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Engineering×

Durham University, Full Time Masters Degrees in Engineering

We have 7 Durham University, Full Time Masters Degrees in Engineering

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he overall aim of the programme is to develop high level skills in a range of techniques and approaches in the area of (Engineering) Design and Operations Engineering. Read more
he overall aim of the programme is to develop high level skills in a range of techniques and approaches in the area of (Engineering) Design and Operations Engineering. There is a high level on industrial interaction.

Course Structure

3 taught 20 credit modules -
•Advanced Design and Manufacture (including in-company teaching days)
•Manufacture and Management
•Enterprise and Operations
•A 30 credit Industrial Project Module - including 3 short burst in-company technical consultancy industrial projects - done in pairs
•A 90 credit R&D thesis incorporating an in-depth individual Research and Development project under the guidance of an experienced academic.

Optional Modules

It can be possible to exchange the Manufacture and Management module with Applied Mechanics, or Energy Conversion and Delivery, or Digital Signal Processing. These requirement prerequisites - by concession.

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The main objective of the course is to educate students in the rapidly growing area of Communications to undertake responsible and challenging posts in academia and industry. Read more
The main objective of the course is to educate students in the rapidly growing area of Communications to undertake responsible and challenging posts in academia and industry.

The course covers the key areas of wireless and wired networks and protocols, digital signal processing and digital electronics. In addition to the technical background provided in these subjects, hands-on experience is gained through a major individual Research and Development project, a group design project and a supporting laboratory programme.

Course Structure

The programme consists of three modules taught through lectures and a laboratory programme, a group design module and an individual research and design project.

Core Modules:
-Communications Systems
-Radio Communications
-Digital Systems
-Design of Wireless Systems
-Research and Development Project

Learning and Teaching

This is a 12-month full time degree course that runs from October to the end of August the following year. The programme consists of a total of five core elements. These are three modules taught by lectures, tutorials and laboratory classes in Communications Systems, Radio Communications and Digital Systems, a group design module on Design of Wireless Systems module and a major individual research and development project.

The three core lecture modules involve a total of 101 hours of lectures, 18 hours of tutorials and seminars and 33 hours of practical laboratory classes.

For the Group Design Module, each group is supervised by one or more members of staff, and guided through the various stages of design. The principal learning outcome from this module is for students to understand the stages in the design of current communication equipment and to understand the importance of information flow within a design team. Students should expect to have around 20 hours of contact time with their academic supervisors over the course of the design module.

A major individual research and development project is also undertaken on the course. This provides an open-ended challenge to each individual student, in collaboration with a staff supervisor. Regular meetings are held with the supervisor to discuss project progress and planning issues. A mid-term assessment is carried out to ensure project is on track. At the end of the project students are required to submit a final report on their work, in the style of a research paper. They are also required to prepare and to present a poster to allow an assessment to be made of their understanding and ability to present their work, plus an oral examination is held to allow detailed questions to be put to the student regarding the technical aspects of their project. Students should expect to have around 25 hours of contact time with their supervisors plus 500 hours of practical work, supported by the School’s technicians and other research workers, over the course of their research projects.

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The main objective of the course is to educate students in the rapidly growing area of Communications to undertake responsible and challenging posts in academia and industry. Read more
The main objective of the course is to educate students in the rapidly growing area of Communications to undertake responsible and challenging posts in academia and industry.

The course covers the key areas of wireless and wired networks and protocols, digital signal processing and digital electronics. In addition to the technical background provided in these subjects, hands-on experience is gained through a major individual Research and Development project, a group design project and a supporting laboratory programme.

Course Structure

The programme consists of three modules taught through lectures and a laboratory programme, a group design module and an individual research and design project.

Core Modules:
-Communications Systems
-Radio Communications
-Digital Systems
-Design of Wireless Systems
-Research and Development Project

Learning and Teaching

This is a 12-month full time degree course that runs from October to the end of August the following year. The programme consists of a total of five core elements. These are three modules taught by lectures, tutorials and laboratory classes in Communications Systems, Radio Communications and Digital Systems, a group design module on Design of Wireless Systems module and a major individual research and development project.

