youth work or community work. Examples of recent graduate employment include:

Full-time health youth worker for a London Borough, leading on LGBTQ awareness and homophobic bullying
Community Centre based youth worker
Mentoring and Befriending Co-ordinator at a civil society equalities organisation
Community Development Worker in a social work team in Hong Kong
Some seek and gain work in a wide range of other settings, often shaped by the particular interests that they develop during their time with us, such as working with refugees or with disability groups. Others join social enterprises to bid for contracts, join newly developing cooperatives or established NGOs in the UK and abroad.

We have many alumni who have gone on to teaching at university themselves. One of our former students who is now a senior lecturer fed back:

“Studying on the Applied Anthropology, Youth and Community Work Masters provided me with an experience and opportunity to validate 20 years of practice and to consider a wide range of theoretical and disciplinary perspectives. Immediately this impacted on my ability to better articulate a more nuanced and evidence-based understanding of the context that surrounds practice. Before completing the MA I was promoted to a management post, overseeing six trainee community development posts, and three senior workers (the obvious impact of the course on my work was specifically highlighted during post-interview feedback)... It is clear to me that the course delivered positive outcomes in terms of career progression.”

Students from the past recommend the programme to others and recognise the combination of disciplines as unique:

“Put simply, I honestly believe I would not have got any of my three jobs since completing the course in 2003 without the MA. This is mostly reputation. The course has a cachet amongst managers in the voluntary sector, and the assumption is that students are able not only to do development work but also to do it in the right way, with values and processes embedded.”

Placements

Placement experiences and networks developed while on the programme often produce new job opportunities. As one recent graduate explained:

“I actually managed to find paid employment as a result of making a good impression during my second placement. My third placement was a job that I was able to progress effectively in and was a real step up in terms of experience and responsibility. I eventually became a line manager there, and was working on a payment by results programme, which really reflected the new political climate. It also made for a very interesting and topical research essay that I scored really well on. I know that employers look upon my CV and applications favourably due to the fact that I have an MA in Community and Youth Work from Goldsmiths.”

Funding

This programme is now eligible for a Commonwealth Council scholarship, which provides full tuition fees, living cost, airfares and allowances to one postgraduate Masters student from a developing commonwealth country. The scholarship is jointly funded by the Commonwealth Scholarship Commission (CSC) and Goldsmiths.

http://www.gold.ac.uk/international/financial-info/international-scholarships/csc-shared-scholarship/

For further information on funding, please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/

Read less
This MA is the first of its kind in the country, combining academic and professional qualifications. Read more
This MA is the first of its kind in the country, combining academic and professional qualifications. By bringing together Community Development and Youth Work practice with the research methods and theoretical preoccupations of Anthropology, it offers a stimulating synthesis of theory and practice- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-applied-anthropology-community-development/

Taught jointly by the Departments of Anthropology, and Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies, the programme reflects the common concerns of lecturers in both disciplines. The MA fits the spirit of the academic profile of Goldsmiths both in its interdisciplinary and multi-cultural character, and by bringing together academic and practical fields of study.

This Master’s degree is aimed at graduates interested in working in Community Development and Youth Work. We offer two alternative pathways:

* The MA in Applied Anthropology & Community and Youth Work results in a qualification in the fields of Community and Youth Work and Anthropology that is fully endorsed by the National Youth Agency and the Joint Negotiating Committee for Youth and Community Workers for pay and qualification purposes

* The MA in Applied Anthropology & Community Development  (this programme) is aimed at applicants who don't have the required level of work experience to apply for the professionally validated programme, and offers students an opportunity to develop community-based theoretical interests and practice

What you study

The MA reflects the common concerns of Social Anthropology and Community and Youth Work, and offers a stimulating synthesis of theory and practice. It consists of an academic programme of lectures, seminars and tutorial assignments, and practical experience. Courses are taken over one academic year if you are studying full-time, and two years if you are studying part-time (part-time study only available to home/EU students). Please note that all modules are compulsory.

The Research Methods in Anthropology module covers the research methods of anthropology, the collection of different types of data including surveys, in-depth interviews, participant observation and participatory research, its uses by subjects, and conflicts of interest. It combines weekly lectures and seminar-based work with the completion of a small individual project in the second term. Assessment is by essay, combining project material with theoretical literature.

Contemporary Social Issues consists of four themes:

* First World/Third World Anthropological Perspectives
* Gender, Race and Class
* Community
* Youth Cultures

It is taught through lectures/seminars, and assessment is by one three-hour examination paper.

