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Full Time Masters Degrees in Sociology, Durham, United Kingdom

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Sociology as a discipline encompasses the examination and analysis of all aspects of social life and social relations. This programme is designed to provide students with grounding in social research to enable them to develop sociological investigations of the social world. Read more
Sociology as a discipline encompasses the examination and analysis of all aspects of social life and social relations. This programme is designed to provide students with grounding in social research to enable them to develop sociological investigations of the social world.

Please note: this course is not a currently recognised pathway within the Doctoral Training Centre.

Course Structure

Core Modules

Students take a range of taught modules primarily in the first two terms of the academic year. Starting from the first term, students undertake a module on research design which enables students to develop a research proposal for their dissertation.

Typical modules outlined below are those that were available to students styuding this programme in previous years.

-Perspectives on Social Research (15 credits)
-Statistical Exploration and Reasoning (15 credits)
-Research Design and Process (15 credits)
-Qualitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)
-Quantitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)
-Contemporary Sociological Theory and Social Transformation (30 credits)
-Categorical Data Analysis with SPSS and R (15 credits)
-Dissertation (60 credits)

Academic learning is assessed through a range of summative essays, statistical/computer-based projects, research proposals, and a dissertation.

Learning and Teaching

These MA Research Methods programmes are full time, starting in early October and continuing over 12 months following university terms.

The main teaching methods include lectures, seminars, and computer practical sessions. Lectures introduce the key concepts, theories, current debates and other issues critical for understanding the topics. Seminars are opportunities for students to discuss any questions arising from the readings, to share experience of conducting research, to present their own work for comments. Modules that teach the use of computer software packages have practical sessions in computer rooms so that students can carry out hands-on exercises under supervision and further assistance

Modules are usually assessed through essays. Statistics modules may require students to complete specific analyses with more structured instructions. Some module conveners may allow students to submit formative assignments in order for students to obtain a sense of how well they understand the subject. Some modules’ assessment may contain a proportion of presentations and group projects.

Further academic supports are available. Students have the opportunities to learn from their dissertation supervisors at individual tutoring meetings, dissertation workshops, and forums. Every member of teaching staff has two hours of office hours each week, when students can come without having to make an appointment beforehand. Both the University and the School organize seminars by external speakers that are open to all students.

Students will have access to a variety of learning resources, including learning spaces in libraries and teaching rooms, readings and textbooks, computers, databases, etc.

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This degree is designed for high calibre graduates who intend to undertake research for a doctoral degree in Politics or International Relations and need to acquire all-round training in research methods and methodologies in the political and social sciences. Read more
This degree is designed for high calibre graduates who intend to undertake research for a doctoral degree in Politics or International Relations and need to acquire all-round training in research methods and methodologies in the political and social sciences. The object is to equip students with comprehension of basic principles of research design and strategy.

This MA programme is specifically focused to provide research training. It is assumed that students taking this MA do so with the intention of proceeding to a PhD. It has received official recognition from the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and eligible candidates can apply for (ESRC) (1+3) studentships. Anyone proposing to do this should apply as early as possible in order to meet the ESRC deadlines.

Student Profiles

“I choose the Research Methods Masters because it offered me the most diverse skillset. The programme has a strong interdisciplinary character and I chose modules offered by Psychology and Sociology schools as well as the School of Government. This diversity has given me a broader skillset than a more focused master’s degree. Moreover this master’s has given me the confidence and ability to consider a wider variety of career options than that offered by my single-honours history undergraduate degree. I fully recommend this course for anyone looking to enlarge their knowledge in research methods and especially when applied to the fields of politics and international relations.” Jack Ekinsmyth, 2015/16

“The MA Research Methods, by spanning across two departments, allowed me to experience more of Durham University. The course was challenging, but prepared me for transitioning to a PhD. It also helped me secure ESRC funding, as the course offers ESRC-recognised research training modules. Durham University, with its reputation and beautiful city setting, was an easy choice and I enjoyed my busy year there.” Alex, 2014/15

Course Content

This degree is offered in collaboration with other departments in the Faculty of Social Sciences and Health and is designed to provide a strong all-round training in research methods allied to further specialisation within the field of politics and international relations/studies. It is assumed that in taking this MA, you do so with the intention of proceeding to a PhD in Politics or International Relations. It has received official recognition from the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and eligible candidates can apply for (ESRC) (1+3) studentships. The programme includes compulsory elements in a wide variety of techniques including statistics and quantitative methods, but contains less subject-specific content than the other MA courses.

Core Modules:
-Perspectives on Social Research
-International Relations Theory

Optional Modules - Optional modules in previous years have included:
-Statistical Exploration and Reasoning
-Quantitative Research Methods in Social Science
-Applied Statistics
-Qualitative Research Methods in Social Science
-Fieldwork and Interpretation

Additional Optional Modules - Optional modules in previous years have included:
-European Institutions and the Policy Process
-The European Union as a Global Actor
-German Foreign Policy
-Collective Identities and Political Thought in Britain Since 1850
-Contemporary Socio-Political Issues in Muslim Religious Thought
-European Security
-International Relations and Security in the Middle East
-Issues in the Politics of Military Occupation
-Just War in Political Theory and Practice
-The Contemporary Politics of the Middle East
-The Political Economy of Development in the Middle East
-America and the World: The Making of US Foreign Policy
-Region, Nation and Citizen in SE Asia
-Political Economy and Development in Chinese Business
-Nationalism, Revolution and Reform in Contemporary China
-Human Rights
-Political Ideology
-Strategic Asia: Policy and Analysis
-Categorical Data Analysis with SPSS and R
-A module offered by the School of Modern Languages

Learning and Teaching

At the beginning of the academic year, students go through five-day induction events in which they are informed about University, the School, the MA/MSc programmes and the facilities available for their learning.

