• Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of York Featured Masters Courses
  • Imperial College London Featured Masters Courses
  • Leeds Beckett University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • Regent’s University London Featured Masters Courses
De Montfort University Featured Masters Courses
University of Sussex Featured Masters Courses
Cardiff University Featured Masters Courses
Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia Featured Masters Courses
University of London International Programmes Featured Masters Courses
0 miles

Brunel University London, Full Time Masters Degrees

  • Brunel University London×
  • Full Time×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 125
Order by 
Accounting information lies at the heart of management and is also used by investors, business contacts, competitors and other external parties. Read more
Accounting information lies at the heart of management and is also used by investors, business contacts, competitors and other external parties. Therefore, the MSc Accounting and Business Management appeals to graduates with a business-related degree who want to develop their understanding of accounting and management in a business context and develop skills that enhance their employability. The rigorous and integrated syllabus emphasises the value of developing knowledge and skills progressively from the core modules to the elective modules. It supports personal learning and development through managed choice and encourages personal initiative, enthusiasm and positive study habits.

Special Features

Valuable accounting and management skills for students intending to seek employment in today’s competitive job market and those who will work in the family business
Strong foundation for entrepreneurs planning to set up and manage their own businesses
Potential exemptions from some of the entry level examinations of ACCA, CIMA, ICAEW and ICAS for those seeking a career in accountancy
Firm foundation for future doctoral studies

Core modules

Financial Accounting and Reporting
International Financial Statement Analysis
Management Accounting
Current Issues in Accounting
International Management
Understanding Business and Management Research
Dissertation

This programme offers students an opportunity to:

Develop an appreciation of the role of accounting within the overall function of management
Acquire technical accounting skills and integrate theoretical and conceptual considerations with practice
Evaluate the principles and theories that underpin accounting and management
Critically reflect on the role of the main stakeholders and the influence of regulatory frameworks on accounting and management
Develop analytical and problem solving abilities and apply them in making management decisions
Review research on current issues in accounting and management and apply accepted research methods to investigate a specific research question independently
Develop transferrable skills that will enhance employability.

Employability

BusinessLife is a unique Employability Programme designed to maximise students’ employability by providing an intensive programme of professional workshops and events that run in parallel with academic studies.
Business Life was conceived, developed and is delivered in association with leading employers from business, industry and the public sector.

Business Life features at-a-glance

High quality personal, technology, language and business skill training courses and workshops
Career development and planning services, including mentoring, industry taster sessions and guest speaker series
Sector leading work experience programme covering placements, volunteering, internships and vacation work
Help with marketing your capabilities, through networking events, CV development, employer exhibitions and student showcases
Lifelong continuous professional development, including short courses and Masters programmes at preferential rates.

Read less
The MSc Applied Corporate Brand Management is composed of two pathways. the MSc in Applied Corporate Brand Management which is a standard postgraduate offering and the MSc in Applied Corporate Brand Management (with Professional Practice). Read more
The MSc Applied Corporate Brand Management is composed of two pathways: the MSc in Applied Corporate Brand Management which is a standard postgraduate offering and the MSc in Applied Corporate Brand Management (with Professional Practice).

The MSc in Applied Corporate Brand Management (with Professional Practice) incorporates a compulsory work placement component at a company or a consultancy of 16 weeks. The unique feature of the work placement distinguishes the programme from other Masters in the country.

The programme covers issues of branding in blue chip companies, the service industry, banks, petroleum companies, lifestyle organisations, corporate brand heritage, nation and place branding

The core contents of branding are examined at the corporate level rather than at the product level. In other words, teaching on the programme focuses on branding of the corporation rather than branding the product. The focus on corporate branding considers the following components:

corporate identity
corporate image and reputation
corporate design
corporate culture
corporate behaviour
corporate brand structure and brand strategy

Students undertake a project in collaboration with branding firms as part of their consultancy-based dissertation option. Examples include projects that are concerned with measuring the corporate image and ascertaining brand success of a chosen corporation.

The academic experts contributing to the programme are prominent world class researchers in the branding field, namely, Professor John Balmer and Professor T C Melewar from Brunel Business School, and Professor Stephen Greyser from Harvard Business School - who is also a Visiting Professor of Corporate Marketing on the programme.

Aims

In addition to offering an unrivalled opportunity to study and evaluate not only contemporary theory relating to corporate branding, the programme will also offer students the chance to examine current research relating to the management of an organisation’s corporate reputation, its corporate identity and its corporate communications.

Furthermore, graduates of this programme will gain a thorough understanding of the issues related to marketing at the corporate level and, equally importantly, a comprehensive appreciation of how to apply corporate branding and marketing theory and practice in the context of the contemporary organisation.

Special Features

The MSc in Applied Corporate Brand Management (with Professional Practice) incorporates a compulsory work placement component at a company or a consultancy of 16 weeks. The unique feature of the work placement distinguishes the programme from other Masters in the country.

Besides formal teaching and the Professional Practise, students are exposed to the myriad of practical applications of the theories taught, such as:

guest speakers from the industry and brand consultancies;
visits to brand companies and consultancies;
career talks and presentations;
visits to the Design Museum and Branding Museum in London.

Brunel Business School is home to The Centre for Research in Marketing which was created in 2005 with a mission to develop, promote and facilitate research on various aspects of marketing. The Centre's expertise ranges from branding, corporate identity, CRM, consumer behaviour, international marketing and marketing communications to political marketing, managing organisational creativity, marketing professional service firms, multi-channel marketing, e-learning and on-line banking.

Corporate Advisory Board

Advise faculty teaching on the programme about course content - especially in relation to practical aspects in the context of being relevant to the needs of industry.
Offer placements, projects, guest lecturers, field trips and other practitioner-based components.
Discuss current research themes and practical developments in the industry which inform the taught parts of the programme.
Promote the interests of the programme within the academic and Corporate Brand Management communities.

