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Economics×

City, University of London, Full Time Masters Degrees in Economics

We have 10 City, University of London, Full Time Masters Degrees in Economics

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From start-ups to multinationals, the MSc Business Economics course is about applying economics to business – and London is the ideal place to do it. Read more
From start-ups to multinationals, the MSc Business Economics course is about applying economics to business – and London is the ideal place to do it.

Who is it for?

The MSc Business Economics / International Business Economics is for students who want to apply economics to real-world issues. From transfer pricing, to the complexity of financial markets and the pros and cons of EU membership, you will need to be strong at statistics and quantitative methods to get to grips with the material that makes up the core modules. The MSc is designed to give you the tools to apply your knowledge, so we expect you to be downloading the free FT app and getting on top of current issues from the second you start.

Objectives

On the MSc Business Economics / International Business Economics you won’t be deriving equations. Instead, we use them to apply economics to current business issues.

The programme has been designed to equip students with a wealth of resources combining data banks from City’s Cass Business School and School of Arts and Social Sciences. This means you have access to everything from Datastream, Bloomberg and Bankscope, to Morning Star and Orbis.

MSc Business Economics / International Business Economics maximises City’s central London location. With high-profile guest lecturers such as Jim O’Neill, former Chief Economist from Goldman Sachs, you gain insight straight from the City studying in the heart of "the world's biggest financial centre" (Economist, 2012.)

Teaching and learning

The course is taught through a series of lectures (which are also available as online resources), seminars, student presentations and interactive group work. Computer laboratory teaching gives you practical experience using software packages to develop statistical and econometric skills that are formatively assessed by computer-based exercises.

You also undertake a research project or economics literature survey on a subject that is of interest to you. This must cover a current topic that is within the remit of Business Economics or International Business Economics.

Assessment

You are assessed by coursework and examination. Your overall degree result is based on your performance in the taught modules and the dissertation.

Modules

The core content is covered in the first term, making this a programme with a lot of choice. There is an economics and econometrics focus, but you also can study topics including the economics of micro-finance, e-commerce, asset pricing and the history of economic thought.

If you choose to study MSc International Business Economics you will need to study the International Business Economics elective in the second term, and your research project has to cover more than one country. So, for example, you could not focus on a single-country subject such as privatisation in the UK. For a detailed module breakdown, see the website: http://www.city.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/business-economics-international-business-economics/2017

Career prospects

When it comes to employer recognition, City is well established. City has become synonymous with quality and the Government Economic Service regularly recruits postgraduate students from this programme. There is also a range of career service events across the School of Arts and Social Sciences and Cass Business School, which you can attend throughout the programme.

Our graduates include Yuliya Bashmakov, Senior Gas Control Scheduler for ExxonMobil and Youssef Intabli who is now working as an account manager at Bloomberg.

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Behavioural economics applies psychological insights into human behaviour to explain how real people make economic decisions. Read more
Behavioural economics applies psychological insights into human behaviour to explain how real people make economic decisions.

Who is it for?

The course is suitable for recent graduates in economics, psychology and related social science or quantitative disciplines who are looking to develop a career in the fast-paced world of behavioural economics, either in the public or private sector.

As the course is offered in full-time and part-time modes, it is also suited to professionals who want to enhance their theoretical knowledge and practical skills and would benefit from an academic environment.

Objectives

Behavioural economics applies psychological insights into human behaviour to investigate how people make economic decisions under various conditions of constraint (e.g. time and knowledge) and influence (e.g. social pressure). This is an important field in modern economics, and the social sciences more generally.

Commercial organisations have long known the limitations of individual decision making and they routinely use this knowledge in their commercial practices (e.g. anchoring effect of minimum payment on credit cards). The practical implications of behavioural economics are varied and significant, and acknowledged to provide a powerful and cost-effective approach to improving human welfare.

The Behavioural Economics MSc will develop your skills and knowledge to prepare you for a wide variety of roles in the private or public sector that require a solid understanding of human behaviour.

Teaching and learning

The modules are taught by lecturers from the economics and psychology department with research interests in behavioural economics.

In each module you will receive typically 30 hours of face-to-face contact, supported by online resources (e.g., videos and advanced readings provided on the learning platform Moodle) for your self-directed study. You will be required to take responsibility for your own learning and to take advantage of the learning opportunities offered (e.g., invited speakers programme and online resources). The learning and teaching strategies for each module will expose you to a range of methods, comprising: lectures, guest lectures, seminars, group work, workshops, small group discussions, tutorials, reflective reports and research project supervision.

Assessment

In order to assess your full range of learning, you will complete reflective reports, essays, examinations, interpretation of statistical analyses, formal research proposals and a research dissertation. Most individual modules are assessed by a combination of coursework and examinations. In addition, you will be directed to independent study and receive detailed feedback on your coursework as an aid to your further learning. These different forms of assessment have the aim of assessing your knowledge, skills and appreciation in different areas of behavioural economics (e.g., theoretical knowledge and applied aspects of behavioural techniques).

Modules

Full-time students take four modules in each of the first two terms, followed by a written research dissertation in the third term.