The 180 credits one-year MA degree programme is divided into one core and seven/eight optional modules. Furthermore, students have to submit a dissertation of 45 credits of not more than 12,000 words. Most of the modules are delivered during the first two terms and students spend the remaining time to write the dissertation.

Usually a module has 18 contact hours spread over 9 weeks and 132 hours of self-directed learning. The modules are mainly delivered through weekly 2 hours sessions which can either take the form of seminars or one hour of lecture and one hour of tutorial. The form in which seminars are conducted can differ from one module to another. Typically modules would have elements of lectures, discussions, and presentations from students—the extent of each of these components would differ from one module to another.

All modules have written exercise for formative assessments. Upon getting feedback on these assignments, students can meet their lecturers to discuss their marks before then eventually completing a summative assessment. Typically summative assessments are 3000 word essays but some modules may be assessed by examination. Students can also meet their module coordinators during their weekly contact hours or by making an appointment. When students are working on their dissertations during the later half of the year, they meet their assigned supervisors for a minimum of 6 hours. Students also have access to the academic advisors whenever there is a need.

SGIA has a wide variety of resources available to students such as: computer room/work room with networked PC’s, printing facilities including scanner and photocopier, audio system, Wi-Fi and a relaxation area with satellite television system.

SGIA conducts weekly seminars and organises lectures and conferences which all postgraduate students can attend. These events provide students the opportunity to engage with, and debate, the most important issues in current political and international studies.

Towards the end of the programme students can contact the Careers Office of the University to get advice on available job prospects and get assistance on applying for these.

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This programme critically addresses a range of key issues and debates relating to crime and the criminal justice system. Students have the opportunity to develop in-depth understanding of crime, deviance and criminal justice from critical theoretical, policy, legal, political and practical perspectives. Read more
This programme critically addresses a range of key issues and debates relating to crime and the criminal justice system. Students have the opportunity to develop in-depth understanding of crime, deviance and criminal justice from critical theoretical, policy, legal, political and practical perspectives. Addressing issues of historical and contemporary concern such as terrorism, prostitution, legal and illegal drugs, crime in the night time economy, forced migration, gender and crime, domestic violence, crime prevention, punishment, policing, youth crime and justice, law enforcement and the use of new technologies. Students study issues of theoretical and social importance with lecturers who are international experts in their fields.

Course Structure

Students take a range of taught modules primarily in the first two terms of the academic year. Students also undertake a module on research design which enables students to develop a research proposal for their dissertation.

Core Modules:
Theorising Crime and Criminal Justice (30 credits)
-Apply theories of crime and justice to topical issues
-Theory and practice of criminal justice
-Analysis of contemporary politics
-Governance of criminal justice

Perspectives on Social Research (15 credits)
-Introduction to social scientific research
-Establishing cause and interpreting meaning in social sciences
-Essentials of quantitative and qualitative research in social science research

Research Design and Progress (15 credits)
-Formulating research questions
-Ethical review procedures
-Research proposal design, evaluation, and development
-Conversational analysis in practice
-Qualitative interviewing.

Dissertation (60 credits)
-A dissertation of up to 15,000 words.

Optional Modules:
Typical modules outlined below are those that were available to students styuding this programme in previous years. Choose modules to the value of 60 credits, listed below (60 credits)
-Gender, Violence and Abuse (30 credits)
-Drugs, Crime and Society (30 credits)
-Crime, Justice and the Sex Industry (30 credits)
-Cybercrime and cybersecurity: (30 credits)
-Sociology of Forensic Science (30 credits)
-Statistical Exploration and Reasoning (15 credits)
-Qualitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)
-Quantitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)

You will also have the opportunity to take a range of modules from other programmes within the Faculty such as those associated with the MSc in Risk and Security.

Learning and Teaching

The MSc Criminology and Criminal Justice is a 1 year full-time programme which may also be taken part-time. The programme’s core consists of a 60 credit dissertation module, one 30 credit module on Criminological Theory, one 15 credit module on Theories of Social Research and one 15 credit module on Research Design. Students are also required to undertake 60 further credits of modules from within SASS or other related departments which may be taught in a variety of ways.

Core teaching on the programme falls primarily within the two 10 week terms, the second of which commences one week prior to the Undergraduate Term. Depending on module choice students may receive between 6 and 8 hours of tuition per week in either or both of these terms.

The programme is taught according to a variety of approaches. Modules such as ‘Theorising Crime and Criminal Justice’ operate a standard 2 hour session within which lecturing, seminar discussion, workshops or presentations may take place. Modules such as ‘Perspectives on Social Research’, ‘Quantitative Methods’ and ‘Qualitative Methods’ operate a weekly lecture series followed by seminar discussion. Other modules such as ‘Statistical Exploration and Reasoning’ operate computer-based practicals.

Following completion of teaching in terms 1 and 2, the ‘Research Design’ module allows for 4 day long workshops. Reflecting on the process of research design, the module supports the student in formulating the research question for their dissertation.

The MSc programme is research-led at its core. The compulsory module 'Theorising Crime and Criminal Justice' links explicitly with the research activities of the criminology staff; the module ‘Crime Violence and Abuse’ links with the current research activities of the School’s research group of the same name; and ‘Drugs, Crime and Society’ is taught by an internationally renowned expert in the field . Students subsequently undertake a 60 credit dissertation on a topic of their choice supervised by staff who are actively researching in a relevant area. While this module is intended to afford an opportunity for a significant piece of independent and original research, it includes up to four hours of regular supervision which takes place typically from the end of term 2. Students will also participate in two one-hour workshops convened by a supervisor and usually alongside others researching in similar areas.

While teaching is intensive, particularly in terms 1 and 2, it is intended that the programme presents options for part-time study. Consequently, teaching is undertaken where possible in timetable slots which take place late in the afternoon.

