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Sociology×

Masters Degrees in Criminology

We have 184 Masters Degrees in Criminology

Masters degrees in Criminology study the causes and effects of crime, along with how criminal behaviour might be prevented. Courses typically examine crime from sociological and legal perspectives, combining theoretical and practical approaches.

Most Criminology Masters are MAs, but some institutions offer them as an MSc. Closely related postgraduate specialisms include Criminal Justice, Criminological Anthropology and Criminal Law.

Why study a Masters in Criminology?

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The course prepares students for undertaking social research and evaluation in criminal justice and criminology, leading to careers in research, research management, and commissioning or using research. Read more

Introduction

The course prepares students for undertaking social research and evaluation in criminal justice and criminology, leading to careers in research, research management, and commissioning or using research.

Accreditation

The course is recognised as research training by the ESRC for those who are studying or going on to study for a PhD (+3), and is also recognised by the ESRC for Master’s Course plus Research Studentship (1+3) purposes.

Key information

- Degree type: MSc, Postgraduate Diploma
- Study methods: Part-time, Full-time
- Start date: Full-time: September Part-time: September/January
- Course Director: Richard Simmons

Course objectives

This MSc has been designed to run concurrently with the MSc Applied Social Research, a long-standing course in Applied Social Science that is recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as meeting the standards of their Research Training Guidelines. The objectives are to:
- Provide you with the skills and knowledge base required to collect, analyse and report qualitative and quantitative data, taking account of ethics, reliability and validity
- Enable you to examine critically the theoretical foundations that underpin criminological and socio-legal research
- Enable you to examine issues concerning comparative criminological and socio-legal research
- Develop your understanding of the relationship between criminological research and policy, and the meanings of evaluation, its terminology, practice and use

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Structure and content

The MSc/Diploma in Applied Social Research (Criminology) comprises six compulsory taught core modules and (for the MSc) a dissertation.
The modules are: Research Design and Process; Introduction to Information Technology and Library Services (not formally assessed); Quantitative Data Analysis; Qualitative Data Analysis; Research Methods in Criminology and Socio-legal Studies; Criminological Perspectives; and Criminalisation, Social Control and Human Rights.
In addition to the modules, you will complete the following:
- Research Dissertation: MSc students must undertake an original criminological or socio-legal research study and complete a research dissertation with academic supervision.

Examples of recent dissertation topics include:
- Explaining Crime through Narrative
- Nurses Perceptions of Workplace Violence and Aggression within an A&E Department
- Policing a Democracy
- The Effect of Anti-Terror Legislation on Liberty

Delivery and assessment

Teaching methods are designed for each module to facilitate your acquisition of skills and progressive development. You are expected to participate in lectures, seminars, tutorials, computer-based workshops and group work.
Full-time and part-time MSc/Diploma students experience a range of different forms of assessment across the compulsory taught modules. These include essays, critical review essays, book reviews, research proposals, a computer lab-based assessment for quantitative data analysis, and the research dissertation. There are no examinations.

Why Stirling?

REF2014
In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

Rating

In the most recent Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), 95 percent of research in Applied Social Science at Stirling was 'Internationally Excellent' with the top 10 percent of that judged to be 'World-leading'.

Career opportunities

90.5% of Stirling students are in employment or further study six months after graduation.

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The programme covers conceptual and practical underpinnings and implications of research, looking at various research techniques and the rationale behind them. It will enable you to develop essential skills in both quantitative and qualitative work and to apply those skills to specific criminological issues. Read more

The programme covers conceptual and practical underpinnings and implications of research, looking at various research techniques and the rationale behind them. It will enable you to develop essential skills in both quantitative and qualitative work and to apply those skills to specific criminological issues.

Course modules

In previous years, typical modules offered were:

Perspectives on Social Research (15 credits)

  • Introduction to social scientific research
  • Establishing cause and interpreting meaning in social sciences
  • Essentials of quantitative and qualitative research in the social sciences.

Statistical Exploration and Reasoning (15 Credits)

  • Spreadsheets and data analysis
  • Populations, sample data and sampling distributions
  • Point estimates and confidence intervals
  • Significance tests, cross-tabulation, and Chi-Square tests
  • Correlation and linear regression.

Research Design and Process (15 credits)

  • Formulating research questions
  • Evaluating and developing a research proposal
  • Reviewing relevant literature
  • Experimental vs. observational studies
  • Sampling and selecting respondents.

Qualitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)

  • Introduction to theory and research practice in qualitative methods
  • Ethnography and grounded theory
  • Group discussions
  • Data analysis and management processes.

Quantitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)

  • Survey data versus experimental data
  • Sampling and sample design, questionnaire design
  • Numerical taxonomy and cluster analysis in practice
  • Methods for representing complex systems.

Theorising Crime and Criminal Justice (30 credits)

  • Key criminological theories and concepts
  • Theory and practice of criminal justice
  • Application of theories and concepts to historical and contemporary issues and debates 
  • Critical evaluation of criminological theories, evidence, practice and policy.

Policy Related and Evaluation Research (15 credits)

  • Relationship between theory and empirical research in evaluation
  • Defining and measuring outcomes
  • Case study analysis
  • Poster presentation and participatory evaluation.

Dissertation (60 credits)

  • 15,000 word Criminology dissertation based on a supervised criminological research project.

Course Learning and Teaching

These MA Research Methods programmes are full-time, starting in early October and continuing over 12 months following university terms. 

The main teaching methods include lectures, seminars, and computer practical sessions. Lectures introduce the key concepts, theories, current debates and other issues critical for understanding the topics. Seminars are opportunities for you to discuss any questions arising from the readings, to share experience of conducting research, to present your own work for comments. Modules that teach the use of computer software packages have practical sessions in computer rooms so that you can carry out hands-on exercises under supervision and further assistance 

Modules are usually assessed through essays. Statistics modules may require you to complete specific analyses with more structured instructions. Some module conveners may allow you to submit formative assignments in order for you to obtain a sense of how well you understand the subject. Some modules’ assessment may contain a proportion of presentations and group projects. 

