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Creative Arts & Design×

University of West London, Full Time Masters Degrees in Creative Arts & Design

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On the MA Film Production, the learning experience is built around practical production modules, underpinned by theory that explores key developments in the history of cinema.Our aim is to nurture filmmakers who can critically reflect on the form and content of both their own work, and the work of others in the field. Read more
On the MA Film Production, the learning experience is built around practical production modules, underpinned by theory that explores key developments in the history of cinema.Our aim is to nurture filmmakers who can critically reflect on the form and content of both their own work, and the work of others in the field

Course detail

The course is predominantly practical, with almost 70% of learning geared towards enabling you to produce documentary and experimental films. For those whose interest is academic, there is also the possibility to replace the double project practice module with a dissertation. The course closely tracks contemporary developments in digital cinematography and sound design, actively encouraging students to create transformative cinematic responses which cross the boundaries between documentary, experimental and fictive forms. This includes:
• lyrical
• Montage
• self-reflexive
• guerrilla
• poetic
• drama-documentary
approaches which challenge the existing output of broadcast, festival and on-line exhibition. Students produce several video sequences, plus two short films and one longer film.

The course examines the 'founding' traditions of documentary and experimental fiction associated with the Lumiere Brothers and Melies and explores overlaps and points of contact between them. The learning experience is built around practical production modules, underpinned by theory exploring key developments in the history of cinema. Our aim is to nurture filmmakers who can also critically reflect on the form and content of both their own work and the work of others in the field.

Modules

• Documentary Practice
• Film Theory
• Experimental Film and Video Practice
• Film and Media Cultures
• Project or Dissertation.

Format

The course blends theory and practice and is designed to help you build creative and critical bridges between the two, so each area of study informs and supports your other learning.

Almost 70% of the course is made up of practical workshops. These typically combine an examination of relevant film clips and approaches with discussions relating to their pros and cons. You will receive regular feedback with discussion on work in progress, test viewings with peers and staff, exhibition visits, and production of a final major piece of work. Throughout these modules, you will receive regular technical input and support.

Theory modules combine a range of approaches, including lectures, visits to the London Film Festival, student-led seminars, presentations and class discussions.

Assessment

The course combines elements of formative assessment with summative approaches, so you can draw insights from peers and tutors.

Career and study progression

Our alumni have gone on to showcase work and win awards in film festivals in the UK and internationally and secure broadcasts of their work in a range of territories.

In recent years many alumni from the course found work with production companies, broadcasters or as independent filmmakers, either in the UK, in their own country or elsewhere. We encourage our alumni to be involved with students and staff on the course and have developed a detailed database of student and alumni production expertise, to facilitate networking and the formation of crews for professional and student productions.

We also offer students the opportunity to pursue more in-depth research interests by undertaking a PhD with us.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/how-apply

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/scholarships-and-bursaries

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Commercial success and a sustained career within the music industry increasingly depend on the artist’s ability to set up their own small record labels, administrate their copyrights, facilitate live events, develop their careers professionally and, equally in today’s marketplace, maintain their health. Read more
Commercial success and a sustained career within the music industry increasingly depend on the artist’s ability to set up their own small record labels, administrate their copyrights, facilitate live events, develop their careers professionally and, equally in today’s marketplace, maintain their health.

Directed by a team of highly experienced industry professionals with unique insights and unprecedented experience in the field, you will have the opportunity to study key concepts in managing and developing your own career - or that of an act you represent.

Course detail

Under the direction of a team of highly experienced industry professionals, this course covers the key concepts of managing and developing your own career, or the career of an act which you represent.

The course modules have been specifically developed and written to provide the demand from students for the knowledge to develop their entrepreneurial and transferable skills to help develop new businesses within the music industry, or to help secure employment within specialist sectors of the music industry.

Modules

• Leadership and Creativity
• Independent Label Management
• Developing your Career
• Artist and Repertoire
• Live Events Management
• Copyright Law
• Research Methods
• Dissertation or Project.

Career and study progression

By completing this course successfully, you will have developed enhanced skills and knowledge, and have an advantage in developing your own career, or that of an artist or artists you represent.

Successful graduates have gone on to enjoy roles in:
• major record Labels in the UK and internationally
• independent record labels
• publishing companies
• PR companies
• artist management
• agency and promotion
• professional music
• tour management
• teaching
• radio station management
• creating new businesses.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/how-apply

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/scholarships-and-bursaries

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The MA Advanced Music Technology course aims to provide students with a higher level of understanding of the practical techniques and theory that underpin traditional and contemporary audio technology. Read more
The MA Advanced Music Technology course aims to provide students with a higher level of understanding of the practical techniques and theory that underpin traditional and contemporary audio technology.

