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Bangor University, Full Time Masters Degrees in Finance

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Description. Study for an MBA Banking and Finance Master's Degree at one of Europe's foremost Banking and Finance Schools. At Bangor, we offer a range of undergraduate and postgraduate degree programmes in the areas of banking and finance. Read more
Description

Study for an MBA Banking and Finance Master's Degree at one of Europe's foremost Banking and Finance Schools. At Bangor, we offer a range of undergraduate and postgraduate degree programmes in the areas of banking and finance. The MBA Banking and Finance is designed for candidates with degrees or relevant business backgrounds, who wish to develop their expertise and further their professional careers. The MBA programme provides a more practical postgraduate course to complement our long established MA course in Banking and Finance and our distance-learning MBA with Manchester Business School.

A primary objective of the MBA Banking and Finance is to develop knowledgeable and capable executives to move quickly to key positions in the financial services sector. The programme will provide executive training at an advanced level covering the latest developments in the management of banks and financial services firms.

We have long held a strong international reputation in the study of banking and finance. Our long established and highly successful MA programme has run since 1973 and over this period we have also had a strong PhD programme where research typically focuses on banking and financial sector issues. Postgraduates have enjoyed a mix of both theoretical and practical elements covering contemporary developments in the banking and financial field. The MBA aims to extend and develop advanced training relating to the practical managerial issues faced by modern financial service firms.

The main aim of our full-time MBA is to introduce a much stronger practical emphasis focussing on the strategies and financial management of financial firms. Your MBA will give you practical insight and skills in a range of strategic and management areas in financial services. We invite practitioners to share their views and experiences. Case studies and contemporary issues figure highly in the programme.

The School has a lively group of staff, who are always willing to share their knowledge and expertise. Your teaching staff at Bangor are active researchers, combining high levels of expertise with a desire to extend their subject area, and, most importantly from a postgraduate viewpoint, an enthusiasm to encourage others to develop their academic, financial and business skills.

We are pleased that you are considering joining the MBA Banking and Finance programme. If you decide to do so, we are confident that we can offer you the guidance, stimulation and support that will make the next year a happy and productive time for you. I wish you every success in your MBA career.

Professor Philip Molyneux
Postgraduate Director

Why study the MBA Banking and Finance?

Financial systems and financial services firms' strategies are now involved in a fundamental, far reaching process of realignment and change. The strategic priority of banks and other financial institutions has shifted away from growth and size alone towards a greater emphasis on profitability, performance and shareholder value creation. The growing economic importance of financial sectors has also re-emphasised that bankers, fund managers, multinational companies, securities firms, regulators and financial advisers must have a clear understanding of the theory and practice relating to banking and finance.

Aims of the course

The Bangor Business School aims to build on our long-established expertise in the area of postgraduate training in banking and finance by offering a one-year modular MBA Banking and Finance, which aims to develop participants' academic and managerial skills in these areas. An important objective is to provide relevant analytical training to familiarise participants with the latest strategic, managerial and industrial developments in the financial services industry.

The MBA Banking and Finance course provides a coherent analytical framework for the study of banking and financial developments from a management perspective. The emphasis throughout the programme is on the application of contemporary, financial, managerial and strategic developments that affect real-world decision-making in the global financial industry.

We recognise that a thorough understanding of recent developments in banking and financial firm strategies, financial management, risk management, international financial markets, marketing strategies and performance evaluation are essential requirements for all those involved in financial sector activities (or those who wish to gain a deeper understanding of these important business and managerial areas).

Who should consider studying the MBA Banking and Finance?

The course will be of interest to the following people:

Graduates who have professional experience in the financial sector;
Managers and accountants in public and private organisations who wish to develop their financial management skills;
Managers employed in the financial services industry;
Graduates contemplating a career in the banking and financial services industry;
Graduates who have relevant practical experience and wish to enhance their skills in the areas of banking and finance;
Finance professionals (like corporate treasurers and accountants) who deal with the financial services industry.

Read less
This course is also offered at the Bangor Business School London Centre. This new course strengthens the profile of Bangor Business School in being one of Europe's foremost institutions for financial research and education, the no. Read more
This course is also offered at the Bangor Business School London Centre.

This new course strengthens the profile of Bangor Business School in being one of Europe's foremost institutions for financial research and education, the no. 1 Business School in the UK for research in Accounting, Banking & Finance (Research Assessment Exercise 2008), and achieving an outstanding student satisfaction rating of 95% for Finance studies in the most-recent National Student Survey (2013).

The course develops a broad vision and understanding of the changing role and nature of international finance within the context of globalised markets. The programme offers students a unique opportunity to develop an appreciation of the causes and significance of current developments in the global financial sector, and to study advanced theory and practice relating to international financial markets and international financial management.

The programme provides management and business training at an advanced level covering the latest developments in International Finance. Students will acquire an understanding of practical managerial issues surrounding the running of international financial institutions, analysing the main features of international financial systems and markets. An important objective is to familiarise students with the latest strategic, managerial and industrial developments in the international financial services industry.
Course Structure

The course is a full-time programme lasting 12 months. It consists of two parts:

Part 1:

Is a wholly taught component, contributing 120 credits. All taught modules carry a credit weighting of 15 credits. Part 1 is taught during the two semesters which make up the academic year. Teaching during semester 1 normally runs from late-September to December, with examinations in January. Teaching during Semester 2 normally runs from late-January to early-May, with examinations in May and June.

Part 2:

This consists of either a supervised Dissertation of around 10,000 words, or a structured Advanced Taught Programme of Summer Study that is specific to your chosen degree. Part 2 is completed during the summer months, from late-May to September. If you undertake a supervised Dissertation, you are expected to submit your Dissertation by September in the calendar year following your initial registration for your postgraduate degree. The assessments for the Advanced Taught Programme of Summer Study are also completed during September in the calendar year following your initial registration.

Compulsory modules:

Current Issues in International Finance
International Financial Markets
Research Methods
International Financial Management
Investment Strategy and Portfolio Management
Financial Econometrics

Optional modules (choose 2):

International Taxation: Policy and Practice
Financial Modelling
Islamic Finance
Financial Engineering
Behavioural Finance

Career Prospects

Graduates of the MSc International Finance are expected to obtain employment in a variety of careers in finance, and will be ideally positioned to take up a position in investment management, corporate finance, trading or consulting. Some students would progress into further postgraduate research study.

Read less
The ever-changing nature of financial markets, financial institutions and business firms, has made it increasingly important for finance experts including… Read more
The ever-changing nature of financial markets, financial institutions and business firms, has made it increasingly important for finance experts including financial managers in multinational companies, investment analysts in securities firms, lending officers in banks and other financial institutions and traders in capital markets and dealing rooms - to have a clear understanding of the theory and practice relating to financial market operations and corporate financial strategy. Familiarity with the most recent developments in risk appraisal, portfolio analysis, the engineering of synthetic products, modelling techniques, financial analysis and valuation are essential requirements for all those involved directly in financial activities or who wish to gain a deeper understanding of this important area of business management.

The MSc and MA Finance programmes at Bangor offer you a unique opportunity to develop an appreciation of the causes and significance of current developments in the financial and corporate sectors, and to study advanced theory and practice relating to financial markets and the financial management of business firms.

