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Qualified Teacher Status is the United Kingdom’s professional accreditation for teaching. The Assessment Only Route is a fast-track route (maximum 12 weeks) to gain Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) for teachers with two or more years’ teaching experience. Read more

Course outline

Qualified Teacher Status is the United Kingdom’s professional accreditation for teaching.

The Assessment Only Route is a fast-track route (maximum 12 weeks) to gain Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) for teachers with two or more years’ teaching experience.

Applications are welcome from teachers, who do not hold Qualified Teacher Status, currently teaching in a school in the UK or abroad, providing they meet the necessary criteria. Schools may be state-maintained, independent or international in any country.

Course content

A preliminary assessment of your suitability for the Assessment Only Route takes place prior to the start date. A tutor from the University of Buckingham will undertake this assessment at your school, and a decision on your suitability will be made on the day. A second tutor visit will take place within 12 weeks of the course start date and will be a final assessment against the Teaching Standards.

Assessment Only Candidates may apply for a September, January or April start date.

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Qualified Teacher Status is the United Kingdom’s professional accreditation for teaching. The Assessment Only Route is a fast-track route (maximum 12 weeks) to gain Qualified Teacher Status for teachers with two or more years’ teaching experience. Read more

Course outline

Qualified Teacher Status is the United Kingdom’s professional accreditation for teaching.

The Assessment Only Route is a fast-track route (maximum 12 weeks) to gain Qualified Teacher Status for teachers with two or more years’ teaching experience.

Applications are welcome from teachers, who do not hold Qualified Teacher Status, currently teaching in a school in the UK or abroad, providing they meet the necessary criteria. Schools may be state-maintained, independent or international in any country.

Course content

A preliminary assessment of your suitability for the Assessment Only Route takes place prior to the start date. A tutor from the University of Buckingham will undertake this assessment at your school, and a decision on your suitability will be made on the day. A second tutor visit will take place within 12 weeks of the course start date and will be a final assessment against the Teaching Standards.

Assessment Only Candidates may apply for a September, January or April start date.

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Detailed theory teaching and clinical training is given in all sub-specialities of General Internal Medicine with emphasis on clinically relevant, state-of-the-art and topical issues. Read more

Course outline

Detailed theory teaching and clinical training is given in all sub-specialities of General Internal Medicine with emphasis on clinically relevant, state-of-the-art and topical issues. The following medical sub-specialities will be comprehensively covered in a structured way over 2 or 3 years for the University of Buckingham Clinical MD programmes:

- Cardiology
- Respiratory Medicine
- Gastroenterology
- Infectious Diseases
- Emergency Medicine
- Diabetes and Endocrinology
- Critical Care including ITU
- Nephrology
- Radiology
- Neurology
- Dermatology
- Haematology & Oncology
- Rheumatology
- Ethics and Law in Medicine
- Audit and Dissertation

The entire curriculum will be taught over 8 terms (for the 2-year MD) or 12 terms (for the 3-year MD) of 10 weeks duration each, with one module per term and 4 terms each year. Students taking the combined Research cum Clinical MD programme will take the MSc in Medical Research in the Clore Laboratory in their first year and then follow the 2-year MD programme.

Find out more about our Medical School on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/medicine.

Programme structure

The total unit value of the Clinical MD curriculum is 360 units. Teaching is delivered over eight courses, each of 45 units:

- Gastroenterology and Nephrology
- Respiratory Medicine and Radiology
- Cardiology and Neurology
- Infectious Diseases, Rheumatology and Dermatology
- Emergency Medicine
- Diabetes and Endocrinology
- Critical Care, Haematology and Oncology
- General Internal Medicine

Included in the MD courses, as an integral part of the Emergency Medicine module, is a comprehensive programme of training in theoretical and practical aspects of cardio-pulmonary resuscitation. All MD fellows who have obtained full General Medical Council registration are enrolled on a Resuscitation Council approved, 2-day, Advanced Life Support course. This internal course takes place at Ealing Hospital and when successfully completed leads to the award of an internationally recognised ALS provider certificate for all MD fellows. The costs of this course are included in the overall tuition fees for the MD programme.

Clinical placement

Students will be expected to spend four 10-week placements at other UK NHS Trusts. This will provide exposure to a broader clinical experience.

Teaching and assessment methods

Dedicated teaching fellows and specialist registrars assist module directors and external consultants, many of national and international eminence. The teaching is clinically-oriented and delivered on the medical wards, out-patients, Accident & Emergency department and in the ITU.

Apply here http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/science/md/generalinternalmedicine.