Further academic support is available. You will have the opportunity to learn from your dissertation supervisors at individual tutoring meetings, dissertation workshops, and forums. Every member of teaching staff has two hours of office hours each week where you can access additional support for your modules, assignments and so forth. In addition, both the University and the School host seminars for external speakers that are open to all students.

You will have access to a variety of learning resources, including learning spaces in libraries and teaching rooms, readings and textbooks, computers, databases, etc. 



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Our PgDip / MSc in Social Science Research Methods aims to provide advanced training in research methods across the full range of the social sciences. Read more
Our PgDip / MSc in Social Science Research Methods aims to provide advanced training in research methods across the full range of the social sciences. 

You will be provided with a thorough theoretical and practical knowledge of how to construct effective research studies, of the variety of data collection methods available to the social scientist and of the principal methods of analysing social scientific data. You will also be introduced to the political and ethical frameworks within which social science research is conducted, and to some of the ways in which the results of social science research are disseminated.

The course pathways have ESRC recognition and they each provide the appropriate training basis for proceeding to a PhD. These programmes provide extensive opportunities for interdisciplinary study, the application of social research expertise for occupational career development, and the pursuit of substantive areas of interest at postgraduate level.

Criminology pathway:

Criminology at Cardiff has a long-established international reputation and stature (it has been taught since 1976). Over the years we have welcomed a significant number of students from Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas. Our staff are nationally and internationally renowned for pioneering research and writing on both specialist and general topics. Our staff and your peer students bring a wide variety of histories and academic backgrounds to the programme which provides exciting exposure to a diversity of practical experiences as well as in-depth academic knowledge.

The Cardiff Centre for Crime, Law and Justice (CCLJ) has a thriving research culture supporting the work of over 30 doctoral students. You are actively encouraged to take part in the Centre’s activities and regularly present work in progress with academic staff at tri-weekly meetings.

The Criminology pathway provides you with analytic and research skills, an interdisciplinary knowledge base (as criminology draws upon the perspectives of sociology, social policy, law, psychology, and political science), and practical understanding of the production of criminological research.

Upon completion of the course, you will be equipped with an understanding of:

• How problems of crime, safety and justice can be investigated.
• What research strategies, designs and methods of investigation can be used to evidence problems of crime, safety and justice.
• How evidence about problems of crime, safety and justice can be analysed, interpreted, communicated and criticised.

Structure

• PgDip

The course can be completed in one year with full-time study or in twoyears by part-time study.

You will be required to complete six 20-credit modules - five core research modules and one specialist pathway module.

In all modules, you will have the opportunity to engage with literature and research relevant to your pathway.

Modules:

Developing Core Research Skills
Foundations of Social Science Research
Qualitative Research Methods
Quantitative Research Methods
Research Applications
Researching Crime, Safety and Justice

• MSc

The course can be completed in one year with full-time study or in three years by part-time study.

You will be required to complete six 20-credit modules - five core research modules and one specialist pathway module. In all modules you will have the opportunity to engage with literature and research relevant to your pathway.

On successful completion of the taught component, you will prepare a dissertation of a maximum 20,000 words. The 60-credit dissertation component requires independent study. You will choose your dissertation topic in agreement with your supervisor.

Modules:

Same modules as PgDip PLUS Dissertation (compulsory).

Teaching

Your programme will be made up of scheduled learning activities (including lectures, seminars, tutorials and practical sessions) and guided independent study.

You will be expected to actively engage in all the educational activities on your programme of study, to prepare for and attend all scheduled teaching activities, and continue your development as an independent and self-directed learner.

Assessment

You will have to successfully complete the taught component which comprises of 120 credits.

On successful completion of the taught component, you will prepare a dissertation of a maximum 20,000 words (MSc only)

Career Prospects

This programme provides knowledge and expertise suitable for careers in research and development, business, market studies, public agencies at international, national and local levels, education, teaching and other public services work, and voluntary organisations.

It also provides appropriate training for proceeding to a PhD.

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The Department of Criminology at Swansea University has run a successful MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology since 1997. Students of the Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology will have the opportunity to learn about crime, the criminal justice system and cutting edge themes in criminology from leading experts in the field. The MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology specialises in the application of criminological knowledge to the workings of the Criminal Justice System and this is strongly reflected in the exciting range of diverse and cutting-edge modules on offer.

The MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology focuses mainly on the application of knowledge to the operation of the criminal justice system, reflecting the policy/ practice orientation of members of the staff team.

Whether you are a practitioner working in the criminal justice system, a researcher wishing to gain a firm foundation for a research degree in an ESRC recognised Doctoral Training Centre, or an undergraduate aspiring to a career in criminal justice, our Masters-level degree in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology is for you! The MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology offers you:

• an up-to-date and high quality programme which includes some of the most important theory and research in criminal justice and criminology

• an opportunity to develop your ability to apply criminal justice and criminological knowledge to research and the operation of the criminal justice system

• an opportunity to develop and apply research methods knowledge and skills

• enhanced employability for those wishing to pursue a career in the criminal justice system and for those interested in an academic or research career

Modules

Modules on the MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology typically include:

• Ethics and Philosophy of Social Research

• Quantitative Methods

• Qualitative Methods

• Case Studies in Applied Social Research

• Data Visualisation

• Crime, Drugs and Alcohol

• Gender, Crime and Criminal Justice

• Applied Criminal Justice

• Understanding Policing

• Youth Justice: Research, Policy & Practice

• Criminal Justice System in England and Wales

• Sexual Abuse and Exploitation of Children

• Human Trafficking

Careers and Employability

The MA in Applied Criminal Justice & Criminology will open the door to a range of careers, including: Local Government, Police Force, Prison Service, Social Work, Victim Support, Teaching, and Probation Service to name a few. Enhancing your career prospects whilst studying on this course, you will have a wealth of opportunities to take advantage of in order to boost your CV and form important employment links for the future.

