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Politics & Government×

University of Birmingham Masters Degrees in Development Studies

We have 11 University of Birmingham Masters Degrees in Development Studies

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Numerous environmental challenges threaten the progress of international development and poverty alleviation. Politics and power have a significant influence on these challenges, how they are understood and responded to. Read more

Numerous environmental challenges threaten the progress of international development and poverty alleviation. Politics and power have a significant influence on these challenges, how they are understood and responded to. The MSc Environment, Development and Politics takes a novel approach to training in environment and development by recognising the importance of power and politics at all levels of decision-making, from the local to the global, with modules covering international development, global environmental governance and environment and sustainable development.  

The International Development Department is well-regarded internationally by sponsors, donor agencies, governments and NGOs. Study with us to benefit from:

  • Expertise in key issues and skills valued by employers
  • A vibrant, welcoming community
  • Individual overseas fieldwork or study visit included in fees (on-campus programmes)
  • Flexible programmes and a wide choice of modules (part-time students also welcome)
  • A diverse and international student body
  • Strong support in study and English language skills

Each programme is taught by a team of multi-disciplinary specialists who work closely with students to address individual interests and concerns. Every student is allocated an academic tutor to support them in their academic progress throughout the year. The department has a long history of teaching students from across the world, and recent students have come from 99 different countries and a wide variety of professional and academic backgrounds.

Course details

Environmental opportunities and challenges are closely intertwined with international development, and understanding of the causes, nature and consequences of environmental issues is essential for anyone working to promote positive change in the livelihoods of the poor. Power and politics fundamentally influence how the environment is recognised, protected and benefited from. Recognising this, the MSc Environment, Development and Politics takes a novel approach to training in environment and development by highlighting the importance of power and politics at all levels of decision-making, from the local to the global. The programme is therefore delivered in conjunction with the Department of Political Science and International Studies (POLSIS).

Learning and teaching

Teaching takes place over two ten-week terms, utilizing a range of teaching and learning methods, including short lectures, problem solving, role play and group work. In the summer term, students complete assignments and focus on their 12,000 word dissertation.

By the end of your study you will gain:

  • An in-depth understanding of competing development theories and approaches and the ability to critically evaluate their strengths and weaknesses.
  • An appreciation of and ability to use approaches to investigating and responding to linkages between the environment and development
  • An in-depth understanding of contemporary themes and analytical approaches to understanding global environmental politics
  • Writing skills to produce well-structured and coherent essays and reports, making good use of references.
  • Oral presentation skills.
  • Ability to access material from different sources including policy documents and other publications from governments and international organisations, documents from the internet, and from books and academic journals.
  • The capacity to interpret and make use of material from the above sources.

Enhancing your Student Experience

In the School of Government and Society we offer much more than a degree. As a student here, whether undergraduate or postgraduate, you have the opportunity to take part in a wide range of events, with some or all of the costs paid for by the School.

Employability

The knowledge and skills gained in the programme will equip graduates for jobs in international, national and local government and non-governmental organizations, think tanks and consultancies.

See what some of our alumni are doing now and what they thought about studying with us at IDD



Read less
The MPA is an international Masters’ programme, aimed at people who are pursuing (or would like to pursue) a career in public administration in government… Read more

The MPA is an international Masters’ programme, aimed at people who are pursuing (or would like to pursue) a career in public administration in government, public enterprises or non-governmental organisations, whether at local, national or international level. The MPA bridges theory and practice to help students to acquire the skills and understanding needed for effective management and strategy in government, and is taught in a highly motivated international learning environment.

The Human Resources MPA pathway recognizes the key role of the human resources function in public management strategy and the need to adapt human resources practice to different cultural contexts and strategic challenges. Using case studies, the pathway enables students to develop their capacity for analysis and problem-solving in complex human resource contexts. 

Course details

The MPA is an international Masters’ programme, aimed at those who aspire to a career in public management in government, public agencies or non-governmental organizations working with government, whether at local, regional, national or international levels, worldwide. The Human Resources MPA pathway is designed for those who are interested in human resource management and development in the public, state or NGO sectors in developing, transitional or newly-industrialised countries. This is primarily a public sector management, not a business management, programme, although the themes covered are relevant to both sectors. The pathway encourages students to consider and analyse how a changing global environment has shaped the ways in which work is organised and managed and how ideas about leadership and management may be applied in response to different problems and challenges. The programme emphasises a diagnostic case study approach in in its core modules, with an emphasis on practical, theoretically-informed discussion and strategy development.