Most of the modules are structured as a combination of two-hour lectures (to present information) and one-hour seminars or clinics (to understand and assimilate lecture material) or lab sessions. Teaching and learning is enhanced by technology-supported resources, and teaching staff are available for one-to-one interaction and feedback.

It is expected that full-time students will spend about three hours in lectures/seminars plus self-directed, independent study hours for each module per week. You should also expect to attend seminars given by invited speakers and seminars on dissertation writing (about one to two hours per week).

Your workload might vary from week to week.

Term 1
-Principles of Economics
-Cognitive and Economic Science of Rational Choice
-Psychological Processes: Individual and Social
-Behavioural Research Methods: Design and Analysis

Term 2
-Experimental Economics and Game Theory
-Fundamentals of Cognitive Science
-Applied Econometric and Psychological Research Methods
-Professional Aspects of Behavioural Economics

Term 3
-Research Dissertation
Students with a strong background in Economics may substitute 'Principles of Economics' with a microeconomics module from one of the MSc programmes offered by the Department of Economics. You may also substitute an appropriate elective from one of the MSc modules offered by the Department of Economics for 'Professional Aspects of Behavioural Economics' - this will allow a pathway through the programme that is focused on theoretical and research economic themes.

Career prospects

Whilst there is not yet a specific occupation of 'behavioural economist', the knowledge and skills acquired are highly valuable in a range of sectors:
-Economic consultants undertaking marketing activities
-Health economics consultants developing sales/markets for products (from branded medicines to health insurance schemes)
-Public policy specialist who advises on the choice architecture of decision making (e.g., transport decisions)
-Political campaigns and public relations more generally
-General marketing, sales and consumer psychology (preferences, sensitivity to incentives, and default behaviour)
-Brand awareness consultancies
-Financial trading and risk assessment
-Internet auction companies
-Design consultancies (e.g. websites)
-In large international institutions, e.g. World Bank, EBRD, Central Banks etc.

City’s Behavioural Economics postgraduate course would be especially valuable for professionals who already work in occupations which involve the need to understand the scientific dynamics of human decision making and behaviour (e.g., financial traders who require the right psychological attitude as much as appropriate strategy knowledge).

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This new Masters is designed to bridge the gap between economics and development, providing strong training in quantitative and policy analysis in development economics. Read more
This new Masters is designed to bridge the gap between economics and development, providing strong training in quantitative and policy analysis in development economics.

Who is it for?

The Development Economics MSc course at City is designed for those looking to gain an understanding of key issues in economic development and provide you with rigorous economic theory and statistical tools to be able to analyse policies and assess their impact on economic and human development.

Objectives

The aim of this course is to develop your critical and analytical abilities in economics, with particular reference to development. By the time you graduate, you should be able to:
-Demonstrate that modern economic theory is relevant to development economics.
-Critically interpret current research in development economics and evaluate its relevance to development practice and policy analysis.
-Understand the enduring determinants of poverty.
-Analyse the issues of fertility, education, health, work, migration and microfinance and their contribution to economic development.
-Develop microeconomic models to explain how people make such decisions and how policy is likely to affect their choices.
-Assess policies designed towards helping the poor by taking into account how people react to policy interventions, and statistically assess the success of such policies.
-Undertake empirical investigations in development economics, using appropriate quantitative methods.

Academic facilities

You will benefit from City's London location, and our proximity to the centres of decision-making in development economics. (We are six tube stops away from the Department for International Development, for example.).

Teaching and learning

The Development Economics MSc course is designed to be flexible in the range of teaching methods used. You learn through a mixture of lecturing, discussions, analysis of case studies, student presentations and particularly for the quantitative elements of the course, interactive computer-based exercises. You are encouraged to participate actively in the classes.

The taught modules usually run for a term and have three hours of teaching each week. This time may include workshops and tutorials as well as lectures.

Outside your timetabled hours you have access to City’s library and computing facilities for independent study. Your independent study will include reading recommended books and papers, and “reading around” the field to develop a deeper understanding.

In your third term we organise for experts from outside City to come in and present current research on both methodological and applied topics.

For the dissertation or literature survey, each student is allocated a supervisor, who will guide you in your research and writing for this module. We also offer pre-sessional induction courses covering topics such as probability, microeconomics and the Stata software.

Assessment

For each taught module in the Department of Economics, you are assessed through a combination of coursework and one final examination. For most modules the coursework contributes 30% of the overall mark and the examination contributes 70%. The nature of the coursework which the lecturer assigns varies according to the module, for example essays, presentations or computer-based data analysis and calculations. Modules taught in the Department of International Politics are usually assessed solely by coursework.

Overall assessment is based on your performance in the taught modules and a dissertation or literature survey. Students require 180 credits to pass the MSc. The weighting of each module within the overall mark is determined by the credit value assigned to that module.

Modules

You will complete 180 credits. This includes taught modules worth 120 credits plus 60 credits through either of the below paths.
-Literature Survey: two extra elective taught modules of 15 credits each and a Literature Survey worth 30 credits
-Dissertation: a 60 credit Economics Research Project.

Each module typically has a weekly two-hour lecture and a one-hour tutorial, but this may vary.