Additional Information

Every student is allocated a Personal Tutor who offers academic and pastoral care throughout the student’s stay in Swansea. Several lecturers invite senior criminal justice practitioners, managers, and policy makers to deliver lectures on key aspects of criminal justice policy and practice. The Department of Criminology also ensures that MA in Applied Criminal Justice & Criminology students participate in social events through the Criminology Society which organises events that give students opportunities to socialise and meet others in the Department of Criminology. There may also be placement and research internship opportunities available to students (subject to availability). Research internships provide opportunities for students to observe practices in a criminal justice agency and then produce their dissertation on a topic that is relevant to the work of the agency.

Student Quotes

- Christie Owen, MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology graduate 2010 -11

“There are a range of different modules covering a broad spectrum of subjects. Helpful tutoring means that those who have not studied Criminology previously will find the subject easy to pick up. There are plenty of approachable staff and lecturers to seek advice if you are unsure. Lectures are well structured with scope for debate with your peers and lecturers, as well as informative media such as videos and power point presentations. There is continuous mentoring while completing dissertations, with supervisors engaging well with students and aiding them in making it more manageable. Supervisors are continuously available to answer any questions or solve any problems that arise while writing such a large piece of work. The library services are also extremely helpful, with access to many books, journals and the internet with a room specifically for postgraduates which is very much needed during busier periods.

The Masters degree in Criminology encouraged me to pursue a career in the Prison Service. After graduating I was offered a position following my first interview and the course has given me skills to use in my new position.”

- Peter Doyle, MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology graduate

Retired Detective Chief Inspector and Senior Investigating Officer Peter, from Kenfig near Porthcawl, had specialised in Homicide and Serious Crime Investigation and has an extensive background in Child Sexual Exploitation (CSE) investigation.

“The course was challenging for me as I do not possess a first degree – a particular challenge was writing in an academic style. I overcame the challenges by applying practice and more practice – plus support from those within the College and my family. I believe the key is not worrying about every mistake you make but learning from them instead.

“I chose Swansea University because it has an excellent reputation for criminology studies and I also worked in Swansea for many years as a police officer. It was a great honour to meet people on my course from such a wide spectrum and of all ages – this was very inspiring, I was made to feel welcome by everyone involved.”



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Are you seeking to enter the criminal justice or community justice sectors? Want to work with drug action teams or in the voluntary and charitable sector?. Read more
Are you seeking to enter the criminal justice or community justice sectors? Want to work with drug action teams or in the voluntary and charitable sector?

The MA Criminology and Criminal Justice at Northumbria University is a dynamic course that offers a flexible mode of study. You will be encouraged to develop a critical understanding of the key themes, issues and political debates concerning crime, crime control and criminal and social justice in the UK and globally.

Learn from an exciting, vibrant and dynamic team of scholars who are high quality teachers and internationally renowned experts within their subject. All of the Criminology staff team have doctorates or extensive professional experience in the Criminology/criminal justice sector.

Equipped with excellent practical, communication, and transferable skills you will be well placed for a range of roles including drug action teams, law enforcement, research, community safety, local authority, voluntary and charitable sectors.

This course has several different available start dates and study options - for more information, please view the relevant web-page:
January full time - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/criminology-and-criminal-justice-dtfscj6/

September part time - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/criminology-and-criminal-justice-dtpscz6/

January part time - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/criminology-and-criminal-justice-dtpscj6/

Learn From The Best

You will learn from a vibrant and dynamic team of scholars who will provide you with an outstanding learning experience, support and engagement in a research rich environment.

The academic team includes 16 criminology-specific academics with extensive research and engagement with the criminal justice system who bring their real-life experience to their teaching.

Nearly all criminology staff have received funding from leading research institutions and organisations such as Economic and Social Research Council, and they often work in partnership with state and third sector organisations such as Youth Offending Teams and homelessness charities.

They play leading roles in professional associations such as the British Society of Criminology and the Academy of the Social Sciences and serve on the editorial boards of leading disciplinary journals.

The department also has excellent international links within Europe, America and Australia where members of the staff team have been Visiting Fellows and Professors.

Teaching And Assessment

You will learn about research methods and their relevance to the global study of criminology, giving you the relevant skills to conduct your own research and engage with contemporary debates. These debates will be covered in the areas of global penal policy, international policing and security, and social exclusion.

All modules are compulsory, but assessment topics and dissertation allow you to concentrate on your own areas of interest as you develop your knowledge of theory, methods and practical topics.

Your learning combines formal input and practical exercises and discussion, allowing you to develop your ideas through interaction with academic staff and your peers.

Your dissertation is an independent and innovative piece of work, which is designed to demonstrate your skills in researching, collecting evidence, and organising that evidence. Working independently, with the support of a tutor, you’ll find your own sources and evaluate their helpfulness to your study topic.

Module Overview
CR7001 - Research Methods for Global Criminology (Core, 30 Credits)
CR7002 - Comparative Penal Policy (Core, 30 Credits)
CR7003 - International Crime, Policing and Security (Core, 30 Credits)
CR7004 - Social Exclusion and Victimisation in a Global Context (Core, 30 Credits)
EF0126 - E.S.A.P. in FADSS Level 7 (Optional, 0 Credits)
SO7001 - Advanced Study Skills (Core, 0 Credits)
SO7002 - Social Sciences Postgraduate Dissertation (Core, 60 Credits)

Learning Environment

We want to make sure that you can conduct your studies to the best of your abilities, so we’ll always do our best to ensure that you know exactly what is expected of you.

The academic team will help you develop the skills required to plan, manage and review your learning, and support you if you have any issues. A central principle of this system is to help you develop a well-honed ability to work independently upon graduation.

You will be given a dedicated dissertation supervisor with relevant subject expertise and you’ll also have a guidance tutor who will provide support for your personal and academic development.

As you progress, the links between taught elements and your own independent learning will be explained at regular intervals, giving you every opportunity to achieve your full potential.

Research-Rich Learning

According to the UK’s most recent research excellence framework, the criminologists on this course are producing research outputs of international quality within world-leading peer reviewed journals such as Criminology, British Journal of Criminology, Theoretical Criminology, Criminology and Criminal Justice, Policing and Society, Justice Quarterly, the Journal of Criminal Justice, and the Howard Journal of Criminal Justice.