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Durham University Department of History
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Durham's MA in Social and Economic History at Durham provides training in research methods for historical topics in any aspect of social and economic history. Read more
Durham's MA in Social and Economic History at Durham provides training in research methods for historical topics in any aspect of social and economic history. The MA provides quantitative and qualitative research methods appropriate to a wide range of historical approaches. Accredited by the ESRC, this MA is part of our four year funding scheme offered by the North-East Doctoral Training Centre. Students can apply for 1+3 funding for this MA followed by a PhD in any aspect of social and economic history with expert supervision available within the Department – and with our partner institution in the NEDTC at Newcastle University. This includes African history, and aspects of governance, as well as traditional social and economic topics. For further information on funding see further below.

The MA programme is shared with the School of Applied Social Science and will help you to build an awareness of the contemporary boundaries of social and economic history and to master advanced understanding of the concepts and methods with which it may be interrogated. It seeks to equip you with a diverse portfolio of research techniques and approaches to enable you to undertake extended independent research in your dissertation, and to make your own contribution to the field. The skills provided by this MA are also transferrable to a wide range of careers.

Durham has a long tradition of economic and social history, on which this MA draws. The breadth of possible subjects for study mirrors the comprehensive and global nature of the department staff: from medieval Europe to modern-day Africa, and from north-east England to the global economy. Durham's History Department is situated in the historic setting of the World Heritage Site, which includes Durham Cathedral and Durham Castle. Students of social and economic history at Durham benefit from the rich archival and manuscript resources in the collections of the University (at Palace Green Library - especially the Sudan Archive - and Ushaw College) and in the Cathedral Library, while the wider regional resources for study of the period are also highly significant: the landscape of industrial revolution and of post-industrial response, of globalisation and regional identity.

Course Structure

The MA in Social and Economic History is a one-year full-time programme (or two-years part-time). All students are allocated a supervisor at the beginning of the first term, and s/he guides each student through the year.

Students take 30 credits of core modules from History: Archives and Sources (15 credits), and Critical Practice (15 credits); and 30 credits of core modules from the School of Applied Social Sciences: Perspectives on Social Research (15 credits) AND EITHER Qualitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits) OR Fieldwork and Interpretation (15 credits). They write a 60-credit dissertation (15,000 words) supervised by a member of academic staff in the History Department. They also choose a 30-credit optional module in History; AND 30 credits of optional modules from Social Sciences: EITHER Statistical Exploration and Reasoning (15 credits) and Quantitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits) OR Applied Stastics (30 credits).

The programme is structured as follows:
Michaelmas Term (October-December)
-Archives and Sources (15 credits)
-Perspectives on Social Research (15 credits)
-*Statistical Exploration and Reasoning (15 credits; OPTIONAL)
* Fieldwork and Interpretation (15 credits; OPTIONAL)
* Applied Statistics (30 credits; OPTIONAL; runs across Michaelmas and Epiphany Terms)

Epiphany Term (January-March)
-Critical Practice (15 credits)
-Option module (30 credits)
Option modules allow students the opportunity to learn about a particular topic or issue in medieval history in depth, and to consider different historical approaches to this topic over a full term's study. In previous years, options included: Power and Society in the Late Middle Ages; The Wealth of Nations; Race in Modern America; 'Tribe' and Nation in Africa since 1800; Tradition, Change and Political Culture in Modern Britain; Gender, Nationalism and Modernity in East Asia; History, Knowledge and Visual Culture (a full list of MA option modules is available at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/history/postgraduate/ma_degrees/optionalmodules/). Option modules are taught in weekly two-hour seminars for a full term's study.
-*Qualitative Research Methods (15 credits; OPTIONAL)
-*Quantitative Research Methods (15 credits; OPTIONAL)

Easter Term (April-June), and the summer vacation (until early September)
-Dissertation (60 credits)

The formal requirements and structure of the programme can be found at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/courses/info/?id=9202&title=Social+and+Economic+History+%28Research+Methods%29&code=V1KB07&type=MA&year=2016#coursecontent a full list of optional modules is available at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/history/postgraduate/ma_degrees/optionalmodules/

The MA can be taken part-time, over two years: please contact the Department if you are interested in exploring this option further.

Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered primarily through small group seminar teaching with some larger classes, and lecture-style sessions. Termly division of contact hours between terms depends on student choice. Archives and Sources has 8 contact hours, split between lectures, classes and seminars. Skills modules are taught through seminars or classes and are usually more contact-hour-intensive. Optional modules are taught in seminars and provide a total of 16 contact hours. Critical Practice involves lectures, a drama workshop, and oral presentation to a group (at a 'mini-conference'). Dissertation supervision involves 8 hours of directed supervision, individually with a dedicated supervisor. Social science modules are taught through lectures, seminars, workshops, and practical classes.

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Durham University Department of Anthropology
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This course is designed for students with an undergraduate degree in a subject other than anthropology who would like to prepare for research in socio-cultural anthropology or for a career requiring expertise in anthropology. Read more
This course is designed for students with an undergraduate degree in a subject other than anthropology who would like to prepare for research in socio-cultural anthropology or for a career requiring expertise in anthropology.

High profile social anthropologist researchers at Durham, with experience of conducting fieldwork all around the world, introduce students to both classical and contemporary writing and research in the discipline. There is equal emphasis on theoretical and methodological questions, and plenty of opportunity to apply this new knowledge to issues of pressing social concern.

The full-time course consists of two terms of teaching, during which students are introduced to the range of research questions and methods used in social or cultural anthropology, and a dissertation, involving the design, development and implementation of an independent research project. Students work closely with academic staff from our highly respected Social Anthropology Research Group [hyper link to https://www.dur.ac.uk/anthropology/research/socialanthropology/], receiving enhanced levels of support as part of the ‘conversion’ to anthropology, including fortnightly small group meetings with the programme tutor, and have the opportunity to become involved in active research projects.