The pathway explores current and recent trends in public administration and human resources, focusing on relationship between hard and soft approaches to the analysis and practice of management, for example between human resources management and human resource development, between leadership and management and between vertical bureaucracy and decentralised collaboration. The pathway considers the interaction between organizational structure, culture, power and motivation in public administration and in international organisations.

Learning and teaching

Teaching takes place over two ten-week terms, utilizing a range of teaching and learning methods, including short lectures, problem solving, role play and group work.

Employability

The knowledge and skills gained in the programme will equip graduates for jobs in international, national and local government and non-governmental organisations.

See what some of our alumni are doing now and what they thought about studying with us at IDD.



Read less
Study from anywhere in the world with practitioners in government, civil society and the private sector, as well as with people new to development. Read more

Study from anywhere in the world with practitioners in government, civil society and the private sector, as well as with people new to development.

This programme is designed to provide students with an understanding of the evolution of thinking and practice in international development over the last fifty to sixty years.

Course details

The core module aims to familiarise students with key concepts (eg development and poverty) and theories (eg modernisation, dependency, neo-liberalism and the ‘crisis’ in development theory) and with the changing roles of international development organisations and states in promoting international development (eg through aid, trade and fiscal, monetary and social policies).

The emphasis throughout will be on encouraging students to reflect critically on what has worked well or not and why. Students will select five optional modules (at 20 credits each) based on their individual interests and career aspirations.

Specialist pathways

Learning and teaching

The programme is delivered online, using a web communications tools system (Canvas) and this web environment is where students are expected to take part in online discussions and group activities, guided by a tutor. All required reading is provided (either in hard copy or via our extensive electronic library, or via Internet links). Assessment takes the form of 2 items of assessment per module, plus a 10,000 to 15,000 word dissertation for the MSc.

Course structure

In delivering our distance learning programmes, we have drawn on lessons learned by academic institutions about how to provide effective distance learning and use a blended learning approach:

  • An intensive online induction programme is included to familiarise students with the web-based discussion boards, the online library facilities and the requirements of the programme
  • Required reading materials are provided in hard copy
  • Discussions and group activities take place within an online learning environment
  • Students benefit from interacting closely with each other and their tutors even while they are separated by continents and time zones (we have students in Africa, the Caribbean, the US, Eastern Europe, South East Asia and the UK)
  • Whilst discussion groups and access to the electronic library rely on the use of a computer, students are not tied to the computer for other reading materials
  • A short online research methods course is provided prior to starting the dissertation project
  • We pride ourselves on strong administrative, academic and pastoral support for students

Our distance learning courses use a variety of teaching and assessment methods: Hard copy teaching and reading materials

  • Textbooks and CDs / DVDs
  • Electronic access to the University’s extensive elibrary facility containing ejournals, ebooks and databases
  • Group online discussion activities (using Canvas, which is part of our 'virtual learning environment')
  • Dissertation
  • Individual reading and reflection

Each module takes six weeks to complete (with guided online discussions). The MSc does not include any face-to-face element.

The course is assumed to be part time, and students study one module at a time.

Course requirements

IDD has designed its distance learning courses to be accessible for a working professional person and we have kept the technical requirements to a minimum. However, before you commit to distance learning, we recommend that you consider the following:

IT equipment: To complete a distance learning course successfully, you will need:

  • Extended access to a computer with Word, Excel, Internet Explorer, a media player software and a CD-ROM drive.
  • Regular access to the Internet for visiting the web-based discussion boards, email and some online library research (whilst this is obviously easier with broadband, we have many students who participate successfully through a dial-up connection).

IT skills: You will find this course less challenging if you are already a confident Internet user, although we are available extensively to coach you through becoming familiar with the web-based discussion format and to address other IT questions.

Time: This course requires that you read a good deal and regularly check into the web-based discussions during the six 'live' weeks of discussion for each module. If you are forced to miss some of the discussions for work or personal reasons, this can be coped with, but if you are regularly out of touch you will find it hard to complete the assignments to the required standard. Writing the assignments is also time-consuming.

Employability

Career opportunities 

This programme tends to recruit studentswho are either currently working for, or plan to work for, ngos, aid donors,the public service sector, etc.

Alumni

Currently more than 3,800 IDD alumni have taken their knowledge and experience to over 148 countries around the globe and are working in a variety of jobs in the public, private and voluntary sector.

See what some of our alumni are doing now and what they thought about studying with us at IDD.



Read less
This programme allows you to explore in depth the challenges facing developing and developed countries in the fight against global poverty, as well as to understand the promise and problems of proposed approaches to poverty reduction. Read more

This programme allows you to explore in depth the challenges facing developing and developed countries in the fight against global poverty, as well as to understand the promise and problems of proposed approaches to poverty reduction. Issues covered include: theories and history of development; changing approaches to poverty reduction; practical policy, programme and research skills.