Note: It is not possible to give exact hours per week because these can vary from one term to the other, depending on which electives you choose.

Dissertation Path
Core modules
-The Economics of Micro-Finance (15 credits)
-Development Economics (15 credits)
-Microeconomic Theory (30 credits)
-Econometrics (30 credits)
-Dissertation (60 credits)
Elective modules
-Asset Pricing (15 credits)
-Macroeconomics (15 credits)

Literature Survey Path
Core modules
-The Economics of Micro-Finance (15 credits)
-Development Economics (15 credits)
-Microeconomic Analysis (30 credits)
-Quantitative Methods (30 credits)
-Literature Survey (30 credits)
Elective modules
-Welfare Economics (15 credits)

Elective modules for both paths
-International Macroeconomics (15 credits)
-Economics of Regulation and Competition (15 credits)
-Health Economics (15 credits)
-History of Economic Thought (15 credits)
-Corporate Finance (15 credits)
-Experimental Economics and Game Theory (15 credits)
-Development and World Politics (15 credits)*
-Political Economy of Global Finance (15 credits)*
-The Politics of Forced Migration (15 credits)*

*Students on the Dissertation Path can take only 1 of these modules, which are taught in the Department of International Politics. Students on the Literature Survey Path can take up to 2 of these modules.

Career prospects

Upon completion of this course you will have the skills to work in:
-Consulting firms specialising in development.
-Governmental bodies such as the Department for International Development (DFID).
-Major international financial and development institutions such as World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, the United Nations or the Overseas Development Institute, which regularly recruits MSc graduates for overseas postings.

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The MSc is designed to meet the demand for health economics’ quantitative, theoretical and analytical skills for decision-making in the healthcare sector, both in developed and in developing countries. Read more
The MSc is designed to meet the demand for health economics’ quantitative, theoretical and analytical skills for decision-making in the healthcare sector, both in developed and in developing countries.

Who is it for?

This course is designed for anyone with an economics background interested in developing a career as a health economist working for the public and private sectors, as well as international health organisations and NGOs.

Objectives

The aim of this course is to develop your analytical and modeling abilities and enable you to apply microeconomics and econometrics tools to understand the health care sector and the demand for health. This course will provide you with the experience and the skills you need to work as a health economists in private or public of institutions doing health economics.

Placements

Companies and organisations are invited to meet our students and propose subjects for their dissertation to be done during a placement. Organisations and students liaise directly with the approval of the academic supervisor.

Placements can be for instance with: Boehringer-I, Janssen –Cilag, Eli Lilly, Campbell Aliance, Office of Health Economics, Otsuka, Celgene, Curo, IMS Health, and many others.

Placements provide a unique opportunity to apply the skills learned during the MSc and acquire experience in the workplace.

Academic facilities

You will benefit from state of the art student-geared facilities, including a bright new gym and meeting points. Most importantly, you will benefit from City’s central London location.

Teaching and learning

The course is taught by research active academic staff, teaching assistants and industry and visiting lecturers.

We also have invited speakers that come to present specialised topics in health economics.

Assessments are typically a combination of unseen written examinations (70% for each module) and coursework (30% for each module) but this can vary by module. About two thirds of our students secure a placement at a firm. The placement is used to learn about the sector while writing the dissertation.

Assessment

The teaching takes place over two terms, from September to June. Full time: 20 weeks of lectures plus dissertation/literature review and examination periods over one year. Full-time students who pass all the taught modules during the main exam sessions will finish the programme at the end of September, when they submit their literature review/dissertation. Full-time students who successfully complete the taught modules in the August re-sit exam session will submit their literature review/dissertation in December.

Part time: 20 weeks of lectures plus dissertation/literature review and examination periods spread over one year and 3 months. Part-time students complete all modules over the course of four terms, from September to June, before undertaking their literature review/dissertation. Part-time students who successfully pass all the taught modules during the main exam sessions will finish the programme in December when they submit their literature review/dissertation. Part-time students who successfully pass all the taught modules in August will submit in March of the following year.

Modules

The teaching takes place over two terms from September to June. Full-time students who pass all the taught modules during the main exam sessions finish the programme at the end of September when they submit their dissertation or literature review. Full-time students who successfully complete the taught modules in the August resit exam session submit their dissertation or literature review in December.

Note: for part-time students, the modules are taught on weekdays during the daytime, alongside the students who are studying on the full-time Master’s programme. Please contact us for further details.

We are introducing a revised programme structure for students who join from September 2016. You will take three core modules, then subsequent modules are tailored to your chosen pathway.

Core modules for all students
-Economic Evaluation (15 credits)
-Advanced Economic Evaluation (15 credits)
-Health Economics (15 credits)

Core modules for the dissertation path
-Microeconomic Theory (30 credits)
-Econometrics (30 credits)
-Economics Research Project (60 credits)

Core modules for the literature survey path
-Microeconomic Analysis (30 credits)
-Quantitative Methods Health (30 credits)
-Economics Literature Survey (30 credits)

Elective Modules - on the Dissertation route you will take one elective, on the literature survey route you will take three.
-Health Economics
-Economic Evaluation Workshops (15 credits)
-Welfare Economics (15 credits)
-Epidemiology (15 credits)
-Development Economics (15 credits)
-Economics of Regulation and Competition (15 credits)
-The Economics of Micro-Finance (15 credits)
-Experimental Economics and Game Theory (15 credits)
-History of Economic Thought (15 credits)

Career prospects

This MSc prepares you for career opportunities in economic consultancies, think-tanks, the pharmaceutical industry, professional associations, governmental bodies and non-governmental organisations.