The course boasts an enviable range of studio facilities and staff who are actively engaged in the music industry. It focuses on cutting edge topics from ambient recording through advanced non-linear techniques, to the evolving arena of surround sound mixing and recording, and encompassing multi-media work and interface design. Graduates from the MA will enjoy an augmented skill-set that will place them at a distinct advantage upon entry into this fast paced, competitive and constantly evolving market place.

Course detail

The course is based in studios of fully professional specification, and students will work on both digital and analogue consoles with access to state-of-the-art Pro Tools systems with hi-end plug-ins, along with other advanced technology such as analogue modular synthesizers, Kyma and Ambisonics.

Modules

• Advanced Recording Techniques
• Digital Audio Interface Design for Music
• Developing your Career
• Research Methods
• Multi-track Recording and Mixing for Surround
• Interactive Music Technology
• Advanced Non-linear Recording
• Masters Level Project.

Format

Modules comprise a combination of lectures, workshops, seminars and tutorials. There are also masterclasses from staff, visiting lecturers and practitioners.

Assessment

We assess modules in a variety of ways. Written work is usually in the form of essays, critical self-reflections and learning journals. Practical assessment varies according to the nature of the practice - for example, DVDs for surround recordings, CDs for audio, and some live installations or electro-acoustic performances. There are often at least two assignments for each module. There are no exams currently in the MA Advanced Music Technology course.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/how-apply

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/scholarships-and-bursaries

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Concert Music develops an advanced knowledge of received compositional techniques from the 16th to 20th/21st century. Read more
Concert Music develops an advanced knowledge of received compositional techniques from the 16th to 20th/21st century. Embracing both stylistic assignments and original creative work, it also includes conducting a vocal ensemble in an assessed rehearsal context.We are proud of LCM's provision of a one-to-one contact time with professional composers from your chosen area of specialisation. One–to-one tutorials are supported by regular lectures.

Course detail

Our highly successful programme of Composer's Workshops serves to underpin the postgraduate MMus course and to offer a further framework for social and professional networking.

The series consists of presentations given by a wide range of internationally recognised composers and music specialists from across the music industry, including copyright specialists, agents, publishers, IT experts and composers who sun their own performing ensembles or media companies, as well as instrumentalists, film composers, critics, theatrical agents. At the time of writing recent guests have included composers Jonathan Dove, Deirdre Gribbin, Judith Bingham, Geoffrey Burgon, Stephen Montague, Augusta Read Thomas, Param Vir, Philip Grange, Suzanne Giraud and Justin Connolly; the film and television composers Nigel Hess, Simon Lambros and Julian Nott; the composer and director of Sound 2 commercial music and media company, Elisa Harris; the West End musical director Michael Haslam and the rock guitarist Chris Francis.

The celebrated film orchestrator and conductor Nick Ingham maintains a visiting association with LCM and we have internationally acclaimed film and tv composers John Cameron and David Arnold as honorary doctors of music who will be joining the team to work with composers in the film/tv electives.

Modules

• Practical Composition one and two
• Orchestration and Arranging
• Conducting.

Or

• Electronic Music Composition one and two
• Developing your Career
• Interactive Music Technology
• Research Methods
• Dissertation or Project.

Optional modules include:

• Stylistic Composition (pre 1900)
• Stylistic Composition (post 1900)
• Multi-track Recording and Mixing for Surround
• Film and TV Score Production
• Advanced Non-linear Recording
• Combining Sounds
• Digital Audio Interface Design for Music
• The Development of Audio Technology
• Manipulating Sounds.

Format

Teaching involves a combination of lectures, practical workshops, seminars and tutorial discussions. Our teaching rooms are equipped with ProTools HD systems, Audient mixing consoles and C24 control surfaces, and lectures involve frequent practical demonstrations and examples.

Career and study progression

This course will equip you with an enviable set of skills that will enable you to succeed in the fast-changing music industry.

Some examples of the professional roles that we would expect graduates to progress to after completing the course include:

• Sound editor
• Copyist
• Arranger
• Composer
• Sound Designer
• Music Director
Study progression

After completing the course you can continue your studies with either a PhD or DMus at the University of West London.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/how-apply

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/scholarships-and-bursaries

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The course is aimed equally at composers of electronic music in the traditional sense, and contemporary artists who may combine the role of composer with producer, engineer, musician and DJ. Read more
The course is aimed equally at composers of electronic music in the traditional sense, and contemporary artists who may combine the role of composer with producer, engineer, musician and DJ. London College of Music (LCM) at the University of West London is at the forefront of the academic study of music technology in general - and popular electronic music composition in particular.

Course detail

The course encompasses a broad range of electronic music, from popular electronic dance music styles to art forms such as electroacoustic music. It assumes you have a level of competence in composition or music sequencing and production. Composition studies include one-to-one tutorials in an area of electronic music that you will negotiate with your lecturer.