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This programme of study is intended primarily for graduates from a non-computing background to obtain fundamental knowledge and understanding of a range of core subjects in IT and computing. Read more

Course Outline

This programme of study is intended primarily for graduates from a non-computing background to obtain fundamental knowledge and understanding of a range of core subjects in IT and computing. Graduates who successfully complete the programme are eligible for entry into the MSc in Innovative Computing degree programme. The Certificate programme consists of 90 units of credit. Students take 6 taught courses over 6 months. The Certificate programme is more suitable for students with science, engineering or mathematics backgrounds. Computing graduates who have applied to study the MSc in Innovative Computing but lack sufficient knowledge in key areas (such as programming, databases and networking) may be required to take the Certificate programme before being admitted to the MSc programme. The overall aims are to:

- Equip graduates who want to develop their careers in their own areas of speciality with a solid understanding and awareness of IT and computing
- Convert those who want to change their careers into the IT and computing field.

On completing the programme, you will be able to:

- Understand fundamental concepts and principles of computing and information systems
- Develop simple software systems and database applications
- Describe computing technologies and their use in practice
- Exercise critical analysis and evaluation of information systems

The programme will also help you to develop skills in:

- A range of Microsoft application software tools
- Programming in industry standard languages (VB or C++ and Java)
- Database development
- Software system analysis and design
- Individual work and teamwork

Find out more about our Department of Applied Computing on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/appliedcomputing.

Teaching Method

Our modules include a mixture of formal lectures, tutorial classes and practical classes. At the start of each module you will be given an up-to-date module outline and reading list. Most modules will provide two or three hours of lectures each week to introduce you to the basic concepts and techniques. These will be supported by lecture notes or handouts.

Lectures are supported by weekly tutorial classes, usually one hour in length, which are held in small groups so that all students can benefit from individual attention. You will be expected to prepare for these classes, for example by attempting a set of exercises or by reading a case study.

Many of our modules have supervised practical classes in the computer laboratories in which you can apply and practise the techniques you have learnt in the lectures. These practical sessions are usually two or three hours long.

You will also be expected to study on your own, using the library for reading research and the computer laboratories to improve your practical skills.

Course material is also available on the University’s own Virtual Learning Environment. This allows students to download lecture notes, submit assignments and share resources in an electronic forum both within the University’s computer network and remotely.

After your degree

We have a high graduate employment rate:

- The Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) ranked Buckingham top for job prospects with 96.9% (July 2013).
- The Guardian League Table for 2014 ranked Buckingham top in the category of job prospects (June 2013).
- The Complete University Guide reported that the University ranked second for Graduate Prospects (May 2013).

Our graduates have gone on to further study at most of the world’s leading universities, including Harvard, London, Oxford and Cambridge and secured jobs in senior positions around the world. Among our alumni we have a graduate who became the head of his country’s civil service and one who became a leading Formula One motor-racing driver. Another secured a position as the Minister of Sabah and one female law graduate became the first British lawyer to become a French Advocate.

Apply here http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/sciences/pgcertificate/computing.

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This programme of study is intended primarily for graduates from any non-computing background to obtain fundamental knowledge and understanding of a range of core subjects in Computing. Read more

Course outline

This programme of study is intended primarily for graduates from any non-computing background to obtain fundamental knowledge and understanding of a range of core subjects in Computing. The overall aim of education is to either equip the graduates who want to develop their careers in their own areas of speciality with additional understanding, awareness and skills of IT and Computing, or help those who want to change their careers into IT and Computing. The programme can also serve as a pre-requisite for advanced master programmes in Applied Computing at Buckingham.

Graduates who successfully complete the programmes are eligible for entry into the MSc in Innovative Computing degree programme.

The Graduate Diploma programme consists of 7 taught modules and an individual project. On completing the programmes, you will be able to understand:

- the role that computers and networked systems play in the modern world.
- the essential knowledge and skills in programming together with relevant structures and concepts to create such systems.
- fundamental concepts and principles of databases, networking, object-oriented programming, web design and human-computer interaction.
- advanced applications including data mining, multimedia, interactive computer graphics, and security systems.
- ethical, professional, social and legal issues in exploiting computing technology in practice.

The programme will also help you to develop skills in:

- Computing and web application
- Web design
- Programming and problem-solving for large scale or mobile applications
- Database and software development
- Developing usable GUIs
- Computer graphics
- Computer network issues

Find out more about our Department of Applied Computing on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/appliedcomputing.

Teaching methods

Our modules include a mixture of formal lectures, tutorial classes and practical classes. At the start of each module you will be given an up-to-date module outline and reading list. Most modules will provide two or three hours of lectures each week to introduce you to the basic concepts and techniques. These will be supported by lecture notes or handouts.