Two supervised community and youth work fieldwork placements (totaling 47 days). These are supported by seminars, lectures, workshops and tutorials. Both fieldwork assignments are assessed by your 5,000 word report on each and your agency supervisor's reports. Overall, at least 50% of all fieldwork must be face-to-face with the 13-19 year age group.

Block fieldwork. For all students there is a six-week block fieldwork assignment (30 working days) focused on any aspect of management in a community and youth work agency, negotiable with your tutor. Assessment is based on your agency supervisor's report and a 5,000 word report on the placement submitted by you.

Full-time students attend on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 10.00am to 4.00pm and spend the rest of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies. Part-time students attend on Thursdays in one year and Tuesdays in the other.

Assessment: Essay; individual project; take-home paper; fieldwork evaluation and reports; dissertation.

Careers:

Our graduates have gone on to develop their professional careers in community and youth work - for example as Connexions personal advisors, youth officers, community development workers, substance misuse workers, youth workers in a range of settings, and some have gone on to work with people who have disabilities.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

Read less
This Masters is the first of its kind in the country, combining academic and professional qualifications. It is aimed at students who wish to pursue a career in youth and community work and who need a professional qualification. Read more
This Masters is the first of its kind in the country, combining academic and professional qualifications. It is aimed at students who wish to pursue a career in youth and community work and who need a professional qualification. It is fully endorsed by the National Youth Agency and the Joint Negotiating Committee for Youth and Community Workers for pay and qualification purposes. http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-applied-anthropology-community-youth-work/

Taught jointly by the Departments of Anthropology and Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies, the MA offers a stimulating synthesis of theory and practice. In short, it is at the core of what Goldsmiths is all about.

Established in 1992, it is the first of three pathways, with an additional MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Development launched in 2012 and an MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Arts started in 2015. The three pathways entail different placements but are taught together, providing much opportunity for exchange of ideas and collaboration amongst students.

What you study

The MA combines an academic programme of lectures, seminars and tutorial assignments with practical experience.

Modules are taken over one academic year if you are studying full-time, and two years if you are studying part-time (part-time study only available to home/EU students).

Full-time students attend on Tuesdays and Thursdays and spend the rest of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies.

Part-time students attend on Thursdays in one year and Tuesdays in the other and spend some of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies

The Department of Anthropology teaches two of the core components of your degree: Contemporary Social Issues and Anthropological Research Methods.

The Contemporary Social Issues module runs through the Autumn and Spring Term, with lectures and student-led seminars alternating on a weekly basis. In the autumn it explores key analytical concepts in anthropology and related social sciences relevant to youth and community work, such as class, gender, race and culture. The Spring Term addresses more specific contemporary social issues affecting communities and young people, such as transnationalism, mental health, gentrification and new media. The module is assessed by a take-home exam in May.

Anthropological Research Methods is taught in the Spring Term. Here, you will become familiar with ethnographic research and writing. Through literature and practical research exercises (five days of fieldwork is attached to this module), you will learn about different methods of data collection including surveys, in-depth interviews, participant observation and participatory research. It combines weekly lectures and seminar-based work with the completion of a small individual project in the second term. Assessment is by essay, combining project material with theoretical literature.

In addition we strongly encourage all students, in particular those without a background in anthropology, to sit in on other MA option courses offered by the anthropology department, such as Anthropological Theory, Anthropology of Development, Anthropology of Violence, Anthropology of Art and Anthropology and the Environment.

The Department of Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies runs the three fieldwork placements, each of which is supported by seminars, lectures, workshops and tutorials.

Fieldwork I: Perspectives and Approaches (22 days practice)

In this module you explore key themes, principles, values and competing perspectives underlying youth work and community development. The value of experiential learning approaches and critical pedagogy in informal learning and community development are explored alongside group work principles, processes and theories. You consider your own values and reflect on your practice perspective.

Fieldwork 2: Critical Practice (25 days practice)

In this module you critically analyse the changing context of community development and youth work practice, develop as critically reflective practitioners and learn how to recognise and challenge discrimination and oppression. Key themes include ethical dilemmas faced in practice, youth participation and methods of engaging communities with a view to facilitating ‘empowerment’.

Fieldwork 3: Management, Enterprise and Development (30 days practice plus five days observations)

This module advances critical understanding of the management of projects, staff and resources, the legal context of community and youth work, how to produce funding bids, prepare budgets and grapple with the issues and processes involved in developing a social enterprise as well as monitoring and evaluation.

All three modules are assessed by a fieldwork report written by the student and a report by the placement supervisor. Overall, at least 50% of all fieldwork must be face-to-face with the 13-19 year age group.