It also prepares you for a PhD in health economics, or teaching and research positions in academic institutions.

Examples: Abacus International, NICE, Optum, IMS Health, Research International, NHS, Kovis, Eli-Lilly, OHE, United Nations, Fidelity, Oxford Outcomes, Gallaher, Johnson&Johnson, Novo Nordisk, Synovate, Tomtah, as well as PhDs at UCL, York, City University London and Warwick.

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The course is designed to give students a thorough background in the latest advances in theoretical, applied and empirical economics. Read more
The course is designed to give students a thorough background in the latest advances in theoretical, applied and empirical economics.

Who is it for?

This course is designed for anyone who wants to undertake rigorous training in modern economics either immediately after completion of an undergraduate degree or as a mid-career professional. Students have the option of studying full time over the course of one year or part time over the course of two.

Objectives

The aim of this course is to develop your critical and analytical abilities in economics and to prepare you academically for a career as a professional economist. The dissertation track also serves as a stepping stone to an Economics PhD.

By the time you graduate, you should be able to:
-Demonstrate knowledge of modern economic theory, at both a micro and a macro level.
-Analyse the strengths and weaknesses of the relevant empirical and theoretical research methodology.
-Demonstrate knowledge of econometric theory and techniques.
-Critically interpret current research in a combination of fields offered, namely, behavioural and experimental economics, financial economics, health economics, macroeconomics, regulation and competition, and development.
-The dissertation track also serves as a stepping stone to an Economics PhD.

Academic facilities

You will benefit from City's London location and our proximity to, and connections with, the City of London. We are minutes away from the Square Mile - London's world-famous financial district - and the headquarters of financial and professional institutions.

Teaching and learning

The teaching takes place over 2 terms from September to June. Full-time students who pass all the taught modules during the main exam sessions finish the programme at the end of September when they submit their dissertation or literature review.

Full-time students who successfully complete the taught modules in the August resit exam session submit their dissertation or literature review in December.

Part-time students complete their modules over the course of four terms from September to June before undertaking their dissertation or literature review.

Course is taught by research active academic staff. Assessments are a combination of unseen written examinations (70% for each module) and coursework (30% for each module).

Modules

You will take 120 credits taught modules and have to accrue 60 extra credits through one of the following routes:
-Literature Survey: two extra elective taught module of 15 credits and a literature review (Economics Literature Survey) worth 30 credits;
-Dissertation: a 60 credit Economics Research Project.

In the dissertation route, you take four core modules and two elective modules. In the literature survey path, you take three core modules and five elective modules.

It is not possible to give exact hours per week because these can vary from one term to the other depending on which electives the students choose.

Dissertation route modules
Core modules
-International Macroeconomics (15 credits)
-Microeconomic Theory (30 credits)
-Econometrics (30 credits)
-Macroeconomics (15 credits)
Elective modules
-Macroeconomics (15 credits)
-Financial Derivatives (15 credits)
-Asset Pricing (15 credits)
-Corporate Investment under Uncertainty** (15 credits)

**cannot be chosen if ECM157 Development Economics is chosen.

Literature survey route modules
Core modules
-International Macroeconomics (15 credits)
-Microeconomic Analysis (30 credits)
-Quantitative Methods (30 credits)

Elective modules
-Macroeconomics (15 credits)
-Corporate Finance (15 credits)
-Welfare Economics* (15 credits)

*available subject to timetabling feasibility.

Career prospects

On completing the Masters in Economics course you will have a range of employment possibilities, to some extent determined by the electives you choose.

For example, if you choose two financial economics electives, one from health economics and the fourth from economic regulation and competition, you may work in the financial industry as a consultant, or in the health industry as a financial analyst, or in any industry that requires a financial or industry analyst.

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The course is designed to give you a thorough background in the latest advances in theoretical and mathematical financial economics. Read more
The course is designed to give you a thorough background in the latest advances in theoretical and mathematical financial economics.

Who is it for?

This course is designed for anyone who wants to undertake rigorous training in financial economics and mathematics, either immediately after completion of an undergraduate degree or as a mid-career professional.

You have the option of studying full-time over the course of one year or part-time over the course of two.

Objectives

The aim of this course is to develop your critical and analytical abilities in mathematics and economics and to prepare you academically for a career as a financial economist or quantitative analyst.

The dissertation track also serves as a stepping stone to an Economics or Finance PhD.

Teaching and learning

The Financial Economics MSc course is delivered through a flexible combination of lectures, seminars and computer lab sessions. Lectures introduce you to the key theories, concepts and economic models. In seminars you have the opportunity to solve applied problems, analyse case studies and make presentations of research published in leading academic journals.