Lectures are supported by weekly tutorial classes, usually one hour in length, which are held in small groups so that all students can benefit from individual attention. You will be expected to prepare for these classes, for example by attempting a set of exercises or by reading a case study.

Many of our modules have supervised practical classes in the computer laboratories in which you can apply and practise the techniques you have learnt in the lectures. These practical sessions are usually two or three hours long.

You will also be expected to study on your own, using the library for reading research and the computer laboratories to improve your practical skills.

Course material is also available on the University’s own Virtual Learning Environment. This allows students to download lecture notes, submit assignments and share resources in an electronic forum both within the University’s computer network and remotely.

Study options

Students may take the diploma over 9 (April start) or 12 (January start) months. The course is also available on a part-time basis over two years (starting in January).

After your degree

We have a high graduate employment rate:

- The Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) ranked Buckingham top for job prospects with 96.9% (July 2013).
- The Guardian League Table for 2014 ranked Buckingham top in the category of job prospects (June 2013).
- The Complete University Guide reported that the University ranked second for Graduate Prospects (May 2013).

Our graduates have gone on to further study at most of the world’s leading universities, including Harvard, London, Oxford and Cambridge and secured jobs in senior positions around the world. Among our alumni we have a graduate who became the head of his country’s civil service and one who became a leading Formula One motor-racing driver. Another secured a position as the Minister of Sabah and one female law graduate became the first British lawyer to become a French Advocate.

Apply here http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/sciences/pgdiploma/appliedcomputing.

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The Independent Postgraduate Certificate of Education has been developed in close consultation with the Headmasters’ and Headmistresses’ Conference (HMC). Read more

Course outline

The Independent Postgraduate Certificate of Education has been developed in close consultation with the Headmasters’ and Headmistresses’ Conference (HMC). Since 2002 it has been offering teachers in the independent sector, who have not undergone a period of formal teacher training, the opportunity to participate in a structured programme of professional development.

Course content

The PGCE is a 37-week school-based course, during which time you will work under the guidance of a mentor and receive weekly tutorials to review progress and set targets. It is available in most subjects and to all age levels. There are three residentials (eight days overall) to attend and these are supplemented by a weekly programme on the University’s Virtual Learning Environment (VLE). You will be assigned a University tutor who visits once per term to assess your progress and guide your development. You will be assessed by both your mentor and your tutor and there are three assignments to complete.

For teachers undertaking their first year of teaching we highly recommend your participation in our Ab Initio course in late August as an addition to the PGCE. This will provide you with some basic knowledge and skills to start teaching

Find out more about our School of Education on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/education.

How to apply

Contact Nikki Mugford, Secretary to the Department of Education, on +44 (0)1280 820219 or email .

Apply here http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities/pgce/independentpgce.

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We offer three programmes of postgraduate study by research, all in either full-time or part-time mode. These are degrees by research which require an original contribution to the body of knowledge in a particular academic or professional discipline. Read more

Course Outline

We offer three programmes of postgraduate study by research, all in either full-time or part-time mode. These are degrees by research which require an original contribution to the body of knowledge in a particular academic or professional discipline.

- LLM by research – 1 academic year of full-time study or 2 years of part-time study.
- MPhil – 2 academic years of full-time study or 4 years of part-time study.
- DPhil – 3 academic years of full-time study or 6 years of part-time study.

Normally, postgraduate students wishing to register for our DPhil programme must first register for the MPhil and seek conversion at a later stage. The School operates a system of preliminary registration for all research degrees to allow students to prepare a formal proposal during their first two terms of study. All research students must also subject their work to an annual progress review.

Find out more about our Law School on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/law

Teaching Method

Candidates spend the aforementioned time period undertaking supervised research, at the end of which they submit a thesis embodying the results of that research. This thesis must demonstrate familiarity with, and an understanding of the subject, its principal sources and authorities. It should display critical discrimination and a sense of proportion in evaluating evidence and the judgements of others. The subject should be dealt with in a competent and scholarly manner.

Apply here http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/law/mphil/law.

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The underlying philosophy of the LLM is to develop specialists in the field of international and Commercial Law. The programme attracts students from a wide variety of backgrounds with different experiences. Read more

Course outline

The underlying philosophy of the LLM is to develop specialists in the field of international and Commercial Law. The programme attracts students from a wide variety of backgrounds with different experiences. It stresses the importance of interaction between staff and student, as well as between student and student. We believe this is an essential element in the development of effective lawyers in this area.