The dissertation presents the culmination of your work, in that it is here that you apply anthropological methods and theories to a specific issue relevant to youth work that you are interested in. It is taught jointly by both departments.

Please note that it is possible to exit with a postgraduate diploma, also fully endorsed by the National Youth Agency, if you do not wish to move onto the dissertation.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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This MA addresses the historical, political, theoretical and ethical issues of applied theatre and develops your ability to contextualise, critique and create- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-applied-theatre/. Read more
This MA addresses the historical, political, theoretical and ethical issues of applied theatre and develops your ability to contextualise, critique and create- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-applied-theatre/

Our aim is to prepare students to be collaborative, responsive, imaginative, politically engaged and culturally aware artist practitioners. The course is aimed at newly-emerging practitioners with a background in theatre, education, activism or social change, as well as at more established practitioners who want to reflect, refresh and develop their skills. We actively encourage the sharing of skills and expertise among our multi-national group of students. We prioritise applicants with some experience in the arts, education, activism or social care, and it is rare that we take applicants directly from their first degree.

Together we explore the ways in which theatre and performance is created by diverse groups of people in a variety of community, social and educational settings: in schools or on the streets, in children’s homes and elderly care, in conflict zones, conferences, crèches and youth clubs, pupil referral units and prisons, women’s refuges and refugee centres, hospitals and hostels – anywhere groups of people meet and interact.

What is applied theatre?

Applied theatre is an umbrella term for a range of exciting worldwide performance forms concerned with personal and social change.

The term embraces: theatre of the oppressed, community theatre, theatre-in-education, drama in education, theatre for development, prison theatre, intercultural arts, intergenerational arts, theatre in museums, archives and heritage sites, story-telling, reminiscence theatre, conflict resolution. The work often moves across art forms. This is not a definitive list, as it is a field that is dynamic and changing.

The MA considers case studies from the UK and from across the globe. Central to this investigation are: questions of identity; representation; discrimination; health; equality; human rights; opportunity; access; social inclusion/exclusion; participation; ethics; evaluation and documentation; aesthetics and the role of the artist.

Placement and partnerships

The course is structured so that practice and theory constantly respond to one another, through practical classes and seminars. All students undertake a placement in a recognised host organisation where you'll work with experienced practitioners, and learn from the inside how participatory arts organisations function.

We have active partnerships with many companies, and the majority of the tutors, including the convenor, are active artists, with a variety of arts practices in performance, community and social settings.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Sue Mayo

Structure

Full time students are in Goldsmiths Monday to Wednesday in terms 1 & 2.

Part time students are in Goldsmiths Tuesday and Wednesday in terms 1 & 2 of year 1, and Mondays only in year 2.

In the summer term, for both years, there are 5 days of teaching in April and May, dates to be confirmed.

Assessment

The MA Applied Theatre has five points of assessment:

a 6,000-word essay based on material covered in Term 1
a 6,000-word reflective portfolio on the placement
a 12,000-word research project/dissertation
These assessments count towards 80% of the final mark.

The remaining 20% is derived from assessment of the two shared complementary/contextual modules, which include Disability Theatre, Performance Praxis, African Theatre, Musical Theatre and Cultural Theory.

Skills
The MA aims to equip you with the appropriate background knowledge and understanding to work creatively and critically within the broad remit of applied theatre. Recent research identified three core skills for participatory artists working in socially engaged theatre practice. These are:

critical thinking (the ability to contextualise and interrogate practice in the light of current thinking and practice)
creativity (the ability to take creative risks based on a strong skill base)
responsiveness (the ability to reflect and adapt)
The course works with these core skills threaded through its methodology, while also offering opportunities to look at the hard skills of planning, documenting and evaluating work.

Careers

Our students go on to work in a range of roles including setting up and running community/participatory theatre companies, as freelance drama workshop facilitators, lecturers, heads of education or participation producers within established theatre companies.

Previous students have gone on to carry out:

work with people with learning disabilities
theatre work with early years
creative work in pupil referral units
cross-arts projects in a range of educational, community and social contexts
theatre education and outreach
community theatre
museum education and theatre in prisons
Previous graduates from the programme have also continued with research study towards the MPhil or PhD qualification.

We have graduates working at the Southbank Centre, the Royal National Theatre, The Young Vic, Brighton Dome, Pan Arts, Rewrite, Ovalhouse, Battersea Arts Centre, the Albany and Talawa Theatre; with MIND, Tender, Magic Me, and Headway.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Working from a strong theoretical basis, this programme will help you to understand a range of empirical, aesthetic and conceptual issues which traverse and exceed both 'art' and 'international' politics. Read more
Working from a strong theoretical basis, this programme will help you to understand a range of empirical, aesthetic and conceptual issues which traverse and exceed both 'art' and 'international' politics.

