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Teesside University Masters Degrees in Energy Technologies

We have 3 Teesside University Masters Degrees in Energy Technologies

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This programme is appropriate for you if are seeking to develop the skills and confidence to address the critical global challenges of energy and diminishing natural resources. Read more

This programme is appropriate for you if are seeking to develop the skills and confidence to address the critical global challenges of energy and diminishing natural resources. Clean energy, optimal use of resources and the economics of climate change are the key issues facing society, and form the fundamental themes of this programme.

Course details

You explore the world’s dependency on hydrocarbon-based resources, together with strategies and technologies to decarbonise national economies. The course examines global best practice, government policies, industrial symbiosis and emerging risk management techniques. You also address the environmental, economic and sociological (risk and acceptability) impacts of renewable energy provision and waste exploitation as central elements. 

The programme develops the problem-solvers and innovators needed to face the enormous challenges of the 21st century - those who can play key roles in driving energy and environmental policies, and in formulating forward-looking strategies on energy use and environmental sustainability at corporate, national and global scales.

What you study

For the PgDip award you must successfully complete 120 credits of taught modules. For an MSc award you must successfully complete the 120 credits of taught modules and a 60-credit master's research project. 

Energy, environment, risk managing projects, sustainability and integrated waste management are the main foci of the programme, but you also explore the financial aspects of energy and environmental management. Economics is integral to the development of policies and is often a key influencing factor.

This programme aims to develop a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the role and place of energy in the 21st century and the way the environment impinges on the types of energy used and production methods. It also aims to investigate the environment as it is perceived, and contextualise its actual importance to mankind. Specific objectives for this course are to establish the financial validity for the pursuit of alternative energy forms and management of the environment.

You are encouraged to take up opportunities of voluntary placements with local industries to conduct real-world research projects. These placements are assessed in line with the assessment criteria and learning outcomes of the Project module. 

Examples of past MSc research projects

  • The taxonomy of facilitated industrial symbioses
  • Assessment of the climate change impacts of the Tees Valley
  • Exploring the links between carbon disclosure and carbon performance
  • Hydrothermal carbonisation of waste biomass
  • Quantifying the impact of biochar on soil microbial ecology
  • Potential for biochar utilisation in developing rural economies
  • Carbon trading opportunities for renewable energy projects in developing countries
  • Exploring the potential for wind energy in Libya
  • Demand and supply potential of solar panel installations
  • A feasibility study of the application of zero-carbon retrofit technologies in building communal areas
  • Energy recovery from abandoned oil wells through geothermal processes

Course structure

Core modules

  • Concepts of Sustainability
  • Economics of Climate Change
  • Energy and Global Climate Change
  • Global Energy Policy
  • Integrated Waste Management and Exploitation
  • Project
  • Research Methods and Proposal

Modules offered may vary.

Teaching

How you learn

The course provides a number of contact teaching and assessment hours (through lectures, tutorials, projects, assignments), but you are also expected to spend time on your own, called 'self-study' time, to review lecture notes, prepare course work assignments, work on projects and revise for assessments. For example, each 20-credit module typically has around 200 hours of learning time. 

In most cases, around 60 hours are spent in lectures, tutorials and in practical exercises. The remaining learning time is for you to gain a deeper understanding of the subject. Each year of full-time study consists of modules totalling 180 credits; hence, during one year of full-time study a student can expect to have 1,800 hours of learning and assessment.

How you are assessed

Modules are assessed by a variety of methods including examination and in-course assessment with some utilising other approaches such as group-work or verbal/poster presentations.

Employability

Work placement

There may be short-term placement opportunities for some students, particularly during the project phase of the course. This University is also in the process of seeking accreditation for the Waste Management module from the Chartered Institution of Wastes Management.

Career opportunities

Successful graduates from this course are well placed to find employment. As an energy and environmental manager, you might find yourself in a role responsible for overseeing the energy and environmental performance of private, public and voluntary sector organisations, as well as in a wide range of engineering industries.