You will also examine the history and concepts of electronic music, the creation of sound installations and live performances, together with options that include the theory and practice of sequencing, sound synthesis, sampling, production techniques and the use of Max/MSP.

This course helps you build a wide range of skills, knowledge and creative strategies essential for a successful career in the contemporary, fast-changing music industry - or as a springboard to further postgraduate study at PhD level.

Modules

Depending on the route you choose, the core modules you study will be:

• Practical Composition one and two
• Orchestration and Arranging
• Conducting

Or

• Electronic Music Composition one and two
• Developing your Career
• Interactive Music Technology
• Research Methods
• Dissertation or Project

Optional modules include:

• Stylistic Composition (pre 1900)
• Stylistic Composition (post 1900)
• Multi-track Recording and Mixing for Surround
• Film and TV Score Production
• Advanced Non-linear Recording
• Combining Sounds
• Digital Audio Interface Design for Music
• The Development of Audio Technology
• Manipulating Sounds.

Format

The department's extensive research in this subject area means our teaching is informed directly by the world's most up-to-date ideas on the academic study of record production. Also, our teaching staff are renowned for their professional expertise.

Teaching involves a combination of lectures, practical workshops, seminars and tutorial discussions. Our teaching rooms are equipped with ProTools HD systems, Audient mixing consoles and C24 control surfaces, and lectures involve frequent practical demonstrations and examples.

The contact hours for the course are concentrated into two days for full-time and one day for part-time students. For the rest of week you will book your own studio and computer time to complete your assignments and develop your composing skills, network, create music with other LCM students and engage in self-directed study. The course runs for a complete year - normally September to September - in full-time mode and two years for part-time.

Career and study progression

This course will equip you with an enviable set of skills that will enable you to succeed in the fast-changing music industry.

Some examples of the professional roles graduates have progressed to after completing the course include:
• Composer
• Sound Designer
• Remixer.

After completing the course you can continue your studies with either a PhD or DMus at the University of West London.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/how-apply

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/scholarships-and-bursaries

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Film and Television develops technical skills in compositional techniques and studio-based work. Designed for advanced composers, it provides an in-depth specialist training. Read more
Film and Television develops technical skills in compositional techniques and studio-based work. Designed for advanced composers, it provides an in-depth specialist training. Contextual knowledge of mainstream repertoire and significant previous experience of composition and orchestration are required.

Course detail

The MMus in Composition for Film and Television at London College of Music (LCM) is one of the longest-established qualifications of its kind. The course provides an ideal opportunity for in-depth examination of specific techniques (both historical and current) employed in the creation of music for modern media, and for drawing upon these procedures in a practical context by composing music for a diverse range of genres, including…

• television thrillers
• animation
• video game trailers
• science fiction
• dramatic cinema
• silent film
• costume drama
• documentary and…
• …horror!

In addition, you will hone and refine your skills as orchestrators by writing for a variety of specified ensembles. You will also expand your musical and dramatic vocabulary via an imaginative series of compositional pastiche exercises (an integral feature of the portfolio submission during Semester 1).

You will undertake further assessments in film score analysis (taking the form of an extended contextual essay, based upon a score/composer of your own choice) and in-studio ensemble conducting, working 'to click' with a group of 'live' performing musicians.

Modules

• Practical Composition 1 and 2
• Film and Television Score Production
• Business of Music
• Orchestration
• Combining Sounds
• Composers' Workshop Series.

Format

The course is taught mainly through individual tutorials, but may include group work, workshops, seminars and lectures.

Assessment

We assess written portfolio work through portfolios of compositions responding to verbal briefs, and in the second semester (or second year for part-time students), composing direct to picture. There is also a practical assessment in the Film and Television Score Production module and an extended essay project for the Business of Music module. There is a viva voce exam as part of the portfolio submissions in both semesters (or both years for part-time students).

Career and study progression

Course alumni have gone on to compose music for an excitingly diverse range of projects and for an impressive list of clients, including the BBC, BBC Worldwide, BBC Three, The National Theatre, Youth Music Theatre UK, Projection Pictures, The National Theatre, Sky, Channel 4 and the British Film Institute.

Also, in addition to orchestrating their own music, many specialise in orchestrating and conducting the music of other (notable) film composers.

While most students progress directly into the industry after completing this course, graduates may alternatively choose to undertake a PhD or further their compositional studies with a DMus.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/how-apply

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/scholarships-and-bursaries

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The London College of Music's postgraduate course in Performance offers a generous allowance of one-to-one instrumental tuition with internationally renowned recitalists. Read more
The London College of Music's postgraduate course in Performance offers a generous allowance of one-to-one instrumental tuition with internationally renowned recitalists. The course provides a range of fascinating modules that support and extend practical musicianship.