We will explore practices and issues related to public space, democracy, equality, participation, justice and affect. By shuttling across art and politics, rather than seeking to produce a synthesis between the two, we probe a range of practices and strategies which, in the encounter between art and politics, play out in numerous forms and very different kinds of social spaces.

You will work alongside a mixed constituency of students from Art, Politics, International Studies, Philosophy, Cultural Studies as well as numerous other disciplines, which means we can take up the challenge to develop frameworks and spaces that are mixed and mobile, and which can operate in trans-disciplinary settings. In such a mixed context, questions about ‘autonomy’ and the political character of art take on renewed vigour and urgency.

Similarly we are able to probe art’s potential in times of political and cultural crisis. Why for instance, do contemporary arts practices increasingly claim ‘political’ origins and motivations, while political parties seek the involvement of art and artists of all kinds? Or, what good are practices that are neither art nor politics?

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Bernadette Buckley

Department

Voted one of the top political universities in the UK by students**

Politics and International Relations

In the Department of Politics and International Relations at Goldsmiths our focus goes beyond voting systems, parliaments and the conventional arenas of power. And it looks beyond the West.

We study politics and international relations for the 21st century, in which anarchism may be as important as liberalism, and in which Asia and Africa are as economically and geopolitically important as Europe and North America.

We also take an unconventional approach. So you may be working on group projects, writing a blog, or submitting a Manga comic instead of an essay.

Find out more about the Department of Politics and International Relations.

**Which? University 2014

Modules & Structure

Core modules

You take the following three core modules:

Art and Politics: Theory History Event (30 credits)
Group Project (MA in Art and Politics) (30 credits)
MA in Art & Politics Dissertation (60 credits)


Option modules

Students make up their remaining 60 Credits from the following list of options:

An(Other) China: Postcolonial Theory, Postmodern Concerns (30 credits)
Counter-Mapping London: The Politics of Space (15 credits)
Latin American Dictionary: Politics through the Arts (15 credits)
Memory and Justice in Post-Conflict Societies (30 credits)
Politics of Knowledge: Debates in Human Science (15 credits)
Finance in the Global Political Economy (15 credits)
The Political-Economic Governance of the European Union (30 credits)
Politics of Human Rights (15 credits)
Psychopolitics (15 credits)
Theories of International Relations (15 credits)
Visualising Asia: Body, Gender, Politics (30 credits)

Students may choose up to 30 credits of approved options from other departments at Goldsmiths.


Project work

You are required to undertake project-based work in accordance with your own political and aesthetic interests. The purpose of this project-work is to find ways of ‘doing’ politics which employ ‘artistic’ strategies and interventions in their realisation.

Projects have a student-centred material focus, complementing the theoretical emphasis of core and optional modules, and will seek to raise awareness of particular issues and draw attention to their position in the public arena. They may be written, broadcast, performed, curated, made, or involve any other kind of appropriately documented submission.

Training in digital and genetic media will be provided where necessary. Project training is monitored and co-ordinated by the artist-in-residence in the Department of Politics – who will oversee students’ individual needs while ensuring that there is continuity of support and opportunities to identify and build upon individual strengths and weaknesses.

Download the programme specification for this degree to find out more about what you'll learn and how you'll be taught and assessed.

Please note that due to staff research commitments not all of these modules may be available every year.

Skills & Careers

Careers

Our graduates come from diverse disciplinary backgrounds and embark on highly contrasting career paths. These include careers in curating (both independent and embedded); art practice (both collaborative and individual); journalism (radio, web and print journalism); performing arts; central and local government; work with NGOs (national and international); research (academic and professional); project development, administration and management. Some of our graduates undertake further professional training in law; journalism; education and social work.

Skills

You'll develop: a critical engagement with the broad field of international studies, communication skills, research skills, presentation skills.

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths http://www.gold.ac.uk/skills-careers/

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Our research programmes are designed for artists who would like to explore and develop their understanding of their practice, and in so doing to contribute to the wider cultural context through original critical work. Read more
Our research programmes are designed for artists who would like to explore and develop their understanding of their practice, and in so doing to contribute to the wider cultural context through original critical work. http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-art/

In all Art research subjects (whether you specialise as an artist, a curator or a writer) you may either register for practice-based research or register to undertake research leading to a thesis submitted in accordance with the normal provisions of the University.