Research is embedded throughout your course at all stages. You will be introduced to research methods to equip you with all the relevant skills you’ll need throughout your studies and beyond.

The Advanced Study Skills module introduces higher level reading, writing and research skills to help support you through the course. Whatever your previous background this module will provide you with important skills to succeed with your studies and to boost subsequent career prospects.

Give Your Career An Edge

The MA Criminology and Criminal Justice focuses on embedding skills to prepare you for a career in a crime related area or for further doctoral study.

You will write traditional essays and develop skills sought by employers through real-world assessments including debate logs, a critical literature review, a portfolio, a research bid and a dissertation.

The department has close links with a range of relevant agencies, including the Prison Service, law enforcement agencies and the voluntary sector, and these close networks will further enhance your learning experience throughout the course.

You will also have access to tailored career guidance in 1-to-1 and CV skills sessions with the Northumbria Careers team.

Your Future

On graduating, you will have developed advanced written and oral communication skills and the ability to apply Criminological concepts to a wide range of practical issues.

You will be able to demonstrate research skills which are valuable in many professions and show that you are someone who can apply independent critical thinking and judgement.

Previous students are enjoying successful careers in the criminal justice and community justice sectors, drug action teams, law enforcement agencies, voluntary and charitable sectors, crime analysis, research, local government, community safety, youth justice and the prison system. You also have the opportunity to continue your academic studies at PhD level.

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The course was one of the first to take an internationally comparative perspective across a broad range of criminology and criminal justice issues. Read more
The course was one of the first to take an internationally comparative perspective across a broad range of criminology and criminal justice issues. It is designed to meet the needs of three groups of potential students: those requiring a thorough research training specialising in criminology and criminal justice; those who are interested in pursuing criminology and criminal justice to an advanced level; and practitioners in the criminal justice field who wish to expand their horizons from national to international levels. The programme components consist of a generic research module (The Research Process) for training in qualitative and quantitative research methods in the Social Sciences, specialised training in Applied Research Criminology and a module on international case studies in Criminology, which allows students to incorporate their particular research interests and areas of enquiry in comparative criminological and criminal justice research. The MA includes a 20,000 word dissertation.

Structure
The course aims to provide advanced training in research and analysis, linking theoretical awareness with empirical studies in criminology and criminal justice. The taught element of the course is studied by both MA and Diploma students and consists of core research training and theory modules, plus a module focussing on international and comparative criminological and criminal justice research. MA students who successfully complete the taught element proceed to the research dissertation.

Core modules:

The Research Process
Comparative Criminological Research
Key Issues in Crime and Justice
Empirical studies:

Applied Research in Criminology
MA students also take part in the fortnightly lecture series of the School of Social Sciences. Visiting speakers and Bangor staff present topics related to social policy, criminology and sociology.

Research Dissertation
The dissertation is a piece of independent research where you are expected to apply your research skills to a specific criminological or criminal justice topic. You will conduct this work with academic guidance provided by your supervisor who will be a member of the criminology and criminal justice team. Examples of successful MA dissertations in the past include:

Youth crime: high spirits or a criminal act
Sex offenders in the community
Human trafficking
An Englishman’s home is his castle
’Get out of jail free’ – malingered psychosis in prison populations
Research Interests of the Criminology and Criminal Justice Team
Youth homelessness and crime
Institutional child abuse
Critical approaches to law, crime and criminology
Sociology of law
Public opinion on crime and criminal justice
Penal policy
Rural criminology
Lay judges and jurors
Procedural justice
Popular legal culture, including film and TV
Victimology
Islamic extremism and terrorism
Trust in courts, police and the legal profession
Teaching and assessment methods
Teaching occurs via lectures, seminars and tutorials given by research experts in the School of Social Sciences. The team of lecturers employs the concept of ’active learning’ by students. Assessment methods include essays, assignments, presentations and a 20,000 word dissertation.

Careers
The course prepares for a wide range of employment including:

Law-enforcement agencies: the police, customs, the prison service
Public administration: including crime prevention units, offender management, general administration, international institutions
Political associations, work for members of parliaments, for lobby groups related to the criminal justice system and to issues of social justice broadly conceived
Research institutes, researching criminological and sociological issues
Academic institutions such as universities

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The MSc Criminology and Criminal Psychology programme provides students with the conceptual knowledge and skills to open up diverse career paths. Read more
The MSc Criminology and Criminal Psychology programme provides students with the conceptual knowledge and skills to open up diverse career paths. Core courses will enable you to develop an understanding of the concepts, theories, methods and principles central to criminology and the skills to apply these in the forensic and legal area. Optional courses build on this core grounding and enable you to develop an empirical insight in an area of your choice, culminating in a research project.

This approach provides you with knowledge of the changing nature of psychology, law and criminology, and professional applications. It will also develop your ability to relate theory to practice in a way that provides more informed solutions to problems, and opportunities in the workplace. There is a valuable research grounding and a broad coverage of criminological, forensic and psychological approaches to crime and criminality.

Please note that this programme does not provide British Psychological Society accreditation or recognition. This is because the programme is a criminology programme with a strand of specialist criminal / investigative / forensic psychology and is not a postgraduate psychology degree programme. The MSc Criminology & Criminal Psychology programme meets the British Criminology Society benchmarks for postgraduate taught courses.

From time-to-time we update our programmes to reflect changes in knowledge and industry standards, so the programme structure, mode and the courses and course structure can be subject to change from what is listed below. The availability of option courses also varies from year-to-year according to student preference, staff availability and may, for some courses, also depend on a student's academic performance. Until the academic term immediately prior to the academic term in which an option is listed to run, we are not able to guarantee that an option listed will be available. In addition, please note that some courses may only be open to certain students and may also involve an application process which may include successfully passing a selection process to take the course. For these reasons, the structure (i.e. the mode(s), the courses and the course structure) of the programme shown in this information is shown for illustrative purposes only.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/crim/crimpsych

What you'll study

Full time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Criminal Investigative Psychology (15 credits)
Psychology, Development and Crime (15 credits)
Comparative Criminological Research (30 credits)
Crime Theory (30 credits)
Criminology Postgraduate Dissertation Project (60 credits)

Students are required to choose 30 credits from this list of options.

