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Full Time Masters Degrees in Education, Durham, United Kingdom

We have 29 Full Time Masters Degrees in Education, Durham, United Kingdom

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Durham University School of Education
Distance from Durham: 0 miles
The MA in Education provides an opportunity to study broad educational and pedagogical issues, while an individually supervised dissertation gives you the opportunity to research a specific issue in depth. Read more
The MA in Education provides an opportunity to study broad educational and pedagogical issues, while an individually supervised dissertation gives you the opportunity to research a specific issue in depth. It will provide you with a clear understanding of the nature and significance of educational issues, both generic and subject specific, and will examine the ways in which research in education might illuminate these issues.

A key feature of the programme is that students can make it their own: that is, while studying a limited range of modules, students can choose the contexts in which to apply the core ideas. During the dissertation there is further opportunity to select areas of personal interest and concern. Some students select one context to consider in all of their modules e.g. ideas from the programme applied to, say, science education or informal learning. Others use the opportunity to broaden their understanding of education by selecting different foci in different modules. In our modules we aim to introduce students to key ideas and ways of thinking that enable them to engage with related issues in contexts that are relevant to them.

The degree has been designed to meet the needs of educational professionals, especially those in teaching, management or administration at all levels of education. Students likely to benefit from the programme are those who are interested in education, often teachers, with a commitment to pedagogy, and educational managers in schools, further and higher education, as well as those working in educational administration.

Through its flexible delivery routes the MA in Education is suitable for students from all backgrounds and countries. In addition to a traditional full-time study route, the course is available via part-time and International Postgraduate Programme routes. On the part-time route teaching is delivered through intensive teaching weekends scheduled around (Durham) school half-term holidays making the programme suitable for those working full-time. Meanwhile the part-time International Summer Postgraduate Institute (ISPI) route is delivered through a combination of intensive summer school teaching and independent study. The ISPI summer teaching runs in Durham throughout July each year and attracts students from a wide range of backgrounds and countries, including the UK, and is ideal for those seeking part-time study in a truly international context. ISPI students benefit from a range of extra academic and cultural activities organised by the School.

Students who have successfully completed the PGCE at Durham in the previous academic year have the option to use 90 credits they have accredited on this course. Therefore, these students will only need to do the core modules, Research Methods in Education and the Dissertation (if part-time, over 2 years), to complete the programme.

Course Structure

Full-time students study the four taught modules plus the dissertation over one year.

Part-time students normally study two taught modules per year in years one and two and the dissertation in year three.

Core Modules

-Research Methods Education (30 credits)
-Critical Perspectives in Education (30 credits)
-Dissertation (60 credits)

Optional Modules

Students must select 60 credits from a list of optional modules which may include:
-21st Century Technology: Implications for Teaching and Learning (30 credits)
-Arts in Education (30 credits)
-Assessment (30 credits)
-Curriculum Analysis (30 credits)
-Intercultural and International Education (30 credits)
-Policy Studies (30 credits)
-Psychology of the Learner (30 credits)
-Special Educational Needs and Inclusion: Rhetoric or Reality? (30 credits)

The above are examples of modules we have run in previous years. Modules are continually developed in response to student feedback and interests, as well as to reflect the changing nature of academic research within the department.

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Durham University School of Education
Distance from Durham: 0 miles
The MA Intercultural Communication and Education develops critical understanding of education and intercultural communication in the context of global movements of people and the internationalisation of education. Read more
The MA Intercultural Communication and Education develops critical understanding of education and intercultural communication in the context of global movements of people and the internationalisation of education. The programme provides students, educators, and policy makers with resources for reflecting on and responding to the growing need for intercultural education and communication in an increasingly intercultural/international world. This programme is available for part-time and full-time students through the academic year. It can also be studied part time at the School of Education International Summer Postgraduate Institute (ISPI) programme that runs in Durham every July.

Course structure

Students on this pathway must do Research Methods in Education (30 credits) with two core modules, Intercultural and International Education and Intercultural Communication. They then have a choice of one additional module from across those running in the School of Education (see MA Education for full list). Students also do a 15,000 word dissertation within the field of intercultural education and internationalisation. This is a supervised piece of work working with specialists in the field.

Modules

-Intercultural and International Education (30 credits) Assessment by 5,000 word assignment
-Intercultural Communication (30 credits) Assessment by 5,000 word assignment

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Durham University School of Education
Distance from Durham: 0 miles
The Doctorate in Education (EdD) is designed to meet the needs of education professionals in teaching, management or administrative roles in all sectors from primary to higher education. Read more
The Doctorate in Education (EdD) is designed to meet the needs of education professionals in teaching, management or administrative roles in all sectors from primary to higher education.

The EdD differs from a PhD in that it is primarily focused on professional rather than theoretical issues and is aimed at those who have already been employed in the education sector for a number of years, either as lecturers, teachers administrators, advisers or inspectors. For some, the established PhD route comprising in-depth study of a single specialised topic does not satisfy their needs. To meet the requirement for a new approach the EdD was instituted and this programme provides students with a broad-based knowledge of a number of areas through a system of taught modules that develop a basis for the thesis and the opportunity to research a specific issue of professional concern in depth.

Programme Structure

The EdD is structured to offer maximum flexibility and, as such, we provide three modes of study for applicants to choose from:

-Full-time study
-Part-time study
-ISPI (International Summer Postgraduate Programme).