The International Development Department is well-regarded internationally by sponsors, donor agencies, governments and NGOs. Study with us to benefit from:

  • Expertise in key issues and skills valued by employers
  • A vibrant, welcoming community
  • Individual overseas fieldwork or study visit included in fees (on-campus programmes)
  • Flexible programmes and a wide choice of modules (part-time students also welcome)
  • A diverse and international student body
  • Strong support in study and English language skills

Each programme is taught by a team of multi-disciplinary specialists who work closely with students to address individual interests and concerns. Every student is allocated an academic tutor to support them in their academic progress throughout the year. The department has a long history of teaching students from across the world, and recent students have come from 99 different countries and a wide variety of professional and academic backgrounds.

Course details

Students will explore theories of development in historical context from (roughly) 1945 up to the present in the single compulsory module. The theories are then applied to contemporary development approaches and issues. Throughout, the emphasis is on you developing a critical understanding of the evolution of development theories over the last half century and its implications for present day thinking about development.

Students can then select the remaining five modules to suit their own needs and interests. They could, for example, take modules or rural and urban poverty reduction, on conflict and development or gender and development. They could also take modules on project management, disaster management or governance. Many other modules are also available to choose from.

Learning and teaching

Teaching takes place over two ten-week terms, utilizing a range of teaching and learning methods, including short lectures, problem solving, role play and group work.

By the end of your study you will gain:

  • An in-depth understanding of competing development theories – their origins, their continuities and their differences – and the ability to critically evaluate their strengths and weaknesses.
  • An understanding and ability to critique the distinctions between economic, social and political approaches to development.
  • An understanding of the role of international institutions (such as the World Bank, International Monetary Fund and the World Trade Organisation) in the processes of development and an ability to critique the theoretical underpinnings of these institutions.
  • The ability to critically appraise the role of the state in the governance of developing countries.
  • Writing skills to produce well structured and coherent essays and reports, making good use of references.
  • Oral presentation skills.
  • Ability to access material from different sources including policy documents and other publications from governments and international organisations, documents from the internet, and from books and academic journals.
  • The capacity to interpret and make use of material from the above sources.

Fieldwork

Gain first-hand experience of development concepts plus valuable work experience without additional costs. This Masters degree enable students either to carry out individual fieldwork in a country and on a topic of their choice or to take part in an organised study visit. Funding for this overseas study is included in the programme fee. 

Enhancing your Student Experience

In the School of Government and Society we offer much more than a degree. As a student here, whether undergraduate or postgraduate, you have the opportunity to take part in a wide range of events, with some or all of the costs paid for by the School.

Employability

The knowledge and skills gained in the programme will equip graduates for jobs in international, national and local government and non-governmental organizations, think tanks and consultancies.

See what some of our alumni are doing now and what they thought about studying with us at IDD.



Read less
This programme recognises an area of increasing importance in the academic and policy worlds, namely the links between peace, conflict and development. Read more

This programme recognises an area of increasing importance in the academic and policy worlds, namely the links between peace, conflict and development. The programme reflects the international debates about the nature of peace and conflict in the developing world and the approaches of the international community to support and create peaceful governance in areas of conflict.

The programme makes a direct link between academic and practical policy approaches to analysing and recovering from conflicts, with an emphasis on developing countries, and will provide an extensive menu of choices for masters level students. Contemporary debates cover issues as broad as accountability and transparency, corruption, conflict, political settlement, human rights, participation, access to justice, democratisation and state building and will be of interest to individuals already working in development or recent graduates with some work/volunteer experience seeking careers in development or government, or in NGOs related to governance, state-building and peace.

The International Development Department is well-regarded internationally by sponsors, donor agencies, governments and NGOs. Study with us to benefit from:

  • Expertise in key issues and skills valued by employers
  • A vibrant, welcoming community
  • Individual overseas fieldwork or study visit included in fees (on-campus programmes)
  • Flexible programmes and a wide choice of modules (part-time students also welcome)
  • A diverse and international student body
  • Strong support in study and English language skills

Each programme is taught by a team of multi-disciplinary specialists who work closely with students to address individual interests and concerns. Every student is allocated an academic tutor to support them in their academic progress throughout the year. The department has a long history of teaching students from across the world, and recent students have come from 99 different countries and a wide variety of professional and academic backgrounds.