The computer labs provide you with practical experience of using computer software to perform calculations and conduct realistic simulations. In addition, econometric methods are taught in lab sessions, so you have the opportunity to apply econometric software to empirical research and financial market estimations.

When appropriate, "practitioner slots" - such as research seminars conducted by external financial experts, presentations by invited academics etc. - will be incorporated into module delivery.

We also offer pre-sessional induction courses on economic analysis for students who need to build up their background in the fundamental aspects of financial economics.

Teaching takes place over two terms, from September to June. Full-time students who pass all the taught modules during the main exam sessions finish the programme at the end of September when they submit their dissertation or literature review. Full-time students who successfully complete the taught modules in the August resit exam session submit their dissertation or literature review in December.

Part-time students complete there modules over the course of four terms from September to June before undertaking their dissertation or literature review.

Assessment

Assessments are a combination of unseen written examinations (70% for each module) and coursework (30% for each module).

Modules

You will take two 30 credit taught modules, four 15 credit taught modules and will accrue 60 extra credits through one of the following routes:
-Literature survey: two extra elective taught modules of 15 credits each and a literature survey (Economics Literature Survey) worth 30 credits
-Dissertation: a 60 credit dissertation (Economics Research Project).

Note: It is not possible to give exact hours per week because these can vary from one term to the other depending on which electives the students choose.

Dissertation route modules
Core modules:
-Financial Markets (30 credits)
-Econometrics (30 credits)
-Economics Research project (60 credits)

Literature survey route modules
Core modules:
-Financial Markets (30 credits)
-Quantitative Methods (30 credits)
-Economics Literature Survey (30 credits)

Elective modules:
-Economics of Regulation and Competition (15 credits)
-The Economics of Micro-Finance (15 credits)
-Economics and Business Strategy (15 credits)

Electives
On the dissertation route you will choose two modules from group one and one module from group two. On the literature survey route you will choose two modules from group one, two modules from group two and two further electives from either group or from the route specific electives.
Group one
-Financial Derivatives (15 credits)
-Asset Pricing (15 credits)
-Corporate Finance (15 credits)

Group two
-Quantitative Finance with Matlab (15 credits)
-International Macroeconomics (15 credits)
-Corporate |nvestment under Uncertainty (15 credits)

Career prospects

On completing the Masters in Financial Economics course you will have a range of employment possibilities, to some extent determined by the electives you choose.

For example, you may work in the financial industry as a consultant, banker, quantitative analyst, or in the health industry as a financial analyst, or in any industry that requires a financial or industry analyst.

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Discover the real-world career opportunities in the energy sector with this MSc in Energy and Environmental Technology and Economics. Read more
Discover the real-world career opportunities in the energy sector with this MSc in Energy and Environmental Technology and Economics.

Who is it for?

Wherever you are, energy has an implication. This course is for students who want to engage with different types of settings to research and establish the energy, environmental and technological implications that exist within them. Energy and Environmental Technology and Economics students will care for the environment as a sustainable system and ultimately have a desire to improve conditions for the wider population.

Students come from a range of backgrounds including engineering, finance and economics – and from within the energy industry itself.

Objectives

This Masters degree has been designed to give you a wide perspective when it comes to analysing and forecasting the future for energy, environmental technology and economics. We engage with the industry so you gain a real-world understanding of the problems that exist, and we consider our own ethical responsibilities in relation to energy use.

Imagine a Grade 1-listed building such as the Guildhall in London. As an energy consultant your task is to analyse the site to make it more efficient. But there is a caveat: you cannot make any structural changes to the walls or the windows. The MSc Energy and Environmental Technology and Economics course gives you the tools to examine and address these kinds of challenges.

The MSc Energy and Environmental Technology and Economics course is not about learning academic theories. Instead we focus on the breadth of the subject in the real world. By engaging with practising businesses and trade associations we identify a range of perspectives, and look at the influence of a myriad of other forces at play, from regulation and government funding, to behavioural psychology and emerging technologies. Here are some of the questions the course poses:
-Does this new form of technology operate as it should?
-How does the UK relate to other European countries when it comes to energy efficiency?
-How does organisational psychology affect energy use within a company?
-How do you decide which energy contract to choose?
-What is the impact of a consumer society on personal energy use?

Placements

There is no formal requirement to do an industry-based placement as part of the programme. However, some students arrange to undertake their dissertation research within a company or within their part of the world. A recent student investigated the future of coal-fired generation in Turkey, and another student is combining a work placement at The World Energy Council with their dissertation.

Academic facilities

As part of the University of London you can become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

Teaching and learning

Teaching is organised into modules comprising four consecutive day courses taken at a rate of one a month or so. This format makes the programme accessible for students who want to study part time while working.

Full-time students are also welcome. Whether you choose to take the course as a part-time or full-time student, we will offer a great deal of support when it comes to helping you prepare for the modules and project work. You will be expected to devote a significant part of your non-taught hours to project work as well as private study.