Each route offers a different pattern of teaching but all follow the same basic structure:

-Six taught modules during the taught phase
-One thesis (60,000 words max.) during the research phase.
-Learning Outcomes

The taught phase of the programme enables students to address these broad learning outcomes:

Learning Outcome

Group A: Critical understanding of issues relating to teaching & learning

Group B: Critical understanding of the organisation of education

Group C: Ability to analyse and evaluate educational research

The structure is designed to provide a focus towards the thesis. Students are introduced to the requirements of the thesis early on in their programme, so that they can develop and refine their ideas with support from colleagues. The taught modules provide a wide platform in the obligatory modules that can then be extended in the other modules in order to be responsive to students' needs.

As the thesis requires a high level of independent thinking in order to produce a piece of research that makes a contribution to the field, the Analysing, Interpreting and Using Educational Research, Understanding Qualitative Educational Research and the Thesis Proposal modules are compulsory.

In the final phase students work as individuals with two supervisors to produce a thesis, which is often but not always related to a specific aspect of their work and position in the education service. It is expected that the research topic should complement the current staff research areas.

Thus, the EdD moves from a broad base to a specific thesis which, though shorter and more focused than a doctoral dissertation, has to reach the same level and is judged by the same criteria. The EdD and PhD have exact parity of degree status.

Taught Modules

Students need to successfully complete six modules in order to advance to the thesis phase of the programme.

Students take 3 compulsory modules:

Engaging with Interpretive Research Design (30 credits)
Analysis and Evaluation of Educational Research (30 credits)
Thesis Proposal (30 credits)

They then have a choice from all other PGT modules. So they must chose three modules from the domains of

Technology in Education,
Mathematics Education,
Science Education,
Arts Education,
Educational Assessment,
Curriculum & Policy,
Special Educational Needs and Inclusion,
Intercultural & International Education, and
Management.

(NB. The modules available each academic year do vary depending on staff availability so please check at the time of registration).

A student wishing to progress to the research phase of the EdD must obtain an overall average mark of at least 60% in the assessment of their taught modules. Any student who does not obtain an overall mark of at least 50% will be required to withdraw from the programme.

Thesis

Students may already have a proposal for a thesis upon starting the programme, but many begin to formulate their proposal while taking modules. For example, an assignment for one of the units may provide the opportunity to explore a theme prior to commitment for the thesis.

Students work individually under the supervision of one or more members of staff on a topic chosen in consultation with their supervisor. This is often related to the work these students have undertaken in their institution and involves an independent investigation demonstrating their ability to test ideas and to understand the relationship between the theme of their investigation and the wider field of knowledge.

The thesis should represent an original contribution and include matter worth of publication. The thesis should be a maximum of 60,000 words.

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Durham University School of Education
Distance from Durham: 0 miles
The MSc Mathematics Education focuses in detail on important issues emerging from research into the teaching and learning of Mathematics at all levels, particularly with regards to developing understanding in Mathematis. Read more
The MSc Mathematics Education focuses in detail on important issues emerging from research into the teaching and learning of Mathematics at all levels, particularly with regards to developing understanding in Mathematis. The course builds on existing research taking place here in the Durham University School of Education, conducted by Dr Patrick Barmby.

Facts

Find out more about entry requirements, duration of the course and tuition fees here. (Note: this link will direct you to the University's central course tool. Use the link provided to return to the School of Education homepage.)

How will I be taught?

Teaching on the specialised core modules takes place in three full days, taught at weekends. This allows full-time and part-time, home and international students to meet. The teaching involves a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials and practical activities.

You will be assessed using a variety of methods, including presentations, written assignments and portfolios.

What will I learn?

You will take Research Methods in Education (30 credits) and two other core modules: Developing Understanding in Mathematics and Representations and Reasoning in Mathematics. You will also choose one additional module from across those running in the School of Education. You will also research and write up a 15,000 word dissertation within the field of Mathematics Education. This is a supervised piece of work supported by specialists in the field.

The two core modules are:

-Developing Understanding in Mathematics

The module focuses on the notion of understanding in Mathematics in relation to learning theories and linking these ideas to broader issues such as problem solving, creativity, misconceptions and assessment. The implications of the research literature on these issues are examined in terms of pedagogical practice.

Assignments include a presentation on key issues from the research in a specific area of Mathematics (30%) and a 3,500 word assignment relating the theory of developing understanding to practice in schools with implications for teaching (70%).

-Representations and Reasoning in Mathematics

The module focuses on the use of mathematical representations in the teaching of Mathematics, relating the use of these to learning theories and relating these ideas more broadly to mathematical thinking and reasoning. Key representations that are used in both primary and secondary Mathematics classrooms are examined.

Assignments include a portfolio examining the use of a particular mathematical representation in the classroom (30%) and a 3,500 word assignment relating the theory of the use of mathematical representations to practice in schools with implications for teaching (70%).

The optional modules available for you to choose from are:

21st Century Technology (30 credits)
Arts in Education (30 credits)
Classroom Assessment (30 credits)
Judgement based assessment (30 credits)
Enhancing Teaching and Learning through Productive Thinking (30 credits)
Curriculum Analysis (30 credits)
Standardised Test and Exams (30 credits)
Intercultural and International Education (30 credits)
Intercultural Communication (30 credits)
Improving Computer Education (30 credits)
Management, Leadership and Change (30 credits)
Policy Studies (30 credits)
Psychology of the Learner (30 credits)
Special Educational Needs and Inclusion: Rhetoric or Reality? (30 credits)
Learning and Teaching in Science (30 credits)
Physics as an Additional Subject Specialism (30 credits)
Chemistry as an Additional Subject Specialism (30 credits)

Who will teach me?