Please see http://www.durham.ac.uk/anthropology/postgraduatestudy/taughtprogrammes/sociocultural for further information on modules.

Course Learning and Teaching
The programme is delivered through a mixture of interactive lectures, seminars and workshops, in addition to one-to-one dissertation supervision. Typically, lectures deliver key information on progressively more advanced themes and topics. Seminars provide an opportunity to reflect in more depth upon material delivered in lectures and gathered from independent study outside the programme’s formal contact hours. They give students an opportunity to engage with academic issues at the cutting-edge of research in Anthropology, in a learning environment focused on discussion and debate of current issues.

Full-time students have on average 6-8 hours of formal teaching and learning contact per week, and are also expected to attend weekly departmental and Social Anthropology Research Group research seminars, often given by prominent visiting speakers. Outside timetabled contact hours, students are also expected to devote significant amounts of time to reading, discussing and preparing for classes, assignments and project work

Throughout the programme, all students meet fortnightly with their degree tutor, who provides academic support and guidance. Furthermore, all members of teaching staff have weekly office hours when they are available to meet with students on a ‘drop-in’ basis. Students work closely with leading academics to develop an original piece of research for their dissertation, and guidance on the dissertation is also provided by the dissertation leader.

Before the academic year starts, we provide information on preparing for the course. On arrival we have induction sessions, including fieldtrips and social events, headed by the Director of Postgraduate Studies and the Degree Tutor for the MA ion Sociocultural Anthropology. Students also attend an “Introduction to Research Groups in Anthropology”,including the Social Anthropology Research Group.

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The MA in Geography (Research Methods) - or MARM - aims to give a broad training in social science research methodology as well as more specific training in the approaches and techniques used in human geography. Read more
The MA in Geography (Research Methods) - or MARM - aims to give a broad training in social science research methodology as well as more specific training in the approaches and techniques used in human geography. There is a balance between theory and practical application. The degree programme includes skills training and reflection on personal experience, and those students who are going on to MPhil/PhD work are encouraged to relate what they learn to their future research. Most of the teaching is in small groups and emphasises student engagement and discussion. The MARM is an ESRC recognised Masters training course and all modules are designed and delivered in line within the ESRC's requirements. All modules include formative and summative assessment. The teaching programme is delivered in Terms 1 and 2. From Easter onwards students work on their dissertation with the support of an allocated supervisor.

Course Structure

The MARM is composed of six core (compulsory) modules and a choice from three optional modules. The core modules total 150 credits and, in addition, students take 30 credits from the optional modules adding up to a total of 180 credits. The course is delivered by the Department of Geography, the Department of Anthropology, the Department of Psychology and the School of Applied Social Sciences (SASS).

Core Modules

-Philosophy and Theory in Contemporary Human Geography
-Research Frontiers in Human Geography
-Using Geographical Skills and Techniques
-Perspectives on Social Research
-Fieldwork and Interpretation: Qualitative Research Methods
-Dissertation

Optional Modules available in previous years include:

-Statistical Exploration and Reasoning
-Applied Statistics
-Quantitative Methods in Social Science

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Durham University Department of Anthropology
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*Why do energy efficiency measures often fail?. *How will we transition into a post-carbon energy system?. *Why do some energy technologies spread, while others disappear?. Read more
*Why do energy efficiency measures often fail?
*How will we transition into a post-carbon energy system?
*Why do some energy technologies spread, while others disappear?
*How can people be persuaded to change their energy habits?

The MSc in Energy and Society investigates energy systems from all angles. On this course you will look at energy in practice, what it means to make an energy transition, what we mean by energy justice, and how energy practices change.

The programme brings in leading experts in energy studies at Durham from Anthropology, Engineering, Economics, Law, Geography, Geosciences and many other departments. It is taught through intensive block-teaching, field-study, original dissertation research and a range of optional modules that complement the core teaching. You will learn about current and new energy technologies, histories of energy, how to understand energy policy, and how to study energy practices.

A broad range of optional subjects enables you to tailor the course according to your particular interests – you can take modules in law, international politics, advanced engineering, geography, risk, development or resilience, depending on your prior qualifications. In your fully supported personal research project you will deepen your expertise in your chosen area.

The full-time course consists of two terms of teaching, during which students are introduced to the range of research questions and methods, and a dissertation, involving the design, development and implementation of an independent research project. Students work closely with academic staff, and have the opportunity to become involved in active research projects.

Compulsory modules

-Dissertation
-Energy in Practice (Field Study)
-Context and Challenges in Energy
-Energy Society and Energy Practices

Optional modules from across the University and have previously included:

-Academic and Professional Skills in Anthropology
-Fieldwork and Interpretation
-Group Renewable Energy Design Project
-Key Issues in Sociocultural Theory
-Society, Energy, Environment and Resilience
-Computational Methods for Social Sciences
-Anthropology and Development
-Negotiating the Human
-Statistical Analysis in Anthropology
-Energy, Markets and Risk
-Renewable Energy and the Environment
-Risk Frontiers

Please see http://www.durham.ac.uk/anthropology/postgraduatestudy/taughtprogrammes/mscenergyandsociety for further information on modules.

Dissertation

We place an emphasis on independent learning. This is supported by the University’s virtual learning environment, extensive library collections and informal contact with tutors and research staff. We consider the development of independent learning and research skills to be one of the key elements of our postgraduate taught curriculum and one which helps our students cultivate initiative, originality and critical thinking.

The dissertation is a significant piece of independent research that constitutes a synthesis of theory, method and practice in anthropology and is supported by an individual supervisor and the dissertation coordinator.