Our course is led by an exceptional group of experts in energy, supply, demand management and policies. As an example, one of our module leaders leads the UK contribution to writing international energy management standards and informing policy through the European Sector Forum for Energy Management. This forum looks at methodologies across the continent. There is also input to global standards development through the International Standards Organisation (ISO). At City we bring on board people with well-established academic careers as well as leaders from the energy industry. The programme has strong links with industry and commerce and involves many visiting lecturers who hold senior positions in their fields.

The Energy and Environmental Technology and Economics MSc gives you the opportunity to consider the role of International Energy Management Standards. You will explore the opportunities these standards provide for global service users and providers in relation to reducing energy costs and the environmental impact of energy use.

You will discover the range of current European and International Standards, explore why they are needed and how they are developed, and examine the benefits they deliver through case studies.

The UK has had a leading role in developing these standards in terms of both their writing and implementation. For example the Energy Audit standard, which forms part of the EU Energy Efficiency Directive, Article 8, mandates audits for private sector, non-SME organisations. In the UK this has been implemented as the Energy Savings Opportunities Scheme (ESOS).

Modules

Each course module is taught over four consecutive days of teaching with one module each month. Alongside the teaching you will have coursework to complete for each module. The modules run from October to April, and in the remaining time, you will concentrate on your dissertation, which forms a significant part of the programme.

The dissertation gives you the opportunity to create your own questions and to decide on your own area of interest. It should be a detailed investigation into a subject on energy supply and/or demand, with your own analysis and conclusions outlining the way forward. You may see the focus of your dissertation as a future career path, but whatever your area of study, these final few months of the degree should embody your vision of the future.

You will take four core modules and have six elective modules from which you can choose four topics from diverse subjects relating to energy supply and demand. These include energy in industry and the built environment, renewables, energy markets from the purchaser’s perspective and water supply and management. The latter has close parallels, and directly engages, with energy. You start the course with an introduction to energy and environmental issues and energy policies and economic dimensions in the first term, but you do not need to follow the course in any particular order from this point onwards.

If you are interested in sustainability, you have the option of taking up to two elective modules from the MSc in Environmental Strategy offered by the University of Surrey.

Completing eight modules and four examinations and four modular assessments will lead to a Postgraduate Diploma. Completing four core and four elective modules and a dissertation will lead to a Masters degree. If you are interested in this course may also be interested in the MSc Renewable Energy and Power Systems Management.

Core modules
-Introduction to energy and environmental issues (15 credits)
-Energy policies and economic dimensions (15 credits)
-The energy market from the purchaser's perspective (15 credits)
-Corporate energy management (15 credits)

Elective modules
-Energy, consumer goods and the home (15 credits)
-Transport energy and emissions (15 credits)
-Energy in industry and the built environment (15 credits)
-Renewable energy and sustainability (15 credits)
-Risk management (15 credits)
-Water supply and management (15 credits)

Career prospects

The story of energy is now part of public debate and climate change drives the international agenda. In the UK, there are additional energy supply issues, through the decline of existing nuclear capacity, growing imports of fossil fuels and challenging medium-term targets for renewables and low carbon supply.

Our priority is to make you employable in a range of sectors in which effective energy supply and demand side management has become an important consideration.

You will graduate with economic and market-based skills relevant to complying with relevant legislation and technical and engineering skills related to energy generation and management.

With strong industry links and working level experience from our exceptional team of expert lecturers, as well as the diverse modules on offer, you will be equipped to become a leader and entrepreneur in your chosen area of specialisation within the realm of energy management, supply or policy making.

Our graduates have gone on to hold high-ranking positions as energy consultants, data analysts and directors of corporate sustainability working within organisations including:
-AK Home Energy
-Enelco Environmental Technology
-Energy Institute
-Equinoxe Services Ltd
-Log Tech Consultancy
-Ofgem
-Peckham Power
-RWE NPower Renewables
-SCFG

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The MSc is designed to meet the demand for health economics’ quantitative and analytical skills for decision-making in the healthcare sector, both in developed and in developing countries. Read more
The MSc is designed to meet the demand for health economics’ quantitative and analytical skills for decision-making in the healthcare sector, both in developed and in developing countries.

Who is it for?

This course is designed for anyone with a quantitative background interested in developing a career as a health economist working for the public or private sector. Typical backgrounds of students comprise medical sciences, economics, pharmacy, biology and other.

This course will enable you to change the direction of your professional career towards health economics.

Objectives

The aim of this course is to develop you’re your analytical and modeling abilities, as well as to provide you with the background and theoretical foundations of health economics. This course will provide you with the experience and the skills you need to work as a health economists in a pharmaceutical company; and in private or public of institutions.

Placements

Companies and organisations are invited to meet students and propose subjects for their dissertation to be done during a placement. Organisations and students liaise directly with the approval of the academic supervisor. Placements can be for instance with Boehringer-I, Janssen –Cilag, Eli Lilly, Campbell Aliance, Office of Health Economics, Otsuka, Celgene, Curo, IMS Health, and many others.

Placements provide a unique opportunity to apply the skills learned during the MSc and acquire experience in the workplace.

Academic facilities

You will benefit from state of the art student-geared facilities, including a bright new gym and meeting points. Most importantly, you will benefit from City’s central London location.