Dr Patrick Barmby is a Lecturer in Primary Mathematics at the Durham University School of Education. In the past, he has published on a broad range of areas, including attitudes towards science and teacher recruitment and retention. However, his main areas of research are the notion of understanding in Mathematics, the role of representations in understanding and reasoning in Mathematics and teacher subject knowledge in Mathematics. Along with colleagues, Patrick wrote the textbook for primary teachers, Primary Mathematics: Teaching for Understanding, published in 2009 by Open University Press. This was based on his research work on understanding, reasoning and representations in Mathematics. Patrick and colleagues received research funding from the Nuffield Foundation for the project ‘Visual representations in the primary classroom', which aims to develop primary teachers' use of visual representations particularly for multiplication and fractions.

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Durham University School of Education
Distance from Durham: 0 miles
For enquiries relating to the programme please contact the Pathway Leader. Dr Vanessa Kind For enquiries relating to admission, including entry requirements and how to apply, please contact our Admissions Team. Read more
For enquiries relating to the programme please contact the Pathway Leader: Dr Vanessa Kind For enquiries relating to admission, including entry requirements and how to apply, please contact our Admissions Team

This programme aims to promote critical understanding of and reflection on aspects of teaching and learning in science education generally as well as within specialist subject areas of chemistry, physics, and primary science and biology/outdoor education. It will develop knowledge at subject, pedagogical and theoretical levels and support participants in understanding issues within extant literature.

This programme is linked explicitly to Science Learning Centre North East as well as an extensive body of published and funded research funded within the School of Education. In addition the programme has been designed to meet the demand to focus on teachers' professional learning in Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths subject areas, particularly enhancing subject knowledge and pedagogical skills for science teachers working outside their specialist subjects. Thus the programme offers an opportunity for collaboration between CPD activity and higher degree provision.

Structure

The course has four taught modules (each of 30 credits): two specialised core modules in science education, a research method module, and an optional module. In addition there is a supervised dissertation (60 credits).

Students will take Teaching and Learning in Science as a specialised core module and then choose either Physics as an Additional Subject Specialism (PASS) or Chemistry as an Additional Subject Specialism (CASS).

The course can be taken on a part time basis over three years or full time over one year.

Specialised Core Modules

Teaching and Learning in Science Education
The module analyses the many challenges and implications of science education. Students will learn about key current issues in science education, such as assessment, conceptual change, engagement, the role of practical work, learning progressions and threshold concepts. The content of the module changes regularly to ensure the content is kept current.

Physics as an Additional Subject Specialism (PASS) or Chemistry as an Additional Subject Specialism (CASS)
These modules aim to provide physics/ chemistry subject matter knowledge for non-specialist secondary science teachers. They develop teaching skills in physics/ chemistry among non-specialist secondary science teachers and focus on better understanding of current issues in physics / chemistry education research.

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Durham University School of Education
Distance from Durham: 0 miles
The PGCE Secondary is the first phase of a career-long process of personal and professional development, which will equip you to become a secondary school teacher. Read more
The PGCE Secondary is the first phase of a career-long process of personal and professional development, which will equip you to become a secondary school teacher. The PGCE Secondary is a course in Initial Teacher Training which is accredited by the DfE, the successful completion of which will accord you Qualified Teacher Status (QTS). Our course has recently been inspected by Ofsted which resulted in an “Outstanding” grading for all aspects of our provision.

Subject pedagogy is explored in curriculum groups, examining techniques for making each subject accessible and stimulating in a classroom environment.

Integrated into the Course are university sessions, school experiences and OAA activities. An undoubted strength of the Course is the excellent partnership that exists between the university and schools. The course has been devised by the University Tutor and Physical Education specialists in local schools to prepare you to teach Physical Education to the full secondary age and ability range.

Whilst in University you will follow a structured PE programme which will involve sessions reflecting good practice. Sessions, therefore, feature discussion, collaborative work, experiential learning, the examination and analysis of materials but especially the active participation of members of the group. There will be an obvious focus on all PE activity areas (games, gymnastic activities, dance, athletic activities, swimming and outdoor and adventurous activities) throughout the course.

The design of the PE course also takes into account the simultaneous delivery of the PI lectures programme. It therefore complements and reinforces the generic and subject specific principles, skills and techniques required of the competent teacher. Through critical reflection on current teaching practices, as well as your own teaching and research, you will be given the opportunity to develop into a more effective PE teacher, progressively improving the quality of your preparation and classroom practice, to become a physical educationalist for the future.

As part of your course you will complete 3 Teaching placements (one of which you will arrange yourself) in a variety of local schools. This will comprise a minimum of 120 days to meet the minimum requirement for QTS.

Structure

The course is organised as three modules:
-Professional Issues in school based education
-Teaching and Learning in the Curriculum
-Self-directed Study

The Professional Issues in School Based Education relates to the Teacher Standards and is delivered in two parts, prior to each of the two extended teaching practices. The teaching is related to those classroom-based issues such as the psychology of learning, the law, curriculum groups, examining techniques for making each subject accessible and stimulating in a classroom environment and is followed up in subject groups and during school placements The block practices in the Autumn and Spring allow for practical opportunities for full professional development where there is a progression from observation, structured activities and group work to whole class work.

Teaching and Learning in the Curriculum and Self Directed Study are studied at Masters Level. The Teaching and Learning in the Curriculum Module draws on the international research expertise within the School of Education enabling student teachers to engage critically in issues relevant to the classroom and school, particularly those that impact on the success of children as learners. The Self Directed Study module draws on students’ experience during weekly visits to schools and their own small scale action research, and links this to critical engagement with published educational research.

These Masters modules provide an opportunity to explore, in a more theoretical way, the issues to do with teaching and learning through lectures and mixed subject and phase seminar groups taught as a conference week usually after Christmas. In addition to covering Teacher standards these modules will enable assessment work to be carried out for the award of PGCE.