Read less
Core modules. Compulsory modules on research methodology and research practice. Innovation, Management and Research Methods (15 credits). Read more
Core modules

Compulsory modules on research methodology and research practice
Innovation, Management and Research Methods (15 credits)
Bioengineering Research Method (15 credits)
Biomedical Engineering Principles (15 credits)
Biomedical Statistics (15 credits)
Dissertation (90 credits)

Optional modules

The two optional modules for each of the four offered streams are designed to suit students of different backgrounds. The optional modules are all designed to enhance the students’ knowledge or fill the student knowledge gaps on specific disciplines of bioengineering so that students are enabled to perform high quality research.

Stream A
Biomedical Imaging and Image Processing (15 credits)
Control Theory for Bioengineering (15 credits)

Stream B
Biofluid Mechanics (15 credits)
Advanced Biofluid Mechanical Research (15 credits)

Stream C
Biomechanics and Biomaterials (15 credits)
Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine (15 credits)

Stream D
Advanced Separation Science and Industrial Case Studies (15 credits)
Process Instrumentation and Practice (15 credits)

The dissertation module starts early in the first year and last through the entire year. Students may not decide the specific dissertation title at the beginning of the year, but the desired research area (stream). The students can decide on the specific dissertation title at mid-term when they have gained further knowledge about the stream subject area. However, the intensive research activities only start from the second term once the exam period for the first term modules has finished.

Read less
As well as giving a solid scientific understanding, the course also addresses commercial, ethical, legal and regulatory requirements, aided by extensive industrial contacts. Read more
As well as giving a solid scientific understanding, the course also addresses commercial, ethical, legal and regulatory requirements, aided by extensive industrial contacts.

Students who successfully complete the course will have acquired skills that are essential to the modern biomedical and healthcare industry, together with the expertise required to enter into management, product innovation, development and research.

Programme Structure

The MSc programmes in Biomedical Engineering are full-time, one academic year (12 consecutive months). The programmes consist of 4 core (compulsory) taught modules and two optional streams. Biomedical, Genetics and Tissue Engineering stream has 3 modules, all compulsory (see below). The second option, Biomedical, Biomechanics and Bioelectronics Engineering stream consists of 5 modules. Students choosing this option will be required to choose 60 credit worth of modules. See individual course pages.

The taught modules are delivered to students over two terms; Term 1 (September – December) and Term 2 (January – April) of each academic year. The taught modules are examined at the end of each term, and the students begin working on their dissertations on a part-time basis in term 2, then full-time during the months of May to September.

Core Modules
Biomechanics and Biomaterials (15 credit)
Design and Manufacture (15 credit)
Biomedical Engineering Principles (15 credit)
Innovation, Management and Research Methods (15 credit)

Additional Compulsory Programme Modules
Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine (15 credit)
Genomic Technologies (15 credit)
Molecular Mechanisms of Human Disease (30 credit)
Dissertation (60 credit)

Module Descriptions

Biomechanics and Biomaterials

Main topics include: review of biomechanical principles; introduction to biomedical materials; stability of biomedical materials; biocompatibility; materials for adhesion and joining; applications of biomedical materials; implant design.

Biomedical Engineering Principles

Main topics include: bone structure and composition; the mechanical properties of bone, cartilage and tendon; the cardiovascular function and the cardiac cycle; body fluids and organs; organisation of the nervous system; sensory systems; biomechanical principles; biomedical materials; biofluid mechanics principles, the cardiovascular system, blood structure and composition, modelling of biofluid systems.

Design and Manufacture

Main topics include: design and materials optimisation; management and manufacturing strategies; improving clinical medical and industrial interaction; meeting product liability, ethical, legal and commercial needs.

Genomic Technologies

Main topics: General knowledge of genomic and proteomic technology; Microarrary technology; Transgenic technology. Drug discovery technology; Translational experiment-design and interpretation; Sequencing in microbiology research

Innovation and Management and Research Methods

Main topics include: company structure and organisation will be considered (with particular reference to the United Kingdom), together with the interfacing between hospital, clinical and healthcare sectors; review of existing practice: examination of existing equipment and devices; consideration of current procedures for integrating engineering expertise into the biomedical environment. Discussion of management techniques; design of biomedical equipment: statistical Procedures and Data Handling; matching of equipment to biomedical systems; quality assurance requirements in clinical technology; patient safety requirements and protection; sterilisation procedures and infection control; failure criteria and fail-safe design; maintainability and whole life provision; public and environmental considerations: environmental and hygenic topics in the provision of hospital services; legal and ethical requirements; product development: innovation in the company environment, innovation in the clinical environment; cash flow and capital provision; testing and validation; product development criteria and strategies.

Molecular Mechanisms of Human Disease

Main topics: The module will focus on the following subject material with emphasis on how these processes are altered in a variety of human diseases. Where appropriate, therapeutic intervention in these processes will be highlighted. Signalling pathways resulting from activation of membrane, intracellular or nuclear receptors will be discussed. Examples include: Mammalian iron, copper and zinc metabolism, G-Protein coupled receptor signalling, Wnt signalling, JAK/STAT signalling and cytokine signalling, Steroid signalling

Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

Main topics: Fundamentals of tissue structure, function and pathology. Tissue regeneration. Tissue engineering substitutes. Cells, cell culture, stem cells, cell and gene therapy. Extracellular matrix, structure, scaffolds. Cell signalling, growth factors, cytokines, neurotransmitters, receptors and other signalling molecules. Bioreactors, ex-vivo and in-vivo. Engineering host tissue responses.