Following successful completion of the LLM in International and Commercial Law, you should have developed a range of skills, which include:

- A sound understanding of each of the chosen areas of the law
- Confidence in the analysis of complex case-law
- The ability to make your argument convincingly, orally and in writing
- The ability to take a co-operative approach to problem solving

Find out more about our Law School on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/law.

Teaching methods

Seminars are the primary teaching method for this course. They encourage the development of clear analytical skills and create a forum where you can test your ideas against the arguments of your peers. Whether you enter the legal profession or business world you will find it is essential to have developed persuasive abilities. LLM options are taught in the form of three hours of seminars spread over each of the teaching weeks of the course. LLM seminars for subjects which are also taught at LLB level take place in two hour blocks every fortnight.

You are expected to read the cases and other materials relevant to the particular seminar in advance. At the seminar you will be asked to support your opinions and discuss your analysis of the area with your fellow students. In some modules you may be expected to make a presentation on a topic given to you by your tutor. Whilst these tasks may seem daunting at the beginning of the year, you will rapidly gain confidence as your debating skills develop.

Where seminars are on a fortnightly basis, the course will be supported by three hours of lectures per week during the lecturing period. Seminars will complement the lecture series.

Course material is available on the University’s own Virtual Learning Environment (VLE), Moodle. This allows students to download lecture notes, submit assignments and share resources in an electronic forum both within the University’s computer network and remotely.

Specialist designations

Students can select specific modules to have their LLM designated as specialising in:

- International Trade and Maritime Law;
- International Oil and Gas Law; or
- Financial Services Law

Each designation requires the following to be taken:

- 20 unit Advanced Legal Research module;
- 40 unit Core module; and
- 120 units of Options.

Apply here http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/law/llm/internationalandcommercial.

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The cutting-edge Taught MA in Biography was founded in 1996, remains unique to Buckingham and is consistently rated ‘excellent’ by external examiners and inspectors. Read more

Course outline

The cutting-edge Taught MA in Biography was founded in 1996, remains unique to Buckingham and is consistently rated ‘excellent’ by external examiners and inspectors. Since then, in response to student demand, the available options have been extended to include postgraduate research degrees at three levels: MA by Research, MPhil or DPhil level. Study can be on either a full-time or a part-time basis.

Find out more about our School of Humanities on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities.

Course structure

For their first year of study students on all these courses attend the same weekly seminars as students taking the Taught MA in Biography. These provide the critical awareness of the subject which is an essential prerequisite for dissertation work and they are one of the most distinctive and valuable elements of the MA. They take place as follows:

- Autobiography (September to December)
- Special Paper in Biography (January to June)
- Research Methods (January to June)

The modules on Biography and Autobiography are designed to combine the study of classic biographies and memoirs with contemporary writing. In addition, the Research Methods module provides an invaluable and innovative training, especially devised for biographers.

Guest seminars on the course are led by leading biographers, critics, publishers and agents. Teachers and speakers on the course have included Andrew Motion, Kathryn Hughes, Frances Wilson, Frances Spalding, Jeremy Lewis, Rupert Shortt, Caroline Dawnay, Andrew Lownie and Miranda Seymour.

Research students are expected to produce, as a valuable preliminary to their own research project, written coursework for the Research Methods module (an annotated bibliography and a short biography, with supporting material, produced according to the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography format), and one other piece of written work, but the full amount of termly written work required for the taught course is not compulsory. During the early part of the course, research students refine their research proposal under the individual supervision of the course director for eventual discussion with the Research Officer. Once the research proposal has been accepted students concentrate on individual research and the preparation of a dissertation, under the supervision of the course director.

Teaching methods

One of the distinctive features of the programme is the value attached to the supervision which is provided for students working on dissertations. One-on-one supervisions are held every two or three weeks during term. While the dissertation must be the candidate’s independent work, it is the supervisor who offers advice on refining the topic (if necessary), on primary sources, on secondary reading, on research techniques and on writing the dissertation. Regular group discussions between research students at all degree levels (MA, MPhil and DPhil) allow the exchange of research experiences and mutual support.

Programme director

Professor Jane Ridley founded the Buckingham Biography MA in 1996. She is an Oxford-trained historian and biographer, and her publications include The Young Disraeli (1995) and The Architect and his Wife: A Life of Edwin Lutyens (2002), which won the Duff Cooper Prize. She has contributed widely to the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, and she is a regular reviewer for publications such as the Spectator, the Literary Review and the Times Literary Supplement. She is currently completing a biography of Edward VII, for which she was awarded a research fellowship by the Leverhulme Trust.

Location

Teaching takes place in London. See the University's website for more information.