You can also benefit from London College of Music's (LCM) weekly Postgraduate Research Seminars and Composition Workshops, which offer great opportunities to learn new skills and network with students from other postgraduate courses. LCM also has several large ensembles, including the LCM Sinfonia, LCM Big Band, LCM Choir, and LCM Glee Choir, which students are able to participate in.

Course detail

The MMus course focuses on developing your musical performance at an advanced level. You will benefit from: one-to-one tuition with our instrumental teaching staff (all are internationally acclaimed recitalists); playing and learning with other students in workshops and masterclasses; and taking part in LCM's lively musical environment.

The course explores a wide range of 20th Century music and performance styles and you will be encouraged to develop your own. It places particular emphasis on developing critical thinking and listening skills and aims to give you an understanding of, and the opportunity to experiment with a broad range of performance styles.

Modules

MMus Performance students will pursue the following core modules:
• Postgraduate Instrumental Studies
• Postgraduate Performance Workshop
• Postgraduate Research Methods.

Optional modules
• either Postgraduate Dissertation or Postgraduate Project
and
• either Postgraduate Ensemble Studies or Developing your Career with Performing in the Studio.

Career and study progression

Graduates will leave the course more confident performers and better informed all-round musicians, having gained musical insight and transferable skills including being able to evaluate situations, engage in professional dialogue and work effectively with others. Graduates will most likely pursue a career as a professional performing musician.

Successful graduates may be eligible to study an LCM Doctor of Music (DMus).

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/how-apply

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/scholarships-and-bursaries

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This course is designed for students working primarily as instrumentalists, composers or conductors. Attendance for lectures is as limited as possible, with the remaining tuition delivered by one-to-one contact time through the tutorial system and via the e-learning platform. Read more
This course is designed for students working primarily as instrumentalists, composers or conductors. Attendance for lectures is as limited as possible, with the remaining tuition delivered by one-to-one contact time through the tutorial system and via the e-learning platform.

The course aims to equip you with a breadth of skills and information enabling you to develop your careers within today's music industry. Provision is made for students' professional work to form part of the assessment process, particularly with regard to practical components of the course.

The course is structured around the needs of the professional performing musician. Central to this is the further development of advanced, technically assured and artistically informed performance skills. These are supplemented by more narrowly defined skills, which relate to and arise directly from each chosen area of specialist work.

Modules

• Instrumental Studies or Conducting (one)
• Instrumental Studies or Conducting (two)
• Dissertation
• Negotiated Work-based Learning
• Project.

In addition to these core modules, students will have the opportunity to select three optional modules, ranging from practical based areas such as composition, orchestration and arranging, transcription and chamber music modules, through to theory-based modules in ensemble management:

• Instrumental Studies One and Two
• Postgraduate Conducting Studies One and Two
• Research Methods
• Dissertation
• Negotiated Work-based Learning
• Composition
• Performance Project
• Orchestration and Arranging
• Live Event Management
• Chamber Music Project
• 2nd Study Conducting
• Transcription.

Career and study progression

The course is aimed at students who are already working primarily as an instrumentalist or conductor in the music industry, but will enable you to progress in your chosen field.

After completing the course students can progress to the DMus in Performance.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/how-apply

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/scholarships-and-bursaries

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The The London College of Music's postgraduate course in Performance offers a generous provision of one-to-one instrumental tuition with internationally renowned recitalists. Read more
The The London College of Music's postgraduate course in Performance offers a generous provision of one-to-one instrumental tuition with internationally renowned recitalists. This performance course provides a range of fascinating modules which support and extend practical musicianship.

You can also benefit from LCM's weekly Postgraduate Research Seminars and Composition Workshops, which offer great opportunities to learn new skills and network with students from other postgraduate courses. LCM also has several large ensembles, including the LCM Sinfonia, LCM Big Band, LCM Choir, and LCM Glee Choir.

Course detail

The PgDip focuses on developing musical performance at an advanced level. As a performer, you will benefit from: one-to-one tuition with our instrumental teaching staff (all are internationally acclaimed recitalists); playing and learning with other students in workshops and masterclasses; and taking part in LCM's lively musical environment.

The course explores a wide range of 20th Century music and performance styles and you will be encouraged to develop your own. It places particular emphasis on developing critical thinking and listening skills and aims to give you an understanding of, and the opportunity to experiment with, a broad range of performance styles.

Modules

• Postgraduate Instrumental Studies
• Postgraduate Performance Workshop
• Postgraduate Ensemble Studies.

Career and study progression

This course opens up a vast range of employment opportunities to graduates, with previous students having gone on to careers in:
• one-to-one instrumental tuition
• instrumental examination
• recital musicianship.