Dissertation

The choice of Dissertation topic will be made by the student in consultation with academic staff and (where applicable) with the sponsoring company. The topic agreed is also subject to approval by the Module Co-ordinator. The primary requirement for the topic is that it must have sufficient scope to allow the student to demonstrate his or her ability to conduct a well-founded programme of investigation and research. It is not only the outcome that is important since the topic chosen must be such that the whole process of investigation can be clearly demonstrated throughout the project. In industrially sponsored projects the potential differences between industrial and academic expectations must be clearly understood.

Read less
As well as giving a solid scientific understanding, the course also addresses commercial, ethical, legal and regulatory requirements, aided by extensive industrial contacts. Read more
As well as giving a solid scientific understanding, the course also addresses commercial, ethical, legal and regulatory requirements, aided by extensive industrial contacts.

Programme Structure

The MSc programmes in Biomedical Engineering are full-time, one academic year (12 consecutive months). The programmes consist of 4 core taught modules and two optional streams. Biomedical, Genetics and Tissue Engineering stream has 3 modules, all compulsory (individual course pages). The second option, Biomedical, Biomechanics and Bioelectronics Engineering stream consists of 5 modules. Students choosing this option will be required to choose 60 credit worth of modules.

The taught modules are delivered to students over two terms of each academic year. The taught modules are examined at the end of each term, and the students begin working on their dissertations on a part-time basis in term 2, then full-time during the months of May to September.

Core Modules
Biomechanics and Biomaterials (15 credit)
Design and Manufacture (15 credit)
Biomedical Engineering Principles (15 credit)
Innovation, Management and Research Methods (15 credit)
Plus: Dissertation (60 credit)

Optional Modules

60 credit to be selected from the following optional modules:
Design of Mechatronic Systems (15 credit)
Biomedical Imaging (15 credit)
Biofluid Mechanics (15 credit)
Artificial Organs and Biomedical Applications (15 credit)
Applied Sensors Instrumentation and Control (30 credit)

Module Descriptions

Applied Sensors Instrumentation and Control

Main topics:

Sensors and instrumentation – Sensor characteristics and the principles of sensing; electronic interfacing with sensors; sensor technologies – physical, chemical and biosensors; sensor examples – position, displacement, velocity, acceleration, force, strain, pressure, temperature; distributed sensor networks; instrumentation for imaging, spectroscopy and ionising radiation detection; 'lab-on-a-chip'.

Control – Control theory and matrix/vector operations; state-space systems, multi-input, multi-output (MIMO) systems, nonlinear systems and linearization. Recurrence relations, discrete time state-space representation, controllability and observability, pole-placement for both continuous and discrete time systems, Luenberger observer. Optimal control systems, Stochastic systems: random variable theory; recursive estimation; introduction to Kalman filtering (KF); brief look at KF for non-linear systems and new results in KF theory.

Artificial Organs and Biomedical Applications

Main topics include: audiology and cochlear implants; prostheses; artificial limbs and rehabilitation engineering; life support systems; robotic surgical assistance; telemedicine; nanotechnology.

Biofluid Mechanics

Main topics include: review of the cardiovascular system; the cardiac cycle and cardiac performance, models of the cardiac system, respiratory system and respiratory performance, lung models, physiological effects of exercise, trauma and disease; blood structure and composition, blood gases. oxygenation, effect of implants and prostheses, blood damage and repair, viscometry of blood, measurement of blood pressure and flow; urinary system: anatomy and physiology, fluid and waste transfer mechanisms, urinary performance and control, effects of trauma, ageing and disease; modelling of biofluid systems, review of mass, momentum and energy transfers related to biological flow systems, fluid mechanics in selected topics relating to the cardiovascular and respiratory systems; measurements in biomedical flows.

Biomechanics and Biomaterials

Main topics include: review of biomechanical principles; introduction to biomedical materials; stability of biomedical materials; biocompatibility; materials for adhesion and joining; applications of biomedical materials; implant design.

Biomedical Engineering Principles

Main topics include: bone structure and composition; the mechanical properties of bone, cartilage and tendon; the cardiovascular function and the cardiac cycle; body fluids and organs; organisation of the nervous system; sensory systems; biomechanical principles; biomedical materials; biofluid mechanics principles, the cardiovascular system, blood structure and composition, modelling of biofluid systems.

Biomedical Imaging

Principle and applications of medical image processing – Basic image processing operations, Advanced edge-detection techniques and image segmentation, Flexible shape extraction, Image restoration, 3D image reconstruction, image guided surgery

Introduction of modern medical imaging techniques – Computerized tomography imaging (principle, image reconstruction with nondiffracting sources, artifacts, clinical applications)

Magnetic resonance imaging (principle, image contrast and measurement of MR related phenomena, examples of contrast changes with changes of instrumental parameters and medical applications)

Ultrasound imaging (description of ultrasound radiation, transducers, basic imaging techniques: A-scan, B-scan and Doppler technique; clinical application)

Positron emission tomography (PET imaging) (principle, radioactive substance, major clinical applications)

Design and Manufacture

Main topics include: design and materials optimisation; management and manufacturing strategies; improving clinical medical and industrial interaction; meeting product liability, ethical, legal and commercial needs.

Design of Mechatronic Systems

Microcontroller technologies. Data acquisition. Interfacing to power devices. Sensors (Infrared, Ultrasonic, etc.). Optoelectronic devices and signal conditioning circuits. Pulse and timing-control circuits. Drive circuits. Electrical motor types: Stepper, Servo. Electronic Circuits. Power devices. Power conversion and power electronics. Line filters and protective devices. Industrial applications of digital devices.