At research level the Department of Art’s aim is to support the development of original practice in the form of artworks, curatorial production and writing. As an artist registered for either practice-based research or by written thesis only, you will work alongside curators and writers and participate in our rich critical research environment. You will normally work with two supervisors who will meet you to discuss the development of your research project on a regular basis, as well as have the opportunity to organise and participate in training workshops, seminars, screenings, displays and research symposia.

You will apply with a well-developed idea for an individual research project that you have begun to plan artistically as well as to contextualise with reference to contemporary and historical examples of artworks, exhibitions, designs, social, political and philosophical ideas, etc. We consider all elements of the MPhil – the written element and the artistic or curatorial production for practice-based research – to be sites of rigorous formal experimentation. Throughout your period of study you will be expected to articulate the shape and form of your research and the relation between its elements and to discuss them in research fora on a regular basis.

If you are an international student and would like to study a 'tailor-made' programme (for up to a year), you may be interested in applying as a Guest Research Student.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Professor Michael Newman.

Structure

If you are registered for a practice-based research project you are expected to produce a series of artworks and/or documentation of a series of exhibitions or events developed whilst on the programme as well as a dissertation of 20,000 words. If you are registered according to the normal provisions of the University your final text has a target of 40,000 words.

All research students are registered first for an MPhil then may either transfer registration to PhD following the successful completion of an upgrade exam or finish their study at this stage by submitting their research for an MPhil exam.

We provide full-time practice-based research students with studio or office accommodation as appropriate; we expect part-time students to have their own studio or office as appropriate, which is subject to the same conditions as for part-time MFA in Fine Art students.

We recommend that all applicants contact us initially to discuss their proposal and identify a potential supervisor from the Art Department academic staff with whom they would like to work. All applications must be accompanied by a digital portfolio or website. If shortlisted, applicants will be expected to attend an interview (international applicants may be interviewed by skype).

Assessment is by either:

Thesis, including practice; viva voce
Thesis and viva voce

Department

We have a world-leading reputation that brings together
students and researchers from all over the globe
Art
We specialise in making, curating and writing about contemporary art in a dynamic, critical and interdisciplinary environment.

And we work with a network of artists, curators, galleries and museums in both London and internationally to create an inspiring and dynamic place in which to study and develop an artistic practice.

Our alumni go on to do great things. Many of them are among the most recognised names working in art today, and since 1990 they’ve been nominated for the Turner Prize more than 30 times, winning the prize on seven occasions.

Skills

Our art programmes aim to equip you with the necessary skills to develop independent thought and confidence in your practice. In addition, these skills are of use in other career paths you may wish to follow.

Careers

Our students have been successful in many fields including media, museums, galleries, education, the music business and academia. Many have continued to be successful, practising artists long after graduating, and have won major prizes and exhibited around the world. The Turner Prize shortlist has consistently included at least one of our former graduates. Seven of the prize winners have studied here:

Grenville Davey
Antony Gormley
Damien Hirst
Gillian Wearing
Steve McQueen
Mark Wallinger
Laure Prouvost

How to apply

Before you apply for a research programme, we advise you to get in touch with the programme contact, listed above. It may also be possible to arrange an advisory meeting.

Before you start at Goldsmiths, the actual topic of your research has to be agreed with your proposed supervisor, who will be a member of staff active in your general field of research. The choice of topic may be influenced by the current research in the department or the requirements of an external funding body.

If you wish to study on a part-time basis, you should also indicate how many hours a week you intend to devote to research, whether this will be at evenings or weekends, and for how many hours each day.

Research proposals

Along with your application and academic reference, you should also upload a research proposal at the point of application.

This should be in the form of a statement of the proposed area of research and should include:

-delineation of the research topic
-why it has been chosen
-an initial hypothesis (if applicable)
-a brief list of major secondary sources

If you are applying for practice-based research please provide examples of your recent work in an appropriately documented form. You should explain how the written component of your thesis will exemplify and locate the ideas you hope to develop in conjunction with your practice. Please make sure that your slides and other supporting material are clearly labelled with your name and address.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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What kind of learning emerges from art practice, and how does such learning further impact upon art practice? This reflexive question lies at the heart of the MPhil in Art Practice & Learning- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-art-practice-learning/. Read more
What kind of learning emerges from art practice, and how does such learning further impact upon art practice? This reflexive question lies at the heart of the MPhil in Art Practice & Learning- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-art-practice-learning/

The programme aims to promote research into dialogical relations between pedagogical and art practices; a central purpose is to expand understanding of what both can become.