Successful graduates may be eligible to study LCM's Fellowship Award (FLCM).

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/how-apply

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/scholarships-and-bursaries

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The Popular Music Performance course is designed to address the practical, academic and professional needs of contemporary musicians, and welcomes students from all genres. Read more
The Popular Music Performance course is designed to address the practical, academic and professional needs of contemporary musicians, and welcomes students from all genres.

Our postgraduate music performance courses offer substantial one-to-one instrumental tuition, with recitalists of international renown. They comprise fascinating and engaging modules that support and extend your practical musicianship and academic skills.

London College of Music's (LCM) regular Composition Workshops and Masterclasses offer great opportunities to learn new skills and network with students from other postgraduate courses. You can also benefit from being part of the vibrant LCM community with regular performance opportunities at LCM Sessions gigs, hosted by Popular Music students, and are encouraged to join in with musical activities throughout the LCM. The college runs several large ensembles including Pop and Gospel Choir, LCM Sinfonia, LCM Big Band, LCM Choir, and LCM Glee Choir, which students are able to participate in.

Course detail

This course provides specialist training for drummers, vocalists, guitarists, bassists and keyboard players that reflects the needs of today’s music industry.

The course is taught by postgraduate tutors from the London College of Music, all of whom are active professional musicians of the highest standard.

It combines technical and stylistic performance tuition through one-to-one lessons, as well as group sessions with other students from across the postgraduate community, to ensure an enhanced learning experience and the opportunity to network with like-minded artists.

The course runs throughout each calendar year.

Modules

• Performance Portfolio
• Ensemble and Music Direction Skills
• Critical Perspectives
• Research Methods
• Dissertation or Project.
Plus one option from:
• Studio Recording Project
• L Music Pedagogy.
Plus one option from:
• Performing in the Studio
• Live Event Management.

Format

You will have the opportunity to develop your technical and creative performance skills through a programme of one-to-one tuition supported by group-based lectures, seminars and workshops.

There is also an exciting masterclass programme which provides students with the opportunity to engage with leading practitioners from across all areas of the music industry - performance, production and songwriting.

Career and study progression

Graduates will likely pursue a career as a professional performing musician.

The degree might lead to further academic study, including DMus or MPhil/ PhD.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/how-apply

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/scholarships-and-bursaries

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We stand at the forefront of the academic study of musictechnology in general and record production in particular. This course investigates the theoretical and practical production of recorded popular music. Read more
We stand at the forefront of the academic study of musictechnology in general and record production in particular. This course investigates the theoretical and practical production of recorded popular music.

Investigating the production of popular recorded music from both a theoretical and practical standpoint, you will learn to combine a creative vision of the whole project with the practical management of the technical and artistic process.

Situated within one of the largest university music technology departments in the world, the course is led by a team of world-renowned record producers, composers, arrangers and engineers all involved in the recording industry.

Course detail

Designed to combine the technical skills of advanced recording techniques, digital signal processing and mixing with 'human skills' such as managing sessions, pre-production, developing your career, communication and performance in the studio.

Deconstruct and analyse the process of record production to develop the knowledge and skills necessary in understanding the contemporary, fast-changing music industry or as a springboard to further postgraduate study.

Modules

• Developing Your Career
• Advanced Recording Techniques
• The Development of Audio Technology
• Manipulating Sounds
• Performing in the Studio
• Combining Sounds
• Research Methods
• Dissertation/Project.

Format

Modules comprise a combination of lectures, workshops, seminars and tutorials. There are also master classes from staff, visiting lecturers and practitioners.

Assessment

There are often at least two assignments for each module. We assess modules in a variety of ways. Written work is usually in the form of essays, critical self-reflections and learning journals. Practical assessment varies according to the nature of the practice – for example, CD recordings, although there will always be a substantial written component in the assessment.

Career and study progression

Graduates from this course work in a wide range of professional roles. For example, as sound engineers, post-production engineers, recording artists, studio managers, company directors, product developers, product demonstrators, producers, composers and re-mixers. Our students have gone on to work with many prominent artists, including Lady Gaga, Peter Gabriel, Bloc Party and Blondie, and organisations such as the BBC, Norsk Films, The London Synthesis Orchestra and Warner Brothers.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/how-apply

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/scholarships-and-bursaries

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Design Innovation and Brand Management are the commercial powerhouses of all global organisations. These need to be understood and applied to the fast-growing business and luxury markets worldwide. Read more
Design Innovation and Brand Management are the commercial powerhouses of all global organisations. These need to be understood and applied to the fast-growing business and luxury markets worldwide. This course will help you become an innovator, attracting design savvy and communication conscious entrepreneurs.