Course details

This is an innovative programme taught by one of the leading centres of excellence in this field internationally. IDD hosts the Journal of Intervention and Statebuilding and the Journal of Civil Wars and has produced the leading textbook in this area, Conflict, Security and Development. IDD staff also edit two book series in Statebuilding and Conflict and Development for Routledge. As such the programme draws on our world-leading research to provide an offering that is research-led but also strongly informed by our regular involvement in policy in this area. We are a development department that is looking at peace and conflict. This gives us a particular range of modules and an approach that is unique amongst our competitors, most of which are delivered from an international security perspective. We are currently one of the market leaders in security and development and that particular relationship is in demand with increasing concerns about development aid, refugees, civil wars and the implications for post conflict reconstruction.

The programme looks at the dynamics of conflict and post-conflict politics, including the linkages between good governance, state-building, state resilience, fragility or collapse and approaches to reconstructing peace following violence. It draws on relevant debates, theories and approaches to development, innovations in theories and practices of good governance and state-building in application to developing and transitional countries. All students have access to significant knowledge of the design and implementation of post-conflict peacebuilding and development strategies, including contemporary debates related to international intervention, local political systems, hybridity and the politics of peacebuilding.

Learning and teaching

Teaching takes place over two ten-week terms, utilising a range of teaching and learning methods, including short lectures, problem solving, role play and group work.

Enhancing your Student Experience

In the School of Government and Society we offer much more than a degree. As a student here, whether undergraduate or postgraduate, you have the opportunity to take part in a wide range of events, with some or all of the costs paid for by the School.

Employability

This programme provides a framework for exploring academic synergies and for students to undertake genuinely interdisciplinary study. Students leaving this programme will be academically well-trained but also be in a position to undertake careers in conflict analysis, good governance and management in the developing world. This offers careers in NGOs, Government agencies and international organisations as well as organisations concerned with international risk and business within conflict areas.

See what some of our alumni are doing now and what they thought about studying with us at IDD



Read less
The notion that “politics matters” has increasingly become the mantra of development policy-makers and practitioners – as well as development scholars - and there is now a growing recognition that international development is inherently political. Read more

The notion that “politics matters” has increasingly become the mantra of development policy-makers and practitioners – as well as development scholars - and there is now a growing recognition that international development is inherently political. Development agencies want staff trained in political economy analysis skills while academics and governments now focus more than ever on the political underpinnings of global development challenges.

This MSc makes a direct link between academic and practical policy approaches to international development, with an emphasis on exploring and understanding the politics of developing countries and the relationship between politics and development. Issues examined include: the impact of political systems, governance and political actors on developmental successes and failures; the relationships between global, regional, national and local organisations, networks and institutions and the driving of developmental change and the politics of aid and international donors.

The programme is designed for recent graduates preparing to work in international development and for professionals working for NGOs, donor agencies or development projects.

The International Development Department is well-regarded internationally by sponsors, donor agencies, governments and NGOs. Study with us to benefit from:

  • Expertise in key issues and skills valued by employers
  • A vibrant, welcoming community
  • Individual overseas fieldwork or study visit included in fees (on-campus programmes)
  • Flexible programmes and a wide choice of modules (part-time students also welcome)
  • A diverse and international student body
  • Strong support in study and English language skills

Each programme is taught by a team of multi-disciplinary specialists who work closely with students to address individual interests and concerns. Every student is allocated an academic tutor to support them in their academic progress throughout the year. The department has a long history of teaching students from across the world, and recent students have come from 99 different countries and a wide variety of professional and academic backgrounds.

Course details

It is now clearer than ever before that the greatest development challenges of our time – poverty, conflict, famine, poor governance etc. – are driven primarily by political, not technical, factors. The aim of this programme is to provide theoretical and empirical training to students to enable them to understand the role that politics plays in both facilitating and undermining development, in both the North and the South.

The programme is aimed at recent graduates preparing to work in international development and for professionals working for NGOs, donor agencies or development projects and focuses on a range of key questions, including:

  •  are democracy and development intrinsically linked?
  • how do theories of development link to development practice?
  • what is the ‘developmental state’?
  • how do historical and structural factors play into developmental change, or failure?

The programme is taught by some of the leading thinkers on the relationship between politics and development, each of whom work closely with policy-makers in the UK and internationally. Students will also benefit from engagement with major research programmes focused on the politics of development based in IDD, including theGovernance and Social Development Resource Centre.

Learning and teaching

Teaching takes place over two ten-week terms, utilising a range of teaching and learning methods, including short lectures, problem solving, role play and group work. In the summer term, students complete assignments and focus on their 12,000 word dissertation.