The programme anticipates that through an exploration and interrogation of the dialogical relations between art practices and pedagogies, sites of practice and sites of learning you will engage with areas such as philosophical, political and aesthetic dimensions of learning and practice.

The MPhil programme offers the opportunity for the student to continue their research to a PhD.

The outcomes of the research will consist of a practice component and a written thesis of 50,000 words which articulate a coherent and integrated research study in which both components are viewed equally as contributing to the research. The written component must be able to demonstrate a clearly articulated research project and a rigorous theoretical engagement with the research focus, drawing upon, analysing and applying relevant literature.

The practice component must demonstrate an exploration and articulation of the research focus that draws upon domains of practice including visual or other practices to inform the research. The practice component could, for example, take the form of an exhibition, a film/video (approximately one hour in length), an installation, a web-based production, a performance, a participatory work, a sonic work or performance.

A key feature of the MPhil in Art Practice & Learning is that you will form a research community that meets regularly each term to discuss/share/debate research and ideas, and to discuss readings and art practice. These research meetings will be held at Goldsmiths or in galleries or other contexts and will involve invited artists, academics and other contributions.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Anna Hickey-Moody.

Structure

Supervision
You will be allocated two supervisors within the Department but joint-supervision with colleagues in other Departments who have expertise relevant to your research may also be possible. You'll be expected to attend Department research training and College research training and to participate whenever possible in Department research centre meetings.

Resources

The Department of Educational Studies has the theoretical and practical resources to support the anticipated research and it is able to draw upon important alliances and relations with cultural institutions with whom it has worked over many years, including for example, Tate, Whitechapel Gallery, Showroom Gallery, 198 Gallery and Iniva.

The programme draws upon a team of dedicated staff in Educational studies who are committed to developing this research; it will also draw upon part-time contributions from artists of national and international standing who already contribute to the

The programme can be studied full or part-time, and appropriate facilities will be provided.

Assessment

A practice component and a written thesis of 50,000 words.

Department

Education at Goldsmiths is ranked 8th in the UK for the quality of our research**

**Research Excellence Framework 2014, Times Higher Education research intensity subject rankings

As a department we’re interested in seeing what education can tell us about the social, political and economic forces of our times. And what these forces mean for the everyday lives of individuals and groups.

We see education as a window through which to view the world, and as something with the power to define who we are and how we live.

That’s why our research delves into areas including culture and identity, gender, multilingualism, and youth cultures, and why we maintain a commitment to social justice and inclusion.

How to apply

Before you apply for a research programme, we advise you to get in touch with the programme contact, listed above. It may also be possible to arrange an advisory meeting.

Before you start at Goldsmiths, the actual topic of your research has to be agreed with your proposed supervisor, who will be a member of staff active in your general field of research. The choice of topic may be influenced by the current research in the department or the requirements of an external funding body.

If you wish to study on a part-time basis, you should also indicate how many hours a week you intend to devote to research, whether this will be at evenings or weekends, and for how many hours each day.

Research proposals

Along with your application and academic reference, you should also upload a research proposal at the point of application.

This should be in the form of a statement of the proposed area of research and should include:

delineation of the research topic
why it has been chosen
an initial hypothesis (if applicable)
a brief list of major secondary sources

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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This programme will provide you with a broad understanding of the theories and practices of art psychotherapy necessary for safe and effective clinical work- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-art-psychotherapy/. Read more
This programme will provide you with a broad understanding of the theories and practices of art psychotherapy necessary for safe and effective clinical work- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-art-psychotherapy/

The Masters enables you to practice as an art therapist in the NHS, Social Services, and educational establishments, and to become a practitioner registered with the British Association of Art Therapists and eligible to apply for registration with the Health & Care Professions Council (HCPC).

Your learning is underpinned by the principles and practices of psychodynamic psychotherapy practised within the context of mental health care, and informed by contemporary art practice.

Via theoretical studies, clinical work and experiential learning you will integrate cognitive understanding and practical experience with a developing awareness of self and other. The nature of the therapeutic relationship between client, their art work, and the art therapist is explored, and you have the opportunity to put your learning into practice through two 60-day placements which are supervised and supported in-depth.

You are encouraged to develop your own art practice and to situate your work in relationship to your development as a therapist, to contemporary art practice and to psychoanalytic theories. You must be in personal therapy throughout the programme.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Sally Skaife.

Modes of study

The MA in Art Psychotherapy is a course that leads to successful applicants becoming eligible to apply for registration as an Arts Therapist with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC), the body which regulates and monitors standards of practice in the public sector. The programme can be studied in two modes - full-time for 2 years or part-time for 3 years. A clear indication of the mode chosen should be stated on application forms.