Issues you will tackle as part of your MSc or MA Finance degree programme include:

What are the relationships between risk and return governing investment in company shares and other derivative instruments?
Can market risk be priced accurately?
Can credit risk be priced accurately?
Which factors are most likely to influence the evaluation and implementation of international investment projects?
How can we calculate a suitable cost of capital to appraise the capital investment decision?
How should institutional investors go about constructing a portfolio of assets to maximise returns on behalf of investors?
How can we assess the investment performance of pension funds, insurance companies and unit trusts?
How are futures, options, derivatives and swaps used to manage balance sheet and off-balance sheet risks?
What are the key principles of international portfolio management in a world of fast and unpredictable movements in exchange rates?
How can spreadsheets be used to develop financial models, and what techniques are required to obtain computational solutions to finance problems?
What are the main features of financial engineering, and how can one asset be transformed into another?
What are the design features of synthetic assets, and how do they help us to develop strategies for hedging risks?
How can financial forecasts be used in business valuation, and what techniques should be used to improve trend analysis and interfirm comparison?

With these needs in mind, the MSc and MA Finance programmes at Bangor are designed to develop participants' existing skills through a scheme of specialist advanced study. An important objective is to provide participants with relevant analytical training so that they are familiar with the latest theoretical and practical developments relating to corporate finance and the capital markets. These programmes provide a coherent theoretical framework for the various subject areas, but the emphasis throughout is on advanced practical application of financial techniques in a real-world setting.

The availability of parallel MSc and MA degrees in Finance allows you to choose between registering for a more technical MSc degree (including a compulsory element in Financial Econometrics), and a less technical MA degree (for which Financial Econometrics is optional). The MSc degree may be more suitable for applicants with some previous background in mathematics, statistics or econometrics, while the MA degree is more suitable for applicants who prefer to adopt a predominantly non-quantitative approach to their studies. However, both degrees include a compulsory module in Research Methods, which includes coverage of both quantitative and non-quantitative research techniques. Provided you are registered for the correct modules for your chosen degree, it is normally possible to transfer between the MSc and MA degrees during the first few weeks following your initial registration.
ESRC Recognition

The MA Finance is recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as the first year of a 1+3 PhD training programme.
Course Structure

January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Compulsory modules:

Research Methods

International Financial Markets

Corporate Risk Management

Financial Crises and Bank Regulation

Investment Strategy and Portfolio Management

International Financial Management

Optional modules (choose 2):

Financial Modelling

Islamic Finance

Accounting Theory

Advanced Financial Reporting and Regulation

Financial Institutions Strategic Management

Financial Analysis

Islamic Banking

Read less
Issues you will study as part of your MSc or MA Management and Finance degree programme include. How can organisations ensure their own survival in a rapidly changing competitive environment?. Read more
Issues you will study as part of your MSc or MA Management and Finance degree programme include:

How can organisations ensure their own survival in a rapidly changing competitive environment?
What are the key strategic management problems facing organisations?
Are organisations as complex as they seem?
How can you analyse the strategy process, evaluate the strategic choices that may be made and place a value on the strategic options that are available?
How would you recognise effective approaches to HRM?
What are the costs and benefits of the alternatives?
Do contemporary employment practices lessen conflicts and tensions in the employment relationship?
Which factors are most likely to influence the evaluation and implementation of investment projects?
How can we calculate a suitable cost of capital to appraise the capital investment decision?
What are the relationships between risk and return governing investment? Can market risk be priced accurately?
Can credit risk be priced accurately?
What are the key principles of international portfolio management in a world of fast and unpredictable movements in exchange rates?
Can futures, options, derivatives and swaps be used to manage the risks involved?
How can financial forecasts be used in business valuation, and what techniques should be used to improve trend analysis and interfirm comparison?

With these needs in mind, the MSc and MA Management and Finance programmes at Bangor are designed to develop participants' existing skills through a scheme of specialist advanced study. An important objective is to provide participants not only with an insight into organisational behaviour and strategic choices in HRM and marketing, but also with an understanding of theoretical developments relating to corporate finance and the capital markets, and competence in the techniques required to assess the consequences for business management. These programmes provide a coherent theoretical framework for the various subject areas, but the emphasis throughout is on advanced practical application of business management and financial techniques in a real-world setting.

ESRC Recognition

The MA Business and Finance is recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as the first year of a 1+3 PhD training programme.
Course Structure

January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Compulsory modules:

Research Methods:This module develops knowledge of intermediate and advanced research methods, and provides a basis in research methodology for those who may eventually wish to pursue research degrees.

Organisations and People: This module examines key issues arising from contemporary research in organisational behaviour (OB) and human resource management (HRM). It provides an integrated analysis of management, organisations and people, developing the conceptual, strategic and practical skills necessary for managers in complex, global organisational contexts.

International Strategic Management: This module analyses strategic decision-making within business. You will develop a critical understanding of the strategic processes of business management, the interconnections with the functional domains of marketing, human resource management and corporate finance, and the management of knowledge systems.

International Financial Markets: This module provides an overview of financial instruments in a multi-currency world, taking account of insights from portfolio theory concerning the relationship between risk and return, the diversification of risk, and the pricing of assets.

International Financial Management: In this module the financial management of multinational companies and the influence of macroeconomic, fiscal, currency and political environments on business and financial decision-making are examined in an international and global context.

New Venture Creation: This module examines the advantages and disadvantages of the various routes to business start-up, including new venture creation, or establishing a business based on your own expertise, experience and ideas; buying an established business; purchasing a franchise; and succession through a family firm, an increasingly common way of becoming involved in entrepreneurial activity.

Optional module (choose 2):

Islamic Finance: This module provides an insight into topical issues relating to Islamic financial instruments and related risk management issues. The first part of the module examines issues relating to financial contracting, instruments and various intermediation issues. The second part focuses on the role of the capital market in providing Islamic financing, and highlights financial engineering and risk management features of this type of business.

Knowledge Management: This module examines the processes whereby organisations and individuals develop and utilise their knowledge bases. Successful knowledge management hinges on people, culture and technology. As such it has professional and academic links with organisational behaviour and organisational learning.

Contemporary Issues in Management: This module develops several theories and concepts in contemporary management theory and practice. It provides a detailed and critical analysis of management, further developing the conceptual, strategic and practical skills necessary for managers in complex, global organisational contexts.

Financial Analysis: This module analyses the techniques that are used to evaluate a company’s financial position and performance. You will examine the principles underlying inter-firm comparison (comparing the performance of one firm with another) and trend analysis (comparing the performance of the same firm over different periods).

Investment Strategy and Portfolio Management: This module evaluates the development of investment strategies for bonds, equities and derivatives that are designed to achieve optimal risk-return outcomes, and examines the measurement and evaluation of the performance of a portfolio of investments.

Public Sector Management: This module identifies the distinctive characteristics of the public sector in a competitive market-driven environment. Organisational forms in the public sector are reviewed, in the light of the changing culture of public services, competition, best value and public expectations.