Innovation and Management and Research Methods

Main topics include: company structure and organisation will be considered (with particular reference to the United Kingdom), together with the interfacing between hospital, clinical and healthcare sectors; review of existing practice: examination of existing equipment and devices; consideration of current procedures for integrating engineering expertise into the biomedical environment. Discussion of management techniques; design of biomedical equipment: statistical Procedures and Data Handling; matching of equipment to biomedical systems; quality assurance requirements in clinical technology; patient safety requirements and protection; sterilisation procedures and infection control; failure criteria and fail-safe design; maintainability and whole life provision; public and environmental considerations: environmental and hygenic topics in the provision of hospital services; legal and ethical requirements; product development: innovation in the company environment, innovation in the clinical environment; cash flow and capital provision; testing and validation; product development criteria and strategies.

Dissertation

The choice of Dissertation topic will be made by the student in consultation with academic staff and (where applicable) with the sponsoring company. The topic agreed is also subject to approval by the Module Co-ordinator. The primary requirement for the topic is that it must have sufficient scope to allow the student to demonstrate his or her ability to conduct a well-founded programme of investigation and research. It is not only the outcome that is important since the topic chosen must be such that the whole process of investigation can be clearly demonstrated throughout the project. In industrially sponsored projects the potential differences between industrial and academic expectations must be clearly understood.

Read less
This exciting new programme explores developments in cloud based and mobile commerce that are changing the way businesses will operate in the future. Read more
This exciting new programme explores developments in cloud based and mobile commerce that are changing the way businesses will operate in the future. The course draws together technology and business perspectives in order to understand the implications for social-media enabled business.

We emphasise the business and commercial implications of disruptive technologies on this course, therefore, our applicants are normally expected to have a Business, Management, Economics or other closely related first degree, or have extensive business and management experience. The course should also appeal to candidates with professional experience in IT management, as well as those with an MBA wishing to expand their understanding of technology management and consultancy.

This course helps students prepare for a career in business and management within and beyond the IT sector by gaining technical skills and an appreciation of the crucial role social web technologies play in today’s organisations and their ability to transform business processes.

The MSc in Business Intelligence and Social Media provides students with sound knowledge and understanding of new-media related business practices and to provide them with transferable skills designed to meet the challenges of employment within the global economy.
The course helps students understand the importance of information and mass communications technologies to the operations of modern businesses of all kinds.Students are encouraged to reflect on the relevance of concepts to business and apply their newly developed skills in advance studies or professional practice. Successful graduates of the course progress to leadership and decision making roles in industrial organisations or develop successful consultancy and advisory businesses of their own.

Special Features

Curriculum focus on social media in business
Teaching with and through social media
Technologies introduced from non-tech perspective
Focus on consultancy and entrepreneurship
Opportunities for students to practice and develop problem analysis, solution design, advisory and communication skills, as well as to become familiar with business models and the life-cycle of business development

Academics who teach on this exciting programme are part of the Information Systems Evaluation Group which is a research centre of excellence that supports a number of Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) funded networks and projects. This group is housed in the Brunel Business School in collaboration with the excellent-rated (RAE score 5) School of Information Systems, Computing and Mathematics. ISEing is the first multi-disciplinary research group to receive government funding in the areas of Information Systems Evaluation, Enterprise Integration and eGovernment.

Read less
Our Master's programmes seek to develop knowledge, creativity and originality in one package - you. Each programme is a framework to help you to develop. Read more
Our Master's programmes seek to develop knowledge, creativity and originality in one package - you. Each programme is a framework to help you to develop:
a systematic understanding of knowledge;
a comprehensive understanding of techniques relevant to your area of study;
the key skills associated with critical awareness and evaluation.

As part of your development on the course, you will be increasingly expected to demonstrate that you can deal with complex issues in a systematic and creative manner and demonstrate self-direction and originality in problem solving.

Your studies on the course will cover:

Research Methods

This module will introduce methods of data collection and analysis when conducting empirical research. This research can take place in an organisational setting. Both in the private or the public sector. This module is essential preparation for the dissertation.

Enterprise Modelling

Cultivates skills and knowledge related to business, conceptual and software modelling. Example topics of study include different paradigms for modelling (including business services, processes and objects), techniques for modelling the business domain and business behaviour, the relationship between business modelling and software modelling and the use of the Unified Modelling Language (UML).

ERP Systems Theory and Practice

Examines the rationale, theories and practices around Enterprise Resource Planning systems (ERP) and develops the knowledge required to understand the forces driving ERP design and implementation. Example topics of study include enterprise systems strategy and rationale, issues of organisational implementation and business services, processes and functions from an ERP perspective. The module provides an introduction to the SAP R/3 environment and the practice of business process integration in that environment.

ERP Systems Deployment and Configuration

Examines the implications of implementing ERP systems in organisations and develops the key skills necessary to deploy and configure ERP systems. Example topics of study include business process improvement alongside enterprise systems configuration and configuration management (including Master Data Management, business services, processes and functions). The module examines practical aspects of configuration in the context of the SAP R/3 environment.

Service-oriented Architecture

Examines the organisational impact of service-oriented approaches and the technologies necessary for the successful implementation of enterprise and web services. Example topics of study include issues in creating and managing a system landscape based on services, architectural approaches to service-orientation and web service technologies (including semantic web services). Practical aspects of web service implementation are examined in the context of integration via the SAP Netweaver environment.

Data Management and Business Intelligence

Develops the knowledge and skills necessary to support the development of business intelligence solutions in modern organisational environments. Example topics of study include issues in data/information/knowledge management, approaches to information integration and business analytics. Practical aspects of the subject are examined in the context of the SAP Netweaver and Business Warehouse environment.