Child and Adolescent Psychology in Practice (30 credits)
Current issues in Child and Adolescent Psychology (30 credits)
Contemporary Issues in Criminology (30 credits)
Crime, Terrorism and the State (30 credits)

Part time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Psychology, Development and Crime (15 credits)
Crime Theory (30 credits)

- Year 2:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Criminal Investigative Psychology (15 credits)
Comparative Criminological Research (30 credits)
Criminology Postgraduate Dissertation Project (60 credits)

Students are required to choose 30 credits from this list of options.

Child and Adolescent Psychology in Practice (30 credits)
Current issues in Child and Adolescent Psychology (30 credits)
Contemporary Issues in Criminology (30 credits)
Crime, Terrorism and the State (30 credits)

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.

Career opportunities

This programme encompasses criminological, legal, forensic and psychological approaches. It will appeal to those with a broad interest in criminology and criminal psychological issues, including those whose future employment is likely to involve public, private and/ or non-governmental criminological or criminal justice work or applied criminal/legal/forensic psychological work in the UK or internationally. It is relevant to careers in local government, European and international institutions, and national and international nongovernmental organisations. It will also appeal to those wishing to prepare for a research degree in humanities and social sciences.

Teaching and assessment

The programme employs a range of innovative teaching and learning methods. Lectures and seminars are dynamic and interactive. Teaching and learning activities may include:

- Role play
- Real-world problem solving
- Speed debates
- Presentations
- Project supervision
- Work-based placements and tutorials.

Where possible and depending on the courses studied, one or more field trip (please note that any field trip will be a day-time trip only, not an overnight or multi-day trip).

Assessment of learning is usually based on a mixture of examination and coursework and can include presentations/group work, the submission of essays and the sitting of examinations.

Further information

If you would like more information on this programme, please contact us at .

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply

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Pursue a career in Criminology. Criminology is fast becoming a vital discipline! A career in criminology explores the motives behind criminal behaviour and analyses the criminal justice system. Read more

Pursue a career in Criminology

Criminology is fast becoming a vital discipline! A career in criminology explores the motives behind criminal behaviour and analyses the criminal justice system. A Master of Criminology at Bond prepares graduates for a career in the industry. Graduates are given the skills and training necessary to understand crime, justice, and forensic issues. Graduate sooner with Bond’s accelerated degrees!

About the program

The Master of Criminology program gives students skill development and training as well as scholarly appreciation of crime, justice and forensic issues. The program provides an understanding of a broad range of issues involving criminology theories, contemporary information on crime prevention, the theory and practice of punishment, criminal offenders, the police, courts and correctional institutions, including current crime and deviance issues. Students will be provided with both knowledge and research skills and techniques required for the analysis of criminological issues and an understanding of how to critically evaluate published research. 

Structure and subjects

View the Master of Criminology Program Structure and Sequencing

The Master of Criminology comprises 12 subjects, as follows:

Core subjects (2)

Foundation subjects (6)

Dissertation/Elective option subjects (4)

Students must choose one (1) of the following suites of subjects:

Or

  • Minor Dissertation/Portfolio A (HUMR71-705)
  • Minor Dissertation/Portfolio B (HUMR71-706)
  • Plus two (2) elective subjects taken from the Faculty of Society & Design list of available postgraduate subjects. (CRIM71-700 Criminology Internship and Portfolio and further minor dissertation/portfolio subjects are available as elective subject options).

Teaching methodology

Bond University’s teaching methodology involves a combination of lectures, tutorials, seminars, examinations, projects, presentations, assignments, computer labs and industry projects.

Available research topics for dissertation / portfolio

The Faculty of Society & Design has highly skilled academic staff who can provide supervision to students in the following research areas:

  • A Critical Examination of the Criminal Justice System and Why Mistakes Happen
  • Analysis of an Effective Response to the Illicit Drug Problem
  • Analysis of Regulations Pertaining to Crime and Criminal Justice
  • Case Analysis of Miscarriage of Justice
  • Comparing Efficiency of Different Methods of Criminal Profiling
  • Consequences of Wrongful Convictions
  • Copycat Crime and New Media
  • Corruption and Bribery in the Justice System
  • Criminal Justice and Youth Crime
  • Cyber Bullying – Where Does the Responsibility Lie?
  • How Stalking Victims Prolong the Intensity or Duration of Stalking
  • Indigenous Crime and Justice
  • Looking at Criminal Investigations and Understanding the Social and Criminological Context Within Which These Operate
  • Measures to Prevent Violence in the Workplace
  • Media Coverage of a Topical Crime Genre
  • Preventing Assaults on Drivers of Public Transport
  • The CSI Influence on Juries
  • The Link Between Self Esteem and Crime
  • Understanding the Role Victims Play in the Criminal Justice System


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Are you intrigued by the behaviour of criminals? Do you question what motivates people to commit shocking crimes? As more people feel insecure with their own communities, Criminology examines how we manage crime and social disorder. Read more

Are you intrigued by the behaviour of criminals? Do you question what motivates people to commit shocking crimes? As more people feel insecure with their own communities, Criminology examines how we manage crime and social disorder. Studying Criminology offers career opportunities in the police and probation services, but also in other sectors that depend on an analytical mind.

Visit the website: http://bucks.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/health-and-social-sciences/pt/criminology-communities-and-disorder-pt-1718

Is this course for me?

Are you naturally curious and analytically minded? Studying Criminology will open your eyes to the problems we need to solve for society to be safer. You'll find out how we can use research methods to answer important questions and understand the criminal mind.

Most of our Criminology students have graduated from areas such as the social sciences, law and policing. However, the course is designed for anyone interested in taking the next steps towards an exciting career in Criminology.

This course also attracts professionals who want to expand their knowledge in a related field. A better understanding of Criminology is particularly useful if you work within the criminal justice system, local council or government. Examining research and theory will deal with day-to-day problems in the workplace in a more effective way.