Full-time study

Year 1: all day Monday and Tuesday in college. Clinical placement days are usually Thursday and Friday. One day should be set aside for on-going studio practice where possible.

Years 2: all day Tuesday in college plus two days clinical placement to be arranged on other days – usually two consecutive days and these are negotiated with your placement. There are also three two day blocks of time for experiential groups (Mondays and Tuesdays). One day should be set aside for on-going studio practice where possible.

Part-time study

Year 1: all day Monday and Tuesday in college. One day should be set aside for on-going studio practice where possible.

Year 2: all day Tuesday in college plus two days clinical placement to be arranged on other days – usually two consecutive days. There are also three two day blocks of time for experiential groups. One day should be set aside for on-going studio practice where possible.

Year 3: Half a day in college on Tuesdays with some full-time Tuesdays (the yearly timetable will have details of which Tuesdays are half day or full day), plus, two days clinical placement to be arranged on other days – usually two consecutive days. One day should be set aside for on-going studio practice where possible.

Personal therapy

It's a mandatory aspect of the course that all students must be in personal therapy for the duration of their training. Therapy may be on a group or individual basis and can be art therapy or verbal psychotherapy.

Skills

The MA will develop skills including:

the ability to work with a range of client populations
an understanding of psychodynamic concepts
development of your own art practice
Careers
Completion of the programme provides eligibility for the Health & Care Professions Council (HCPC) registration as an art psychotherapist.

Our graduates are invariably seen as offering a valuable and unique service to their clients and to the multidisciplinary teams in which they work – graduates have gone on to practice as art psychotherapists in the NHS, social services and in the education sector.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

Read less
We offer opportunities for students who want to pursue research in art psychotherapy- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-art-psychotherapy/. Read more
We offer opportunities for students who want to pursue research in art psychotherapy- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-art-psychotherapy/

For MPhil study, you usually register for research by written thesis (although there are also possibilities for research based on a written element and studio practice).

The MPhil programme offers the opportunity for the student to continue their research to a PhD.

Whatever your topic, you have your first supervisor in Art Psychotherapy and may have your second in another department – Art, Educational Studies, Psychology, or Sociology, for example.

You meet your supervisors regularly for discussion and guidance, and present your work to the Art Psychotherapy research student group.

You also attend the Goldsmiths Research Methods Training Course.

Supervision is currently available in the following areas:

-art therapists and their art
-cross-cultural issues
-evidence-based practices
-group work
-history and development of the professions in the UK and internationally
-occupational choice, career development and role change of arts therapists and arts therapy trainees
-clinical work with various client populations

Current research topics include:

-key issues in art psychotherapy with the blind
-the creative experience inside and outside an art psychotherapy group
-the image as an assessment tool with children who have an autistic spectrum disorder
-thinking about art with adults who have learning disabilities
-art therapists’ working environments

You'll be assessed by a thesis and viva voce.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Sally Skaife.

Department

The Department of Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies
has human relationships at its heart
Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies
You’ll benefit from the wealth of experience of our staff and their commitment to ensuring that you’ll leave us as a reflective, research-minded professional.

We offer programmes in Community Studies, Social Work, and Therapeutic Studies.

Our degrees are informed by our commitment to social justice and applied practices – whether you want to:

understand and challenge the ways that vulnerable individuals and groups are disadvantaged and marginalised
become a social worker, community and youth worker, therapist or counsellor
change people’s lives through dance, drama and music
You’ll benefit from the wealth of experience of our staff and their commitment to ensuring that you’ll leave us as a reflective, research-minded professional.

How to apply

Before you apply for a research programme, we advise you to get in touch with the programme contact, listed above. It may also be possible to arrange an advisory meeting.

Before you start at Goldsmiths, the actual topic of your research has to be agreed with your proposed supervisor, who will be a member of staff active in your general field of research. The choice of topic may be influenced by the current research in the department or the requirements of an external funding body.

If you wish to study on a part-time basis, you should also indicate how many hours a week you intend to devote to research, whether this will be at evenings or weekends, and for how many hours each day.

Research proposals

Along with your application and academic reference, you should also upload a research proposal at the point of application.

This should be in the form of a statement of the proposed area of research and should include:

delineation of the research topic
why it has been chosen
an initial hypothesis (if applicable)
a brief list of major secondary sources

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

Read less
This Masters gives artists, practitioners, teachers and educators, in informal and formal learning environments, the opportunity to extend, enrich and consolidate the overlapping practices and theories of contemporary art and learning and teaching through individual and collaborative research- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-artist-teachers-contemporary-practices/. Read more
This Masters gives artists, practitioners, teachers and educators, in informal and formal learning environments, the opportunity to extend, enrich and consolidate the overlapping practices and theories of contemporary art and learning and teaching through individual and collaborative research- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-artist-teachers-contemporary-practices/

Why study MA Artist Teachers & Contemporary Practices (MAAT) at Goldsmiths?