Energy and environmental managers examine corporate activities to establish where improvements can be made and ensure compliance with environmental legislation across the organisation. You might be responsible for reviewing the whole operation, carrying out energy and environmental audits and assessments, identifying and resolving energy and environmental problems and acting as agents of change. Your role could include the training of the workforce to develop the ability to recognise their own contributions to improved energy and environmental performance.

Your role may also include the development, implementation and monitoring of energy and environmental strategies, policies and programmes that promote sustainable development at corporate, national or global levels.



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This MSc Energy and Environmental Management (with Advanced Practice) course is ideal if are seeking to develop your skills and confidence to address the critical global challenges of energy and diminishing natural resources. Read more

This MSc Energy and Environmental Management (with Advanced Practice) course is ideal if are seeking to develop your skills and confidence to address the critical global challenges of energy and diminishing natural resources. Clean energy, optimal use of resources and the economics of climate change are the key issues facing society, and form the fundamental themes of this programme.

Course details

You explore the world’s dependency on hydrocarbon-based resources, together with strategies and technologies to decarbonise national economies. This course examines global best practice, government policies, industrial symbiosis and emerging risk management techniques. You also address the environmental, economic and sociological (risk and acceptability) impacts of renewable energy provision and waste exploitation as central elements.There are three routes you can select from to gain a postgraduate Master’s award:

  • MSc Energy and Environmental Management – one year full time
  • MSc Energy and Environmental Management – two years part time
  • MSc Energy and Environmental Management – two years full time

The one-year programme is a great option if you want to gain a traditional MSc qualification – you can find out more here. This two-year master’s degree with advanced practice enhances your qualification by adding to the one-year master’s programme an internship, research or study abroad experience.The MSc Energy and Environmental Management (with Advanced Practice) offers you the chance to enhance your qualification by completing an internship, research or study abroad experience in addition to the content of the one-year MSc. This two-year programme is an opportunity to enhance your qualification by spending one semester completing a vocational internship, research internship or by studying abroad. Although we can’t guarantee an internship, we can provide you with practical support and advice on how to find and secure your own internship position. A vocational internship is a great way to gain work experience and give your CV a competitive edge. Alternatively, a research internship develops your research and academic skills as you work as part of a research team in an academic setting – ideal if you are interested in a career in research or academia. A third option is to study abroad in an academic exchange with one of our partner universities. This option does incur additional costs such as travel and accommodation. You must also take responsibility for ensuring you have the appropriate visa to study outside the UK, where relevant.

What you study

For the MSc with advanced practice, you complete 120 credits of taught modules, a 60-credit master’s research project and 60 credits of advanced practice.

Energy, environment, risk managing projects, sustainability and integrated waste management are emphasised on the programme, but you also explore the financial aspects of energy and environmental management. Economics is integral to developing policies and is often a key influencing factor.

You develop a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the role and place of energy in the 21st century, and how the environment impinges on the types of energy used and the way they are produced. You investigate the environment as it is perceived, and contextualise its actual importance to mankind. Specific objectives for this course are to establish the financial validity of pursing alternative energy forms and managing the environment.

Examples of past MSc research projects

  • The taxonomy of facilitated industrial symbioses
  • Assessment of the climate change impacts of the Tees Valley
  • Exploring the links between carbon disclosure and carbon performance
  • Hydrothermal carbonisation of waste biomass
  • Quantifying the impact of biochar on soil microbial ecology
  • Potential for biochar utilisation in developing rural economies
  • Carbon trading opportunities for renewable energy projects in developing countries
  • Exploring the potential for wind energy in Libya
  • Demand and supply potential of solar panel installations
  • A feasibility study of the application of zero-carbon retrofit technologies in building communal areas
  • Energy recovery from abandoned oil wells through geothermal processes

Course structure

Core modules

  • Concepts of Sustainability
  • Data Acquisition and Signal Processing Techniques
  • Economics of Climate Change
  • Energy and Global Climate Change
  • Global Energy Policy
  • Integrated Waste Management and Exploitation
  • Research Methods and Proposal
  • Research Project (Advanced Practice)

Advanced Practice options

  • Research Internship
  • Study Abroad
  • Vocational Internship

Modules offered may vary.