Expanding your knowledge

As you learn about the key concepts of Criminology, you'll also examine the sociological, legal and criminal justice theories used to interpret the actions of criminals and the impact on society.

You will study the events of the last 30 years to determine how social, political and cultural motions have shaped our response to recent events.

What will this course cover?

The course reflects the latest policies and methods used within the criminal justice system. You will gain an understanding of the social causes of crime and how these issues can be effectively managed in society.

We will help develop your analytical understanding of the relationship between crime and community. Progressing to more complex issues such as social disorder and social tension, you'll see society from a range of perspectives.

What are my career prospects?

Criminology offers many different career paths. Jobs often involve managing members of the community in roles such as police officers, community development workers and prison governors.

However, there are also opportunities for graduates within social welfare roles supporting vulnerable members of society. You may also wish to work in areas such as mental health support and drug rehabilitation.

Other graduates continue their academic career and conduct social research to expand your knowledge in the area. This could involve working as a research assistant or completing a PhD.

How will you help me prepare for my future career?

By the end of the course, we'll make sure you have all the skills you need to impress potential employers. You'll be confident in applying theory and concept to understand the management of communities.

The nature of Criminology means it is highly topical and of interest to many, therefore your study prepares you for a wide range of opportunities.

How to apply

Apply here: http://bucks.ac.uk/applynow/

Funding

There are a range of funding opportunities for postgraduate students which include sponsorship, bursaries, scholarships and loans: http://bucks.ac.uk/fees_funding/postgraduate-masters-scholarships/



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Your career in Criminology. Criminology is fast becoming a vital discipline! A career in criminology explores the motives behind criminal behaviour and analyses the criminal justice system. Read more

Your career in Criminology

Criminology is fast becoming a vital discipline! A career in criminology explores the motives behind criminal behaviour and analyses the criminal justice system. A Master of Criminology (Professional) at Bond prepares graduates for a career in the industry. Graduates are given the skills and training necessary to understand crime, justice, and forensic issues. Graduate sooner with Bond’s accelerated degree option!

About the program

The Master of Criminology (Professional) program provides students with skill development and training as well as scholarly appreciation of crime, justice and forensic issues. The program provides an understanding of a broad range of issues involving criminology theories, contemporary information on crime prevention, the theory and practice of punishment, criminal offenders, the police, courts and correctional institutions, including current crime and deviance issues. Students will be provided with both knowledge and research skills and techniques required for the analysis of criminological issues and an understanding of how to critically evaluate published research. At the end of the degree, candidates will have a professional portfolio detailing their research and practical expertise in their chosen vocational area. The program duration is 4 semesters and 20 weeks (92 weeks). 

Structure and subjects

View the Master of Criminology (Professional) Program Structure and Sequencing

Master of Criminology (Professional) comprises 13 subjects, as follows:

Core subjects (2)

Must be completed in first two semesters of enrolment.

Foundation subjects (6)

Dissertation/Portfolio (2)

Electives (2)

  • Student must choose two (2) subjects from the FSD list of available postgraduate subjects. Students can choose to undertake additional Minor Dissertations/Portfolios as electives if desired.

Professional

* Please note that the Professional Portfolio sibject can only be commenced once all coursework subjects have been completed.

Teaching methodology

Bond University’s teaching methodology involves a combination of lectures, tutorials, seminars, examinations, projects, presentations, assignments, computer labs and industry projects.



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How do we understand crime? How can it be prevented? Why should crime be punished, and how should we go about it? Criminologists engage with some of the most pressing issues, decisions and dilemmas facing societies today. Read more
How do we understand crime? How can it be prevented? Why should crime be punished, and how should we go about it? Criminologists engage with some of the most pressing issues, decisions and dilemmas facing societies today. On our course you explore the nature of crime, criminal justice and punishment within wider social contexts.

Criminology at Essex builds on strong sociological foundations and reflects the diversity of staff interests, including leading contributors to studies of women, young people and criminal justice, prostitution, homicide, victimisation, visual criminology and media, organised crime and law enforcement, terrorism and surveillance, environmental crime and more. Our courses provide critical, conceptual and theoretical analyses of crimes and harms, from the local to the global.

The course provides you with a strong grounding in the key theories, understandings and issues covered by cutting-edge criminology. You explore a wide range of topics, including:
-The analysis, politics and prevention of crime
-Globalisation and various forms of crime
-Security and the state
-New criminological theory
-Terrorism, counter-terrorism, surveillance and human rights

You also develop the skills needed to make your own contribution to the field, gaining a critical and coherent perspective on empirical research and examining the key assumptions and ideological underpinnings of qualitative and quantitative research.

Our Department of Sociology was rated top 10 in the UK for research quality (REF 2014), and we consistently receive strong student satisfaction scores, including 96% overall student satisfaction in 2015.

Our expert staff

You are taught by a team of award-winning internationally renowned scholars widely regarded as leading experts in their fields.

Criminology at Essex is led by Professor Eamonn Carrabine, Professor Pamela Cox, Dr Isabel Crowhurst, Professor Pete Fussey, Dr Anna Sergi, Professor Nigel South, Dr Darren Thiel and Dr Jackie Turton.

All staff are actively engaged in research at the cutting edge of their respective fields of interest and specialism and bring the very latest developments and findings into the classroom. All are prominent writers and the criminology team collectively author the best-selling criminology textbook, Criminology: A Sociological Introduction (now in its 3rd edition), used on undergraduate courses across the country.

Our staff have worked at local, national and international level with bodies from local councils and the Home Office, to Amnesty International and the United Nations.

Specialist facilities

-Our Centre for Criminology hosts expert speakers and practitioners
-Dedicated postgraduate support facilities through a unique Student Resource Centre where you can get help with your studies, access examples of previous students’ work, and attend workshops on research skills
-Our renowned off-campus Graduate Conference takes place every February
-The Sociology common room is open all day Monday-Friday, is stocked with daily newspapers, magazines and journals
-Links with the Institute of Social and Economic Research, which conducts large-scale survey projects and has its own library, and the -UK Data Archive, which stores national research data like the British Crime Survey
-Our students’ Sociology Society is a forum for the exchange of ideas, arranging talks by visiting speakers, introducing you to various career pathways, and organising debates

Your future

This course provides excellent preparation for further academic study, and many of our postgraduates go on to successful academic careers, both in the UK and overseas.