Previous dissertations and research projects as part of the course have been undertaken in partnership with DONG Energy UK, Haringey Borough of London, National Energy Action, Durham County Council, energy enterprises and community energy schemes.

Careers

This course attracts high quality applicants from all over the world and delivers highly-skilled graduates who are able to communicate across disciplines and countries to further environmental progress and energy justice. Graduates of the MSc will be in demand from industry, community organisations, Non-Governmental Organisations and governments around the world. Graduates have gone on to work in Energy justice organisations, local authorities, energy consultancies and further Doctoral study.

Student support

Throughout the programme, all students meet regularly with the degree tutor, who provides academic support and guidance. Furthermore, all members of teaching staff have weekly office hours when they are available to meet with students on a ‘drop-in’ basis. In term time, the department also has an extensive programme of departmental and research group seminars which postgraduate students are encouraged and expected to attend. The undergraduate Anthropology Society also organises its own visiting lecturer programme. We ensure that we advertise any other relevant seminars and lectures in Durham, Newcastle and further afield, and encourage students to attend relevant conferences.

Before the academic year starts, we provide information on preparation for the course. On arrival we have induction sessions and social events, headed by the Director of Postgraduate Studies and attended by both academic and administrative staff. Students also attend an “Introduction to Research Groups in Anthropology”.

Postgraduate study at Durham University

The MSc Energy and Society is based in Durham University’s Department of Anthropology in association with the Durham Energy Institute. Durham has one of the largest Anthropology departments in the world with 40 research active academic teaching staff working across the full range of the discipline. Our Anthropology department is ranked in the top 50 of the prestigious QS World University Subject Rankings. The overall QS rankings also placed Durham 54th in the world for citations, recognising the impact and influence of its research among other academics, and 31st globally for employer reputation, giving recognition to the quality of, and international demand for, Durham’s graduates.

Students on this course can become members of the Durham Energy Institute (DEI) community and can attend its wide range of seminars and events, benefitting from its extensive network of contacts in the energy sector. DEI ( http://www.durham.ac.uk/dei/ ) covers the spectrum of energy research from technological innovation, to the social, political and economic dimensions of energy. DEI addresses energy challenges collaboratively through strong partnerships with industry, international partners, governments, community groups and other academic institutions. This ensures our research is relevant, timely and effective.

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This programme provides an exciting opportunity to develop professional practice that is supported by an in-depth theoretical understanding for those working in a wide range of careers with young people and communities. Read more
This programme provides an exciting opportunity to develop professional practice that is supported by an in-depth theoretical understanding for those working in a wide range of careers with young people and communities. The programme attracts practitioners from a wide range of contexts and countries, enabling learning in an internationally-comparative context. At the same time, it enables students to become professionally validated by the National Youth Agency (with JNC recognition) for practice in the UK. Learning on the programme incorporates reflective professional approaches to informal education which enable the development of young people and communities. These are integrated together with wider critical learning on shaping the wider social, political and organisational context in which such practice takes place. The programme combines academic study on taught modules, two periods of fieldwork practice and students conducting their own choice of research with support from experienced researchers. The fieldwork practice placements enable students to develop their practice within local agencies (e.g. local charities and non-governmental organisations) with supported from experienced supervisors. Find out more about the programme from staff and students by watching our short videos.

Course structure

Core modules:
-Community Policy and Practice (15 credits)
-Youth Policy and Practice (15 credits)
-Professional and Personal Development (30 credits)
-Management in Community Settings (30 credits)
-Research in Professional Practice (45 credits)
-Fieldwork Practice Development 1 (15 credits)
-Fieldwork Practice Development 2 (30 credits)

Students are required to pay for travel costs to and from their fieldwork practice placement.

Academic learning is assessed through 3,000 word essays, fieldwork reports, self-assessment, oral presentation and a 10,000 word research report. There are no examinations. To gain a Durham University MA, you must gain 180 credits at Masters level (pass mark 50%)..

Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered through a range of lectures, seminars, tutorials, group work, reflective practice seminars, research seminars, fieldwork practice and study visits.

Within an ethos of informal education, our teaching and learning incorporates a range of methods which reflect this and time is allocated to provide a balance between tutor-led and self-directed learning. The programme is taught as part of a group of programmes, which attract practitioners from a wide range of contexts and countries, enabling learning in an internationally-comparative context, whilst including a particular focus on UK policy and practice.

Typically, taught sessions provide students with academic input on a particular area of the professional discipline of community and youth work and reflect the diverse range of community and youth settings within which practice takes place. Drawing from relevant literature and legislation and acknowledging the related range of professional skill, competence and understanding, issues are identified for discussion, drawn from historical and contemporary contexts. Seminars provide the opportunity for students to discuss and debate the issues, to share ideas and experience, broaden their understanding and test out their knowledge gained through the taught sessions and independent study. Classroom learning provides students with the latest research and critical theory on the subject area. Two assessed periods of fieldwork practice offer opportunities for learning in practice settings related to community and youth work.

The MA Community and Youth Work provides the student with a learning opportunity within which they can apply and test understanding, knowledge and skills related to professional roles and responsibilities in practice settings. A critical examination of the relationship of theory and practice is central to this.

Core modules are structured to enable students to attend university for teaching on an average of one day per week (part time) or two days per week (full time), so that their study can fit around other commitments that they may have.

The programme is assessed through continual assessment using a range of methods including written assignments, reflective journals, individual and group presentations, and assessed fieldwork practice. There is an expectation that students will undertake independent study to prepare and plan for their classes, through reading relevant literature and legislation, journals and drawing on their current and previous practice experience.

The Community and Youth Work Programme is part of the School of Applied Social Sciences and is significantly involved with the Centre for Social Justice and Community Action at Durham University, as well as being a partner in many collaborative pieces of research and professional practice developments. There are therefore many events and initiatives that students are encouraged to attend, such as extra-curricular training, research seminars and workshops to broaden their understanding and deepen their knowledge of wider issues related to the professional discipline.