Systems project management

Develops a critical awareness of the central issues and challenges in information systems project management. Example topics of study include traditional project management techniques and approaches, the relations between projects and business strategy, the role and assumptions underpinning traditional approaches and the ways in which the state-of-the-art can be improved.

Semantic Integration Frameworks

Helps you develop a critical and practical understanding of concepts, standards and frameworks supporting semantic system integration, with a particular emphasis on the Semantic Web – the web of the future. Example topics of study include ontologies and their uses, ontology management and integration, inferencing and reasoning for and in semantic integration, as well as semantic integration standards such as RDF and OWL.

Dissertation

In addition, provided that you have reached an acceptable standard in the assessments and examinations, you may then undertake a dissertation. Work on a dissertation for this course will normally involve an in-depth study in the area of distributed information systems and computing (eg, a state-of-the-art review together with appropriate software development) and provides you with an excellent opportunity to demonstrate your expertise in this area to future employers or as a basis for future PhD study. Additionally, you can now work on an internship during your dissertation (see Special Features below).

Awards

A master's degree is awarded if you reach the necessary standard on the taught part of the course and submit a dissertation of the required standard. If you do not achieve the standard required, you may be awarded a postgraduate diploma or postgraduate certificate if eligible.

Read less
Our MSc in Climate Change and Sustainability has been developed around two important principles. 1. the latest academic research from this field, which is used to give you all the necessary knowledge to work on sustainability issues;. Read more

About the Course

Our MSc in Climate Change and Sustainability has been developed around two important principles:

1. the latest academic research from this field, which is used to give you all the necessary knowledge to work on sustainability issues;
2. the skills requirements of employers in the environmental sector, so that you can be sure of your employability.

Whether you want to work in the public, private, charitable or academic sector, our course has the flexibility to give you the focused knowledge and skills that are needed to start, or re-energise, your career.

The programme is based around 5 compulsory modules that provide the essential background to climate change and sustainability. Students then chose 3 optional modules to focus their studies on their particular area of interest e.g. energy, policy and law, environmental management, modelling and data analysis or environmental science. Indeed, our alumni have gone on to work in all these areas.

Aims

We aim to provide students with an interdisciplinary knowledge of the science and potential impacts of climate change across a variety of key areas, including energy, health, business, policy and technology. This is underpinned by a critical understanding of the concept of sustainability as applied to resource and energy use. The course will give you the skills and confidence required to develop creative and evidenced solutions to climate change and sustainability.

In so doing, we aim to meet the changing needs of society by generating graduates able to tackle the challenges presented by climate change, thus preparing them for careers that will span the transition to a post-carbon economy. The course content has been developed in consultation with our alumni, employers and using the findings of national surveys of environmental sector employers (i.e. the NERC Most Wanted Skills survey).

Accreditation

The MSc in Climate Change and Sustainability is accredited by the Institution of Environmental Sciences (IES) and the Chartered Institution of Water and Environmental Management (CIWEM). This entitles students to free student membership of the IES and CIWEM. Our teaching team is NUS Green Impact (Bronze) accredited

Scholarships

For our September intake we have 2 specific scholarship schemes available: the Queen's Anniversary Prize Scholarships provide 6 x £3000 fee waiver scholarships to our best applicants (no additional application is required for these); and the £4000 Water Conservators Bursary is awarded to one student who writes the essay on water and the environment (some years we split the scholarship between 2 exceptional applicants). Brunel Univeristy London also has some scholarship schemes available for applicants to any MSc programme.

Designed to suit your needs

The programme can be taken Full- or Part-time (from 2-days or 1-day contact time per week, respectively, depending on the optional modules chosen) and has a start date in September or January.

Employability

Our alumni have gone on to work in key public and private sector organisations as well as more entrepreneurial pursuits. Employability is a major focus within the university with support for transferable skills, CV and application writing, interview skills and opportunities for internships and work placements.

Course modules

Compulsory modules
* Climate Change: Science and Impacts (15 credits)
* Sustainable Development in Practice (15 credits)
* Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation (15 credits)
* Environment, Health and Societies (15 credits)
* Research and Critical Skills in Environmental Science (15 credits)
* Dissertation (60 credits)

Optional modular blocks

Group A (pick 2)
* Environmental Hazards and Risk (15 credits)
* Environmental Management (15 credits)
* Biosphere (15 credits)
* Environmental Modelling (15 credits)
* Renewable Energy Technologies I - Solar (15 credits) (September start only)
* Renewable Energy Technologies II - Wind, Tidal, Wave, Hydroelectricity (15 credits) (September start only)

Group B (pick 1)
* Clean Technology (15 credits)
* Environmental Law (15 credits)
* GIS and Data Analysis (15 credits)

Students normally choose 2 modules from Group A and 1 module from Group B. (If desired, students are also able to choose “1 module from Group A and 2 modules from Group B” or “3 modules from Group A and no modules from Group B” but must understand that this unbalances the 2 terms: 45:75 or 75:45 credits as opposed to 60:60.)

Read less
This is a multi-school, interdisciplinary programme that explores the likely impacts of global climate change on society and the wider environment and to instil the skills to develop creative and evidenced solutions. Read more
This is a multi-school, interdisciplinary programme that explores the likely impacts of global climate change on society and the wider environment and to instil the skills to develop creative and evidenced solutions.

This MSc is accredited by the Institution of Environmental Sciences (IES) and the Chartered Institution of Water and Environmental Management (CIWEM).

Scholarship schemes available for this MSc course

1.The Water Conservation Bursary (£4,000)
2.The Queen’s Anniversary Prize Scholarships (6 x £3,000 fee waivers)

Aims

We aim to provide students with an interdisciplinary knowledge of the potential impacts of global warming and climate change across a variety of key areas, including public health, business and economics, national and international policy and technological development, underpinned by a critical understanding of the concept of sustainability as applied to resource and energy use.