Behavioural Finance: This module provides in-depth coverage of behavioural finance, which replaces the "rationality" assumption with behavioural biases that have been documented by psychologists.

Read less
This course is also offered at the Bangor Business School - London Centre. Banking and financial services represents a highly competitive and rapidly changing sector in every modern economy. Read more
This course is also offered at the Bangor Business School - London Centre.

Banking and financial services represents a highly competitive and rapidly changing sector in every modern economy. Changes in customer requirements, technology, competitive conditions and regulation create the need for managers, traders and analysts to make rapid and often far-reaching decisions about their short term operations and long term strategies. The MSc and MA in Banking and Finance degree courses at Bangor offer you a unique opportunity to study advanced theory and practice relating to financial services, and to develop an appreciation of the causes and significance of current developments in this vitally important and dynamic sector of the economy.

Issues you will tackle as part of your MA/MSc Banking and Finance degree programme include:

Why are the banking systems in different countries (such as the UK, Germany, Japan and the US) so diverse?
What determines the structure, performance and efficiency of banking and financial markets?
Why do banks and financial intermediaries exist?
What are the main theories of the banking firm?
How relevant are financial intermediaries in a world of increasing securitization and with the evolution of virtual banking?
How do banks optimally allocate capital?
Does bank regulation increase or decrease risks?
How do we measure the risks undertaken by banks?
Can regulators reduce the likelihood of systemic (system-wide) risk?
What are the relationships between risk and return governing investment in company shares and other derivative instruments?
Can market risk be priced accurately? Can credit risk be priced accurately?
How should institutional investors go about constructing a portfolio of assets to maximise returns on behalf of investors?
How can we assess the investment performance of pension funds, insurance companies and unit trusts?
How do banks use futures, options, derivatives and swaps to manage their balance sheet and off-balance sheet risks?
What are the key principles of international portfolio management in a world of fast and unpredictable movements in exchange rates?
How do banks manage their business so as to maintain customer relationships, improve operational efficiency and add shareholder value?

With these needs in mind, the MSc and MA Banking and Finance programmes at Bangor are designed to develop participants' existing skills through a scheme of specialist advanced study. An important objective is to provide participants with relevant analytical training, so that they are familiar with the latest theoretical and practical developments relating to banking, finance and capital markets. These programmes provide a coherent theoretical framework for the various subject areas, but the emphasis throughout is on advanced practical application of financial techniques in a real-world setting.

The availability of parallel MSc and MA degrees in Banking and Finance allows you to choose between registering for a more technical MSc degree (including a compulsory element in Financial Econometrics), and a less technical MA degree (for which Financial Econometrics is optional). The MSc degree may be more suitable for applicants with some previous background in mathematics, statistics or econometrics, while the MA degree is more suitable for applicants who prefer to adopt a predominantly non-quantitative approach to their studies. However, both degrees include a compulsory module in Research Methods, which includes coverage of both quantitative and non-quantitative research techniques.

ESRC Recognition

The MA Banking and Finance is recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as the first year of a 1+3 PhD training programme.

Course Structure

January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Compulsory modules

Research Methods: This module develops knowledge of intermediate and advanced research methods, and provides a basis in research methodology for those who may eventually wish to pursue research degrees.

Bank Financial Management: This module provides a grounding in the nature, strategic context and managerial functions of financial management in banks, and other financial services firms.

International Financial Markets: This module provides an overview of financial instruments in a multi-currency world, taking account of insights from portfolio theory concerning the relationship between risk and return, the diversification of risk, and the pricing of assets.

International Banking: This module examines the origins of international banking, the activities of international banks, the markets in which they participate, and the sources of risk.

Financial Crises and Bank Regulation: This module examines why banks and financial markets are inherently vulnerable to crises, and analyses the role of policy makers and institutions. The roles of monetary policy, bank supervision and regulation, corporate governance and ratings agencies in mitigating or exacerbating crises are considered.

International Financial Management: In this module the financial management of multinational companies and the influence of macroeconomic, fiscal, currency and political environments on business and financial decision-making are examined in an international and global context.

Optional modules

Islamic Finance: This course provides an insight into topical issues relating to Islamic financial instruments and related risk management issues.

Corporate Risk Management: This module provides an analysis of pure risk and its management.

Financial Institutions Strategic Management: This module examines the main theoretical and practical issues concerning banking business. You will develop a critical awareness of the theory of the banking firm, the motives for international banking, and regulatory and structural issues impacting on bank behaviour.

Financial Analysis: This module analyses the techniques that are used to evaluate a company’s financial position and performance.

Investment Strategy and Portfolio Management: This module evaluates the development of investment strategies for bonds, equities and derivatives that are designed to achieve optimal risk-return outcomes, and examines the measurement and evaluation of the performance of a portfolio of investments.

Islamic Banking: This module provides an insight into the key features of Islamic banking business.

Read less
This course is also offered at the Bangor Business School - London Centre. Changes in the business environment create the need for individuals wishing to pursue a senior management role to be aware of contemporary accounting and finance developments. Read more
This course is also offered at the Bangor Business School - London Centre.

Changes in the business environment create the need for individuals wishing to pursue a senior management role to be aware of contemporary accounting and finance developments.

Understanding these theoretical and practical issues is critical for managers who often have to make rapid and far-reaching decisions about the short term financial operations and long term strategies of firms.

The MSc in Accounting and Finance offers you a unique opportunity to develop an appreciation of the causes and significance of current developments in the financial and corporate sectors, and to study advanced theory and practice relating to accounting and finance.

The aim of the programme is to provide graduates and other individuals that have practical accounting and financial training with the knowledge and skills necessary to pursue a senior level professional career in accounting, financial services or related sectors of the economy.

Issues you will tackle as part of your MSc Accounting and Finance degree programme include:

How are the financial accounts of companies formulated, and how do they differ across jurisdictions?
What agency issues are important in the creation of company accounts?
How does accounting theory inform financial and management accounting practice?
How does regulation impact on the performance of firms, and how do accounting practices highlight profit and/or loss realisation?
What empirical techniques can be used to evaluate company performance?
In what ways have financial accounting requirements and auditing been influenced by recent company failures?
What are the relationships between risk and return governing investment in company shares and other derivative instruments?
Which factors are most likely to influence the evaluation and implementation of international investment projects?
How can we calculate a suitable cost of capital to appraise the capital investment decision?
How should institutional investors go about constructing a portfolio of assets to maximise returns on behalf of investors?
How are futures, options, derivatives and swaps used to manage balance sheet and off-balance sheet risks?
What are the key principles of international portfolio management in a world of fast and unpredictable movements in exchange rates?
How can financial forecasts be used in business valuation, and what techniques should be used to improve trend analysis and interfirm comparison?

With these needs in mind, the MSc Accounting and Finance programme at Bangor is designed to develop participants’ existing skills through a scheme of specialist advanced study. An important objective is to provide participants with relevant analytical training, so that they are familiar with the latest theoretical and practical developments relating to accounting and finance. The programme provides a coherent theoretical framework for the various subject areas, but the emphasis throughout is on advanced practical application of accounting and financial techniques in a real-world setting.
Course Structure

January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Compulsory modules:

Research Methods: This module develops knowledge of intermediate and advanced research methods, and provides a basis in research methodology for those who may eventually wish to pursue research degrees.