Teaching

How you learn

You learn through a variety of teaching methods including lectures, tutorials, projects and assignments. You are also expected to participate in self-directed study, to review lecture notes, prepare assignments, work on projects and revise for assessments. Each 20-credit module typically has around 200 hours of learning time. 

You usually spend around 60 hours in lectures, tutorials and in practical exercises over the duration of the course. The remaining learning time is for you to gain a deeper understanding of the subject. Each year of full-time study consists of modules totalling 180 credits. During one year of full-time study you can expect to have 1,800 hours of learning and assessment.

How you are assessed

Modules are assessed by a variety of methods including exams and in-course assessment with some using other approaches such as group work, or verbal or poster presentations. 

Your Advanced Practice module is assessed by an individual written reflective report (3,000 words) together with a study or workplace log, where appropriate, and through a poster presentation.

Employability

Career opportunities

Successful graduates from this course are well-placed to find employment. As an energy and environmental manager, you might find yourself responsible for overseeing the energy and environmental performance of a private, public or voluntary sector organisation, or in one of a wide range of engineering industries.

Work placement

There may be short-term placement opportunities for some students, particularly during the project phase of the course. This University is also in the process of seeking accreditation for the Waste Management module from the Chartered Institution of Wastes Management.



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This programme is for graduate engineers wishing to work in the electrical power industry. It develops your knowledge of electrical power and energy ystems, giving you a good understanding of the latest developments and techniques within the electrical power industry. Read more

This programme is for graduate engineers wishing to work in the electrical power industry. It develops your knowledge of electrical power and energy ystems, giving you a good understanding of the latest developments and techniques within the electrical power industry.

Course details

The programme is centred around three major themes:

  • electrical power networks with emphasis on conventional networks, smart grids, high voltage direct current transmission and asset management of network infrastructure
  • renewable energies with emphasis on wind and solar power
  • power electronics with emphasis on power electronic convertors in converting and controlling power flows in electrical networks and renewable energy systems.

What you study

For the postgraduate diploma (PgDip) award you must successfully complete 120 credits of taught modules. 

For MSc students

For an MSc award you must successfully complete 120 credits of taught modules and a 60-credit master's research project.

Course structure

Core modules

  • Asset Management
  • Emerging Transmission Systems
  • Power Electronics
  • Practical Health and Safety Skills
  • Project Management and Enterprise
  • Renewable Energy Conversion Systems
  • Research and Study Skills
  • Smart Power Distribution

MSc only

  • Major Project

Modules offered may vary.

Teaching

How you learn

You learn through lectures, tutorials and practical sessions. Lectures provide the theoretical underpinning while practical sessions give you the opportunity to put theory into practice, applying your knowledge to specific problems. 

Tutorials and seminars provide a context for interactive learning and allow you to explore relevant topics in depth. In addition to the taught sessions, you undertake a substantive MSc research project.

How you are assessed

Assessment varies from module to module. The assessment methodology could include in-course assignments, design exercises, technical reports, presentations or formal examinations. For your MSc project you prepare a dissertation.

Employability

As an electrical power and energy systems engineer you can be involved in designing, constructing, commissioning and lifecycle maintenance of complex energy production, conversion and distribution systems. 

Your work could include energy storage systems, management and efficient use of energy in building, manufacturing and processing systems.

You could also be involved in work relating to the environmental and economic impact of energy usage.

Examples of the types of jobs you could be doing include:

  • designing new electrical transmission and distribution systems
  • managing maintenance and repair
  • managing operations of existing systems
  • managing operations of a wind turbine farm
  • analysing the efficiency of hydroelectric power systems
  • evaluating the economic viability of new solar power installations
  • assessing the environmental impact of energy systems.


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