Teaching and learning

The course is taught by research active academic staff, teaching assistants and industry and visiting lecturers.

We also have invited speakers that come to present specialised topics in health economics. Assessments are typically a combination of unseen written examinations (70% for each module) and coursework (30% for each module) but this can vary by module.

About two thirds of our students secure a placement at a firm. The placement is used to learn about the sector while writing the dissertation

Full and part time assessment
The teaching takes place over two terms, from September to June. Full time: 20 weeks of lectures plus dissertation and examination periods over one year. Full-time students who pass all the taught modules during the main exam sessions will finish the programme at the end of September, when they submit their dissertation. Full-time students who successfully complete the taught modules in the August re-sit exam session will submit their dissertation in December.

Part time: 20 weeks of lectures plus dissertation and examination periods spread over one year and 3 months. Part-time students complete all modules over the course of four terms, from September to June, before undertaking their dissertation. Part-time students who successfully pass all the taught modules during the main exam sessions will finish the programme in December, when they submit their dissertation. Part-time students who successfully pass all the taught modules in August submit in March of the following year.

Modules

You will complete 180 credits. This includes modules worth 120 credits: one module worth 30 credits and six modules worth 15 credits. The research project is worth 60 credits.

Each module typically has a weekly two-hour lecture and a one-hour tutorial, but this may vary. This course is taught on Thursdays and Fridays only. A full-time student can expect to spend all Thursday and all Friday at City, for 10 or 11 weeks in the Autumn term and the Spring term.

Note: It is not possible to give exact hours per week because these can vary from one term to the other, depending on which electives you choose.

Part one: route core module
-Quantitative methods (Health) (30 credits)
-Advanced Economic Evaluation in Health Care (15 credits)
-Economic evaluation (15 credits)
-Economic evaluation workshops (15 credits)
-Welfare economics (15 credits)
-Epidemiology (15 credits)
-Health Economics (15 credits)

Part two: route core module
-Economics research project (60 credits)

Career prospects

This MSc prepares you for career opportunities in economic consultancies, think-tanks, the pharmaceutical industry, professional associations, governmental bodies and non-governmental organisations and teaching and research positions in academic institutions.

Examples: Abacus International, NICE, Optum, IMS Health, Research International, NHS, Kovis, Eli-Lilly, OHE, United Nations, Fidelity, Oxford Outcomes, Gallaher, Johnson&Johnson, Novo Nordisk, Synovate, Tomtah, as well as PhDs at UCL, York, City, University of London and Warwick.

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This advanced specialist degree provides a cutting-edge perspective of economic and financial dynamics, state strategies, and questions of global order and change. Read more
This advanced specialist degree provides a cutting-edge perspective of economic and financial dynamics, state strategies, and questions of global order and change.

Who is it for?

The MA in Global Political Economy caters specifically to students who wish to broaden their understanding of the complex contemporary global economic system and the socio-political relationships contained therein. Often students begin this course with no formal economics education and from a wide range of subject fields, including politics, law, business studies, media studies and the humanities, among others.

Objectives

The MA in Global Political Economy (GPE) at City, University of London enables students to critically evaluate complex relationships between markets, governments, transnational actors and networks in the context of a globalising world economy. The course is tailored to students who wish to acquire a range of analytical skills and specialist knowledge of the global economic system in the 21st century.

This advanced specialist MA gives you the tools to analyse the complex and changing roles of private markets, states, institutions and transnational forces and actors in the global capitalist system. It enables students to gain an advanced understanding of the means and processes through which actors, institutions and structures of the global political economy participate in economic and political life.

By the end of the course, you will have developed an in-depth understanding of the ways the global economy works and will have learned to address and analyse critical issues facing global business leaders as well as national and international policymakers.

Teaching and learning

The MA in Global Political Economy is taught by internationally renowned and world leading scholars in the field. This includes Ronan Palan, Anastasia Nesvetailova, Stefano Pagliari, Amin Samman, Sandy Brian Hager and Nick Srnicek amongst others.

Academic staff

The staff within our Department of International Politics are research active, enthusiastic and passionate about their work. Often this research and influence leads to policy change and many media appearances.

Student activities

In many modules students are encouraged to give presentations. We use group discussions, brain-storming, role-play and mini-roundtables on thematic issues in addition to conventional teaching techniques.

As MA student you are also invited to attend PhD workshops organised by doctoral students in the Department. The dissertation in MA in Global Political Economy is grounded in a specialised stream of the Research Design module (IPM111), where GPE students receive specialised training in research methodology tailored for their dissertation in the field of global political economy.

Assessment

All modules are assessed through a written essay of 4,500 words. In addition to coursework, you must complete a final MA dissertation of 15,000 words based on your independent research. The dissertation is worth one-third of the overall MA mark.

Modules

City's MA in Global Political Economy provides you with analytical skills and conceptual knowledge of key debates around the role of states and societies, companies and markets, global finance and international organisations in shaping globalisation in the 21st century.