Timescale

The normal periods of study for achieving these research degrees are as follows:

- MA Res– 1 year full-time or 2 years part-time
- MPhil – 2 years full-time or 4 years part-time
- DPhil – 3 years full-time or 6 years part-time

Administrative arrangements

A system of preliminary registration for all research degrees is in operation to allow students to prepare a formal proposal during the early part of their course. Admission to research degrees is normally on a provisional basis while the candidate, with the help of the supervisor, refines the proposal for the research, including developing a work plan and identifying the requirements for support and resources and how these will be met. Students for the MA degree in Biography by Research are registered initially for the taught MA until the research proposal has been accepted. Postgraduate students wishing to register for the DPhil programme in Biography must first register for the MPhil and seek conversion at a later stage. Registration is upgraded to DPhil, normally between 12 and 18 months from first registration, once the student has demonstrated through the submission of draft written work that he or she has the ability to conduct research at the advanced level required for the award of the degree. All research students must also subject their work to an annual progress review.

Changing the level of the research degree after the start of the course, although not impossible, can produce complications. Prospective students uncertain about the level or length of course best suited to them are strongly advised to discuss this with the course director before applying.

Apply here http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities/mres/biography.

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The MA in English Literature by research is taught through seminars, group sessions, and personalised one-to-one teaching with a first and second supervisor. Read more

Course Outline

The MA in English Literature by research is taught through seminars, group sessions, and personalised one-to-one teaching with a first and second supervisor. A postgraduate reading group, and seminars led by staff and guest speakers, gradually develop the insights needed to complete your research project.

There are four parts to the qualification:

a research proposal
a bibliography
a short essay
a longer Dissertation

There are no exams. For more detail, click on the image on the right to download the brochure (PDF file, 7 MB).

This is an opportunity to work closely on a writer or topic that fascinates you, within a supportive environment. You can undertake research in most literary topics within the period 1550 to the present day. You start by developing the Project Preliminaries with your supervisors: the research proposal, bibliography, and essay. Then you progress to the full Dissertation (25,000-30,000 words), written under the guidance of your supervisors.

The MA commences in September or January each year, on a full- or part-time basis. The MA takes one year full-time, two years part-time.

For the MA, full-time attendance on campus is not required, but overseas students in particular, or home students wishing to use libraries intensively, may apply for a room in University accommodation. Alternately, you can travel in for the teaching days, usually Wednesdays during term. The one-to-one sessions with your supervisors can be arranged for any day of the week.

Find out more about our Department of English on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/english.

Teaching Method

At the heart of the MA is the close working relationship between candidate and supervisor. While the final thesis must be the candidate’s independent work, it is the supervisor who offers advice on refining the topic (if necessary), on primary sources, on secondary reading, on research techniques and on writing the final thesis. Supervisors and candidates meet frequently throughout the year, and not less than twice a term; and the supervisor is always the candidate’s primary contact for academic advice and support.

Those with limited time may prefer to spread the writing of their dissertation over two years, in which case an individual timetable of lectures and supervisions will be arranged.

Apply here http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities/ma/englishliterature.

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This ground-breaking Master’s programme addresses the urban ‘data revolution’ that has transformed our understanding of the associations between ‘built form’ — buildings and how these relate to each other — and happiness, and both mental health and physical health. Read more
This ground-breaking Master’s programme addresses the urban ‘data revolution’ that has transformed our understanding of the associations between ‘built form’ — buildings and how these relate to each other — and happiness, and both mental health and physical health. Urban designers, however, have often struggled to integrate this emerging evidence into their own practice. The principal aim of this Master’s course is to help urban design professionals, civic leaders, developers or investors to better understand this recent research and to apply it to their work.

The course explores ways in which the processes of evidence gathering and community consultation can be integrated successfully into a creative design process – to blend art and science. It will also provide access to a stimulating body of scholarly literature, and to leading researchers and urban thinkers. The course offers a rich exploration of how various research methods can inform better urban design practice. Graduates will learn to be able to assess the quality of research across a range of disciplines, and understand how this evidence is to be interpreted and appropriately applied. Master’s students will achieve improved data literacy (distinguishing, for example, correlation from causation, mediator from moderator) and acquire the skills needed to utilise the insights derived from this research. The course will employ practical case studies to illuminate the process of commissioning and producing reliable and applicable evidence.