This course will enable you to apply contemporary management and design thinking in a professional context, helping you compete in the growing global markets using your creativity, strategy and management theory.

The key to successful brand development is an understanding of business strategy in relation to design thinking models and a diverse and inquisitive mind as to the relationships involved in incremental or radical innovation. Branding connects to the consumer through a range of tools; identity, experience, advertising and manipulation, while design innovation is more about new thinking processes, new associations/relationships between functionality and aesthetics and new technologies.

Learn about these fascinating contemporary areas and gain relevant professional skills, preparing you for success in your career.

Course detail

Students study luxury design, design innovation and its relationship to the experience of creative management through brand strategies. This is then applied creatively to a range of live industry projects. Through carefully designed modules you will explore a range of evolutionary and revolutionary processes that build a professional understanding of current global environments.

As well as this critical industry knowledge, you will also:
• Have the unique opportunity to collaborate across other post graduate courses delivered in the London School of Film Media and Design and the London School of Music
• gain specialist skills and knowledge in your course
• gain insight and professional practice from working alongside students from the other courses, replicating collaborative industry practices
• explore a range of evolutionary and revolutionary processes to build a professional understanding of today's competitive global environments related to design, innovation processes and the management of brands
• develop your own project driven by your new knowledge: the culmination of your Masters experience
• apply management and design thinking to support organisations to compete in the growing global markets combining creativity, strategy and management and visual language as communication powerful tools
• learn to research, apply and present/pitch design innovation and branding campaigns with mentored design partnerships or teams on industry set briefs.

Jobs and placements

The Professionalisation module is an immersive module that covers the key professional creative and technical skills that anchor industry.

Through seminars and practical workshops you will:
• explore the working life of a professional
• gain a better understanding of industry narratives
• understand historical approaches used within the field of advertising, branding and communications.

The Internship or Industry Mentored Brief is an important module and an integral element of the MA Luxury Design Innovation and Brand Management. This is a module designed to develop the experience of design, branding and communication through experience in industry or doing a professional live mentored brief, with one of our mentors.

The University of West London has its own 'W5 Productions' which will support appropriately-skilled students find relevant work placements or an industry mentored brief in the creative industries.

Career and study progression

The MA Luxury Design Innovation and Brand Management develops graduate attributes that prepare you for a range of possible careers, depending on your interests and talents.These include:
• Brand and design managers
• Marketers
• Client account handlers
• Project managers
• Creative directors
• Senior designers
• Design team leaders
• Art directors
• Advertising managers
• Account planners
• Strategic thinkers
• Communication Consultants
• Content creators and managers
• Client account executives

The UK attracts many global brands, setting up flagship stores to attract domestic and overseas visitors to private retail locations. Retailers continue to look to enter new markets in potential higher growth regions, seeking to improve their existing operational performance in these markets to achieve sustained growth. This course has been designed to lead to employment and is targeted towards students whose career developments and interests lie within this field and the growth sector of the Design and Fashion Industries.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/how-apply

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/scholarships-and-bursaries

Read less
Creative research in humanities has become an important part of postgraduate study at Masters and Doctoral level. It has helped performers and practitioners remediate their work as research, and allowed practitioners to reflect on the processes of practice as much as its ramifications. Read more
Creative research in humanities has become an important part of postgraduate study at Masters and Doctoral level. It has helped performers and practitioners remediate their work as research, and allowed practitioners to reflect on the processes of practice as much as its ramifications. Like all our courses, the DMus reflects the mission and values of University of West London. It enhances progression and quality in education, and encourages widening participation.

Its emphasis on creative research, and its 'submission pathway' attracts recently qualified postgraduates and professional musicians who want doctoral recognition of their skills and experience - and this is sympathetic with the School's academic plan to attract mature and part-time students, together with the University's vision to reach out to students of all ages through flexible education.

The DMus extends the rich and eclectic musical experience our students enjoy at undergraduate and Masters level, to doctoral level, and enhances the London College of Music's growing postgraduate community. The DMus also maximises our research strengths in composition, performance and music technology.

MPhil

After a year of full-time study or two years of part-time study, you will have completed:
• a 30 to 90 minute performance accompanied by performance notes and a biography
• a critical commentary of at least 5,000 words.

The MPhil portfolio may comprise several contrasting pieces, or just one longer, structurally ambitious piece. The nature of your performance will determine its duration. For example, most romantic and modern concerts are between 30 and 40 minutes, while a solo piano recital might last between 50 and 90 minutes, depending on whether it is a daytime or evening performance. The supervisor must approve your repertoire and total performance duration, and will then notify the principal assessor in cases where that role is taken by another academic.

Your portfolio piece should be innovative, and show a new technique within, or an extension to, an existing practice. Examiners will attend the performance.

