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Languages, Literature & Cu…×

Masters Degrees in Danish Society & Culture

We have 8 Masters Degrees in Danish Society & Culture

Masters degrees in Danish Society & Culture involve advanced study of the social and cultural relationships, traditions and phenomenon originating from, or associated with Denmark.

Related postgraduate specialisms include Scandinavian Studies, and European and Nordic Studies. Entry requirements typically include a relevant undergraduate degree such as Modern Languages or Cultural studies.

Why study a Masters in Danish Society & Culture?

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UCL's Scandinavian Studies MA offers an intellectually exciting and flexible range of options focusing on Nordic culture in a global context. Read more
UCL's Scandinavian Studies MA offers an intellectually exciting and flexible range of options focusing on Nordic culture in a global context. No prior knowledge of a Nordic language is required, though students can opt to consolidate their language or translation skills, or to start Danish, Finnish, Icelandic, Norwegian or Swedish from scratch.

Degree information

Option modules include advanced translation skills, Nordic cinema, Nordic literature in global perspective, the transnational politics of the region, and material cultures as well as modules on Viking and medieval Scandinavia. Assessed modules are supplemented with workshops and a summer school providing opportunities for networking and career development in publishing, translation, filmmaking, and the heritage and creative sectors.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme offers two pathways: taught and research. Taught: one core module (30 credits), three optional modules (90 credits), dissertation (60 credits). Research: one core module (30 credits), two taught modules (60 credits), dissertation (90 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma, one core module (30 credits), three optional modules (90 credits) full-time nine months or part-time two years, is offered. A Postgraduate Certificate, one core module (30 credits), one optional module (30 credits) full-time three months, part-time six months, is offered.

Core module - Language, Culture and History. This core module permits research into two areas of major contemporary interest; for example, topics explored during the current year include the following: Trauma; Memory; Visual Culture; Queer(y)ing Sexuality

Optional modules - students take a choice of optional modules on topics such as the following:
-Advanced Scandinavian Translation
-Nordic Cinema: Contextualising Dreyer, Bergman and Dogme 95
-Introduction to Old Norse
-Crime and Small Communities in Nordic Literature
-Advanced Old Icelandic Literature
-Sources for the Viking Age

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a substantial dissertation.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures and reading and language classes. Student performance is assessed through written examination, coursework, and the dissertation.

Careers

An MA in Scandinavian Studies offers prospects for employment in the private as well as in the public sector, whether in Scandinavia or in the English-speaking world. Former graduate students in the department are to be found in a range of challenging careers, which include work in IT and management, museums and university teaching.

Employability
In the UK and abroad, the Nordic countries are increasingly recognised for the success of their political and social model, and for their film, literature, food and design. Our MA graduates bring their deep understanding of Scandinavian culture to careers in which knowledge of the region is key: publishing, the arts, commerce and information management. Expertise in Nordic languages is rare in the UK, and employer demand is accordingly high. Our MA allows students to hone their Nordic language skills or to try a new language. Many of our graduates launch careers with translation companies and as freelancers.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Scandinavian Studies is the largest independent Scandinavian department in the UK. Our research and teaching encompasses the languages, literatures, cultures, histories and politics of the entire Nordic region, ranging from the Viking Middle Ages to the present day.

Facilities are excellent: UCL boasts possibly the best Scandinavian Studies library outside Scandinavia, and students also have the outstanding collections of the British Library close at hand. Excellent links with universities in mainland Scandinavia, Iceland and Finland provide further benefits.

The department is home to the Viking Society for Northern Research, a leading publisher of Old Norse texts and monographs on medieval Scandinavia.

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This programme provides an opportunity for postgraduates with some knowledge and experience of radio to explore the medium in depth, both in theory and practice- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-radio/. Read more
This programme provides an opportunity for postgraduates with some knowledge and experience of radio to explore the medium in depth, both in theory and practice- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-radio/

-Facilities available are broadcast-standard with professional standard post-production suites
-Three sound studios are linked into a networked sound/ENPS electronic newsroom with subscriptions to news agencies broadcast services such as Sky, IRN, PA and AFP
-We also have our own student radio station broadcasting online and with an FM restricted service licence
-The course tutor is a practising broadcaster, and an experienced sound engineer runs the studio
-Our students have won industry awards, and our graduates are working at local, regional, national and international level
-The MA has been accredited by the Broadcast Journalism Training Council
-MA Radio students are taught online production skills and fully involved in publishing multimedia journalism and creative features with a sound focus on their dedicated public platform Londonmultimedianews.com

Overview

The MA programme in its 20-year history has had the privilege of participating with students from all over the world from Mongolia, Japan and China to Australia, USA, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Germany, Spain, Portugal, Egypt and many other countries. Home, EU and international students of all ages and backgrounds work together in a 70% practice to 30% theory practice Masters degree.