The Global Political Economy Masters course focuses on contemporary issues and processes in global political economy in the context of the broader changes associated with 'globalisation,' change, crises and global governance. You will consider and become part of the conceptual and policy debates around issues such as:
-Economic growth and financial crises.
-International competition and economic diplomacy.
-Development, growth and inequality.
-States, international institutions and governance.
-The rise of new economic powers.
-Migration and cultural identity.

Core modules
-Global political economy: contemporary approaches (30 credits)
-Global capitalism: past, present, future (30 credits)
-GPE dissertation (60 credits)

Elective modules - choose 60 credits
Typical modules offered by the Department of International Politics:
-Understanding Security in the Twenty-First Century (15 credits)
-Development and World Politics (15 credits)
-Political Economy of Global Finance (15 credits)
-The Politics of Forced Migration (15 credits)
-Global Governance (15 credits)
-International Politics and the Middle East (15 credits)
-Global Financial Governance (15 credits)
-Strategy, Diplomacy and Decision-Making (30 credits)
-Economic Diplomacy (15 credits)
-Foreign Policy Analysis (15 credits)
-Religion in Global Politics (15 credits)

Typical modules offered by The City Law School:
-International Law and the Global Economy (30 credits)
-International Tax Law (30 credits)
-International Trade Law(30 credits)
-Money Laundering Law (30 credits)
-International Investment Law (30 credits)
-International Banking Law (30 credits)

In Term 3 you will complete your dissertation project.

Career prospects

This is a specialised degree enabling graduates who are often non-economists to engage competently and confidently with economic and financial developments and pursue professional careers in the public and the private sectors, including finance and banking, transnational corporations, civil service and international diplomacy, the media and development agencies.

In addition, graduates of this MA may continue their education into doctoral programmes.

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Explore the legal foundations of the global economy with the in depth study of the effect of trade, investment and competition on international business. Read more
Explore the legal foundations of the global economy with the in depth study of the effect of trade, investment and competition on international business.

Who is it for?

The LLM in International Economic Law is ideally suited to law students seeking to deepen their legal knowledge of the regulatory environment underpinning the global economy. It will also be attractive to legal practitioners who wish to expand their expertise or to change directions in their career. This qualification should assist lawyers at all stages and from all backgrounds in cultivating an international dimension to their existing knowledge-based and professional portfolio.

Objectives

The LLM in International Economic Law focuses on the international laws which underpin the broad functioning of the global economy across a range of legal fields. It consists of classic modules on World Trade Law and International Investment Law as well subjects such as International Tax, Competition and Energy Law.

The demand for graduates in this specialist field is growing rapidly along with the increasing global integration of regulation of economic activity as seen in the rise in free trade agreements, investment treaties and international energy agreements.

Academic facilities

As a City Law School student you will benefit from everything the institution has to offer including the Learning Success department and Lawbore, an online resource designed to help you find the information you need for the course modules. All course modules have online depositories through Moodle. As part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

You will benefit from City, University of London’s extensive library of hard copy and electronic resources, including its comprehensive database of domestic and international caselaw, legislation, treaties and legal periodicals. There are two law-specific libraries – one at the Gray’s Inn campus and one at our Northampton square campus - with individual study spaces and dedicated rooms for group work.

Additionally, we are a short walk away from the British Library and the Law Library of the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies.

Placements

Each year a small number of internships become available and you will be provided with information about such opportunities and how to apply during the year of your study.

Teaching and learning

This course is taught by leading academics as well as visiting practitioners including barristers and solicitors who work in private practice and in legal departments of major companies.

Assessment

All modules are structured as ten weekly two-hour seminars which comprise both lectures as well as interactive tutorials. All modules are supported by our online learning platform - Moodle. Assessment is by way of coursework which comprises 100% of the final mark in each module. Each module carries the same weight in terms of the overall qualification.

You will be allocated a dedicated supervisor for your dissertation who will help you develop a specific topic and provide support in terms of resources, content and structure.

Modules

As with all LLM specialisms at City, University of London, you may take either five modules and a shorter dissertation (10,000 words) or four modules and a longer dissertation (20,000 words). All modules are of the same duration and are taught per term (September – December or January – April) rather than the whole academic year. If you take four modules you will take two per term in each term and if you take five modules you will have three in one term and two in the other. Dissertations are written during the summer term when there are no classes.

In order to obtain this specialism, you must choose at least three modules from within this specialism and write your dissertation on a subject within the specialism.

Specialism modules - choose from the following 30-credit modules:
-World Trade Law
-Energy Law
-International Tax Law
-EU Tax Law
-International Law & The Global Economy
-European Business Regulation I
-European Business Regulation II
-Comparative Antitrust Law
-International Investment Law
-International Cartels
-International Intellectual Property Law
-Mergers

For your remaining modules you can choose from more than 50 modules covering a diverse range of subjects.

Career prospects

As a graduate of this specialist LLM you will be well placed to pursue careers in this area of law in private practice, in house in a legal practice, policy and government, non-governmental organisations, and a wide range of non-legal careers in trade, investment, and intellectual property.

The City Law School has a vibrant Pro Bono programme including our award-winning commercial law clinic for tech start-ups Start-Ed.

Students who complete the LLM may wish to continue their academic studies by enrolling in a PhD offered by The City Law School.

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