By the end of your study you will gain:

  • An in-depth understanding of competing development theories and approaches and the ability to critically evaluate their strengths and weaknesses.
  • The different political systems operating in developing countries and how and why such systems have come about.
  • The complex relationship between politics and development
  • The impact of political systems and political actors on developmental success and failure.
  • The impact of the political economy in developing countries and globally on aid and donor policies 
  • The ability to critically analyse and understand complex political and economic relationships and events.
  • The ability to understand in-depth and critically evaluate approaches to political analysis in developing countries.
  • The ability to critically, clearly and concisely argue the case for and against a range of development strategies.
  • The ability to interpret, explain and critically evaluate approaches to the political economy of development.
  • The ability to make presentations and write in a well argued, well-structured and readable manner, making good use of a wide range of references.

Enhancing your Student Experience

In the School of Government and Society we offer much more than a degree. As a student here, whether undergraduate or postgraduate, you have the opportunity to take part in a wide range of events, with some or all of the costs paid for by the School.

Employability

The knowledge and skills gained in the programme will equip graduates for jobs in international, national and local government and non-governmental organisations, think tanks and consultancies.

See what some of our alumni are doing now and what they thought about studying with us at IDD.



Read less
The MPA is an international Masters’ programme, aimed at people who are pursuing (or would like to pursue) a career in public administration in government… Read more

The MPA is an international Masters’ programme, aimed at people who are pursuing (or would like to pursue) a career in public administration in government, public enterprises or non-governmental organisations, whether at local, national or international level. The MPA bridges theory and practice, enabling students to acquire the skills and understanding needed for effective management and strategy in government. The programme is delivered in a highly motivated international learning environment.

The Finance pathway enables managers in the public sector and not-for-profit sector to update and improve their understanding of financial and economic management. The programme is particularly designed for those working in finance ministries, finance sections within sectoral ministries, development banks, local government, public enterprises, aid providers, non-governmental organisations, and research and training organisations who wish to participate at a strategic level in financial management decisions.

Course details

The MPA is an international Masters’ programme, aimed at people who are pursuing (or would like to pursue) a career in public administration in government, public enterprises or non-governmental organizations, whether at local, national or international level. The MPA bridges theory and practice, enabling students to acquire the skills and understanding needed for effective management and strategy in government. The programme is delivered in a highly motivated international learning environment.

The aim of the Finance pathway is to enable public sector managers to update and improve their practical skills in financial and economic management. The aim is to enable managers to participate on financial management at the strategic level in their organisation rather than to focus on detailed technical skills like bookkeeping. The programme is particularly designed for those working in finance ministries, finance sections within sectoral ministries, development banks, aid providers local government, public enterprises, non-governmental organisations, and research and training organisations who need to understand the principles of financial management and work with operational staff like accountants. This is primarily a public sector management, not a business management, programme, although some of the themes covered are relevant to both sectors.

The approach taken within the programme is practical and introduces theories and conceptual models where they help understand and solve practical problems. Students analyse practical cases, using real data as far as possible to provide excellent experience and develop required skills in public economic and finance management.

The programme includes development of understanding of the role of the state in managing the economy and public finances; managing monetary, exchange rate, fiscal, trade and environmental policy; budgeting and control. The programme considers the issues associated with working with the private sector; and, in designing, planning, financing and evaluating projects. New approaches to reform of financial management including performance budgeting and improving accountability receive string attention. There is a special focus on decentralised service delivery reflecting IDD’s long experience on working in decentralised systems.

Learning and teaching

Teaching takes place over two ten-week terms, utilizing a range of teaching and learning methods, including short lectures, problem solving, role play and group work. This is followed by the study trip and completion of the dissertation.

Employability

The knowledge and skills gained in the programme will equip graduates for jobs in international, national and local government and non-governmental organisations.

See what some of our alumni are doing now and what they thought about studying with us at IDD.



Read less
This programme enables you to study development with a specific focus on poverty and inequality, both key aspects of current development policy discourse. Read more

This programme enables you to study development with a specific focus on poverty and inequality, both key aspects of current development policy discourse. Issues examined include: definitions and indicators of poverty, inequality and development; causes of poverty and inequality; poverty reduction strategies; cross-cutting issues such as gender and conflict; practical policy, programme and research skills. 

The International Development Department is well-regarded internationally by sponsors, donor agencies, governments and NGOs. Study with us to benefit from:

  • Expertise in key issues and skills valued by employers
  • A vibrant, welcoming community
  • Individual overseas fieldwork or study visit included in fees (on-campus programmes)
  • Flexible programmes and a wide choice of modules (part-time students also welcome)
  • A diverse and international student body
  • Strong support in study and English language skills

Each programme is taught by a team of multi-disciplinary specialists who work closely with students to address individual interests and concerns. Every student is allocated an academic tutor to support them in their academic progress throughout the year. The department has a long history of teaching students from across the world, and recent students have come from 99 different countries and a wide variety of professional and academic backgrounds.