Accounting Theory: This module critically evaluates a widespread and widely based set of theories that underpin any explanation of accounting behaviour and accounting regulatory output.

International Financial Markets: This module provides an overview of financial instruments in a multi-currency world, taking account of insights from portfolio theory concerning the relationship between risk and return, the diversification of risk, and the pricing of assets.

Advanced Financial Reporting and Regulation: This module provides an advanced treatment of the main theoretical principles underlying financial reporting, and the practical implications of alternative regulatory regimes.

Financial Analysis: This module analyses the techniques that are used to evaluate a company’s financial position and performance.

Management Accounting: This module provides an understanding of the uses of financial data in measuring and evaluating business performance, and in setting the strategic aims of the organisation.

Optional modules (choose 2):

Corporate Risk Management: This module provides an analysis of pure risk and its management.

Islamic Accounting and Financial Reporting: This module develops a critical awareness of theoretical and practical approaches to Islamic accounting and financial reporting. Islamic accounting standards are compared with IFRS, and the content and impact of academic research in this area is examined.

Islamic Finance: This course provides an insight into topical issues relating to Islamic financial instruments and related risk management issues.

Financial Econometrics: This module provides advanced coverage of econometric methods and practices that are used to model financial and business data. You will develop the independent capability to design, estimate and evaluate appropriate econometric models using econometric software.

International Financial Management: In this module, the financial management of multinational companies, and the influence of the macroeconomic, fiscal, currency and political environments on business and financial decision-making are examined in an international and global context.

Investment Strategy and Portfolio Management: This module evaluates the development of investment strategies for bonds, equities and derivatives that are designed to achieve optimal risk-return outcomes, and examines the measurement and evaluation of the performance of a portfolio of investments.

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Description. Read more
Description

The ever-changing nature of business firms and the markets in which they operate, has made it increasingly important for corporate managers have a clear understanding of the theory and practice relating to strategic management and the interrelationships between the firm, its employees and its markets, and the implications for corporate financial strategy. Familiarity with the most recent developments in risk appraisal, valuation, marketing, human resource management (HRM), organisational behaviour and strategic management are essential requirements for all those involved directly in business, or in financing business activities, or those who wish to gain a deeper understanding of these important areas.

Issues you will study as part of your MSc or MA Business and Finance degree programme include:

How can organisations ensure their own survival in a rapidly changing competitive environment?
What are the key strategic management problems facing organisations?
Are organisations as complex as they seem?
How can you analyse the strategy process, evaluate the strategic choices that may be made and place a value on the strategic options that are available?
How would you recognise effective approaches to HRM?
What are the costs and benefits of the alternatives?
Do contemporary employment practices lessen conflicts and tensions in the employment relationship?
Which factors are most likely to influence the evaluation and implementation of investment projects?
How can we calculate a suitable cost of capital to appraise the capital investment decision?
What are the relationships between risk and return governing investment? Can market risk be priced accurately?
Can credit risk be priced accurately?
What are the key principles of international portfolio management in a world of fast and unpredictable movements in exchange rates?
Can futures, options, derivatives and swaps be used to manage the risks involved?
How can financial forecasts be used in business valuation, and what techniques should be used to improve trend analysis and interfirm comparison?
With these needs in mind, the MSc and MA Business and Finance programmes at Bangor are designed to develop participants' existing skills through a scheme of specialist advanced study. An important objective is to provide participants not only with an insight into organisational behaviour and strategic choices in HRM and marketing, but also with an understanding of theoretical developments relating to corporate finance and the capital markets, and competence in the techniques required to assess the consequences for business management. These programmes provide a coherent theoretical framework for the various subject areas, but the emphasis throughout is on advanced practical application of busniess management and financial techniques in a real-world setting.

The availability of parallel MSc and MA degrees in Business and Finance allows you to choose between registering for a more technical MSc degree (including a compulsory element in Financial Econometrics), and a less technical MA degree (for which Financial Econometrics is optional). The MSc degree may be more suitable for applicants with some previous background in mathematics, statistics or econometrics, while the MA degree is more suitable for applicants who prefer to adopt a predominantly non-quantitative approach to their studies. However, both degrees include a compulsory module in Research Methods, which includes coverage of both quantitative and non-quantitative research techniques. Provided you are registered for the correct modules for your chosen degree, it is normally possible to transfer between the MSc and MA degrees during the first few weeks following your initial registration.

The MSc and MA degrees in Business and Finance are scheduled for a duration of 12 months. Each degree programme consists of two parts.

Part 1 is a wholly taught component, contributing 120 credits. Part 1 is taught during the two semesters which make up the academic year. Teaching during semester 1 normally runs from late-September to December, with examinations in January. Teaching during semester 2 normally runs from late-January to early-May, with examinations in May and June.

Part 2 is a supervised dissertation of around 10,000 words, contributing 60 credits. The dissertation provides you with the opportunity to critically review, and possibly (but not necessarily) produce an original contribution to, the literature in any part of the taught syllabus. Part 2 is completed during the summer months, from June to September. You are expected to submit your dissertation by the end of September in the calendar year following your initial registration for your MSc or MA degree programme.

Continuous assessment is an integral part of all of our taught modules. The weightings attaching to coursework and other forms of continuous assessment vary from module to module, from a minimum of 25% to a maximum of 50%.

ESRC Recognition
The MA Business and Finance is recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as the first year of a 1+3 PhD training programme.

Read less
This course is also offered at the Bangor Business School - London Centre. Over the past two or three decades or so, Islamic banking and finance has emerged as another viable way of financial intermediation. Read more
This course is also offered at the Bangor Business School - London Centre.

Over the past two or three decades or so, Islamic banking and finance has emerged as another viable way of financial intermediation. It has gained credibility and has spread worldwide and is the preferred way of banking for one fifth of the world's population. This taught MBA offers an opportunity to study the structure of the Islamic banking and finance industry, including its theoretical foundations, products, performance, Islamic financial instruments and risk management issues. These and other topics will be studied within the wider context of the banking and finance industry worldwide. The MBA aims to develop executives who will progress quickly to senior management positions in institutions that transact banking business on Islamic principles.
Course Structure

January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Compulsory Modules:

Organisations and People: This module examines key issues arising from contemporary research in organisational behaviour (OB) and human resource management (HRM). It provides an integrated analysis of management, organisations and people, developing the conceptual, strategic and practical skills necessary for managers in complex, global organisational contexts.

Management Research: This module analyses the philosophical basis for research in the management sciences, and examines a number of key methodological issues and approaches. Research designs for both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies are developed, including interviews, case studies, focus groups, surveys and experiments.

Islamic Finance: This course provides an insight into topical issues relating to Islamic financial instruments and related risk management issues. The first part of the course examines issues relating to financial contracting, instruments and various intermediation issues. The second part of the course focuses on the role of the capital market in providing Islamic financing and highlights financial engineering issues and well as risk management features of this type of business.