The need for applied academic study of these topics is rendered more urgent by the current British demand for a much-increased rate of house building. Given the consistently lower popularity of recently constructed urban space (as compared with most older designs), there is both a desire and a sense of necessity within government and among many involved in urban planning to improve their ability to create urban spaces and buildings that command general support. There is also added pressure to make better policy and planning decisions, reflected in the recent establishment by the UK Government of the ‘What Works Network’ — an initiative to enable government agencies and other organisations to create, share and use high quality evidence for decision-making.

Location of Seminars and Teaching

This programme is London-based and is co-directed by Nicholas Boys Smith, a Senior Research Fellow, director of Create Streets and Government advisor in urban design, Dr Jamie Anderson, a Knowledge Transfer Fellow based at University of Cambridge, and Jonathan Schifferes, an Associate Director at the Royal Society of Arts.

The Seminar Programme

There are ten seminars held in a central London location. Each will feature internationally distinguished scientists, policy-makers, property researchers and urban designers. The seminars will be held in the early evenings to permit the enrolment of working professionals, and each will be followed by a question session and a working dinner, for those who wish to attend, where there is an opportunity to continue the seminar discussion in an informal environment. Tutorials and meetings with supervisors will take place at the University of Buckingham’s London offices in Bloomsbury: 51 Gower Street, London, WC1E 6HJ.

In addition to the Course Directors, confirmed lecturers include Sir Anthony Seldon (Vice-Chancellor of the University of Buckingham and co-founder of Action for Happiness); Dr David Halpern (Chief Executive of the Behavioural Insights Team – founded by the Cabinet Office and better known as ‘The Nudge Unit’); Professor Yolande Barnes (Director of World Research at Savills and visiting professor at UCL); Professor Philip Steadman (UCL Energy Institute); Dr Kai Ruggeri (Affiliated Lecturer in Psychology, Director of Studies, Corpus Christi, Cambridge and Director of the Policy Research Group); and David Rudlin (Director of URBED and winner of the Wolfson Economic Prize).

The seminar programme will run from October to spring in the course of the academic year. Click on “Teaching & Assessment” for the seminar dates.

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The University of Buckingham has introduced as part of its London-based Programmes a new research MA in Archaeology. Stonehenge and the First Britons which offers a unique opportunity to study the subject of archaeology and the celebrated site. Read more
The University of Buckingham has introduced as part of its London-based Programmes a new research MA in Archaeology: Stonehenge and the First Britons which offers a unique opportunity to study the subject of archaeology and the celebrated site.

The World Heritage Site of Stonehenge has intrigued scholars for centuries, with each succeeding generation learning more about the site and its setting, among the other henges and richly furnished burial barrows located on Salisbury Plain.

This groundbreaking London-based programme is led by Professor David Jacques, director of the internationally significant excavations at Blick Mead and Vespasian’s Camp, near Stonehenge, and supported by the latest generation of archaeologists to work in the area. Located just over 2km from Stonehenge, the Blick Mead site is providing new evidence of the first humans to occupy the Stonehenge landscape during the Mesolithic period (7960-4041 cal BC). Tantalising new evidence from these excavations suggests that this site may begin to explain why Stonehenge was built where it was.

This programme will provide opportunities for students to take part in fieldwork at the site, as well as visit the archaeological sites in the Stonehenge landscape.

The programme runs from October to September and will consist of a series of ten research seminars. These are supplemented by two optional three-day weekend field trips, each of which combines visits to major archaeological sites with first-hand fieldwork at Blick Mead and Vespasian’s Camp, and two dissertation workshops. Examination will be by original dissertation of no less than 20,000 words.

Find out more about our School of Humanities on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities.

Teaching methods

The research seminar programme has two strands. The first offers a broadly chronological survey of British prehistory focusing on the internationally important landscape of Salisbury Plain and the Stonehenge World Heritage Site, enabling students to place their own individual research within the broader context of developments in human society and culture since the end of the last Ice Age.

The second strand offers support to students considering how to devise a successful research project, and structure a dissertation. The seminar series complements their individual research project and dissertation; and at the heart of this MA is the close working relationship between student and supervisor. Dissertations may be either library- or fieldwork-based, and address themselves to any of archaeology’s sub-fields. While the final thesis topic is chosen by the student and must be an independent work, it is the supervisor who offers advice on refining the topic as necessary, on primary sources, on secondary reading, on research techniques and on writing the final text, which should be not less than 20,000 words. Supervisors and students will meet frequently throughout the year, and not less than twice a term; and the supervisor is the student’s primary contact for academic advice and support.

The MA is taught by staff from the University of Buckingham, with the participation of a number of renowned scholars who give lectures and lead some of the seminars.