Others have established careers in non-governmental organisations, local authorities, specialist think tanks, government departments, charities, media production, and research organisations.

We work with the university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-Formative Debates in Criminology
-Current Controversies in Criminology and Criminal Justice Policy
-Sociological Research Design
-Dissertation
-Interviewing and Qualitative Data Analysis (optional)
-Organised Crime: Global and Local (optional)
-Critical Perspectives on Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism (optional)

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ABOUT. Why do people commit crime? What can we do to prevent crime? What are the connections between mental health and substance use in relation to offending and victimisation? These are a few of the questions criminologists strives to answer. . Read more

ABOUT

Why do people commit crime? What can we do to prevent crime? What are the connections between mental health and substance use in relation to offending and victimisation? These are a few of the questions criminologists strives to answer. 

Criminology at Malmö University is a multidisciplinary subject that includes a broader range of study areas than just crime; utilising diverse theories as well as empirical research. It is a subject area that encompasses individual, societal, and situational aspects with a focus on processes and events throughout an individual’s life. 

Our students independently, critically and systematically analyse complex topics relevant to social and behavioural science generally, and criminology more specifically. The programme is composed of students from different fields and cultural backgrounds, it encourages students to discuss subjects in both a Swedish and an international context. This provides a chance to develop - emphasising multi-disciplinary, multi-professional and international work.

The programme highlights international perspectives and encourages student mobility. All courses can be taken independently and are open to national and international students, free-movers as well as exchange students.

Programme structure 

Our department profile specialises in the areas of risk-assessment, prevention, geography and crime, juvenile offending, criminal careers and victimology. The department also hosts guest researchers from both Swedish and international universities in order for our students to broaden their perspectives. Students receive supervision in writing their thesis and have the opportunity to explore research topics of their own choosing. This is an opportunity for students to establish contact with employers and identify new research projects that meet the needs of contemporary society. 

The programme is based on independent study, group work, journal clubs, seminars and workshops as well as lectures. Valuing the benefits of two-way communication and collaboration in the classroom, students are encouraged to discuss, question and think critically in all learning activities. In line with the Swedish academic model of teaching in higher education, students are responsible for their own learning development, and we provide an open and interactive teaching environment in our programme that varies between courses.

This education is provided by the Faculty of Health and Society at the department Criminology.

If you have not studied Criminology before

If you are new to Criminology, one or all of the following books can be useful as an introduction and or reference during the programme: Criminology by Tim Newburn, Introduction to Criminology by Frank Hagan, The Oxford Handbook of Criminology by Mike Maguire, Rod Morgan and Robert Reiner.

Syllabus

For more information on syllabus, course content and learning outcomes, please see here.

Career possibilities

There is a substantial demand in today’s labour market for knowledge in the field of criminology.

For example, the need for collaboration between actors in the society that offenders and victims come in contact with, for instance, the prison and probation services, the social services and the justice system, as well the psychiatric sector and other sectors involving individuals with substance use and mental health problems. This programme seeks to improve the competence of students entering existing professions within the municipality, county council and state administrations as well as institutes and organisations within the private sector and thus builds upon the students’ earlier experiences and academic studies.

Since the programme is taught in English, our students will be well-prepared for the labour market both within and beyond Swedish borders.



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The MA Criminology and Law, which is run by Bangor School of Social Sciences and Bangor Law School, will provide students with postgraduate level knowledge and skills in the interdisciplinary area of criminology and law. Read more
The MA Criminology and Law, which is run by Bangor School of Social Sciences and Bangor Law School, will provide students with postgraduate level knowledge and skills in the interdisciplinary area of criminology and law. It builds on criminological and legal skills and knowledge so as to provide specialist training in criminological, criminal justice and legal research. The programme enables students to develop an international perspective on crime, justice and law through national and cross-national approaches and case studies of other societies, and/or ‘cutting edge’ issues in contemporary criminology and law. Students will also acquire a wide range of transferable skills.

Employment opportunities
Graduates will be sought after by law-enforcement agencies such as the police. Other employment opportunities include public administration: e.g. crime prevention units, offender management, general administration, and international institutions. Political associations and NGOs are also possible employers. Graduates may take up work for members of parliaments, for lobby groups related to the criminal justice system and to issues of social justice and law broadly conceived. Jobs are also available in research at universities and other research institutions. Of course, students may progress into further postgraduate study leading to a PhD.

Structure
Part 1: Taught Courses

Modules in Criminology and Law are taught in two semesters between September and May. Of these modules, half will be law based and taught in the Law School and half will be criminology based and taught in the School of Social Sciences. Modules together give 60 credits for Law and 60 for Criminology.

For this MA, Bangor Law School will offer a ground breaking course Forensic Linguistics in Court, which will examine the use of language in the criminal process. Training in Legal Research will include working with databases such as LexisNexis or Westlaw. Topics in International Criminal Law include international criminal courts and the offences they deal with. In the School of Social Sciences issues such as sentencing policy, theories of deviance, victimisation, international terrorism, the operation of the penal system and theories of policing and law enforcement can be studied both from a UK and international perspective. Teaching is mainly seminar based and allows for in-depth discussions with lecturers.

Part 2: Dissertation

Students will write a 20,000 word dissertation on a topic of their choice from within the broad remit of Criminology. Any topic can be suggested that is of interest for students and dissertation tutors.