DMus

After approximately three years of full-time study or six years' part-time study, you will have completed:
• five performances, each between 30 and 90 minutes long, accompanied by programme notes and a biography, of which the first performance can be your work from the MPhil requirement
• a critical commentary of at least 20,000 words, of which the first 5,000 words can be from your MPhil requirement.

As with the MPhil, your DMus portfolio performances may comprise several contrasting pieces, or just one longer, structurally ambitious piece. You may wish to explore a range of roles and repertoire, or stick with just one concerto performance. The nature of your performance will determine its duration. For example, most romantic and modern concerts are between 30 and 40 minutes, while a solo piano recital might last between 50 and 90 minutes, depending on whether it is a daytime or evening performance. The supervisor must approve your repertoire and total performance duration, and will then notify the principal assessor in cases where that role is taken by another academic.

Your portfolio piece should be innovative, and show a new technique within, or an extension to, an existing practice. Examiners will attend the performance.

Proposal

Your proposal must not exceed 4,500 words. Unless you are studying for your DMus by Direct Entry or Submission, you will complete this proposal as part of the assessment regime for the Level 7 Research Methods module.

The proposal for the MPhil/DMus in Music Production is different from a proposal for a PhD. The core of the proposal will be a list of works you intend for portfolio submission. It should also include the anticipated duration of, and instrumentation for, each piece. Proposals for DMus by Submission should also append the compositions. You should explain in your proposal the current musical and extra-musical influences on your work, and how your portfolio constitutes an original and substantial contribution to the area of practice. For this, you should include:
• a 'literature review' of contemporary practice in the same field
• an analysis and explanation of existing techniques in the field
• an explanation of how the creative work represents an extension of, or reaction to, contemporary practice.

Your proposal should also include a timescale for each part of the project, and append an outline bibliography.

Full-time and part-time candidates - you may also identify areas of technical development, analysing how your portfolio pieces might enable this transition. You must indicate in your proposal any pieces you intend to include through backdated registration.

You may also include a CV.

Assessment

This will involve an oral examination, conducted in much the same way as a traditional PhD. A viva voce will also be necessary when you ‘exit’ with the MPhil qualification.

Career and study progression

The DMus may lead to a career in teaching and research in higher education.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/how-apply

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/scholarships-and-bursaries

Read less
Creative research in humanities has become an important part of postgraduate study at Masters and Doctoral level. It has helped performers and practitioners remediate their work as research, and allowed practitioners to reflect on the processes of practice as much as its ramifications. Read more
Creative research in humanities has become an important part of postgraduate study at Masters and Doctoral level. It has helped performers and practitioners remediate their work as research, and allowed practitioners to reflect on the processes of practice as much as its ramifications. Like all our courses, the DMus reflects the mission and values of University of West London. It enhances progression and quality in education, and encourages widening participation.

Its emphasis on creative research, and its 'submission pathway' attracts recently qualified postgraduates and professional musicians who want doctoral recognition of their skills and experience - and this is sympathetic with the School's academic plan to attract mature and part-time students, together with the University's vision to reach out to students of all ages through flexible education.

The DMus extends the rich and eclectic musical experience our students enjoy at undergraduate and Masters level, to doctoral level, and enhances the London College of Music's growing postgraduate community. The DMus also maximises our research strengths in composition, performance and music technology.

Course detail

The DMus is a practice-led doctorate, and an alternative to the traditional PhD for experienced practitioners who wish to show an outstanding and innovative contribution a specific area of expertise.

MPhil

After a year of full-time study or two years of part-time study, You will have completed:

• a portfolio of notated music composition, 30 to 40 minutes in performance duration - you may submit a recording of the portfolio piece, but this is not compulsory

• a critical commentary of at least 5,000 words.

The MPhil portfolio may comprise several pieces to show a range of contrasting abilities, or just one structurally ambitious work. It may be part of an even larger work, which you can use for the DMus portfolio. Your portfolio piece should be innovative, and show a new technique within, or an extension to, an existing practice.

DMus

After approximately three years of full-time study or six years' part-time study, you will have completed:

• a portfolio of notated music composition, 75 to 90 minutes in performance duration - of which the MPhil portfolio forms the first 30 to 40 minutes. You may submit a recording of the portfolio piece, but this is not compulsory

• a critical commentary of at least 20,000 words, of which the first 5,000 words will be your MPhil critical commentary.

The DMus portfolio may comprise several pieces to show a range of contrasting abilities, but must include one structurally ambitious work lasting 20 to 30 minutes. Alternatively, you may submit just one extended structurally ambitious piece, which your MPhil portfolio may be part of. Your portfolio piece should be innovative, and show a new technique within, or an extension to, an existing practice.

Proposal

Your proposal must not exceed 4,500 words. Unless you are studying for your DMus by Direct Entry or Submission, you will complete this proposal as part of the assessment regime for the Level 7 Research Methods module.