Islamic Banking: This module provides an insight into the key features of Islamic banking business. The first part of the course outlines the theoretical foundations and development of Islamic banking practices. In particular, the main characteristics of various types of Islamic banking products are discussed. The second part of the course examines the operational features of Islamic banks focusing on their performance and how they compete with conventional interest-based banks. The final part of the course outlines contemporary challenges to Islamic banking business.

International Banking: This module examines the origins of international banking, the activities of international banks, the markets in which they participate, and the sources of risk. You will investigate the determinants of the efficiency of international banks, and evaluate the implications for banks' strategic decision-making.

Optional Modules:

International Strategic Management: This module analyses strategic decision-making within business. You will develop a critical understanding of the strategic processes of business management, the interconnections with the functional domains of marketing, human resource management and corporate finance, and the management of knowledge systems.

Marketing Financial Services: This module surveys the tools of modern financial services marketing, focussing on the key methods of financial services marketing in the acquisition of customers and sale and distribution of financial services. The module progresses considering consumer behaviour, the changing customer demands, consumer heuristics and biases and ways in which financial services marketing has succeeded and failed.

Islamic Accounting and Financial Reporting: This module develops a critical awareness of theoretical and practical approaches to Islamic accounting and financial reporting. Islamic accounting standards are compared with IFRS, and the content and impact of academic research in this area is examined.

Contemporary Issues in Management: This module develops several theories and concepts introduced in Organisations and People, critiquing key issues arising from contemporary research in organisational behaviour (OB) and management. It provides a detailed and critical analysis of management, further developing the conceptual, strategic and practical skills necessary for managers in complex, global organisational contexts.

Banking and Development: This module critically evaluates the theory underlying the policy of financial liberalisation, and examines its implementation, primarily in developing countries. The impact of financial liberalisation on the financial systems of developing countries is analysed in depth.

Islamic Insurance: This module analyses the nature and principles of Islamic insurance, and examines the operational modes and practice of Islamic insurance. The structure of Islamic insurance markets is described, and constraints and opportunities for Islamic insurance and Islamic insurance accounting are highlighted.

Marketing Strategy: This module critically evaluates the contributions of various schools of thought in marketing, and examines the relevant analytical models and management practices, with emphasis on the strategic importance of marketing to all organisations.

Merger and Acquisition: This module provides an analysis of incentives and outcomes associated with merger and acquisition deals. It covers the development and execution of an acquisition strategy, the valuation of the target, the conduct of the negotiation, and the implementation of the post-merger integration plan.

Read less
This course is also offered at the Bangor Business School – London Centre. Over the past two or three decades or so, Islamic banking and finance has emerged as another viable way of financial intermediation. Read more
This course is also offered at the Bangor Business School – London Centre.

Over the past two or three decades or so, Islamic banking and finance has emerged as another viable way of financial intermediation. It has gained credibility and has spread worldwide and is the preferred way of banking for one fifth of the world’s population. This taught MA offers an opportunity to study the structure of the Islamic banking and finance industry, including its theoretical foundations, products, performance, Islamic financial instruments and risk management issues. These and other topics will be studied within the wider context of the banking and finance industry worldwide. There is also an MSc version of this MA programme, and whilst the MSc is more suitable for candidates with some previous background in mathematics, statistics or econometrics, this MA is more suitable for candidates who prefer a less quantitative approach to their studies.
Course structure

January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Compulsory modules:

Research Methods: This module develops knowledge of intermediate and advanced research methods, and provides a basis in research methodology for those who may eventually wish to pursue research degrees.

International Financial Markets: This module provides an overview of financial instruments in a multi-currency world, taking account of insights from portfolio theory concerning the relationship between risk and return, the diversification of risk, and the pricing of assets.

Islamic Finance: This module provides an insight into topical issues relating to Islamic financial instruments and related risk management issues. The first part of the module examines issues relating to financial contracting, instruments and various intermediation issues. The second part focuses on the role of the capital market in providing Islamic financing, and highlights financial engineering and risk management features of this type of business.

Islamic Banking: This module provides an insight into the key features of Islamic banking business. The first part of the course outlines the theoretical foundations and development of Islamic banking practices. In particular, the main characteristics of various types of Islamic banking products are discussed. The second part of the course examines the operational features of Islamic banks, focusing on their performance and how they compete with conventional interest-based banks. The final part of the course outlines contemporary challenges to Islamic banking business.

International Banking: This module examines the origins of international banking, the activities of international banks, the markets in which they participate, and the sources of risk. You will investigate the determinants of the efficiency of international banks, and evaluate the implications for banks’ strategic decision-making.

Financial Crises and Bank Regulation: This module examines why banks and financial markets are inherently vulnerable to crises, and analyses the role of policy makers and institutions. The roles of monetary policy, bank supervision and regulation, corporate governance and ratings agencies in mitigating or exacerbating crises are considered.

Optional modules (choose 2):

Islamic Accounting and Financial Reporting: This module develops a critical awareness of theoretical and practical approaches to Islamic accounting and financial reporting. Islamic accounting standards are compared with IFRS, and the content and impact of academic research in this area is examined.

Corporate Risk Management: This module provides an analysis of pure risk and its management.

Bank Financial Management: This module provides a grounding in the nature, strategic context and managerial functions of financial management in banks and other financial services firms. Three key themes are: identification and management of the trade-off between risk and return; improvement of a bank’s value using market models; and external market-based tests of bank performance.

Financial Institutions Strategic Management: This module examines the main theoretical and practical issues concerning banking business. You will develop a critical awareness of the theory of the banking firm, the motives for international banking, and regulatory and structural issues impacting on bank behaviour.

Investment Strategy and Portfolio Management: This module evaluates the development of investment strategies for bonds, equities and derivatives that are designed to achieve optimal risk-return outcomes, and examines the measurement and evaluation of the performance of a portfolio of investments.

Islamic Insurance: This module analyses the nature and principles of Islamic insurance, and examines the operational modes and practice of Islamic insurance. The structure of Islamic insurance markets is described, and constraints and opportunities are highlighted.

Read less
This course is also offered at the Bangor Business School London Centre. The course offers students a sound knowledge of the theoretical foundations that underpin modern investment and risk management techniques, and prepares them for entry into the fast-growing investment management industry. Read more
This course is also offered at the Bangor Business School London Centre.

The course offers students a sound knowledge of the theoretical foundations that underpin modern investment and risk management techniques, and prepares them for entry into the fast-growing investment management industry. The programme aims to cover the traditional syllabus of a Masters degree in finance whilst providing students with advanced level management and business training in specialised areas of investment, such as the management of equity and bond portfolios; trading techniques; risk management; management of foreign exchange and derivative securities and emerging markets investment. Students will benefit from a unique opportunity to use various online databases available in Bangor Business School, such as Bloomberg, DataStream and SNL.

Students will acquire advanced, specialised knowledge and skills across a range of investment applications at strategic and operational levels. They will develop intellectual skills and research expertise in the area of investment analysis and portfolio management; technical skills relevant to financial markets’ operation and management; critical skills in examining advanced level theories and empirical evidence; computational skills in financial service activity; and analytic skills in exploring the efficient markets hypothesis.
Course Structure

The course is a full-time programme lasting 12 months. It consists of two parts:

Part 1:

Is a wholly taught component, contributing 120 credits. All taught modules carry a credit weighting of 15 credits. Part 1 is taught during the two semesters which make up the academic year. Teaching during semester 1 normally runs from late-September to December, with examinations in January. Teaching during Semester 2 normally runs from late-January to early-May, with examinations in May and June.