Compulsory Modules:

International Case Studies in Criminology and Criminal Justice
Key Issues in Crime and Justice
Legal Research
Forensic Linguistics in Court
International Criminal Law
Dissertation on any topic within Criminology

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The structure of the programme will be as follows. Part I. Taught Courses. The MA Criminology and Law, which is run by Bangor School of Social Sciences and Bangor Law School, will provide students with postgraduate level knowledge and skills in the interdisciplinary area of criminology and law. Read more
The structure of the programme will be as follows:

Part I: Taught Courses
The MA Criminology and Law, which is run by Bangor School of Social Sciences and Bangor Law School, will provide students with postgraduate level knowledge and skills in the interdisciplinary area of criminology and law. It builds on criminological and legal skills and knowledge so as to provide specialist training in criminological, criminal justice and legal research. The programme enables students to develop an international perspective on crime, justice and law through national and cross-national approaches and case studies of other societies, and/or ‘cutting edge’ issues in contemporary criminology and law. Students will also acquire a wide range of transferable skills.

Employment opportunities
Graduates will be sought after by law-enforcement agencies such as the police. Other employment opportunities include public administration: e.g. crime prevention units, offender management, general administration, and international institutions. Political associations and NGOs are also possible employers. Graduates may take up work for members of parliaments, for lobby groups related to the criminal justice system and to issues of social justice and law broadly conceived. Jobs are also available in research at universities and other research institutions. Of course, students may progress into further postgraduate study leading to a PhD.

Structure
Part 1: Taught Courses

Modules in Criminology and Law are taught in two semesters between September and May. Of these modules, half will be law based and taught in the Law School and half will be criminology based and taught in the School of Social Sciences. Modules together give 60 credits for Law and 60 for Criminology.

For this MA, Bangor Law School will offer a ground breaking course Forensic Linguistics in Court, which will examine the use of language in the criminal process. Training in Legal Research will include working with databases such as LexisNexis or Westlaw. Topics in International Criminal Law include international criminal courts and the offences they deal with. In the School of Social Sciences issues such as sentencing policy, theories of deviance, victimisation, international terrorism, the operation of the penal system and theories of policing and law enforcement can be studied both from a UK and international perspective. Teaching is mainly seminar based and allows for in-depth discussions with lecturers.

Part 2: Dissertation

Students will write a 20,000 word dissertation on a topic of their choice from within the broad remit of Criminology. Any topic can be suggested that is of interest for students and dissertation tutors.

Compulsory Modules:

International Case Studies in Criminology and Criminal Justice
Key Issues in Crime and Justice
Legal Research
Forensic Linguistics in Court
International Criminal Law
Dissertation on any topic within Criminology

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Combining theoretical reflection and practical application, our course will provide you with an opportunity to specialise in the latest developments in criminology and criminal justice. Read more

Overview

Combining theoretical reflection and practical application, our course will provide you with an opportunity to specialise in the latest developments in criminology and criminal justice. We welcome applications from recent graduates, mature students, and professionals in criminal justice or related fields. We tailor teaching content to your individual educational and professional background and interests. Our teaching format provides you with many opportunities to develop your own intellectual interests or professional experience. You will attend four, three-day long blocks of intensive teaching and discussion between September and May, plus an additional half day dissertation workshop. This format allows you to combine your studies with either part-time or full time employment should you wish to do so.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/criminologyandcriminaljustice/

Course Aims

- To introduce students to recent and contemporary theorising in criminology and governance studies

- To show students how recent and contemporary theorising in criminology and governance studies has attempted to describe, analyse and interpret contemporary developments in criminal justice, transnational justice, international justice, and governance more broadly

- To enable students to think through methodological problems and choose appropriate methods for the study of crime, criminal justice, and governance

- To enable students to critically assess research in a number of fields within criminology, criminal justice, and governance studies more broadly

- To enable students to design and complete a research project and understand the importance of the research process in the social sciences

Course Content

Our taught master’s programme comprises four 30 credit module blocks and one 60 credit dissertation. Each taught module is assessed by a 5,000 word written assignment. The pass mark is 50% and you must pass each of the modules in order to progress to the dissertation, which involves researching and writing a dissertation of 15,000 to 20,000 words under the supervision of an individual member of the teaching team. Each module block comprises three days of intensive face to face contact between staff and students. Students are also supported by online content and access to staff throughout the academic year. The programme is taught by criminologists who all have considerable research and teaching expertise in criminology, criminal justice and related subjects. Each three-day long module block is divided into four thematically linked sessions:

Indicative Modules
• Contemporary Criminology: Theory and Practice
• Researching Crime and Criminal Justice
• Contemporary Challenges in Criminal Justice

You will study an elective module (subject to change) in:
• Advanced Topics in Criminology and Criminal Justice

You will also be offered full advice and support to undertake your dissertation.

This programme is designed to fit around your work and personal commitments. The taught content is delivered in twelve days and the extensive online supporting materials allow you to complete your personal study at times that suit you.

Teaching & Assessment

Each of the taught modules is assessed by written, summative coursework assignments of up to 5,000 words (essay, case-study, research proposal, and empirical research report). The pass mark is 50% and students must pass each of the modules in order to progress to the dissertation, which involves researching and writing a dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words. There are no exams.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-Library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this post-graduate programme.

Careers

Graduates from our course have found employment in a variety of occupations including: the accelerated police and prison graduate training programmes; the probation service; in other criminal justice agencies; in the voluntary sector with organisations such as Victim Support and NACRO; and in a variety of other graduate level jobs. In addition, a number of graduates have gone on to take postgraduate courses at Keele and elsewhere.

As part of your Criminology degree you will have gained a set of Distinctive Graduate Attributes that put you in a unique position in an uncertain labour market that demands graduate employees to be skilled, yet flexible, workers.

For further help and advice about how to put yourself in the best position upon graduation explore the Careers and Employability web pages or drop in to see them. They can help with all aspects of the transition into employment, from drawing up a CV to preparing for job interviews.

TUITION BREAKS, GRANTS AND BURSARIES:
All students from North America (USA and Canada) are eligible for tuition breaks of 10%. Students from universities that are among Keele University's partner institutions are eligible for tuition breaks of up to 25% of the tuition fee.
Further information can be found at: http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesfornastudents/

All students are eligible for an ERASMUS grant for the period spent at an EU partner institution. For further information on Erasmus grants and tuition breaks, please contact

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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