The three core lecture modules involve a total of 101 hours of lectures, 18 hours of tutorials and seminars and 33 hours of practical laboratory classes.

For the Group Design Module, each group is supervised by one or more members of staff, and guided through the various stages of design. The principal learning outcome from this module is for students to understand the stages in the design of current communication equipment and to understand the importance of information flow within a design team. Students should expect to have around 20 hours of contact time with their academic supervisors over the course of the design module.

A major individual research and development project is also undertaken on the course. This provides an open-ended challenge to each individual student, in collaboration with a staff supervisor. Regular meetings are held with the supervisor to discuss project progress and planning issues. A mid-term assessment is carried out to ensure project is on track. At the end of the project students are required to submit a final report on their work, in the style of a research paper. They are also required to prepare and to present a poster to allow an assessment to be made of their understanding and ability to present their work, plus an oral examination is held to allow detailed questions to be put to the student regarding the technical aspects of their project. Students should expect to have around 25 hours of contact time with their supervisors plus 500 hours of practical work, supported by the School’s technicians and other research workers, over the course of their research projects.

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The MSc in New and Renewable Energy is designed to equip our graduates with the skills required to meet the growing challenge to achieve energy and environmental sustainability through the application of new and renewable energy technologies. Read more
The MSc in New and Renewable Energy is designed to equip our graduates with the skills required to meet the growing challenge to achieve energy and environmental sustainability through the application of new and renewable energy technologies. The programme aims to enable students to develop the capacity to solve problems across the traditional Engineering boundaries and to have an appreciation of complete energy systems from source to end user, to have knowledge of the relevant technologies and to understand the interactions between them. The programme also provides students with the opportunity to develop skills in research, development, design and project management through individual and team-based project work.

Course Structure

The programme consists of four core modules to provide a solid foundation in a broad range of New and Renewable Energy technologies and three optional modules that allow students to choose more specialised study programmes that are most suited to their interests. The modules include lecture courses, a group design project and a major, individual research and development project. The course starts in September with a fundamentals module which prepares students from different backgrounds to take full advantage of the courses modules that follow and which combines lectures, tutorials and laboratory experiments.

Core Modules

-Renewable Energy Fundamentals
-Renewable Energy and Environment
-Group Design Project
-Research and Development Project

Optional Modules

Students select three optional modules. In previous years these modules have included:
-Low Carbon and Thermal Technologies
-Turbomachinery and Nuclear Power Engineering
-Energy Delivery and Network Integration
-Energy Generation and Conversion Technologies
-Energy Markets and Risk

Learning and Teaching

This is a 12-month full time degree course that starts in September with an intensive core module on engineering fundamentals and finishes at the end of August the following year, when students submit a report and have an oral examination on their chosen research project. The programme consists of four core modules to provide a solid foundation in a broad range of New and Renewable Energy technologies and three optional modules that allow students to choose study programmes which are most suited to their interests. The modules include lecture courses, a group design project and an individual research and development project.

The course starts in September the first of the core modules (Renewable Energy Fundamentals), which prepares students from different backgrounds to take full advantage of all aspects of the courses. This module consists of an intensive study programme which typically combines over 30 hours of lectures with 12 hours of tutorials and labs. Topics studied include thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, power system plant, electrical circuits and power electronics and converters. The module also introduces students to best practice research techniques.

The second core module (Renewable Energy & the Environment) typically involves 19 hours of lectures and tutorials. Assessment is through a combination of examination and a coursework.

The third core module is a group design project focused on a realistic application of renewable energy. Students gain experience of teamwork and project management, as well as the technical aspects of engineering design.