Other admission requirements

Applicants with substantial professional experience may be admitted by concession without an upper second class honours degree, providing that they have demonstrated an ability to undertake Masters level work. All applicants for this programme have to pass an informal interview, which can be conducted either in person in Durham or via telephone/webcam. This will also give applicants an opportunity to find out more about the programme from a member of the teaching team and have any questions answered. If potential applicants have any queries about the entry criteria or programme before making an application, we are happy to respond to informal queries at any stage and to discuss the programme with you.

Admission is subject to satisfactory Disclosure and Barring Service Enhanced Disclosure check being undertaken upon an offer of a place being made, to assess whether applicants have any previous convictions that prevent them from working with vulnerable people. The cost of a DBS check is currently £44.

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*Individual modules are also available as short courses, which can be combined into the large qualification. This programme provides an opportunity for a range of professionals whose role includes engaging with communities to undertake related advanced study and professional development to develop their career further. Read more
*Individual modules are also available as short courses, which can be combined into the large qualification

This programme provides an opportunity for a range of professionals whose role includes engaging with communities to undertake related advanced study and professional development to develop their career further. It is ideal for those wishing to develop their understanding of the management and policy context of this work at a postgraduate level, especially for those who already have (or do not require) a professional qualification in Community and Youth Work. This might include those practising in community development, housing associations, community health, community enterprise, neighbourhood regeneration, community arts, and professionals in a range of statutory, voluntary and private sector posts that have an element of community involvement and engagement; for example, economic development, planning, policing, transport, and voluntary sector development.

The programme attracts practitioners from a wide range of contexts and countries, enabling learning in an internationally-comparative context. Core modules enable students to explore and develop their understanding of management, policy and practice in this field, as well as learn core research methods skills and carry out their own piece of advanced research. Students have a choice of optional modules to enable more focused study in their own areas of interest.

Course structure

Typical modules outlined below are those that were available to students styuding this programme in previous years.

Core Modules

-Community Policy and Practice (15 credits)
-Professional and Personal Development (30 credits)
-Management in Community Settings (30 credits)
-Practitioner Research and Dissertation (60 credits)

Optional Modules

Typical modules outlined below are those that were available to students styuding this programme in previous years.
-Community Analysis (15 credits)
-Crime, Justice and the Sex Industry (30 credits)
-Drugs, Crime and Society (30 credits)
-Gender, Violence and Abuse (30 credits)
-Policy Related and Evaluation Research (15 credits)
-Qualitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)
-Quantitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)
-Youth Policy and Practice (15 credits)

To study the PG Certificate in Managing in Community Practice you will be required to take Community Policy and Practice and Management in Community and Youth Work plus one 15 credit optional module.

To study the PG Diploma in Managing Community Practice you will be required to take Community Policy and Practice, Management in Community and Youth Work and Professional and Personal Development, plus 45 credits from the optional modules.

Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered through a range of lectures, seminars, tutorials, group work, reflective practice seminars, research seminars and study visits.

Within an ethos of Informal Education, our teaching and learning incorporates a range of methods which reflect this and time is allocated to provide a balance between tutor-led and self-directed learning. The programme is taught as part of a group of programmes which attract practitioners from a wide range of contexts and countries, enabling learning in an internationally-comparative context, whilst including a particular focus on UK policy and practice.

Typically, taught sessions provide students with academic input on a particular area of the professional discipline of community work and reflect the diverse range of community settings within which the management of practice takes place. Drawing from relevant literature and legislation and acknowledging the related range of professional skill, competence and understanding, issues are identified for discussion and draw from historical and contemporary contexts. Seminars provide the opportunity for students to discuss and debate the issues, to share ideas and experience, broaden their understanding and test out their knowledge gained through the taught sessions and independent study. Classroom learning provides students with the latest research and critical theory on the subject area.

The MA Managing Community Practice provides the student with a learning opportunity within which they can apply and test understanding, knowledge and skills related to the managerial roles and responsibilities of their practice settings. A critical examination of the relationship of theory and practice is central to this. Core modules are structured to enable students to attend university for teaching on an average of one day per week (part time) or two days per week (full time), so that their study can fit around other commitments that they may have.

The programme is assessed through continual assessment using a range of methods including written assignments, reflective journals, individual and group presentations so there is an expectation that students will undertake independent study to prepare and plan for their classes, through reading relevant literature and legislation, journals and drawing on their current and previous practice experience.

The Community and Youth Work Programme is part of the School of Applied Social Sciences and is significantly involved with the Centre for Social Justice and Community Action at Durham University, as well as being a partner in many collaborative pieces of research and professional practice developments. There are therefore many events and initiatives to which the students are encouraged to attend such as extracurricular training, research seminars and workshops to broaden their understanding and deepen their knowledge of wider issues related to their professional discipline.

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*Individual modules are also available as short courses, which can be combined into the large qualifications. Read more
*Individual modules are also available as short courses, which can be combined into the large qualifications.

This programme provides an ideal route for practitioners working with young people, including youth workers and those who manage them, enabling them to develop an advanced understanding of the issues involved in managing work with young people. It is designed for those who wish to further their understanding of these issues at postgraduate level and who already have (or do not require) a professional qualification in Community and Youth Work.

Course structure

Core Modules

-Youth Policy and Practice (15 credits)
-Professional and Personal Development (30 credits)
-Management in Community Settings (30 credits)
-Practitioner Research and Dissertation (60 credits)

Optional Modules

Typical modules outlined below are those that were available to students studying this programme in previous years.
-Community Analysis (15 credits)
-Community Policy and Practice (15 credits)
-Crime, Justice and the Sex Industry (30 credits)
-Drugs, Crime and Society (30 credits)
-Gender, Violence and Abuse (30 credits)
-Policy Related and Evaluation Research (15 credits)
-Qualitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)
-Quantitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)

To study the PG Certificate in Managing Youth Work Practice you will be required to take Management in Community and Youth Work and Youth Policy and Practice plus one 15 credit optional module.