Part 2:

This consists of either a supervised Dissertation of around 10,000 words, or a structured Advanced Taught Programme of Summer Study that is specific to your chosen degree. Part 2 is completed during the summer months, from late-May to September. If you undertake a supervised Dissertation, you are expected to submit your Dissertation by September in the calendar year following your initial registration for your postgraduate degree. The assessments for the Advanced Taught Programme of Summer Study are also completed during September in the calendar year following your initial registration.

Compulsory modules:

Current Issues in International Finance
International Financial Markets
Research Methods
Financial Modelling
Investment Strategy and Portfolio Management
Financial Analysis

Optional modules (choose 2):

International Financial Management
Financial Econometrics
Financial Engineering
Behavioural Finance
Financial Stability

Career Prospects

Graduates of the MSc in Investment Management are expected to obtain employment in a variety of careers in investment institutions, and will be ideally positioned to become investment specialists or managers and consultants in other corporate bodies. Some students would progress into further postgraduate research study.

Read less
In today’s global competitive marketplace, the successful corporate executive needs to understand how the legal system and legal regulation can impact on their own area of expertise. Read more
In today’s global competitive marketplace, the successful corporate executive needs to understand how the legal system and legal regulation can impact on their own area of expertise. Accordingly, the BangorBusinessSchool and the Bangor School of Law have combined to offer an innovative suite of interdisciplinary MBA and MA programmes.

The MA in Banking and Law is an interdisciplinary programme that will enable the student to study key legal and regulatory developments affecting the financial sector. This includes the regulation of financial services, security instruments, corporate finance, arbitration and other issues affecting modern banks at UK, EU and international level. As well as the general principles of International Banking Law, you will also choose from a wide range of law and business. The programme will equip candidates with higher level knowledge in both the Banking and Law areas, as global Banking practice today is heavily influenced by the Law. In particular the financial and regulatory lessons to be drawn from the so-called ‘credit crunch’ in the USA and the UK will be examined. The MA degree is suitable for those who wish to adopt a predominantly non-quantitative approach to their studies.

Course Structure
January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Compulsory modules:

Research Methods: This module develops knowledge of intermediate and advanced research methods, and provides a basis in research methodology for those who may eventually wish to pursue research degrees.

Bank Financial Management: This module provides a grounding in the nature, strategic context and managerial functions of financial management in banks, and other financial services firms.

International Banking: This module examines the origins of international banking, the activities of international banks, the markets in which they participate, and the sources of risk.

Financial Institutions Strategic Management: This module examines the main theoretical and practical issues concerning banking business. You will develop a critical awareness of the theory of the banking firm, the motives for international banking, and regulatory and structural issues impacting on bank behaviour.

Financial Crises and Bank Regulation: This module examines why banks and financial markets are inherently vulnerable to crises, and analyses the role of policy makers and institutions. The roles of monetary policy, bank supervision and regulation, corporate governance and ratings agencies in mitigating or exacerbating crises are considered.

International Banking and Capital Markets Law: This module will provide a sound understanding of the law and practice of modern international banking, including the regulation and prudential supervision of banks in the UK and EU in the areas of capital adequacy and risk management.

Optional Law modules (choose 2):

Comparative Corporate Governance: Major corporate scandals in the US, Europe and the UK in recent years have raised questions about the organisation and governance of companies, in particular large multinational organisations. The growth of private equity buy-outs has also raised issues of transparency and accountability.

Credit and Security Law: The supply of credit is the lifeblood of industry but of course a lender will require security. This module will examine in detail the provisions relating to the regulation of the supply of credit to consumers and business.

International Corporate Finance Law and Merger Regulation Law: This module focuses on the study of leading case law and selected legislation, relating to international mergers and their financing from several common law countries such as the USA, Britain, Ireland, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, as well as China, India and the EU.

International Commercial Arbitration: This module considers the theoretical and institutional structure of arbitration and alternative dispute resolution, examines the legal framework within which disputes are resolved and reviews the practice of international commercial arbitration.

Consumer Law: This module focuses on the main areas of legal liability and the pitfalls that can arise if an organisation does not comply with the relevant consumer protection rules both in the UK and Europe.

Intellectual Property Law: This module addresses the fundamentals of intellectual property law, the definition and scope of copyright; the authorship, ownership, duration and qualification for copyright protection.

Competition Law: This module focuses on the theory and law of competition, focusing on UK competition law, and EU competition law relating to the control of restrictive practices, vertical and horizontal restraints and abuse of a dominant position. Comparative regimes, in particular that of the US, are examined.

Industrial Property Law: This module examines the history and development of industrial property law in the UK, EU and internationally. It covers the law relating to trade secrets, patents, copyrights, design rights and trademarks.

World Trade Law: This module studies aspects of the regulation of international trade through the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and the World Trade Organisation.

International Insurance Law: Insurance plays an important role in commerce and risk management. Insurance contracts are governed by the rules of general law of contract. The module explores the nature and scope of the contract of insurance, considers the general principles of insurance, and examines the relationships between parties to a contract.

International Taxation Law: This module studies the basic principles of income taxation of international transactions involving taxpayers of several European countries (including the UK, the Netherlands, France, Germany, Ireland), the US, Australia, Canada and Japan.

Employment Law: Modern employment law is complex, and imposes major compliance costs on employers. This module covers contract of employment, minimum wage legislation, discrimination against employees, and unfair dismissal actions before Employment Tribunals.

International Environmental Law: This module focuses on internationally recognised principles and values concerning environmental protection, and how they are translated into legally enforceable tools. Methods of environmental regulation are analysed and compared.

Read less
In today’s global competitive marketplace, the successful corporate executive needs to understand how the legal system and legal regulation can impact on their own area of expertise. Read more
In today’s global competitive marketplace, the successful corporate executive needs to understand how the legal system and legal regulation can impact on their own area of expertise. Accordingly, the BangorBusinessSchool and the Bangor School of Law have combined to offer an innovative suite of interdisciplinary MBA and MA programmes.

The MA in Banking and Law is an interdisciplinary programme that will enable the student to study key legal and regulatory developments affecting the financial sector. This includes the regulation of financial services, security instruments, corporate finance, arbitration and other issues affecting modern banks at UK, EU and international level. As well as the general principles of International Banking Law, you will also choose from a wide range of law and business. The programme will equip candidates with higher level knowledge in both the Banking and Law areas, as global Banking practice today is heavily influenced by the Law. In particular the financial and regulatory lessons to be drawn from the so-called ‘credit crunch’ in the USA and the UK will be examined. The MA degree is suitable for those who wish to adopt a predominantly non-quantitative approach to their studies.
Course Structure

January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Compulsory modules:

Research Methods: This module develops knowledge of intermediate and advanced research methods, and provides a basis in research methodology for those who may eventually wish to pursue research degrees.