In so doing, we aim to meet the changing needs of society by generating graduates able to tackle the challenges presented by climate change, thus preparing them for careers that will likely span the transition to a post-carbon economy.

About the Institute for the Environment

During your MSc you will be based in the Institute for the Environment (IfE). IfE is a rapidly expanding research centre housing a strong team of leading experts held in high international regard in their respective fields. In 2011, IfE's research revealing the link between chemicals in rivers and reproductive health won the Queen’s Anniversary Prize for Higher and Further Education.

Interdisciplinary course in award winning Specialist Research Institute
Excellent staff to student ratio (around 1:4)
IES and CIWEM accredited course
Full time (2-day contact a week) or part time (1-day contact a week)
Campus university with excellent facilities and close to London with great transport links

Read less
The School of Arts offers a Masters programme in performance creation that draws upon the vast resources of London and the facilities and expertise of Brunel. Read more
The School of Arts offers a Masters programme in performance creation that draws upon the vast resources of London and the facilities and expertise of Brunel. This innovative MA will provide you with the space to nurture your creativity through the practical and critical exploration of contemporary multi-media performance. The programme offers a combination of critical engagement and practice-based research.

The aim of the programme is to provide a bridge between academia and the professional world, giving you the opportunities to network and engage in a variety of supervised and self-managed projects.

You will undertake a programme of study under the auspices of Drama at Brunel, which is well known for its innovative approach to contemporary performance study and practice. The learning environment encourages independent thought, creativity and craftsmanship through workshops, seminars, lectures, self-directed exercises, tutorials and practical master classes. Many of Brunel’s lecturers and guest artists have international reputations in performance and direction including Helen Paris (acclaimed performance artist and director of curious performance company) and Fiona Templeton (playwright, author and theatre company founder).

We offer specialisation in directing, solo performance and performance writing and there are opportunities for professional work placements/apprenticeships that allow you to develop your own project work under professional circumstances. Students benefit from opportunities to showcase their final pieces – including solo performances and directed projects – in professional venues such as Battersea Arts Centre. These performances help to launch their entry into the professional arena.

Brunel’s proximity to the diverse performance and theatre environment of London allows for direct contact with the work of established as well as cutting edge professionals working in the industry. The programme offers you the opportunity to develop skills, increase employment possibilities and build up a network of professional contacts.

Programme Content
The MA programme has a flexible modular structure designed to accommodate both full time (30-40 study hours per week) and part-time students (15-20 study hours per week). All students will undertake four core modules and a practical project or, if preferred, a written dissertation.

Modules
The modules available are likely to include:
·Specialist options
This module runs in term one as a practical workshop and rehearsal. Students will normally elect one of three specialist perspectives - Performance Directing, Solo Performance or Performance Writing. However, students could choose to explore more than one option, but will be required to choose one option only for their final Performance Project or Written Dissertation. Students will produce two practical pieces (10-15 minutes duration, one focusing on the performer and one on mise-en-scene) together with documentation of their work.
·Approaches to Performance/Mise-en-scene Making
This module addresses the interdisciplinary nature of contemporary performance. It will give close attention to the multiplicity and diversity of approaches to performance making used over the last 100 years at an advanced level.
·Professional Placement
This module runs in the second term. In the first five-six weeks of the module students will attend lectures and workshops on professional development with staff and guest lectures/leading experts in the field. In the second part of the module, students will undertake a placement/apprenticeship (minimum three weeks/90 hours) with an established partner organisation, such as a national or international theatre company, festival organisation, or university with whom we will sign a Learning Contract. We have MA students on placements in London, the US, Canada, Romania and France.
·Research Methodologies
The aim of the module is to enhance the development of independent student thought and an understanding of interdisciplinary research methodologies in performance studies. This will be achieved through an engagement with abstract concepts and group discussions of advanced ideas and current trends in performance. In this way students will be encouraged to discuss and analyse their own and other’s approaches. This will also serve as a platform for students to test their ideas and present a series of short papers on selected topics.
·Performance Project/Dissertation
During the summer term you will work towards your practical performance project or, if preferred, dissertation. The performance project will take the form of a final presentation-performance (lasting approximately 50 minutes and including documentation with visual material and a written commentary) either in directing, performance writing or solo-performance. In the first part of term two there will be a set of intensive workshops where students will be working within their chosen specialist area with guest artists.

There are 2 x £1,500 bursaries/scholarships available for the next 2 years

Your application for a scholarship will be judged on your your written sample and your Statement of Need. If you do not have an appropriate written sample please answer the following question in 1,500 words "How do you see contemporary performance?".

You will be put forward for a scholarship once you have paid your deposit.

For a prospectus please contact:
http://www.brunel.ac.uk/courses

Read less
Designed by writers for writers, this MA covers the most important things that new novelists ought to know. It combines a focus on the skills of writing full-length fiction witha clear-eyed exploration of the publishing process and related creative fields. Read more
Designed by writers for writers, this MA covers the most important things that new novelists ought to know.

It combines a focus on the skills of writing full-length fiction witha clear-eyed exploration of the publishing process and related creative fields. While the programme is designed as a foundation for a writing career, it is also a good choice for students who want to work with authors in publishing for a literary agency.

Typical Modules:
Elements of Fiction
A workshop based module in which you will study different aspects of fiction writing in turn. Taking inspiration from a range of contemporary novels, you will try different techniques for developing characters in action and dialogue and for creating imaginary worlds. At the end, you will produce a collection of short fiction suitable for publication, broadcast or entry in a literary competition.

Theories of Practice
An advanced study of contemporary theories of literature and creativity, which combines creative exercises with crucial analysis.