On successful completion of the course, student teachers will have 90 credits and QTS.

Other admission requirements

-School, town, county, regional or national high level sports performance, preferably in more than one sport.
-A demonstrable interest and involvement in the lives and development of young people.
-Have experience of working with young people in a 11 – 16 school setting and in a coaching setting.
-GCSE English and Mathematics at Grade C or above (or equivalent) which must be achieved at the time of application. If your equivalent qualifications are from an overseas institution, you must apply for a Statement of Comparability from NARIC.
-Pass the QTS Skills Tests by 1st August prior to the beginning of the programme.
-Must have undertaken at least ten days of work experience in a UK mainstream school environment within the three years prior to application.
-Must have completed the 10 day Primary School Experience in a UK Primary School (or a Primary School which follows the English National Curriculum) prior to commencing the University course in mid September. Offer holders will arrange this for themselves in their own local area.

See: https://www.dur.ac.uk/courses/info/?id=9383&title=PGCE+Secondary+-+Physical+Education&code=X7KS14&type=PGCE&year=2016#admissions
for a list of the physical requirements.

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Durham University School of Education
Distance from Durham: 0 miles
The PGCE Primary provides a course in Initial Teacher Training which is accredited by the DfE. Successful completion of the course will provide you with Qualified Teacher Status (QTS), awarded by DfE and a PGCE (awarded by Durham University). Read more
The PGCE Primary provides a course in Initial Teacher Training which is accredited by the DfE. Successful completion of the course will provide you with Qualified Teacher Status (QTS), awarded by DfE and a PGCE (awarded by Durham University). Credits achieved during the PGCE year can also equate to the first year of Durham's MA in Education.

In addressing the government's standards for QTS, the School of Education seeks to promote the notion of primary school teachers as reflective practitioners who are confident in their ability to teach all subjects in the primary curriculum, and able to articulate their beliefs about what constitutes effective pedagogy. PGCE should be viewed as the first phase of a career-long process of personal and professional development.

The course aims to provide you with professional and academic training in preparation of your role as a primary teacher. Underpinning the course is a belief that successful teachers need to understand how children learn and that this is best achieved through a combination of theory, practice and reflection.

The Durham PGCE Primary Course has been developed in partnership with schools, and offers a strong practical element, with student teachers spending a substantial part of the year (around 20 weeks) in school. Students on the course have opportunities to develop an understanding of the values and issues which underpin education and are encouraged to develop and articulate their own beliefs. The responsibility for training is shared between schools and the University, which together provide a supportive professional environment in which you can develop your knowledge, skills, understanding and expertise.

Learning and Teaching

The Primary PGCE is designed to take around 1500 hours of student work, comprising:
-Readings and preparation for teaching in school
-Teaching in schools
-Teaching time in lectures and workshops
-Professional studies days
-Teaching and learning conference
-Follow-up readings after the taught element
-Independent study
-Assignment work

There are approximately 350 hours of university-based contact teaching time in all.

In addition the supervised Directed Study module offers group and one-to-one contact time - students are assigned individual supervisors from within the School of Education staff who assist with devising a suitable topic for study. Academic support for the student is available via all of the following forms of contact:
-Formal workshops as part of the taught element of the course
-Additional, optional workshops to help students address aspects of subject knowledge such as English grammar and mathematics
-Email and telephone: students are encouraged to contact tutors with specific queries
-Group emails: these are sent via Duo (the virtual learning environment) to keep students informed of developments and to answer common queries
-Personal contact: staff are available for individual consultation when not teaching or attending meetings

In addition, all students will be assigned a School Training Centre Coordinator who will provide workshops, support with teaching and guidance on teaching practice. University partnership tutors will also provide support for students before, during and after school placements.

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Durham University School of Education
Distance from Durham: 0 miles
Subjects available. Chemistry, Physics, English, History. The PGCE Secondary is the first phase of a career-long process of personal and professional development, which will equip you to become a secondary school teacher. Read more
Subjects available: Chemistry, Physics, English, History.

The PGCE Secondary is the first phase of a career-long process of personal and professional development, which will equip you to become a secondary school teacher. The PGCE Secondary is a course in Initial Teacher Training which is accredited by the DfE the successful completion of which will accord you Qualified Teacher Status (QTS). Our course has recently been inspected by Ofsted which resulted in an “Outstanding” grading for all aspects of our provision.

Each student teacher on the course specialises in one of the subjects listed above. Subject pedagogy is explored in curriculum groups, examining techniques for making each subject accessible and stimulating in a classroom environment.

Structure and Assessment

The course is organised as three modules:
-Professional Issues in school based education
-Teaching and Learning in the Curriculum
-Self-directed Study

The Professional Issues in School Based Education relates to the Teacher Standards and is delivered in two parts, prior to each of the two extended teaching practices. The teaching is related to those classroom-based issues such as the psychology of learning, the law, curriculum groups, examining techniques for making each subject accessible and stimulating in a classroom environment and is followed up in subject groups and during school placements The block practices in the Autumn and Spring allow for practical opportunities for full professional development where there is a progression from observation, structured activities and group work to whole class work.

Teaching and Learning in the Curriculum and Self Directed Study are studied at Masters Level. The Teaching and Learning in the Curriculum Module draws on the international research expertise within the School of Education enabling student teachers to engage critically in issues relevant to the classroom and school, particularly those that impact on the success of children as learners. The Self Directed Study module draws on students’ experience during weekly visits to schools and their own small scale action research, and links this to critical engagement with published educational research.

These Masters modules provide an opportunity to explore, in a more theoretical way, the issues to do with teaching and learning through lectures and mixed subject and phase seminar groups taught as a conference week usually after Christmas. In addition to covering Teacher standards these modules will enable assessment work to be carried out for the award of PGCE.