Bank Financial Management: This module provides a grounding in the nature, strategic context and managerial functions of financial management in banks, and other financial services firms.

International Banking: This module examines the origins of international banking, the activities of international banks, the markets in which they participate, and the sources of risk.

Financial Institutions Strategic Management: This module examines the main theoretical and practical issues concerning banking business. You will develop a critical awareness of the theory of the banking firm, the motives for international banking, and regulatory and structural issues impacting on bank behaviour.

Financial Crises and Bank Regulation: This module examines why banks and financial markets are inherently vulnerable to crises, and analyses the role of policy makers and institutions. The roles of monetary policy, bank supervision and regulation, corporate governance and ratings agencies in mitigating or exacerbating crises are considered.

International Banking and Capital Markets Law: This module will provide a sound understanding of the law and practice of modern international banking, including the regulation and prudential supervision of banks in the UK and EU in the areas of capital adequacy and risk management.

Optional Law modules (choose 2):

Comparative Corporate Governance: Major corporate scandals in the US, Europe and the UK in recent years have raised questions about the organisation and governance of companies, in particular large multinational organisations. The growth of private equity buy-outs has also raised issues of transparency and accountability.

Credit and Security Law: The supply of credit is the lifeblood of industry but of course a lender will require security. This module will examine in detail the provisions relating to the regulation of the supply of credit to consumers and business.

International Corporate Finance Law and Merger Regulation Law: This module focuses on the study of leading case law and selected legislation, relating to international mergers and their financing from several common law countries such as the USA, Britain, Ireland, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, as well as China, India and the EU.

International Commercial Arbitration: This module considers the theoretical and institutional structure of arbitration and alternative dispute resolution, examines the legal framework within which disputes are resolved and reviews the practice of international commercial arbitration.

Consumer Law: This module focuses on the main areas of legal liability and the pitfalls that can arise if an organisation does not comply with the relevant consumer protection rules both in the UK and Europe.

Intellectual Property Law: This module addresses the fundamentals of intellectual property law, the definition and scope of copyright; the authorship, ownership, duration and qualification for copyright protection.

Competition Law: This module focuses on the theory and law of competition, focusing on UK competition law, and EU competition law relating to the control of restrictive practices, vertical and horizontal restraints and abuse of a dominant position. Comparative regimes, in particular that of the US, are examined.

Industrial Property Law: This module examines the history and development of industrial property law in the UK, EU and internationally. It covers the law relating to trade secrets, patents, copyrights, design rights and trademarks.

World Trade Law: This module studies aspects of the regulation of international trade through the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and the World Trade Organisation.

International Insurance Law: Insurance plays an important role in commerce and risk management. Insurance contracts are governed by the rules of general law of contract. The module explores the nature and scope of the contract of insurance, considers the general principles of insurance, and examines the relationships between parties to a contract.

International Taxation Law: This module studies the basic principles of income taxation of international transactions involving taxpayers of several European countries (including the UK, the Netherlands, France, Germany, Ireland), the US, Australia, Canada and Japan.

Employment Law: Modern employment law is complex, and imposes major compliance costs on employers. This module covers contract of employment, minimum wage legislation, discrimination against employees, and unfair dismissal actions before Employment Tribunals.

International Environmental Law: This module focuses on internationally recognised principles and values concerning environmental protection, and how they are translated into legally enforceable tools. Methods of environmental regulation are analysed and compared.

Read less
The MBA in Banking and Law will develop knowledgeable and capable banking executives and banking lawyers who will move quickly into key positions in the financial sector. Read more
The MBA in Banking and Law will develop knowledgeable and capable banking executives and banking lawyers who will move quickly into key positions in the financial sector. The degree focuses on the financial and strategic management of banks and other financial institutions as well as the increasingly complex legal and regulatory structures within which banks and their executives have to operate. The legal issues will cover a wide range of topics at UK, EU and international level with which a modern banker needs to be familiar. As well as the general principles of International Banking Law, you will also choose from a wide range of law and business options. You will gain practical insight and skills in a range of financial, legal and strategic management topics in the supply of international financial services as well as key Law subjects which have a direct impact on Banking practice. Case studies and contemporary issues figure prominently in the programme, particularly focusing on the lessons to be learnt from the recent ‘credit crunch’ and the issues for international financing and regulation that this has thrown up.

Compulsory modules:

Organisations and People: This module examines key issues arising from contemporary research in organisational behaviour (OB) and human resource management (HRM). It provides an integrated analysis of management, organisations and people, developing the conceptual, strategic and practical skills necessary for managers in complex, global organisational contexts.

Management Research: This module analyses the philosophical basis for research in the management sciences, and examines a number of key methodological issues and approaches. Research designs for both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies are developed, including interviews, case studies, focus groups, surveys and experiments.

Bank Financial Management: This module provides a grounding in the nature, strategic context and managerial functions of financial management in banks and other financial services firms. Three key themes are: identification and management of the trade-off between risk and return; improvement of a bank’s value using market models; and external market-based tests of bank performance.

International Banking: This module examines the origins of international banking, the activities of international banks, the markets in which they participate, and the sources of risk. You will investigate the determinants of the efficiency of international banks, and evaluate the implications for banks’ strategic decision-making.

Financial Institutions Strategic Management: This module examines the main theoretical and practical issues concerning banking business. You will develop a critical awareness of the theory of the banking firm, the motives for international banking, and regulatory and structural issues impacting on bank behaviour.

International Banking and Capital Markets Law: This module will provide a sound understanding of the law and practice of modern international banking, including the regulation and prudential supervision of banks in the UK and EU in the areas of capital adequacy and risk management.

Optional modules (choose 2):

Comparative Corporate Governance: Major corporate scandals in the US, Europe and the UK in recent years have raised questions about the organisation and governance of companies, in particular large multinational organisations. The growth of private equity buy-outs has also raised issues of transparency and accountability.

Credit and Security Law: The supply of credit is the lifeblood of industry but of course a lender will require security. This module will examine in detail the provisions relating to the regulation of the supply of credit to consumers and business.

International Corporate Finance Law and Merger Regulation Law: This module focuses on the study of leading case law and selected legislation, relating to international mergers and their financing from several common law countries such as the USA, Britain, Ireland, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, as well as China, India and the EU.

International Commercial Arbitration: This module considers the theoretical and institutional structure of arbitration and alternative dispute resolution, examines the legal framework within which disputes are resolved and reviews the practice of international commercial arbitration.

Consumer Law: This module focuses on the main areas of legal liability and the pitfalls that can arise if an organisation does not comply with the relevant consumer protection rules both in the UK and Europe.

Intellectual Property Law: This module addresses the fundamentals of intellectual property law, the definition and scope of copyright; the authorship, ownership, duration and qualification for copyright protection.

Competition Law: This module focuses on the theory and law of competition, focusing on UK competition law, and EU competition law relating to the control of restrictive practices, vertical and horizontal restraints and abuse of a dominant position. Comparative regimes, in particular that of the US, are examined.

Industrial Property Law: This module examines the history and development of industrial property law in the UK, EU and internationally. It covers the law relating to trade secrets, patents, copyrights, design rights and trademarks.