The Novel in Society: Internship Programme
As far as we know, this course is unique to Brunel and highly popular with our students. You will study the publishing industry and the strategies adopted by successful authors within it, and will also learn how to build your profile as a writer and prepare a submission to a literary agent. After the taught course, we will place you as an intern within a company in this field to learn at first hand how and why a novel is published. Students should budget both time and funds for a two-week work placement in Central London.

Dissertation
You will be able to work one-to-one with your Dissertation Tutor to write a novel extract, novella or fiction collection of up to 40,000 words accompanied by a related critical commentary. Most students then continue to complete a full-length novel. The dissertation is designed to allow you to work with your tutor to create the optimum submission package for a literary agent.

The Curtis Brown Prize
Curtis Brown Ltd, one of Europe's oldest and largest literary and talent agencies, will endow £1,500 prize for the best student on this programme from 2008 onwards.

Read less
Do people fall in love in the same way in every country?. What makes a good leader in Chinese (and other, non-Western) societies?. Read more
Do people fall in love in the same way in every country?
What makes a good leader in Chinese (and other, non-Western) societies?
How might we help migrants best settle into their new culture?

This course provides you with an understanding of how basic psychological processes may vary across cultures, and gives you the skills necessary to conduct your own research with different ethnic groups. The programme is specifically aimed at those who intend to pursue their psychological work in a number of different cultural settings, whether within Britain or overseas.

Attendance

Students taking the course full time typically attend two days a week for two 12-week terms from the end of September to Easter, plus attendance at up to two exams late April/early May. In the summer term students work (independently with tutor supervision) on their dissertations which are due for submission at the end of September. No formal attendance is required during the Dissertation period and, provided students do not need to use specialist facilities on campus and they maintain email contact with their supervisor, they are free to return home. Dissertations can be submitted by post at the end of September normally.

For students taking the course part time (over 2.5 years) students usually attend one day a week for two 12-week terms from the end of September to Easter each year. The summer term of the first year is free of commitments. During the summer term of their second year and the autumn and spring terms of the third year, part time students work (independently with tutor supervision) on their dissertations which are due for submission at the end of March of the third year.

Aims

The programme is designed for those with undergraduate degrees in psychology (and related subjects) who wish to gain a greater understanding of the role of culture in psychology, and for those already working in professions where psychology is of importance.

We also welcome graduates in related subjects who are interested in learning more about culture and psychology, as well as students who might ultimately want to continue on a PhD programme. By including materials from across the social sciences, the course aims to utilise the complementary disciplines within the College in order to offer a truly inter-disciplinary perspective.

Teaching on the course is by renowned international experts on culture and ethnicity, with the Brunel teaching team being complemented with visiting speakers from around the world. Recent invited lecturers have included specialists from the US, Hungary, Russia and Finland.

Read less
Your studies on the course will cover the modules listed below. The practical aspects of many of the modules will allow you to gain hands-on experience of several commercial SAS tools (eg SAS BASE, Enterprise Guide, Enterprise Miner and Visual Analytics). Read more
Your studies on the course will cover the modules listed below. The practical aspects of many of the modules will allow you to gain hands-on experience of several commercial SAS tools (eg SAS BASE, Enterprise Guide, Enterprise Miner and Visual Analytics). That experience is designed, in part, to develop skills for the SAS certification that partners the programme.

Digital Innovation

The aim of this module is to develop knowledge and skills necessary for the implementation of digital business models and technologies intended to realign an organization with the changing demands of its business environment (or to capitalise on business opportunities). Example topics of study include: understanding and justifying change, change management, digital business models, managing technology risks, ethical issues in change.

Quantitative Data Analysis

The aim of the module is to develop knowledge and skills of the quantitative data analysis methods that underpin data science. You will develop a practical understanding of core methods in data science application and research (eg bi-variate and multi-variate methods, regression etc). You will also learn to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of methods alongside an understanding of how and when to use or combine methods.

High Performance Computational Infrastructures

The aim of the module is to develop knowledge and skills necessary for working effectively with the large-scale data storage and processing infrastructures that underpin data science. Again, you will develop both practical skills and an ability to reflect critically on concepts, theory and appropriate use of infrastructure. Content here covers, highly-scalable data-storage paradigms (eg NoSQL data stores) alongside cloud computing tools (eg Amazon EC2) and in-memory approaches.

Systems Project Management

This module examines the challenges in information systems project management. Example topics of study include traditional project management techniques and approaches, the relationship between projects and business strategy, the role and assumptions underpinning traditional approaches and the ways in which the state-of-the-art can be improved.

Big Data Analytics

The aim of the module is to develop the reflective and practical understanding necessary to extract value and insight from large heterogeneous data sets. Focus is placed on the analytic methods/techniques/algorithms for generating value and insight from the (real-time) processing of heterogeneous data. Content will cover approaches to data mining alongside machine learning techniques (eg clustering, regression, support vector machines, boosting, decision trees and neural networks).

Data Management and Business Intelligence

The aim of the module is to develop knowledge and skills to support the development of business intelligence solutions in modern organisational environments. Example topics of study include issues in data/information/knowledge management, approaches to information integration and business analytics. Practical aspects of the subject are examined in the context of the data warehousing environment, with a focus on emerging in-memory approaches.

Data Visualisation

The aim of the module is to develop the reflective and practical understanding necessary to visually present insight drawn from large heterogeneous data sets (eg to decision-makers). Content will provide an understanding of human visual perception, data visualisation methods and techniques, dashboard and infographic design and augmented reality. An emphasis is also placed on visual storytelling and narrative development.