On successful completion of the course, student teachers will have 90 credits and QTS.

Career Opportunities

Career opportunities in education are wide and include classroom teaching, educational leadership and management, administration and policy development.

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Durham University School of Education
Distance from Durham: 0 miles
This programme delivers high-quality research methods training, including practical experience with qualitative and quantitative data analysis software packages and detailed analysis related to research epistemology and the philosophy of social science. Read more
This programme delivers high-quality research methods training, including practical experience with qualitative and quantitative data analysis software packages and detailed analysis related to research epistemology and the philosophy of social science. It can provide opportunities to gain 'hands on' experience and contribute to current research projects, working, for example, with the Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring (CEM).

The programme is suited to those hoping to later pursue a research degree (usually PhD) but who do not meet the research methods training entry requirements, as well as those who wish to apply for an Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) studentship, as the programme is recognised by the ESRC for 1+3 funding.

The programme is a Faculty-wide course and modules are taught within the School of Education, the School of Applied Social Sciences (Sociology) and the Department of Psychology. This provides our students the opportunity to come into contact with students studying research methods in different disciplines across the Social Sciences.

Core Modules

-Research Design and Process (15 credits)
-Perspectives on Social Research (15 credits)
-Experiments in Education (15 credits)
-Research Methods in Education (30 credits)
-Dissertation (45 credits)

Either:
-Qualitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)
Or:
-Fieldwork and Interpretation (15 credits)

Either:
-Statistical Exploration and Reasoning (15 credits)
And:
-Quantitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)
Or:
-Applied Statistics (30 credits)

Optional Modules

15 credits from:
-Philosophy of Social Research (15 credits)
-Computer Based Applications in Social Research (15 credits)

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Durham University School of Education
Distance from Durham: 0 miles
We offer two Research Masters by Thesis degrees. The Master of Education by Research (MEd) normally takes two years to complete for full-time study and four years for part-time study and requires submission of a 70,000 word thesis. Read more
We offer two Research Masters by Thesis degrees. The Master of Education by Research (MEd) normally takes two years to complete for full-time study and four years for part-time study and requires submission of a 70,000 word thesis. The Master of Arts by Research in Education (MA) normally takes one year to complete in full-time study and two years in part-time study and requires submission of a 50,000 word thesis.

If you are interested in undertaking a research degree which requires in depth research into a topic of your choice, but do not wish to commit to a full PhD, then one of these programmes may be for you. As with the PhD, your research topic will need to align with the interests of a potential supervisor - you can find further information on current research within the department on our current research pages and staff listings.

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Durham University School of Education
Distance from Durham: 0 miles
The MSc in Educational Assessment has been developed to meet the need for specialists in educational assessment within schools and more widely within the education system. Read more
The MSc in Educational Assessment has been developed to meet the need for specialists in educational assessment within schools and more widely within the education system. The programme combines the expertise of two leading institutions in assessment, the School of Education and CEM (Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring). Students learn to construct and use tests, classroom assessments, interviews, school inspections and more. The programme is 'hands on'; candidates learn about the theory of assessment and the challenges associated with assessment, but there is also a strong focus on providing training into the conducting of assessment. Completion of the programme will enable you to apply for the status of Fellow with the Chartered Institute of Educational Assessors (CIEA).

The programme aims to produce specialists who are well equipped to work in assessment within many areas of education. We want these specialists to have good knowledge and skills and be well prepared for the tasks they undertake. Specifically, the programme aims:
-To develop knowledge and awareness of the importance and many roles of assessment in education, and to enable students to engage with debate and to reflect on how to meet the challenges of effective educational assessment;
-To equip students with knowledge, understanding and relevant skills that will help them develop, deliver and analyse assessment at all levels of education, and to facilitate further research and scholarship in this important field.

Lectures take place 5pm-8pm on one evening per week (part-time) and two evenings per week (full-time), making the programme suitable for those who are in full-time employment.

Course structure

The programme comprises four x 30 credit taught modules plus a 60 credit dissertation of up to 15,000 words. On a part time basis, students study two modules per year in both year one and in year two and the dissertation in year three. On a full-time basis, students study all modules and the dissertation within one year.

Core Modules:
-Standardised Tests and Exams
-Classroom Assessment
-Judgement-based Assessment
-Research Methods in Education
-Dissertation

Learning and Teaching

Four 30 UCU taught modules are each designed to take 300 hours of student work, comprising:
-Readings and preparation for teaching
-Teaching time
-Follow-up readings and tasks outside the taught element
-Independent study
-Assignment work

There are 30 hours of contact teaching time per module (3 hours a week for ten weeks) with the remainder distributed through the other elements of the module. In addition the supervised dissertation module offers one to one contact time - students are assigned individual supervisors from within the School of Education/CEM staff who assist with devising a suitable topic for study. The aim of the academic tutorial system is to provide academic advice and support to students during the teaching and assessment of a module.

Academic support for the student is available via all of the following forms of contact:
-Formal tutorials within teaching time
-Email and telephone: Students are encouraged to contact tutors with specific queries
-Group emails: The discussion board on DUO, the virtual learning environment, allows students to keep in touch with peers and staff to raise issues and get generic feedback
-Personal contact: Staff are available for individual consultation during office time

All students are also strongly encouraged to attend research seminars at the School of Education throughout the academic year, when they will meet other students working on research degrees by thesis at Ph.D, Ed.D. or Masters level.