A major individual research and development project completes the core modules. This provides an open-ended challenge to each individual student, in collaboration with a staff supervisor. Regular meetings are held with the supervisor to discuss project progress and planning issues. A mid-term assessment is carried out to ensure project is on track. At the end of the project students are required to submit a final report on their work, in the style of a research paper. They are also required to prepare and to present a poster to allow an assessment to be made of their understanding and ability to present their work, plus an oral examination is held to allow detailed questions to be put to the student regarding the technical aspects of their project. Students should expect to have up to 20 hours of contact time with their supervisors plus 500 hours of research work, supported by the School’s technicians and other research workers, over the course of their research projects.

Each of the optional modules involves typically 19 hours of lectures in addition to tutorials, laboratory work and assignments.

Read less
The MSc in New and Renewable Energy is designed to equip our graduates with the skills required to meet the growing challenge to achieve energy and environmental sustainability through the application of new and renewable energy technologies. Read more
The MSc in New and Renewable Energy is designed to equip our graduates with the skills required to meet the growing challenge to achieve energy and environmental sustainability through the application of new and renewable energy technologies. The programme aims to enable students to develop the capacity to solve problems across the traditional Engineering boundaries and to have an appreciation of complete energy systems from source to end user, to have knowledge of the relevant technologies and to understand the interactions between them. The programme also provides students with the opportunity to develop skills in research, development, design and project management through individual and team-based project work.

Course Structure
The programme consists of four core modules to provide a solid foundation in a broad range of New and Renewable Energy technologies and three optional modules that allow students to choose more specialised study programmes that are most suited to their interests. The modules include lecture courses, a group design project and a major, individual research and development project. The course starts in September with a month long 'fundamentals' module which prepares students from different backgrounds to take full advantage of the courses modules that follow and which combines lectures, tutorials and laboratory experiments.

Core Modules
- Renewable Energy Fundamentals
- Renewable Energy and Environment
- Group Design Project
- Research and Development Project.

Optional Modules
Students select three of the following optional modules:
- Low Carbon and Thermal Technologies
- Turbomachinery and Nuclear Power Engineering
- Energy Delivery and Network Integration
- Energy Generation and Conversion Technologies
- Energy Markets and Risk

Read less
The overall aim of the programme is to develop high level skills in a range of techniques and approaches in the area of (Engineering) Design and Operations Engineering. Read more
The overall aim of the programme is to develop high level skills in a range of techniques and approaches in the area of (Engineering) Design and Operations Engineering. There is a high level on industrial interaction.

Course Structure
Three taught 20 credit modules:

- Advanced Design and Manufacture (including in-company teaching days)
- Manufacture and Management
- Enterprise and Operations
- A 30 credit Industrial Project Module - including 3 short burst in-company technical consultancy industrial projects - done in pairs
- A 90 credit R&D thesis incorporating an in-depth individual Research and Development project under the guidance of an experienced academic.

Optional Modules
- It can be possible to exchange the Manufacture and Management module with Applied Mechanics, or Energy Conversion and Delivery, or Digital Signal Processing. These requirement prerequisites - by concession.

Read less
*Why do energy efficiency measures often fail?. *How will we transition into a post-carbon energy system?. *Why do some energy technologies spread, while others disappear?. Read more
*Why do energy efficiency measures often fail?
*How will we transition into a post-carbon energy system?
*Why do some energy technologies spread, while others disappear?
*How can people be persuaded to change their energy habits?

The MSc in Energy and Society investigates energy systems from all angles. On this course you will look at energy in practice, what it means to make an energy transition, what we mean by energy justice, and how energy practices change.

The programme brings in leading experts in energy studies at Durham from Anthropology, Engineering, Economics, Law, Geography, Geosciences and many other departments. It is taught through intensive block-teaching, field-study, original dissertation research and a range of optional modules that complement the core teaching. You will learn about current and new energy technologies, histories of energy, how to understand energy policy, and how to study energy practices.