Associate Students

For those taking the course as Associate Students, this seminar programme may be enjoyed as a self-contained survey of Stonehenge and its landscape and of British prehistoric archaeology. This status will enable the student to attend the ten research seminars and take a full part in the seminar and buffet dinner discussions, as well as optional field trips, but does not require the submission of written work. Associate Students are not registered for, and do not receive, the MA degree.

Apply here http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities/ma/archaeology.

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This cutting-edge programme is unique to Buckingham. A course with wide appeal, it is aimed at anyone who has an interest in biography or in researching and writing biography for themselves. Read more

Course outline

This cutting-edge programme is unique to Buckingham. A course with wide appeal, it is aimed at anyone who has an interest in biography or in researching and writing biography for themselves. The varied mix of backgrounds and interests that students bring to the course, the experience and commitment of the programme director and the friendly small-group setting allow a lively, enjoyable and intellectually rigorous exchange of ideas. Graduates have gone on to publish their own books, and to win prizes. Some have embarked on further research for the MPhil or the DPhil in Biography.

When it was founded in 1996, the Biography MA was the first of its kind. Since then Life Writing has become part of the postgraduate menu, but the Buckingham course has kept its distinctive edge. Unlike most Life Writing degrees, it is not linked to Creative Writing, and there is a strong emphasis on research and historical biography. The programme is consistently rated ‘excellent’ by external examiners and inspectors.

Find out more about our School of Humanities on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities.

Location

Teaching takes place in central London, usually at a venue close to Marylebone station.

Timetable

The course offers entry points in September and January and runs for a calendar year if taken full-time. Teaching takes place on one day a week over three terms running from September to December, January to March and April to June; the term from July to September is devoted to independent research. The programme may be followed part-time over 2 years. In the first year part-time students follow the taught courses and the second year is normally devoted to the dissertation. A detailed programme is shown here. Suitably qualified students with a major research topic in mind may be accepted for the higher degrees of MPhil (two years full-time/four years part-time) or DPhil (three years full-time/six years part-time).

Course structure

Students have a choice between following the taught MA, or opting for the MA by Research. The taught MA gives an opportunity to produce written term papers on a variety of topics as well as a dissertation of up to 20,000 words. Students accepted for the MA by Research are required to produce written work which includes an extended dissertation of up to 40,000 words. All students produce coursework for the Research Methods module: an annotated bibliography and a short biography, with supporting material, produced according to the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography format.

Research support

One of the distinctive features of the programme is the value attached to the supervision which is provided for students working on dissertations. One-on-one supervisions are held every two or three weeks during term. While the dissertation must be the candidate’s independent work, it is the supervisor who offers advice on refining the topic (if necessary), on primary sources, on secondary reading, on research techniques and on writing the dissertation. Regular group discussions between research students at all degree levels (MA, MPhil and DPhil) allow the exchange of research experiences and mutual support.

Programme director

Professor Jane Ridley founded the Buckingham Biography MA in 1996. She is an Oxford-trained historian and biographer, and her publications include The Young Disraeli (1995); The Architect and his Wife: A Life of Edwin Lutyens (2002), which won the Duff Cooper Prize; and Bertie: A Life of Edward VII (2012), for which she was awarded a research fellowship by the Leverhulme Trust. She has contributed widely to the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, and she is a regular reviewer for publications such as the Spectator, the Literary Review and the Times Literary Supplement.

Apply here http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities/ma/biography.

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This unique MA in French and British Decorative Arts and Interiors focuses on the development of interiors and decorative arts in England and France in the “long” eighteenth century (c.1660-c.1830) and their subsequent rediscovery and reinterpretation in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Read more

Course outline

This unique MA in French and British Decorative Arts and Interiors focuses on the development of interiors and decorative arts in England and France in the “long” eighteenth century (c.1660-c.1830) and their subsequent rediscovery and reinterpretation in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

A key element of the course is the emphasis on the first-hand study of furniture, silver and ceramics, where possible in the context of historic interiors. Based in central London at the European School of Economics, it draws upon the outstanding collections of the nearby Wallace Collection and the Victoria and Albert Museum.

The MA is designed to appeal to those wishing to pursue careers in heritage organisations, antique-dealing and auctioneering, museums, conservation, interior design or university teaching and research. However, those with a strong personal interest in studying the subject for its own sake are also very welcome.

With its focus on first-hand study of decorative arts within historic interiors, the programme provides a vocational and academic training which has enabled students to pursue careers in museums, interior design, antique dealing, and auctioneering. Some of our past students now work at the Royal Collection, the National Trust and English Heritage (see What our students and alumni say).

The MA also provides an excellent spring-board for students wanting to do a PhD in art history or related disciplines.