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Durham University School of Education
Distance from Durham: 0 miles
The PGCE Secondary is the first phase of a career-long process of personal and professional development, which will equip you to become a secondary school teacher. Read more
The PGCE Secondary is the first phase of a career-long process of personal and professional development, which will equip you to become a secondary school teacher. The PGCE Secondary is a course in Initial Teacher Training which is accredited by the DfE, the successful completion of which will accord you Qualified Teacher Status (QTS). Our course has recently been inspected by Ofsted which resulted in an “Outstanding” grading for all aspects of our provision.

Subject pedagogy is explored in curriculum groups, examining techniques for making each subject accessible and stimulating in a classroom environment.

The weekly University-based part of the programme is based around our Professional Issues series of sessions which address the Teacher Standards and then students will explore these in a 'Physics with maths' tutor group, working with an experienced tutor and reflecting on the school-based tasks that have been set.

Please note that students will spend approximately 70% on Science and 30% on Mathematics.

Trainees will work with the Maths cohort for Maths Education sessions, and will join the Physicists (with core science) for the Science Education sessions. Our current model of working with our science trainees in mixed subject groups will continue, with the Physics with Maths trainees benefitting from the many advantages of such grouping which prepares them well for teaching in schools where practice still dictates that a physicist has to be able to teach across all the sciences, particularly at KS3. In mixed groups the trainees learn from other students, offer peer support and understand the role of their specialism within a broad science education.

You will be based in one of our Partnership schools where you will have the opportunity to develop your skills in a teaching background.

The school-based activities involve structured classroom observations, planning and research projects and practical teaching - the latter starting by teaching individual pupils, eventually leading through group work to full classroom teaching.

Structure

The course is organised as three modules:
-Professional Issues in school based education
-Teaching and Learning in the Curriculum
-Self-directed Study

The Professional Issues in School Based Education relates to the Teacher Standards and is delivered in two parts, prior to each of the two extended teaching practices. The teaching is related to those classroom-based issues such as the psychology of learning, the law, curriculum groups, examining techniques for making each subject accessible and stimulating in a classroom environment and is followed up in subject groups and during school placements The block practices in the Autumn and Spring allow for practical opportunities for full professional development where there is a progression from observation, structured activities and group work to whole class work.

These Masters modules provide an opportunity to explore, in a more theoretical way, the issues to do with teaching and learning through lectures and mixed subject and phase seminar groups taught as a conference week usually after Christmas. In addition to covering Teacher standards these modules will enable assessment work to be carried out for the award of PGCE.

On successful completion of the course, student teachers will have 90 credits and QTS.

Other admission requirements

-Have A levels in at least two science subjects (these are usually required).
-A demonstrable interest and involvement in the lives and development of young people.
-GCSE English and Mathematics at Grade C or above (or equivalent) which must be achieved at the time of application. If your equivalent qualifications are from an overseas institution, you must apply for a Statement of Comparability from NARIC.
-Applicants with non-standard qualifications, for example, access routes into higher education are welcome to apply.
-We welcome applications from mature applicants pursuing a career change.
-Pass the QTS Skills Tests by 1st August prior to the beginning of the programme.
-Must have undertaken at least ten days of work experience in a UK mainstream school environment within the three years prior to application.
-Must have completed the 10 day Primary School Experience in a UK Primary School (or a Primary School which follows the English National Curriculum) prior to commencing the University course in mid September. Offer holders will arrange this for themselves in their own local area.

Your professional and interpersonal qualities and your commitment to teaching will be considered when making an admissions decision. Candidates who meet the criteria, will be invited to a selection day. Selection days will involve individual interviews with a pre-prepared presentation element and tests to assess written English and other skills.

Successful candidates will receive an offer conditional upon successful medical and criminal record checks. The latter is carried out by the Disclosure and Barring Service and full instructions on how to apply for a DBS Disclosure are issued with offer letters. If you have a criminal record of any kind, you may contact the School of Education DBS Manager, Steph Tunstall, for further advice and information. All enquiries will be treated in confidence.

We strongly encourage you to register for the DBS Update Service, which lets you take your certificate from one employer to another without having to apply for a new check. Please note, all DBS Enhanced Disclosures for our students must be processed by Durham University unless you have applied to the Update Service.

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Durham University School of Education
Distance from Durham: 0 miles
The aim of the PGCE Secondary Partnership is to enable you to develop the range of skills required to become a qualified teacher of pupils aged between 11 and 16 (with post-16 enhancement). Read more
The aim of the PGCE Secondary Partnership is to enable you to develop the range of skills required to become a qualified teacher of pupils aged between 11 and 16 (with post-16 enhancement).

More specifically, you will learn how to:

Cope effectively in the classroom by developing your classroom management and control skills.
Develop a critical understanding of the curriculum and pedagogy of specialist areas.
Establish an understanding of a range of whole school issues, the values and assumptions that underpin them and their application to school and classroom practice.
Develop an understanding of pupils in school, their similarities and differences, particularly in terms of their needs, their behaviour, their motivation and levels of attainment.
You will hone these skills by undertaking subject specialist study and work on cross-curricular, focusing on school and classroom-based issues. This study, supported by the school-based work, will provide you with an integrated programme of professional training.

In addition, the PGCE Secondary Partnership can consitute the first year of the School of Education's MA Education. Successful completion of the PGCE will enable you to progress on to the part-time second year of this postgraduate degree, should you wish to do so.

Course content

Subjects available: Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Physics with Maths, English, Geography, History, Mathematics, Modern Foreign Languages, Physical Education.

The PGCE Secondary is the first phase of a career-long process of personal and professional development, which will equip you to become a secondary school teacher. The PGCE Secondary is a course in Initial Teacher Training which is accredited by the DfE, the successful completion of which will accord you Qualified Teacher Status (QTS). Our course has recently been inspected by Ofsted which resulted in an “Outstanding” grading for all aspects of our provision.