Course details

Students will explore theories of development in historical context from (roughly) 1945 up to the present in the core compulsory module. The theories are then applied to contemporary development approaches and issues. Throughout, the emphasis is on you developing a critical understanding of the evolution of development theories over the last half century and its implications for present day thinking about development.

The relevance of sociological categories of class, religion, ethnicity and gender in both disaggregating levels of poverty and inequality, and in understanding the processes which foster poverty and inequality in development will be explored in one of the two modules which give this programme its particular identity and focus.

The aim of the other programme specific compulsory module is to examine different approaches to defining and measuring poverty and inequality, to understand the impact of global and national systems on poverty and inequality, to reflect on the potential and limitations of some useful analytical frameworks and methodologies, and to consider some interesting approaches to project and policy led development.

Learning and teaching

Teaching takes place over two ten-week terms, utilising a range of teaching and learning methods, including short lectures, problem solving, role play and group work.

In the School of Government and Society we offer much more than a degree. As a student here, whether undergraduate or postgraduate, you have the opportunity to take part in a wide range of events, with some or all of the costs paid for by the School.

Employability

The knowledge and skills gained in the programme will equip graduates for jobs in international, national and local government and non-governmental organizations, think tanks and consultancies.

See what some of our alumni are doing now and what they thought about studying with us at IDD.



Read less
Study from anywhere in the world with practitioners in government, civil society and the private sector, as well as with people new to development. Read more

Study from anywhere in the world with practitioners in government, civil society and the private sector, as well as with people new to development.

This programme provides development managers with analytical and practical skills that lead to social and economic progress in developing and transitional countries. The programme is designed for those who want to improve their knowledge and skills in development management, from a wide range of sectors, including central and local government, NGOs and donors, and at the same time to acquire an academic qualification.

Course details

The programme is designed for those who want to improve their knowledge and skills in development management, from a wide range of sectors, including central and local government, NGOs and donors, and at the same time to acquire an academic qualification.

It explores:

  • The nature and purpose of development management
  • The role and relationships of and between actors in development management (in government, civil society, the private sector, and donors)
  • The approaches to reforms in developing countries and their management, and appraising their impact on different society interests
  • Policy making
  • Public finance
  • How to adapt public administration concepts to a variety of economic, institutional, geographic and cultural settings
  • key concepts of democracy, human rights, access to justice and accountability to development management practice 

Offered through distance learning, you study via a web-based learning environment, using textbooks and other printed materials, complemented by our extensive electronic library, and an online discussion board where you participate in guided discussion activities with other students and your tutor

The programme is taught by a team of multidisciplinary specialists who work closely with students to address their individual interests and concerns. MSc students have an individual dissertation supervisor.

As a distance learning degree, the MSc Development Management takes a minimum of two years to complete: 18 months for the six taught modules and six months for the dissertation.

The programme does not include any face-to-face element.

Learning and teaching

The programme is delivered online, using a web communications tools system (Canvas) and this web environment is where students are expected to take part in online discussions and group activities, guided by a tutor. All required reading is provided (either in hard copy or via our extensive electronic library, or via Internet links).

Course structure

In delivering our distance learning programmes, we have drawn on lessons learned by academic institutions about how to provide effective distance learning and use a blended learning approach:

  • An intensive online induction programme is included to familiarise students with the web-based discussion boards, the online library facilities and the requirements of the programme
  • Required reading materials are provided in hard copy
  • Discussions and group activities take place within an online learning environment
  • Students benefit from interacting closely with each other and their tutors even while they are separated by continents and time zones (we have students in Africa, the Caribbean, the US, Eastern Europe, South East Asia and the UK)
  • Whilst discussion groups and access to the electronic library rely on the use of a computer, students are not tied to the computer for other reading materials
  • A short online research methods course is provided prior to starting the dissertation project
  • We pride ourselves on strong administrative, academic and pastoral support for students

Our distance learning courses use a variety of teaching and assessment methods: Hard copy teaching and reading materials

  • Textbooks and CDs / DVDs
  • Electronic access to the University’s extensive elibrary facility containing ejournals, ebooks and databases
  • Group online discussion activities (using Canvas, which is part of our 'virtual learning environment')
  • Dissertation
  • Individual reading and reflection

Each module takes six weeks to complete (with guided online discussions). The MSc does not include any face-to-face element. For the MSc, we have replaced exams with time-limited assignments (which take place over the weekend at the end of each module).