Students have an excellent record of employment and career development. MA Radio alumni include international award-winning foreign correspondents, the directors of national broadcasting channels, creative programme makers and broadcast journalists of distinction. But the course is also aimed at providing rich and valuable transferable skills so former students also find they have the springboard and confidence to develop and excel in other professional fields.

Award-winning students and graduates

MA students are consistently winning significant awards for their work. For example in 2012 MA Radio students had considerable success in the Charles Parker student radio feature awards and the Broadcast Journalism Training Council Awards for Best Radio News Feature and Best Online News Website as a result of their work for EastLondonLines.co.uk. Since 2013 MA Radio students have been working on a more specialist externally published broadcast online dimension.

In fact Goldsmiths MA Radio students have a longstanding tradition of success in the Charles Parker awards as you will see in the profile of winners between 2004 and 2012 and the fact that MA Radio students took Gold and Silver in the 2013 awards and their work was broadcast on BBC Radio 4Extra. Our graduates are winning awards for their work too, including Best Radio Feature at the UK Sony Awards

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Tim Crook.

Modules & Structure

You work in practice and theory groups, and take modules that cover:

-radio features and drama
-radio journalism and documentary
-key media law and ethical issues in relation to UK and US media law
-the cultural history of radio (primarily in Britain and the USA)
-adapting prose, film and theatre for radio dramatisation

Throughout the year, the programme includes workshops and seminars by visiting professionals and artists in the radio journalism and radio drama fields. We are happy to support work experience placements in professional newsrooms and radio drama productions. The programme offers students the opportunity to learn Teeline shorthand, television recording techniques and online applications for radio.

We also encourage you to support the Goldsmiths student radio station Wired FM.

Assessment

Portfolio of recorded work; unseen examination; essay; 30-minute radio drama script.

Skills & Careers

Throughout the MA you'll become familiar with a wide range of production techniques and practices, and an awareness of contemporary news values, media law and the operational practice of news stations.

You'll also develop valuable transferable skills including teamwork and communication skills.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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This course is currently not accepting applications. Your programme of study. More and more of us want to know about how people lived in the UK and Europe, what sort of cultures existed and why these cultures were named Celtic or Anglo Saxon. Read more

This course is currently not accepting applications

Your programme of study

More and more of us want to know about how people lived in the UK and Europe, what sort of cultures existed and why these cultures were named Celtic or Anglo Saxon. Why did these people travel or move to the UK as we know it now, what other people were on the scene and how did they influence these people? We know that the Celts came to Britain 500 years ago and Anglo Saxons from 400-1066, joining the Jutes and Frisians from Demark with the language we know today in Northumbria, Mercia, East Anglia, Wessex. The programme allows you to learn more about specific areas of the UK and their influences and folk tales plus history. If you enjoy history you will be fascinated with this discipline and subject areas.

You learn about European Celts, German invaders with Roman culture and legacy. There are in-depth insights of kingdoms, cultures, invasions and accounts of who we really are. The programme offers theories, method and languages, history and literature.

Courses listed for the programme

Semester 1

Celtic and Anglo-Saxon Research Seminar

Optional Courses

Modern Gaelic for Postgraduates

Modern Irish Language for Postgraduates

M.Litt Special Study in Language and Literature 1

Modern Gaelic for Postgraduates

M.Litt Special Study in Language and Literature

Semester 2

Celtic & Anglo- Saxon Research Seminar

Dissertation Preparation

Optional Courses

Modern Gaelic for Postgraduates

Modern Irish Language for Postgraduates

M.Litt Special Study in Language and Literature 1

Modern Gaelic for Postgraduates

M.Litt Special Study in Language and Literatures 1

Semester 3

15000 word dissertation

Why Study at Aberdeen?