Each student teacher on the course specialises in one of the subjects listed above. Subject pedagogy is explored in curriculum groups, examining techniques for making each subject accessible and stimulating in a classroom environment.

Structure and Assessment

The course is organised as three modules:

Professional Issues in school based education
Teaching and Learning in the Curriculum
Self-directed Study

The Professional Issues in School Based Education relates to the Teacher Standards and is delivered in two parts, prior to each of the two extended teaching practices. The teaching is related to those classroom-based issues such as the psychology of learning, the law, curriculum groups, examining techniques for making each subject accessible and stimulating in a classroom environment and is followed up in subject groups and during school placements The block practices in the Autumn and Spring allow for practical opportunities for full professional development where there is a progression from observation, structured activities and group work to whole class work.

Teaching and Learning in the Curriculum and Self Directed Study are studied at Masters Level. The Teaching and Learning in the Curriculum Module draws on the international research expertise within the School of Education enabling student teachers to engage critically in issues relevant to the classroom and school, particularly those that impact on the success of children as learners. The Self Directed Study module draws on students’ experience during weekly visits to schools and their own small scale action research, and links this to critical engagement with published educational research.

These Masters modules provide an opportunity to explore, in a more theoretical way, the issues to do with teaching and learning through lectures and mixed subject and phase seminar groups taught in addition to sessions taught in a conference week usually after Christmas. In addition to covering Teacher standards these modules will enable assessment work to be carried out for the award of PGCE.

On successful completion of the course, student teachers will have 90 credits and QTS.

Read less
Durham University School of Education
Distance from Durham: 0 miles
The PGCE Secondary is the first phase of a career-long process of personal and professional development, which will equip you to become a secondary school teacher. Read more
The PGCE Secondary is the first phase of a career-long process of personal and professional development, which will equip you to become a secondary school teacher. The PGCE Secondary is a course in Initial Teacher Training which is accredited by the DfE, the successful completion of which will accord you Qualified Teacher Status (QTS). Our course has recently been inspected by Ofsted which resulted in an “Outstanding” grading for all aspects of our provision.

Subject pedagogy is explored in curriculum groups, examining techniques for making each subject accessible and stimulating in a classroom environment.

We believe strongly that to be able to teach successfully you must acquire a good understanding of the 'big ideas' of science as well as learning about how to teach science. The university-based time is therefore divided into two main parts:
-Core Science is a compulsory second method theme for all science students. It addresses your own understanding of the key concepts underpinning science. Many students approach this theme with excellent qualifications but have never had an opportunity to explore their understanding of these concepts. We are told that this part of the course is "thought provoking", "enlightening" and "challenging". You are expected to follow up this work with tutor and peer group support, using the extensive library facilities.
-Science Education Issues looks at areas relevant to how science is taught.

Various teaching and learning styles enable you to explore issues such as:
-Motivating pupils in science.
-Questioning strategies.
-Planning lessons to maximise pupils' active involvement.
-Planning to allow pupils' understanding to progress.
-The value of different types of practical work.
-The use of IT to enhance scientific understanding.

The science team has an international reputation for its work on teaching pupils the understanding necessary for investigative science. This is often referred to as 'the thinking behind the doing'. The importance we place in this aspect of science is reflected in the course. You will be based in one of our Partnership schools where you will have the opportunity to develop your skills in a teaching background.

The school-based activities involve structured classroom observations, planning and research projects and practical teaching - the latter starting by teaching individual pupils, eventually leading through group work to full classroom teaching.

Structure

The course is organised as three modules:
-Professional Issues in school based education
-Teaching and Learning in the Curriculum
-Self-directed Study

The Professional Issues in School Based Education relates to the Teacher Standards and is delivered in two parts, prior to each of the two extended teaching practices. The teaching is related to those classroom-based issues such as the psychology of learning, the law, curriculum groups, examining techniques for making each subject accessible and stimulating in a classroom environment and is followed up in subject groups and during school placements The block practices in the Autumn and Spring allow for practical opportunities for full professional development where there is a progression from observation, structured activities and group work to whole class work.

Teaching and Learning in the Curriculum and Self Directed Study are studied at Masters Level. The Teaching and Learning in the Curriculum Module draws on the international research expertise within the School of Education enabling student teachers to engage critically in issues relevant to the classroom and school, particularly those that impact on the success of children as learners. The Self Directed Study module draws on students’ experience during weekly visits to schools and their own small scale action research, and links this to critical engagement with published educational research.

These Masters modules provide an opportunity to explore, in a more theoretical way, the issues to do with teaching and learning through lectures and mixed subject and phase seminar groups taught as a conference week usually after Christmas. In addition to covering Teacher standards these modules will enable assessment work to be carried out for the award of PGCE.

On successful completion of the course, student teachers will have 90 credits and QTS.

Other admission requirements

-A demonstrable interest and involvement in the lives and development of young people.
-GCSE English and Mathematics at Grade C or above (or equivalent) which must be achieved at the time of application. If your equivalent qualifications are from an overseas institution, you must apply for a Statement of Comparability from NARIC.
-Applicants with non-standard qualifications, for example, access routes into higher education are welcome to apply.
-We welcome applications from mature applicants pursuing a career change.
-Pass the QTS Skills Tests by 1st August prior to the beginning of the programme.
-Must have undertaken at least ten days of work experience in a UK mainstream school environment within the three years prior to application.
-Must have completed the 10 day Primary School Experience in a UK Primary School (or a Primary School which follows the English National Curriculum) prior to commencing the University course in mid September. Offer holders will arrange this for themselves in their own local area.