The course is assumed to be part time, and students study one module at a time.

Course requirements

IDD has designed its distance learning courses to be accessible for a working professional person and we have kept the technical requirements to a minimum. However, before you commit to distance learning, we recommend that you consider the following:

IT equipment: To complete a distance learning course successfully, you will need:

  • Extended access to a computer with Word, Excel, Internet Explorer, a media player software and a CD-ROM drive.
  • Regular access to the Internet for visiting the web-based discussion boards, email and some online library research (whilst this is obviously easier with broadband, we have many students who participate successfully through a dial-up connection).

IT skills: You will find this course less challenging if you are already a confident Internet user, although we are available extensively to coach you through becoming familiar with the web-based discussion format and to address other IT questions.

Time: This course requires that you read a good deal and regularly check into the web-based discussions during the six 'live' weeks of discussion for each module. If you are forced to miss some of the discussions for work or personal reasons, this can be coped with, but if you are regularly out of touch you will find it hard to complete the assignments to the required standard. Writing the assignments is also time-consuming.

Employability

Careers

The programme is designed for recent graduates preparing to work in international development and for professionals working for NGOs, donor or government funded development programmes.

Alumni

Currently more than 3,800 IDD alumni have taken their knowledge and experience to over 148 countries around the globe and are working in a variety of jobs in the public, private and voluntary sector.

See what some of our alumni are doing now and what they thought about studying with us at IDD.



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Study from anywhere in the world with practitioners in government, civil society and the private sector, as well as with people new to development. Read more

Study from anywhere in the world with practitioners in government, civil society and the private sector, as well as with people new to development.

This programme recognises the opportunities for educational provision in an area of increasing interest amongst the academic community, namely the links between development, security and conflict. It will make a direct link between academic and practical policy approaches to analysing and recovering from conflicts, with an emphasis on developing countries.

Course details

This programme provides a framework for exploring academic synergies and for students to undertake genuinely interdisciplinary study. 

More information on: International Development MSc by distance learning

Learning and teaching

The programme is delivered online, using a web communications tools system (Canvas) and this web environment is where students are expected to take part in online discussions and group activities, guided by a tutor. All required reading is provided (either in hard copy or via our extensive electronic library, or via Internet links). Assessment takes the form of 2 items of assessment per module, plus a 10,000 to 15,000 word dissertation for the MSc.

Course structure

In delivering our distance learning programmes, we have drawn on lessons learned by academic institutions about how to provide effective distance learning and use a blended learning approach:

  • An intensive online induction programme is included to familiarise students with the web-based discussion boards, the online library facilities and the requirements of the programme
  • Required reading materials are provided in hard copy
  • Discussions and group activities take place within an online learning environment
  • Students benefit from interacting closely with each other and their tutors even while they are separated by continents and time zones (we have students in Africa, the Caribbean, the US, Eastern Europe, South East Asia and the UK)
  • Whilst discussion groups and access to the electronic library rely on the use of a computer, students are not tied to the computer for other reading materials
  • A short online research methods course is provided prior to starting the dissertation project
  • We pride ourselves on strong administrative, academic and pastoral support for students

Our distance learning courses use a variety of teaching and assessment methods: Hard copy teaching and reading materials

  • Textbooks and CDs / DVDs
  • Electronic access to the University’s extensive elibrary facility containing ejournals, ebooks and databases
  • Group online discussion activities (using Canvas, which is part of our 'virtual learning environment')
  • Dissertation
  • Individual reading and reflection

Each module takes six weeks to complete (with guided online discussions). The MSc does not include any face-to-face element.

The course is assumed to be part time, and students study one module at a time.

Course requirements

IDD has designed its distance learning courses to be accessible for a working professional person and we have kept the technical requirements to a minimum. However, before you commit to distance learning, we recommend that you consider the following:

IT equipment: To complete a distance learning course successfully, you will need:

  • Extended access to a computer with Word, Excel, Internet Explorer, a media player software and a CD-ROM drive.
  • Regular access to the Internet for visiting the web-based discussion boards, email and some online library research (whilst this is obviously easier with broadband, we have many students who participate successfully through a dial-up connection).

IT skills: You will find this course less challenging if you are already a confident Internet user, although we are available extensively to coach you through becoming familiar with the web-based discussion format and to address other IT questions.