  • If you enjoy learning about language, history and literature the university (1495) is steeped in history and you can enjoy the museums on site
  • You can enjoy activities on site whilst you study such as events, seminars and festivals relevant to your programme
  • The university is multidisciplinary in subjects and many overlap in relevance to your degree with plenty of seminars you can attend
  • You are taught be experts in the discipline from the Centre for Celtic and Anglo Saxon Studies and Centre for Linguistic Research

Where you study

  • University of Aberdeen
  • 12 Months Full Time or 24 Months Part Time
  • September start

International Student Fees 2017/2018

Find out about fees:

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/international/tuition-fees-and-living-costs-287.php

*Please be advised that some programmes have different tuition fees from those listed above and that some programmes also have additional costs.

Scholarships

View all funding options on our funding database via the programme page

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-taught/finance-funding-1599.php

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/funding/

Living in Aberdeen

Find out more about:

  • Your Accommodation
  • Campus Facilities
  • Aberdeen City
  • Student Support
  • Clubs and Societies

Find out more about living in Aberdeen:

https://abdn.ac.uk/study/student-life

Living costs

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/international/finance.php



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The course is a unique opportunity to embark upon a detailed investigation into the intellectual currents and aesthetic concerns surrounding the study and practice of film. Read more
The course is a unique opportunity to embark upon a detailed investigation into the intellectual currents and aesthetic concerns surrounding the study and practice of film. From the outset, questions of history, theory and context are brought to bear on issues of close analysis and interpretation. Elective modules in Screenwriting, Creative Documentary Practice and Editing allow students to balance film theory with practice. At every step of the way your progress will be informed by an emphasis on independent study and critical thinking. In addition, the course aims to develop the key transferable skills required for postgraduate study. These include dissertation preparation, time management and oral and written presentation.


The course consists of six taught modules and a Dissertation module that includes Research Methodologies.

Dissertation and Research Methodologies
This module prepares students for the formal processes of research and writing at M.Phil. level. Classes will cover library use, archival skills, electronic resources, use of Endnote, research skills, note taking, writing and oral presentation and power-point techniques. Students will write a dissertation of approximately 12,000-15,000 words on an approved topic to be supervised by an appropriate member of staff.

In addition, students choose six of the elective modules listed below:

Aesthetics of Digital Cinema
This course traces the history of the development of the digital image with specific reference to its application to filmmaking. We will look at the analogue origins of the digital image and discuss the aesthetic implications of the shift to digital film. Further we will discuss developing models of criticism and their application to the digital cinematic image. We will be drawing examples from Western (Hollywood, Danish, British) cinemas and non-Western (Iranian) cinemas as well as from other outputs, such as YouTube.

Cinema and Ireland

This course will explore the history of Irish cinema from the 1930s to the present. It will also cover such areas as state film production policies, film censorship, and the history of Irish film distribution and exhibition. In addition, it will trace how British and American cinemas have represented Ireland and the Irish, and it will examine representations of political violence, history, gender and the cinema of the Celtic Tiger years, as well as current trends in Irish film production.

Current Trends in European Cinema
This course will look at and examine the changes taking place in cinema in Europe in the latter part of the twentieth century and the beginning of the twenty-first century. This was a period that saw enormous transformation throughout the continent - both East and West - when the post World War II political dispensation collapsed and Cold War divisions crumbled. The fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, the break-up of the Soviet Union in 1991 and the subsequent overthrow of the remaining Stalinist regimes in Eastern and Central Europe, the emergence of the European Union as a transnational political entity in 1992, and the globalisation of the world economy all impacted on the way in which films were made and the type of themes they explored and topics they tackled.

Cult Cinema
This module will examine a number of films that have acquired 'cult status' for a variety of reasons. It will pay particular attention to the ways in which these films have circulated in popular and academic discourses and the various attempts to identify 'cult' qualities and qualifying practices.

Melodrama
This module will consider a wide range of variations on the ‘melodramatic mode’, including examples from early cinema, classical Hollywood cinema, as well as current American and European cinema.Â

Editing
This module will introduce students to the craft of editing, giving students an understanding of the essential technical and creative skills involved: how a scene is assembled and seamlessly put together, cutting dialogue, creating tension and drama using editing, using pacing, editing to rhythm, cutting to music and beats. It will also provide students with a through knowledge of the editing software, Final Cut Pro X, covering all aspects of the software, from capture and system-settings, editing tools and shortcuts, to effects, transitions and colour correction. The overall aim is to give students the knowledge, tools and confidence to complete their own work to a professional standard.

Creative Documentary Practice
The aim of this module is expose students to the possibilities of creative documentary film making with a strong emphasis on learning thorough practical application. The module will take a critical look at current practices in the genre with an emphasis both on the techniques of documentary filmmaking and the practicalities of how films are made.