Your professional and interpersonal qualities and your commitment to teaching will be considered when making an admissions decision. Candidates who meet the criteria, will be invited to a selection day. Selection days will involve individual interviews with a pre-prepared presentation element and tests to assess written English and other skills.

Successful candidates will receive an offer conditional upon successful medical and criminal record checks. The latter is carried out by the Disclosure and Barring Service and full instructions on how to apply for a DBS Disclosure are issued with offer letters. If you have a criminal record of any kind, you may contact the School of Education DBS Manager, Steph Tunstall, for further advice and information. All enquiries will be treated in confidence.

We strongly encourage you to register for the DBS Update Service, which lets you take your certificate from one employer to another without having to apply for a new check. Please note, all DBS Enhanced Disclosures for our students must be processed by Durham University unless you have applied to the Update Service.

Read less
Durham University School of Education
Distance from Durham: 0 miles
The PGCE Secondary is the first phase of a career-long process of personal and professional development, which will equip you to become a secondary school teacher. Read more
The PGCE Secondary is the first phase of a career-long process of personal and professional development, which will equip you to become a secondary school teacher. The PGCE Secondary is a course in Initial Teacher Training which is accredited by the DfE, the successful completion of which will accord you Qualified Teacher Status (QTS). Our course has recently been inspected by Ofsted which resulted in an “Outstanding” grading for all aspects of our provision.

Subject pedagogy is explored in curriculum groups, examining techniques for making each subject accessible and stimulating in a classroom environment.

We believe strongly that to be able to teach successfully you must acquire a good understanding of the 'big ideas' of science as well as learning about how to teach science. The university-based time is therefore divided into two main parts:
-Core Science is a compulsory second method theme for all science students. It addresses your own understanding of the key concepts underpinning science.
-Science Education Issues looks at areas relevant to how science is taught.

Various teaching and learning styles enable you to explore issues such as:
-Motivating pupils in science.
-Questioning strategies.
-Planning lessons to maximise pupils' active involvement.
-Planning to allow pupils' understanding to progress.
-The value of different types of practical work.
-The use of IT to enhance scientific understanding.

The science team has an international reputation for its work on teaching pupils the understanding necessary for investigative science. This is often referred to as 'the thinking behind the doing'. The importance we place in this aspect of science is reflected in the course. You will be based in one of our Partnership schools where you will have the opportunity to develop your skills in a teaching background.

The school-based activities involve structured classroom observations, planning and research projects and practical teaching - the latter starting by teaching individual pupils, eventually leading through group work to full classroom teaching.

Structure

The course is organised as three modules:
-Professional Issues in school based education
-Teaching and Learning in the Curriculum
-Self-directed Study

The Professional Issues in School Based Education relates to the Teacher Standards and is delivered in two parts, prior to each of the two extended teaching practices. The teaching is related to those classroom-based issues such as the psychology of learning, the law, curriculum groups, examining techniques for making each subject accessible and stimulating in a classroom environment and is followed up in subject groups and during school placements The block practices in the Autumn and Spring allow for practical opportunities for full professional development where there is a progression from observation, structured activities and group work to whole class work.

Teaching and Learning in the Curriculum and Self Directed Study are studied at Masters Level. The Teaching and Learning in the Curriculum Module draws on the international research expertise within the School of Education enabling student teachers to engage critically in issues relevant to the classroom and school, particularly those that impact on the success of children as learners. The Self Directed Study module draws on students’ experience during weekly visits to schools and their own small scale action research, and links this to critical engagement with published educational research.

These Masters modules provide an opportunity to explore, in a more theoretical way, the issues to do with teaching and learning through lectures and mixed subject and phase seminar groups taught as a conference week usually after Christmas. In addition to covering Teacher standards these modules will enable assessment work to be carried out for the award of PGCE.

On successful completion of the course, student teachers will have 90 credits and QTS.

Other admission requirements

-A levels or equivalent in at least two science subjects should your degree have less than 50% relevant subject knowledge and wish to apply for a Subject Knowledge Enhancement course (SKE).
-A demonstrable interest and involvement in the lives and development of young people.
-GCSE English and Mathematics at Grade C or above (or equivalent) which must be achieved at the time of application. If your equivalent qualifications are from an overseas institution, you must apply for a Statement of Comparability from NARIC.
-Applicants with non-standard qualifications, for example, access routes into higher education are welcome to apply.
-We welcome applications from mature applicants pursuing a career change.
-Pass the QTS Skills Tests by 1st August prior to the beginning of the programme.
-Must have undertaken at least ten days of work experience in a UK mainstream school environment within the three years prior to application.
-Must have completed the 10 day Primary School Experience in a UK Primary School (or a Primary School which follows the English National Curriculum) prior to commencing the University course in mid September. Offer holders will arrange this for themselves in their own local area.

Your professional and interpersonal qualities and your commitment to teaching will be considered when making an admissions decision. Candidates who meet the criteria, will be invited to a selection day. Selection days will involve individual interviews with a pre-prepared presentation element and tests to assess written English and other skills.

Successful candidates will receive an offer conditional upon successful medical and criminal record checks. The latter is carried out by the Disclosure and Barring Service and full instructions on how to apply for a DBS Disclosure are issued with offer letters. If you have a criminal record of any kind, you may contact the School of Education DBS Manager, Steph Tunstall, for further advice and information. All enquiries will be treated in confidence.

We strongly encourage you to register for the DBS Update Service, which lets you take your certificate from one employer to another without having to apply for a new check. Please note, all DBS Enhanced Disclosures for our students must be processed by Durham University unless you have applied to the Update Service.

Read less

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