Time: This course requires that you read a good deal and regularly check into the web-based discussions during the six 'live' weeks of discussion for each module. If you are forced to miss some of the discussions for work or personal reasons, this can be coped with, but if you are regularly out of touch you will find it hard to complete the assignments to the required standard. Writing the assignments is also time-consuming.

Employability

Career opportunities

Students leaving this programme will be academically well-trained but also be in a position to undertake careers in conflict analysis and management in the developing world.

Alumni

Currently more than 3,800 IDD alumni have taken their knowledge and experience to over 148 countries around the globe and are working in a variety of jobs in the public, private and voluntary sector.

See what some of our alumni are doing now and what they thought about studying with us at IDD.



Read less
Study from anywhere in the world with practitioners in government, civil society and the private sector, as well as with people new to development. Read more

Study from anywhere in the world with practitioners in government, civil society and the private sector, as well as with people new to development.

The broad purpose of this programme is to give those working in the area of poverty reduction and development in developing and transitional countries, or those wishing to work in such areas, a firmer grounding in understanding poverty and inequality, promoting poverty reduction and analysing the performance of major poverty reducing programmes and policies.

Course details

The core module aims to familiarise students with key concepts (eg development and poverty) and theories (eg modernisation, dependency, neo-liberalism and the ‘crisis’ in development theory) and with the changing roles of international development organisations and states in promoting international development (eg through aid, trade and fiscal, monetary and social policies).

The emphasis throughout will be on encouraging students to reflect critically on what has worked well or not and why. Students will select three optional modules (at 20 credits each) based on their individual interests and career aspirations.

More information on: International Development MSc by distance learning

Learning and teaching

The programme is delivered online, using a web communications tools system (Canvas) and this web environment is where students are expected to take part in online discussions and group activities, guided by a tutor. All required reading is provided (either in hard copy or via our extensive electronic library, or via Internet links). Assessment takes the form of 2 items of assessment per module, plus a 10,000 to 15,000 word dissertation for the MSc.

Course structure

In delivering our distance learning programmes, we have drawn on lessons learned by academic institutions about how to provide effective distance learning and use a blended learning approach:

  • An intensive online induction programme is included to familiarise students with the web-based discussion boards, the online library facilities and the requirements of the programme
  • Required reading materials are provided in hard copy
  • Discussions and group activities take place within an online learning environment
  • Students benefit from interacting closely with each other and their tutors even while they are separated by continents and time zones (we have students in Africa, the Caribbean, the US, Eastern Europe, South East Asia and the UK)
  • Whilst discussion groups and access to the electronic library rely on the use of a computer, students are not tied to the computer for other reading materials
  • A short online research methods course is provided prior to starting the dissertation project
  • We pride ourselves on strong administrative, academic and pastoral support for students

Our distance learning courses use a variety of teaching and assessment methods: Hard copy teaching and reading materials

  • Textbooks and CDs / DVDs
  • Electronic access to the University’s extensive elibrary facility containing ejournals, ebooks and databases
  • Group online discussion activities (using Canvas, which is part of our 'virtual learning environment')
  • Dissertation
  • Individual reading and reflection

Each module takes six weeks to complete (with guided online discussions). The MSc does not include any face-to-face element.

The course is assumed to be part time, and students study one module at a time.

Course requirements

IDD has designed its distance learning courses to be accessible for a working professional person and we have kept the technical requirements to a minimum. However, before you commit to distance learning, we recommend that you consider the following:

IT equipment: To complete a distance learning course successfully, you will need:

  • Extended access to a computer with Word, Excel, Internet Explorer, a media player software and a CD-ROM drive.
  • Regular access to the Internet for visiting the web-based discussion boards, email and some online library research (whilst this is obviously easier with broadband, we have many students who participate successfully through a dial-up connection).

IT skills: You will find this course less challenging if you are already a confident Internet user, although we are available extensively to coach you through becoming familiar with the web-based discussion format and to address other IT questions.

Time: This course requires that you read a good deal and regularly check into the web-based discussions during the six 'live' weeks of discussion for each module. If you are forced to miss some of the discussions for work or personal reasons, this can be coped with, but if you are regularly out of touch you will find it hard to complete the assignments to the required standard. Writing the assignments is also time-consuming.

Employability

Career opportunities 

This programme is most relevant for people who have worked in governments, non-governmental organisations (either international, regional, national or local) or on donor-funded projects, as well as for recent graduates wishing to work for such organizations, who have some experience of developing countries.

Alumni

Currently more than 3,800 IDD alumni have taken their knowledge and experience to over 148 countries around the globe and are working in a variety of jobs in the public, private and voluntary sector.

See what some of our alumni are doing now and what they thought about studying with us at IDD.



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