Screenwriting
This module will introduce students to the techniques and conventions of screenwriting. Class exercises will involve the analysis of screenplays and short films, and the course will cover both the conventional three-act structure and other models of screenwriting.

Please note: all modules are subject to change and/or availability. Students must take three modules in Michaelmas term and three modules in Hilary term, subject to timetabling.

Assessment is by a combination of coursework and dissertation:

Each module will be assessed by a combination of written and/or practice based assignments as appropriate and class participation. Total ECTS: 60
Dissertation of approximately 12,000-15,000 words and Research Methodologies assessment. Total ECTS: 30
Postgraduate Diploma

A Postgraduate Diploma in Film Theory and History may be awarded in certain circumstances on the basis of coursework alone (60 ECTS). Entry is the same as for the M.Phil. programme.

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Research profile. As one of the few centres for the study of modern Scandinavian languages in the UK, we offer a programme that can cater to a wide range of research interests, covering all Scandinavian countries. Read more

Research profile

As one of the few centres for the study of modern Scandinavian languages in the UK, we offer a programme that can cater to a wide range of research interests, covering all Scandinavian countries.

Our academic staff are able to offer supervision on a broad variety of subjects, including:

  • 19th and 20th century literature
  • cultural relations and transfer
  • language history and dialectology
  • literary translation
  • onomastics
  • place and identity
  • Scottish–Scandinavian historical relations

In addition, you have the opportunity to undertake interdisciplinary research in areas such as comparative literature, film studies, translation studies, cultural studies and Scottish studies.

Thanks to our place in the diverse School of Literatures, Languages & Cultures, we are also able to cater for interdisciplinary research programmes.

Training and support

In order to encourage immersion in your research, we celebrate the major Scandinavian festivals, screen regular films and generally make the atmosphere as Scandinavian as possible. We are fortunate in being able to attract many Scandinavian visitors and speakers, including prominent authors and academics.

We encourage you to participate in our very active social and cultural life. We collaborate closely with the many Scandinavian bodies active in Edinburgh, such as the Danish Cultural Institute, the Norwegian Consulate General, the Scottish-Swedish Society and the Scottish-Finnish Society.

In addition, we have a partnership with the Georg Brandes International PhD School for Scandinavian Literature, Art and Linguistics, which is affiliated to the Department of Scandinavian Studies and Linguistics at the University of Copenhagen. This collaboration provides funding for our staff and students to attend and contribute to international workshops and seminars at the University of Copenhagen.



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The MSc in Energy and Society is an innovative postgraduate programme that considers energy as socio-technical. Read more

The MSc in Energy and Society is an innovative postgraduate programme that considers energy as socio-technical. Using ideas from practice theory, notions of integrated energy systems, energy development and social science approaches to energy, it aims to draw together diverse disciplinary approaches, and to ensure that students can speak and read across disciplinary boundaries. It will be of interest to engineers seeking to understand how and why innovations succeed or fail, to social scientists who want to improve their understanding of energy developments and to a broad range of graduates with an interest in today’s energy issues.

The full-time course consists of two terms of teaching, during which students are introduced to the range of research questions and methods, and a dissertation, involving the design, development and implementation of an independent research project. Students work closely with academic staff, and have the opportunity to become involved in active research projects.

The programme draws on leading experts in energy studies at Durham from Anthropology, Engineering, Geography, Earth Sciences and other departments. The two core taught modules are delivered via intensive block-teaching, and there is also a field study module for applied team-research. 

Please see the website for further information on current modules.

Course Learning and Teaching

The full-time course runs for a full year, from October to September. Full-time students attend classes between October and December (Michaelmas Term) and January and March (Epiphany), with further assessment in April and May (Easter Term), and then work, under the supervision of a specialist supervisor, to complete a dissertation by September.

The programme is delivered through a mixture of interactive lectures, seminars, practical sessions and workshops, in addition to one-to-one dissertation supervision. Typically, lectures deliver key information on progressively more advanced themes and topics. Seminars provide an opportunity to reflect in more depth upon material delivered in lectures and gathered from independent study outside the programme’s formal contact hours. They give students an opportunity to engage with academic issues at the cutting-edge of research in Anthropology, in a learning environment focused on discussion and debate of current issues.