To study the PG Diploma in Managing Youth Work Practice you will be required to take Management in Community and Youth Work, Youth Policy and Practice and Professional and Personal Development plus 45 credits from the optional modules.

Learning and Teaching

The MA Managing Youth Work Practice is designed for a range of professionals working with young people including youth workers and those who manage them, who wish to undertake related advanced study. It is ideal for those wishing to develop their understanding of the management of this work especially for those who already have or do not require a professional qualification in Community and Youth Work. It is offered through both a full time and part time route however, this summary refers to the full time route with the part time options being individually tailored to accommodate work patterns of those students already employed in profession practice. The programme is delivered through a range of lectures, seminars, tutorials, group work, reflective practice seminars, research seminars and study visits.

Within an ethos of Informal Education our teaching and learning incorporates a range of methods which reflect this and time is allocated to provide a balance between tutor-led and self-directed learning.

Typically, taught sessions provide students with academic input on a particular area of the professional disciplines of youth work and reflect the diverse range of settings within which the management of practice takes place. Drawing from relevant literature and legislation and acknowledging the related range of professional skill, competence and understanding, issues are identified for discussion and draw from historical and contemporary contexts. Seminars provide the opportunity for students to discuss and debate the issues, to share ideas and experience, broaden their understanding and test out their knowledge gained through the taught sessions and independent study. Classroom learning provides students with the latest research and critical theory on the subject area.

The MA Managing Youth Work Practice provides the student with a learning opportunity within which they can apply and test understanding, knowledge and skills related to the managerial roles and responsibilities of their practice settings. A critical examination of the relationship of theory and practice is central to this. The programme is assessed through continual assessment using a range of methods including written assignments, reflective journals, individual and group presentations so there is an expectation that students will undertake independent study to prepare and plan for their classes, through reading relevant literature and legislation, journals and drawing on their current and previous practice experience.

This programme is part of the School of Applied Social Sciences and is significantly involved with the Centre for Social Justice and Community Action at Durham University, as well as being a partner in many collaborative pieces of research and professional practice developments. There are therefore many events and initiatives which the students are encouraged to attend such as extracurricular training, research seminars and workshops to broaden their understanding and deepen their knowledge of wider issues related to their professional discipline.

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The field of Social Policy examines the definition, pattern and range of social problems in contemporary society and the various policy responses to them. Read more
The field of Social Policy examines the definition, pattern and range of social problems in contemporary society and the various policy responses to them. It explores the role of the state in relation to the welfare and management of its citizens and the role of state intervention in determining the conditions under which people live. This programme is designed to provide students with grounding in social research as applied in social policy investigations.

Course Structure

Students take a range of taught modules primarily in the first two terms of the academic year. Starting in the first term, students undertake a module on research design which enables students to develop a research proposal for their dissertation.

Core Modules

Typical modules outlined below are those that were available to students studying this programme in previous years.

-Perspectives on Social Research (15 credits)
-Statistical Exploration and Reasoning (15 credits)
-Research Design and Process (15 credits)
-Qualitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)
-Quantitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)
-Social Policy and Society (30 credits)
-Policy Related and Evaluation Research (15 credits)
-Dissertation (60 credits)

Academic learning is assessed through a range of summative essays, statistical/computer-based projects, research proposals, and a dissertation.

Learning and Teaching

These MA Research Methods programmes are full time, starting in early October and continuing over 12 months following university terms.

The main teaching methods include lectures, seminars, and computer practical sessions. Lectures introduce the key concepts, theories, current debates and other issues critical for understanding the topics. Seminars are opportunities for students to discuss any questions arising from the readings, to share experience of conducting research, to present their own work for comments. Modules that teach the use of computer software packages have practical sessions in computer rooms so that students can carry out hands-on exercises under supervision and further assistance

Modules are usually assessed through essays. Statistics modules may require students to complete specific analyses with more structured instructions. Some module conveners may allow students to submit formative assignments in order for students to obtain a sense of how well they understand the subject. Some modules’ assessment may contain a proportion of presentations and group projects.

Further academic supports are available. Students have the opportunities to learn from their dissertation supervisors at individual tutoring meetings, dissertation workshops, and forums. Every member of teaching staff has two hours of office hours each week, when students can come without having to make an appointment beforehand. Both the University and the School organize seminars by external speakers that are open to all students.

Students will have access to a variety of learning resources, including learning spaces in libraries and teaching rooms, readings and textbooks, computers, databases, etc

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This programme provides an introduction to the principles and values of social work and an understanding of the organisation and delivery of social welfare and related services in the UK. Read more
This programme provides an introduction to the principles and values of social work and an understanding of the organisation and delivery of social welfare and related services in the UK. It also provides a grounding in the social research methods necessary to conduct applied types of research that are a fundamental part of social work practice and evaluation.

Course Structure

Students take a range of taught modules primarily in the first two terms of the academic year. Starting from the first term, students undertake a module on research design which enables students to develop a research proposal for their dissertation. Part-time candidates take an equal balance of credits in each year.

Typical modules outlined below are those that were available to students styuding this programme in previous years.

Core Modules

-Perspectives on Social Research (15 credits)
-Statistical Exploration and Reasoning (15 credits)
-Research Design and Process (15 credits)
-Qualitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)
-Quantitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)
-Social Work Context and Practice (30 credits)
-Policy Related and Evaluation Research (15 credits)
-Dissertation (60 credits)

Learning and Teaching

These MA Research Methods programmes are full time, starting in early October and continuing over 12 months following university terms.