World Trade Law: This module studies aspects of the regulation of international trade through the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and the World Trade Organisation.

International Insurance Law: Insurance plays an important role in commerce and risk management. Insurance contracts are governed by the rules of general law of contract. The module explores the nature and scope of the contract of insurance, considers the general principles of insurance, and examines the relationships between parties to a contract.

International Taxation Law: This module studies the basic principles of income taxation of international transactions involving taxpayers of several European countries (including the UK, the Netherlands, France, Germany, Ireland), the US, Australia, Canada and Japan.

Employment Law: Modern employment law is complex, and imposes major compliance costs on employers. This module covers contract of employment, minimum wage legislation, discrimination against employees, and unfair dismissal actions before Employment Tribunals.

International Environmental Law: This module focuses on internationally recognised principles and values concerning environmental protection, and how they are translated into legally enforceable tools. Methods of environmental regulation are analysed and compared.

Read less
In today’s global competitive marketplace, the successful corporate executive needs to understand how the legal system and legal regulation can impact on their own area of expertise. Read more
In today’s global competitive marketplace, the successful corporate executive needs to understand how the legal system and legal regulation can impact on their own area of expertise. Accordingly, the Bangor Business School and the Bangor School of Law have combined to offer an innovative suite of interdisciplinary MBA and MA programmes. The MBA in Banking and Law will develop knowledgeable and capable banking executives and banking lawyers who will move quickly into key positions in the financial sector.

Course Structure

January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Compulsory modules:

Organisations and People: This module examines key issues arising from contemporary research in organisational behaviour (OB) and human resource management (HRM). It provides an integrated analysis of management, organisations and people, developing the conceptual, strategic and practical skills necessary for managers in complex, global organisational contexts.

Management Research: This module analyses the philosophical basis for research in the management sciences, and examines a number of key methodological issues and approaches. Research designs for both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies are developed, including interviews, case studies, focus groups, surveys and experiments.

Bank Financial Management: This module provides a grounding in the nature, strategic context and managerial functions of financial management in banks and other financial services firms. Three key themes are: identification and management of the trade-off between risk and return; improvement of a bank’s value using market models; and external market-based tests of bank performance.

International Banking: This module examines the origins of international banking, the activities of international banks, the markets in which they participate, and the sources of risk. You will investigate the determinants of the efficiency of international banks, and evaluate the implications for banks’ strategic decision-making.

Financial Institutions Strategic Management: This module examines the main theoretical and practical issues concerning banking business. You will develop a critical awareness of the theory of the banking firm, the motives for international banking, and regulatory and structural issues impacting on bank behaviour.

International Banking and Capital Markets Law: This module will provide a sound understanding of the law and practice of modern international banking, including the regulation and prudential supervision of banks in the UK and EU in the areas of capital adequacy and risk management.

Optional modules (choose 2):

Comparative Corporate Governance: Major corporate scandals in the US, Europe and the UK in recent years have raised questions about the organisation and governance of companies, in particular large multinational organisations. The growth of private equity buy-outs has also raised issues of transparency and accountability.

Credit and Security Law: The supply of credit is the lifeblood of industry but of course a lender will require security. This module will examine in detail the provisions relating to the regulation of the supply of credit to consumers and business.

International Corporate Finance Law and Merger Regulation Law: This module focuses on the study of leading case law and selected legislation, relating to international mergers and their financing from several common law countries such as the USA, Britain, Ireland, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, as well as China, India and the EU.

International Commercial Arbitration: This module considers the theoretical and institutional structure of arbitration and alternative dispute resolution, examines the legal framework within which disputes are resolved and reviews the practice of international commercial arbitration.

Consumer Law: This module focuses on the main areas of legal liability and the pitfalls that can arise if an organisation does not comply with the relevant consumer protection rules both in the UK and Europe.

Intellectual Property Law: This module addresses the fundamentals of intellectual property law, the definition and scope of copyright; the authorship, ownership, duration and qualification for copyright protection.

Competition Law: This module focuses on the theory and law of competition, focusing on UK competition law, and EU competition law relating to the control of restrictive practices, vertical and horizontal restraints and abuse of a dominant position. Comparative regimes, in particular that of the US, are examined.

Industrial Property Law: This module examines the history and development of industrial property law in the UK, EU and internationally. It covers the law relating to trade secrets, patents, copyrights, design rights and trademarks.

World Trade Law: This module studies aspects of the regulation of international trade through the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and the World Trade Organisation.

International Insurance Law: Insurance plays an important role in commerce and risk management. Insurance contracts are governed by the rules of general law of contract. The module explores the nature and scope of the contract of insurance, considers the general principles of insurance, and examines the relationships between parties to a contract.

International Taxation Law: This module studies the basic principles of income taxation of international transactions involving taxpayers of several European countries (including the UK, the Netherlands, France, Germany, Ireland), the US, Australia, Canada and Japan.

Employment Law: Modern employment law is complex, and imposes major compliance costs on employers. This module covers contract of employment, minimum wage legislation, discrimination against employees, and unfair dismissal actions before Employment Tribunals.

International Environmental Law: This module focuses on internationally recognised principles and values concerning environmental protection, and how they are translated into legally enforceable tools. Methods of environmental regulation are analysed and compared.

Read less
This course is also offered at the Bangor Business School London Centre. Banking services represents a highly competitive and rapidly changing sector in today’s global economy. Read more
This course is also offered at the Bangor Business School London Centre.

Banking services represents a highly competitive and rapidly changing sector in today’s global economy. The course offers students a unique opportunity to study advanced theory and practice relating to the international banking sector, and to develop an appreciation of the causes and significance of current developments in this vitally important and dynamic sector of the economy.

The course provides advanced level management and business training relating to practical issues in international banking, with particular reference to issues pertaining to developing countries and emerging markets. This involves understanding the practical managerial issues surrounding the running of banking/financial firms, such as bank financial and strategic management; bank and corporate performance; and the analysis of financial systems and markets. Also under consideration will be the interactions between economic development and the design, growth, operation and performance of the financial system in emerging markets.
Course Structure

The course is a full-time programme lasting 12 months. It consists of two parts:

Part 1:

Is a wholly taught component, contributing 120 credits. All taught modules carry a credit weighting of 15 credits. Part 1 is taught during the two semesters which make up the academic year. Teaching during semester 1 normally runs from late-September to December, with examinations in January. Teaching during Semester 2 normally runs from late-January to early-May, with examinations in May and June.

Part 2:

This consists of either a supervised Dissertation of around 10,000 words, or a structured Advanced Taught Programme of Summer Study that is specific to your chosen degree. Part 2 is completed during the summer months, from late-May to September. If you undertake a supervised Dissertation, you are expected to submit your Dissertation by September in the calendar year following your initial registration for your postgraduate degree. The assessments for the Advanced Taught Programme of Summer Study are also completed during September in the calendar year following your initial registration.

Compulsory modules:

Banking and Development
International Banking
Research Methods
Bank Financial Management
Financial Intermediation
Financial Engineering

Optional modules (choose 2):

Islamic Finance
Financial Econometrics
Financial Institutions Strategic Management
Financial Stability

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