Learning Development Project

The aim of the module is to develop a team-based integrative solution to a problem/challenge drawn from the business, scientific and/or social domain (as appropriate). Working as part of a small team you will: Refine a coherent set of stakeholder requirements from an open-ended (business, scientific or social) problem/challenge; develop a solution addressing those requirements that coherently draws upon the knowledge and skills of other modules within the programme; effectively evaluate the solution (with stakeholders where appropriate).

Dissertation (including Research Methods)

Your dissertation is an opportunity to showcase your project management and subject specific skills to potential employers, and also serves as valuable experience and a solid building block if you wish to pursue a PhD on completion of the MSc. You will be encouraged to critically examine the academic and industrial contexts of your research, identify problems and think originally when proposing potential solutions that serve to demonstrate and reflect your ideas.

As preparation for the dissertation, you will be given a grounding in both quantitative and qualitative methods of data collection and analysis appropriate to conducting empirical and/or experimental research.

Read less
Digital games have become an important and innovative part of contemporary popular culture, out-competing cinema in terms of revenue. Read more
Digital games have become an important and innovative part of contemporary popular culture, out-competing cinema in terms of revenue. Commercial games may in part be the result of market forces but they are also products of a marriage between art, design and computational form.

What is it that makes for a good game design and good gameplay? What cultural and social values do games carry in terms of their design and form? What types of theories and concepts might we use to help make games that engage and excite players?

This new and innovative masters programme will help you to answer such questions through intensive creative game-making as well as providing the opportunity for you to reflect in theoretically informed ways on your own creative practice and on your own experience of playing games. The programme is taught by game design professionals and theorists who have played significant roles in developing digital game studies as an academic discipline. It offers a unique opportunity for you to analyse in depth what constitutes good game design through a range of practical exercises and written papers. Whether you have experience of making game mods, are already working in the industry, or you are a games’ enthusiast without a technical background, this programme is designed to appeal to those with a desire to explore game design, the theories behind such designs and the place of games in culture.

This Master of Arts programme is designed for those with an interest in the design and cultural significance of digital games. Students will engage in, and experiment with, practical games creation, with workshops led by designers working in the industry, as well as exploring a range of theories and concepts with which to analyse the values of games, play and pleasure.

The programme will be delivered by a team of experienced games researchers, some of whom have played a pioneering role in making digital game studies a new academic discipline. You will engage with a range of game types and styles, from first person shooters to massively multiplayer role-playing games. This MA focuses on conceptual game design as opposed to software development/programming, unlike many MScs focused on interactive media. We take a back-to-basic-principles approach to game design, something often advocated by key industry figures looking for innovation in the field, which will allow you to gain a deep understanding of the fundamental principles of creating original, enjoyable and challenging games.

TYPICAL MODULES
Game Design I
Investigates the principles behind the rules and play of games. A detailed study of how games function to create experiences, including rule design, play, mechanics/structure, game balancing, social game interaction and the integration of textual strategies to create the gaming experience.

Critical Approaches
Explores the criticism and analysis of games. A detailed study and evaluation of the different methodological and theoretical approaches used in the study of games/videogames.

Game Design II
Building on work in Game Design I students will develop, individually, a design for a game for a particular platform (phone, PC, handheld, console etc). The game can be delivered in digital format for those with technical skills or as a storyboard, character profiles, visual ‘mood board’/style palette, sound-effects/music profiling. The project will demonstrate practical application of ideas explored in Critical Approaches.

Socio-Cultural Contexts
Provides theoretical frameworks used in the analysis of the relationships between games and social-cultural contexts. A detailed study of work conducted on the social-cultural implications of games from across a range of disciplines. There is a focused study of an existing MMoRPG (massively multiplayer on-line role-playing game).

Project
A dissertation of 15,000 – 20,000 words or 10,000 words with practical component delivered in either digital format or as a design document.

Read less
What is Digital Service Design? It’s the art of building customer experiences with a strong digital element. This new multi-disciplinary course is designed to help graduates develop cutting-edge user experience design techniques for designing digital products and services. Read more
What is Digital Service Design? It’s the art of building customer experiences with a strong digital element.

This new multi-disciplinary course is designed to help graduates develop cutting-edge user experience design techniques for designing digital products and services. The course features close integration with leading digital companies to help you develop deep knowledge of both design theory and practice as well as to equip you for employment in the digital sector.

The course has been designed in collaboration with Wilson Fletcher, a leading digital design studio, to closely mirror current professional practices. The course includes two industry internships, networking opportunities, one-to-one mentoring from experienced professionals and the opportunity for a company-sponsored dissertation project.

Throughout the course, you will be working closely with leading digital-industry figures from organisations such as:

BBH LBI The Guardian
D4SC Marks & Spencer Tribal / DDB
Friday Mace & Menter UsTwo
Furthermore ORM Virgin Media
FutureHeads RBS W12
The Guardian RMA consulting Wired UX Ltd
HUGE SapientNitro
Hugo & Cat Telegraph media group

Aims

The main aim of the course is to prepare students for roles in the fast-growing digital industry by providing a course led by industry experts and practitioners. By the end of the course you will be able to:

Generate ideas and turn them into viable concepts and working prototypes.


Work in multidisciplinary teams in a studio setting and take responsibility for your work.


Problem-solve and design for both user and business needs.


Understand the skills, tools and methodologies necessary to develop compelling strategies, products and services.


Design and develop experiences, products and services of high quality with digital media at their core.


Demonstrate a critical and practical understanding of the issues relevant to digital service design and their use in the context of modern industry and commercial environments.


Have a thorough and clear understanding of the methodologies and professional skills necessary for effective digital service design in a business environment.


Reflect, critically and in-depth, on relevant aspects of the state-of the art of both the practice and theory of digital service design.

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page


Share this page:

Cookie Policy    X