The main teaching methods include lectures, seminars, and computer practical sessions. Lectures introduce the key concepts, theories, current debates and other issues critical for understanding the topics. Seminars are opportunities for students to discuss any questions arising from the readings, to share experience of conducting research, to present their own work for comments. Modules that teach the use of computer software packages have practical sessions in computer rooms so that students can carry out hands-on exercises under supervision and further assistance

Modules are usually assessed through essays. Statistics modules may require students to complete specific analyses with more structured instructions. Some module conveners may allow students to submit formative assignments in order for students to obtain a sense of how well they understand the subject. Some modules’ assessment may contain a proportion of presentations and group projects.

Further academic supports are available. Students have the opportunities to learn from their dissertation supervisors at individual tutoring meetings, dissertation workshops, and forums. Every member of teaching staff has two hours of office hours each week, when students can come without having to make an appointment beforehand. Both the University and the School organize seminars by external speakers that are open to all students. Students will have access to a variety of learning resources, including learning spaces in libraries and teaching rooms, readings and textbooks, computers, databases, etc.

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The degree includes components necessary to provide the areas of subject-specific expertise and research methods training identified by the ESRC as essential for recognition for the ‘1 + 3’ (MA and PhD) programme. Read more
The degree includes components necessary to provide the areas of subject-specific expertise and research methods training identified by the ESRC as essential for recognition for the ‘1 + 3’ (MA and PhD) programme.

The full-time MA starts in October and continues in three consecutive terms over 12 months. The part-time MA takes place over 24 months with candidates taking an equal balance of credits in each year of study.

You will be required to complete 180 credits for the award of an MA. The programme is comprised of the following modules.

The degree follows a logical progression in that ‘Perspectives on Social Research’ and ‘Statistical Exploration and Reasoning’ are taught in the first term. 'Research Design and Process' is also taught in the first term to help students develop a research proposal for dissertation. These modules provide introductions to the specific areas and are intended to provide a foundation for later work. In term two, ‘Quantitative Research Methods in the Social Sciences’,‘Qualitative Research Methods in the Social Sciences’ and 'Policy Related and Evaluation Research' are taught. These modules develop the work introduced in the first term.

The subject specific module – Theorising Crime and Criminal Justice - run through terms one and two and provide the ‘spine’ to the programme, bringing together issues identified in other modules. These modules also specifically relate more generic issues arising in research to subject-specific questions.

Breadth

The programme is broadly based, covering conceptual and practical underpinnings and implications of research, and covering various research techniques and the rationale behind them. It enable students to develop essential skills in both quantitative and qualitative work and to apply those skills to specific criminological issues.

Depth

The programme covers issues in depth, as appropriate to a Master’s programme. The depth at which students learn progressively increases, with the dissertation providing an opportunity for an in-depth piece of scholarly work at an advanced level.

These are the knowledge and skills students who complete their training in research methods are expected to have acquired and to be able to apply:
-Comprehension of principles of research design and strategy, including an understanding of how to formulate researchable problems and an appreciation of alternative approaches to research problems.
-Competence in understanding, and applying appropriately in a specific subject area, a range of research methods and tools, including essential qualitative and quantitative techniques.
-Capabilities for managing research, including managing data, and conducting and disseminating research in such a way that is consistent with both professional practice and principles of research ethics and risk assessment.

In addition, students are expected to have acquired or further developed a range of transferable employment-related key skills:
-The ability to evaluate and synthesise information obtained from a variety of sources (written, electronic, oral, visual); to communicate relevant information in a variety of ways and to select the most appropriate means of communication relative to the specific task. Students will also be able to communicate their own formulations in a clear and accessible way; they will be able to respond effectively to others and to reflect on and monitor the use of their communication skills.
-The ability to read and interpret complex statistical tables, graphs and charts; to organize, classify and interpret numerical data; to make inferences from sets of data; to design a piece of research using advanced techniques of data analysis; and an appreciation of the scope and applicability of numerical data.
-Competence in using information technology including the ability to word-process, to use at least one quantitative and one qualitative computer software package effectively; to use effective information storage and retrieval; and to use web-based resources.
-The ability to plan work with others, to take a lead role in group work when required, to establish good working relationships with peers, to monitor and reflect on group work (including the student’s own group-work skills) and to take account of external feedback on contributions to group work, and on the group work process as a whole.
-Effective time-management, working to prescribed deadlines.
-The ability to engage in different forms of learning, to seek and to use feedback from both peers and academic staff, and to monitor and critically reflect on the learning process.

Subject-specific learning outcomes based on their ‘spine’ module as follows:
-An advanced knowledge of the relative strengths and weaknesses of core criminology concepts and principles – the social problem of crime and the politics and practice of criminal justice ; the construction and deconstruction of what constitutes crime.
-A clear, systematic and advanced level of understanding criminological theories and their application to criminal behaviour, criminal justice and crime control.
-An advanced understanding of key ideological and theoretical perspectives in criminology – e.g. the shift from social theories of ‘deviance’ to struggles for ‘social justice’.
-An advanced knowledge of key phenomena in criminological analysis, particularly the significance of criminological analysis and contemporary national and international issues that are redefining the study of crime, criminal behaviour and crime control.
-An advanced knowledge of the functions and practices of criminal justice as well as the relationship of these practices to political concerns of crime, disorder and security.

An appreciation of how particular criminal justice policies may be experienced by different social groups.

Course modules

Typical modules outlined below are those that were available to students studying this programme in previous years.
-Perspectives on Social Research (15 Credits)
-Statistical Exploration and Reasoning (15 Credits)
-Research Design and Process (15 credits)
-Qualitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)
-Quantitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)
-Theorising Crime and Criminal Justice (30 credits)
-Policy Related and Evaluation Research (15 credits)
-Dissertation (60 Credits)

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