Find out more about our School of Humanities on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities.

Teaching

Teaching is carried out through a combination of lectures supported by seminars and tutorials. A key feature of the Buckingham teaching method is the use of small tutorial groups which provide the most effective means of ensuring that the students benefit from the academic expertise at their disposal. It is also the philosophy of Buckingham’s faculty to be available to students outside the scheduled tutorial times and to encourage good working relationships between staff and students.

The MA is taught by staff from the University of Buckingham, with the participation of outside experts from the Wallace Collection, the Victoria and Albert Museum, English Heritage, the Royal Institute of British Architects, the Soane Museum. There are also a number of renowned independent scholars who give lectures and lead some of the seminars and class trips.

UK Study Trips

There are frequent trips to collections in and around London, and a study week at Buckingham exploring local country houses such as Woburn Abbey, Waddesdon Manor, Boughton and Blenheim Palace, with their important decorative arts collections.

Paris Study Week

In the second term there is a study week in Paris, where students are granted privileged access to some of the private apartments at Versailles not normally accessible to the public, as well as a number of very important eighteenth-century private houses in Paris, open by special permission.

Professional Practice Projects and Placements in Museums and Galleries

Students also have the opportunity, through the Professional Practice Project to plan an exhibition in a museum, research a project to restore an historic interior, or undertake a part-time museum placement, thereby acquiring useful vocational skills and experience. Some of our students are currently doing placements at English Heritage and Strawberry Hill.

Course Structure

The course starts each September and finishes the following September. During the first term students study the development of the decorative arts and the interior in France and England between c.1660 and the end of the eighteenth century. In the second term students examine revivalism and the practical and historical problems of reinterpreting eighteenth-century interiors and objects. This is combined with a professional practice project designed to equip students with skills and experience applicable to careers in museums and built heritage.

Teaching takes place two days a week (excluding class trips) over two terms, or one day a week for part-time students. During the third term, students research a dissertation under supervision, which is written up over the summer for submission at the end of September. Assessment is by means of coursework and the dissertation.

Subject to the agreement of the Programme Director, there are some options for part-time study, one day a week over two years, or by deferral of the dissertation.

Apply here http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities/ma/decorativearts.

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Based in the city that gave Charles Dickens inspiration throughout his writing life, this groundbreaking London research programme offers students unique access not only to world-class scholars and practitioners drawn from the field of Dickens Studies and the media, but furthermore to the unique collections of the Charles Dickens Museum. Read more

Course outline

Based in the city that gave Charles Dickens inspiration throughout his writing life, this groundbreaking London research programme offers students unique access not only to world-class scholars and practitioners drawn from the field of Dickens Studies and the media, but furthermore to the unique collections of the Charles Dickens Museum.

It is directed by Professor John Drew and Dr Pete Orford, Dickens experts of international reputation, who are also full-time members of the University’s highly regarded Department of English.

The course enables the student to undertake research on a specific topic, agreed with the supervisor, in any area of Dickens Studies: his novels, short fiction, journalism, plays, the public readings, adaptations of his work (cinematic, theatrical) as well as comparative work on translations, writing by precursors, contemporaries, rivals, imitators and inheritors. The research is presented in the form of three ‘Project Preliminaries’: an extended research proposal, an annotated bibliography, and a short research-based case study for which students will be invited to investigate either the archive holdings of the Charles Dickens Museum or the network of Dickens’s collaborators for his journals, as made available by the University’s celebrated project Dickens Journals Online. On successful completion of these three preliminary projects, students will then progress to their dissertation, written under the guidance of the supervisor, of not less than 20,000 words.

Teaching methods

A central feature of the course will be its series of ten evening seminars with distinguished speakers, held both at the University’s Gower Street premises and in the Board Room of the Charles Dickens Museum, each followed by a dinner and discussion, in private rooms at a nearby restaurant in Bloomsbury.

The incredibly wide-reaching influence and impact of Dickens as a writer, performer, editor and social reformer in the English-speaking world means that Dickens Studies can therefore span an equally wide range of research topics right across nineteenth- and twentieth-century literary and print culture. Themes addressed by the seminars will include:

- the lights and shadows of Dickensian biography
- Dickens as a short-story writer
- Dickens’s reception in the twentieth-century
- Dickens and the development of detective and thriller fiction
- Dickens’s influence as an editor and social reformer
- the cultural importance of adaptations of Dickens’s work
- the power of Dickens’s language
- the performative nature of Dickensian characters
- Dickens in the digital age

The course will begin with three practical seminars about how to choose, research and write an academic dissertation, and how to handle archival materials.

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