Engaging with practice and theory, you will create new work; develop innovative research approaches and outcomes; critically debate the changing nature of contemporary art, gallery/exhibition practices and art education; and sustain these practices and ideas as artist teacher beyond the MAAT.
You’ll be taught by staff who are nationally and internationally renowned and published artist researcher teachers.
You’ll draw on the international scope of contemporary art practices in London through partnerships with international galleries including Tate Modern, The Whitechapel Gallery and The Showroom Gallery.
You’ll be part of a student body with a rich diversity of backgrounds and experiences, and have the opportunity to develop and maintain collaborative peer networks and support.
You’ll have access to an extensive programme of guest lectures, presentations and projects that has included: Grayson Perry, Yinka Shonibare, Sonia Boyce, Susan Pui San Lok, Danny Devenny, Mark Ervine, Marty Lyons and John Matthews, hosted through our Centre for Arts and Learning (CAL).
The MAAT can be a pathway before or after the completion of a UK QTS (Qualified Teacher Status) programme, such as the PGCE (Secondary): Art & Design.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact John Johnston

Overview

The programme places a strong emphasis on student-centred and directed learning, where teaching sessions and personal tutorials draw on the critical reflection and development of your artist teacher practices: including artistic, theoretical, political and learning and teaching concerns.

The modules of the programme are all underpinned with theories of contemporary art, learning and critical and dialectical pedagogical theories and philosophies.

You'll attend all lectures, seminars, workshops and tutorials where you'll engage in questioning the political, ideas, practices, theory and philosophy related to the specific topics of: contemporary art practice, teaching and learning, identity and place/space construction, dialectical pedagogical theories and practice, social-engagement, and research led practices where you'll be encouraged and expected to critically discuss and debate the issues raised.

But this is just a small proportion of what we expect you to do on the degree. Independent learning/research (practice with theory) is expected throughout the MAAT, this typically involves critical reflection and development of your practices as artist teacher including: additional readings, preparing topics for discussion/presentations, working with fellow students, producing essays, artist teacher statements, research, planning, organising and producing practice-based work and/or projects, curating exhibitions and presentations, both individually and collaboratively.

This emphasis on independent learning is very important at Goldsmiths. We don't just want you to accept what we tell you without question. We want you to be deeply engaged with theory and practice to develop and sustain your own ideas and practices as artist teachers.

Structure

To enable greater flexibility for you and a more equitable experience for full-time and part-time students, the MAAT programme has a modular structure, with the majority of teaching sessions usually conducted in the evenings.

This also enables part time and full-time students to attend the same evening teaching sessions and therefore form a collaborative and supportive learning environment.

For you to obtain the postgraduate degree of MAAT you will need to complete 180 CATS at Masters level.

The MAAT comprises five core modules (150 CATS) and one option module (30 CATS).

You may also take advantage of two exit points:

Postgraduate Certificate in Artist Teacher and Contemporary Practices (60 Credits)
Postgraduate Diploma in Artist Teacher and Contemporary Practices (120 Credits)

Assessment

The MA Artist Teacher and Contemporary Practices utilises a number of complementary assessment strategies. These have been devised to appropriately assess the range of learning outcomes and are underpinned by the ethos of the programme these include, exhibition/presentation/performance, essay, viva voce.

Download the programme specification for this degree to find out more about what you'll learn and how you'll be taught and assessed.

Please note that due to staff research commitments not all of these modules may be available every year.

Skills
Through the programme, you’ll develop independent thinking, understand theoretical underpinning, and the ability to question and have confidence in your ideas and practice - skills that will benefit you throughout your chosen career. You'll also develop:

critical and analytical skills
creative and practical skills
ability to express complex and sophisticated ideas with clarity and confidence
the ability to work independently and collaboratively
IT skills
As a MAAT alumna, you’ll continue to research and engage in the presentation of your practices through practice, exhibitions, socially-engaged projects, international conferences and international journals.

Careers

Our graduates have an outstanding employment record in the fields of education, galleries/museums, social work/charity, health, public administration and welfare with the majority of graduates gaining full-time employment in a variety of careers including:

Teacher, lecturer, tutor
Heads of Faculties/Departments
Community artists
Gallery educators/curators
Practicing artists/photographers

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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