A broad range of optional subjects enables you to tailor the course according to your particular interests – you can take modules in law, international politics, advanced engineering, geography, risk, development or resilience, depending on your prior qualifications. In your fully supported personal research project you will deepen your expertise in your chosen area.

The full-time course consists of two terms of teaching, during which students are introduced to the range of research questions and methods, and a dissertation, involving the design, development and implementation of an independent research project. Students work closely with academic staff, and have the opportunity to become involved in active research projects.

Compulsory modules

-Dissertation
-Energy in Practice (Field Study)
-Context and Challenges in Energy
-Energy Society and Energy Practices

Optional modules from across the University and have previously included:

-Academic and Professional Skills in Anthropology
-Fieldwork and Interpretation
-Group Renewable Energy Design Project
-Key Issues in Sociocultural Theory
-Society, Energy, Environment and Resilience
-Computational Methods for Social Sciences
-Anthropology and Development
-Negotiating the Human
-Statistical Analysis in Anthropology
-Energy, Markets and Risk
-Renewable Energy and the Environment
-Risk Frontiers

Please see http://www.durham.ac.uk/anthropology/postgraduatestudy/taughtprogrammes/mscenergyandsociety for further information on modules.

Dissertation

We place an emphasis on independent learning. This is supported by the University’s virtual learning environment, extensive library collections and informal contact with tutors and research staff. We consider the development of independent learning and research skills to be one of the key elements of our postgraduate taught curriculum and one which helps our students cultivate initiative, originality and critical thinking.

The dissertation is a significant piece of independent research that constitutes a synthesis of theory, method and practice in anthropology and is supported by an individual supervisor and the dissertation coordinator.

Previous dissertations and research projects as part of the course have been undertaken in partnership with DONG Energy UK, Haringey Borough of London, National Energy Action, Durham County Council, energy enterprises and community energy schemes.

Careers

This course attracts high quality applicants from all over the world and delivers highly-skilled graduates who are able to communicate across disciplines and countries to further environmental progress and energy justice. Graduates of the MSc will be in demand from industry, community organisations, Non-Governmental Organisations and governments around the world. Graduates have gone on to work in Energy justice organisations, local authorities, energy consultancies and further Doctoral study.

Student support

Throughout the programme, all students meet regularly with the degree tutor, who provides academic support and guidance. Furthermore, all members of teaching staff have weekly office hours when they are available to meet with students on a ‘drop-in’ basis. In term time, the department also has an extensive programme of departmental and research group seminars which postgraduate students are encouraged and expected to attend. The undergraduate Anthropology Society also organises its own visiting lecturer programme. We ensure that we advertise any other relevant seminars and lectures in Durham, Newcastle and further afield, and encourage students to attend relevant conferences.

Before the academic year starts, we provide information on preparation for the course. On arrival we have induction sessions and social events, headed by the Director of Postgraduate Studies and attended by both academic and administrative staff. Students also attend an “Introduction to Research Groups in Anthropology”.

Postgraduate study at Durham University

The MSc Energy and Society is based in Durham University’s Department of Anthropology in association with the Durham Energy Institute. Durham has one of the largest Anthropology departments in the world with 40 research active academic teaching staff working across the full range of the discipline. Our Anthropology department is ranked in the top 50 of the prestigious QS World University Subject Rankings. The overall QS rankings also placed Durham 54th in the world for citations, recognising the impact and influence of its research among other academics, and 31st globally for employer reputation, giving recognition to the quality of, and international demand for, Durham’s graduates.

Students on this course can become members of the Durham Energy Institute (DEI) community and can attend its wide range of seminars and events, benefitting from its extensive network of contacts in the energy sector. DEI ( http://www.durham.ac.uk/dei/ ) covers the spectrum of energy research from technological innovation, to the social, political and economic dimensions of energy. DEI addresses energy challenges collaboratively through strong partnerships with industry, international partners, governments, community groups and other academic institutions. This ensures our research is relevant, timely and effective.

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