The proposal for the MPhil/DMus in Composition is different from a proposal for a PhD. The core of the proposal will be a list of works you intend for portfolio submission. It should also include the anticipated duration of and instrumentation for each piece. Proposals for DMus by Submission should also append the compositions, and you may choose to discuss the artistic ambition of each work. You must indicate, through backdated registration, the pieces intended for inclusion.

Although most of the pieces will be based on original ideas, you can also submit works developed from pre-existing material - for example, a folk-song arrangement or a fantasia on a theme.

Your proposal may discuss current musical or extra-musical influences on your work, and should explain how your portfolio constitutes an original and substantial contribution to the area of practice. For this, you should include:
• a 'literature review' of contemporary practice in the same field
• an analysis and explanation of existing techniques in the field
• an explanation of how the creative work represents an extension of, or reaction to, contemporary practice.

Your proposal should also include a timescale for each part of the project, and append an outline bibliography. You may also identify areas of technical development, analysing how your portfolio pieces might enable this transition.

You may also include a CV with your proposal.

Assessment

This will involve an oral examination, conducted in much the same way as a traditional PhD. A viva voce will also be necessary when you 'exit' with the MPhil qualification.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/how-apply

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/scholarships-and-bursaries

Read less
Creative research in humanities has become an important part of postgraduate study at Masters and Doctoral level. It has helped performers and practitioners remediate their work as research, and allowed practitioners to reflect on the processes of practice as much as its ramifications. Read more
Creative research in humanities has become an important part of postgraduate study at Masters and Doctoral level. It has helped performers and practitioners remediate their work as research, and allowed practitioners to reflect on the processes of practice as much as its ramifications. Like all our courses, the DMus reflects the mission and values of University of West London. It enhances progression and quality in education, and encourages widening participation.

Its emphasis on creative research, and its 'submission pathway' attracts recently qualified postgraduates and professional musicians who want doctoral recognition of their skills and experience - and this is sympathetic with the School's academic plan to attract mature and part-time students, together with the University's vision to reach out to students of all ages through flexible education.

The DMus extends the rich and eclectic musical experience our students enjoy at undergraduate and Masters level, to doctoral level, and enhances the London College of Music's growing postgraduate community. The DMus also maximises our research strengths in composition, performance and music technology.

MPhil

After a year of full-time study or two years of part-time study, you will have completed:
• a portfolio of recorded music, 60 to 80 minutes in duration, with optimised session files included
• a critical commentary of at least 5,000 words.

The MPhil portfolio may comprise pieces by several artists, or several by the same artist. It may be part of an even larger work, which you can use for the DMus portfolio. Your portfolio piece should be innovative, and show a new technique within, or an extension to, an existing practice.

DMus

After approximately three years of full-time study or six years' part-time study, you will have completed:
• a portfolio of recorded music, 120 to 140 minutes long - of which the MPhil portfolio forms the first 60 to 80 minutes. The portfolio should include optimised session files of your recordings.
• a critical commentary of at least 20,000 words, of which the first 5,000 words will be your MPhil critical commentary.

The DMus portfolio may comprise several pieces by one artist, or by several different ones, and your MPhil portfolio can be part of this extended work. Your portfolio piece should be innovative, and show a new technique within, or an extension to, an existing practice.

Proposal

Your proposal must not exceed 4,500 words. Unless you are studying for your DMus by Direct Entry or Submission, you will complete this proposal as part of the assessment regime for the Level 7 Research Methods module.

The proposal for the MPhil/DMus in Music Production is different from a proposal for a PhD. The core of the proposal will be a list of works you intend for portfolio submission. It should also include the anticipated duration of each piece. Proposals for DMus by Submission should also append the compositions. You should explain in your proposal how your portfolio constitutes an original and substantial contribution to the area of practice. For this, you should include:
• a 'literature review' of contemporary practice in the same field
• an analysis and explanation of existing techniques in the field
• an explanation of how the creative work represents an extension of, or reaction to, contemporary practice (see pathway appendices), which may be as an extended technique or something more philosophical, ontological or aesthetically grounded - or preferably a combination of the two.

Your proposal should also include a timescale for each part of the project, and an appended outline bibliography.

You may also identify areas of technical development, analysing how your portfolio pieces might enable this transition. You must indicate in your proposal, any pieces you intend to include through backdated registration.

You may also include a CV.

Assessment

Assessment of the submission will involve an oral examination conducted in much the same way as a traditional PhD. A viva voce will also be necessary when a student 'exits' with the MPhil degree.

Career and study progression

The DMus may lead to a career in teaching and research in higher education.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/how-apply

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/scholarships-and-bursaries

Read less

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