Full-time students have on average 6-8 hours of formal teaching and learning contact per week, and are also expected to attend weekly departmental and Durham Energy Institute research seminars, often given by prominent visiting speakers. Outside timetabled contact hours, students are expected to devote significant amounts of time to reading, discussing and preparing for classes, assignments and project work.

Throughout the programme, all students meet regularly with the degree tutor, who provides academic support and guidance. Members of teaching staff have weekly office hours when they are available to meet with students on a ‘drop-in’ basis. Before the academic year starts, we provide information on preparation for the course. On arrival we have induction sessions, including a field trip,and social events, headed by the Director of Postgraduate Studies and the Degree Tutor for Energy and Society.. Students also attend an “Introduction to Research Groups in Anthropology”.

Career Opportunities

Students with a postgraduate qualification in Anthropology pursue a diverse array of careers in areas such as conservation, tourism, public health, health research and management, captive primate care and zoological research management, local government research and management, education (secondary, further and higher), social care, social research, in addition to academia.



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The MA in Translation Studies aims to prepare you for the translation professions and for advanced professional or academic research. Read more
The MA in Translation Studies aims to prepare you for the translation professions and for advanced professional or academic research. It combines practice in translating between English and one other language with education in the academic intellectual discipline of Translation Studies.

You will be introduced to the history and theory of translation and to current issues in the discipline; you will receive thorough grounding in research skills and research paradigms relevant to advanced investigations of translation processes, products, contexts and producers, so that you will be ready to enter the professions or progress to further academic study.

The programme is available for English in combination with most other languages including Arabic, Chinese, Danish, French, German, Greek, Italian, Japanese, Malay, Norwegian, Polish, Spanish, Swedish and Turkish (students with languages other than those listed are advised to enquire before applying).

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Goal of the pro­gramme. Understanding Europe today requires much more than understanding the process of European integration. The tensions, challenges and possibilities that are manifesting themselves today have their roots in a longer political, social and cultural history. Read more

Goal of the pro­gramme

Understanding Europe today requires much more than understanding the process of European integration. The tensions, challenges and possibilities that are manifesting themselves today have their roots in a longer political, social and cultural history.

This programme takes you to these roots. A multidisciplinary study path introduces you to various aspects of European society, culture and politics. Along the way, it draws from the strengths of Nordic research on Europe, with its strong focus on regional cooperation, diversity, identities, institutions, culture and the politics of history and memory. You will get to know the Nordic countries from a European perspective and Europe from a Nordic perspective.

Studying the ways in which Europeans cooperate, how European states and societies are interconnected, and how they are governed, forms an important part of the programme. Besides looking at the processes of integration and the evolution and functioning of the European Union, the programme highlights the significance of regional cooperation in the Nordic context, the EU’s relations with its neighbours and its place in the global system.

At the end of your studies, you will have gained a broad understanding of European issues and acquired advanced research skills. You will be ready to work in a wide range of expert positions that require independent and creative thinking, in both the public and private sectors.

The programme consists of joint courses and specialisation studies. One of the available options is to specialise in Nordic Studies. ENS is the only Nordic Studies programme taught in English in the Nordic countries.

The Master's Programme in European and Nordic Studies is offered by the Faculty of Social Sciences and the Faculty of Arts.

Further information about the studies on the Master's programme website: http://www.helsinki.fi/en/programmes/master/european-and-nordic-studies

Pro­gramme con­tents

The programme consists of a multidisciplinary selection of courses that introduce you to various aspects of Europe, the Nordic countries, and the Baltic Sea Region.

The topics addressed in the joint courses include, for example, contemporary European politics, cooperation and conflict in European history, Nordic societies and cultures, and institutions, ideologies and identities in Europe. You will also learn about nations and nationalism, political and social protest, (Nordic) welfare models, the European Union and Nordic cooperation, European legal traditions, and the politics of memory.

The programme involves substantial interaction between you and your teachers. You will complete several writing assignments and research papers along the way, culminating in a Master’s thesis in your second year. Some courses use active learning or flipped classroom pedagogy.

The content of your studies also depends on your own choices. In addition to core courses that provide you with a deep multidisciplinary understanding of Europe, the degree includes specialisation studies of your own choosing.

If you specialise in Nordic studies, you will have access to some courses taught at the programme for Nordic Literature and the Kultur och Kommunikation Master’s programme.

You also have plenty of other options. The University of Helsinki is a large research university. As a student in ENS you will have access to a rich variety of specialised courses in many faculties and schools. Check the section on research focus to see what we are particularly good at in Helsinki.



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