• University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine Featured Masters Courses
  • Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH Featured Masters Courses
  • Goldsmiths, University of London Featured Masters Courses
  • Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • Anglia Ruskin University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Southampton Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
King’s College London Featured Masters Courses
Cass Business School Featured Masters Courses
Vlerick Business School Featured Masters Courses
Imperial College London Featured Masters Courses
Aberdeen University Featured Masters Courses
0 miles
Creative Arts & Design×

Bangor University, Full Time Masters Degrees in Creative Arts & Design

We have 14 Bangor University, Full Time Masters Degrees in Creative Arts & Design

  • Creative Arts & Design×
  • Bangor University×
  • Full Time×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 14 of 14
Order by 
The course is available in Standard Track and in Special Track. Course Structure. Part 1 (Diploma). In addition to the Principal Subject, in which the student specialises; up to three additional subjects can be studied. Read more
The course is available in Standard Track and in Special Track

Course Structure
Part 1 (Diploma):

In addition to the Principal Subject, in which the student specialises; up to three additional subjects can be studied. Total of 120 credits.

Part 2 (MA):

Normally consists of a dissertation, composition portfolio, or critical edition (in the area of the Principal Subject). Total of 60 credits.

Course description
Standard Track:

The course combines specialisation in one area (including Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Composition, Solo Performance) with further training in up to three complimentary areas.

The range of choice on this course makes it one of the most flexible MA programmes in the UK. Students can make their education as broad or narrow as they wish. For those with a single-minded interest in one area specialised degrees are available.

The programme is divided into two parts: two semesters of taught study (Part I, 120 credits) and a substantial independent piece of work in the main area, produced over the summer (Part II, 60 credits).

Part 1 is centred on the Principal Subject module (WMM4044, 40 credits) in the student’s main area of interest. It lays the foundations of a Part 2 project in the same area. The following subjects are available:

Historical Musicology
Editorial Musicology
Ethnomusicology
Celtic Traditional Music
Music in Wales
Music and the Christian Church
Composition
Electroacoustic Composition
Composing Film Music
Studying Film Music
Solo Performance
Sacred Music Studies
Early Music
20th-/21st-century Music
WMP4052 Preparing for the Part 2 project (10 credits) acts as a bridge between Parts 1 and 2.

An additional 40 credits will be gained through submissions in other fields through either one Major Open Submission (WXM4046, 40 credits) or two Minor Open Submissions (WMP4047 and WMP4048, 20 credits each). Students can select from a number of subject areas, including, but not restricted to, those listed above. Additional offerings include modules in Arts Administration, Music in the Community, Ethnomusicology and Analysis.

Depending on the main area of specialism, students will attend a core module in musicology (WMP4041 Current Musicology, 30 credits) or composition (WMP4042 Contexts and Concepts in Composition, 30 credits). During these modules students will became familiar with up-to-date research and creative techniques and methodologies in the selected disciplines.

Subject-specific teaching is provided through a combination of individual tuition and seminar session in small groups. Within each of the chosen subject areas, students can identify their own projects, for which they will receive expert supervision.

Special Track:

The MA in Music (Special Track) allows students to specialise in any one of the following areas: Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Celtic Traditional Music, Music in Wales, Studying Film Music.

All the training will be centred on the student’s main area, aided by a broader look at the methodological foundation of the discipline as a whole (through the core module in musicology).

The programme is divided into two parts: two semesters of taught study (Part 1, 120 credits) and a substantial independent piece of work in the main area, produced over the summer (Part 2, 60 credits).

Part 1 is centred on the Principal Subject module (WMM4045, 60 credits) in the student’s area of specialism. Another aspect of the same area will be explored in the Independent Special Study (WMP4049, 20 credits).

WMP4052 Preparing for the Part 2 project (10 credits) acts as a bridge between Parts 1 and 2.

Depending on the main area of specialism, students will attend a core module in musicology (WMP4041 Current Musicology, 30 credits) or composition (WMP4042 Contexts and Concepts in Composition, 30 credits). During these modules students will became familiar with up-to-date research and creative techniques and methodologies in the selected disciplines.

Subject-specific teaching is provided through a combination of individual tuition and seminar session in small groups. Within each of the chosen subject areas, students can identify their own projects, for which they will receive expert supervision.

Compulsory modules:

Standard Track

Principal Subject, to be chosen from the published list for that Academic Year (40 Credits). Study areas currently offered are: Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Ethnomusicology, Celtic Traditional Music, Music in Wales, Music and the Christian Church, Composition, Electroacoustic composition / Sonic arts, Composing Film Music, Studying Film Music, Solo Performance, Music in the Community, Sacred Music Studies, Early Music, 20th-/21st-century Music.
Compulsory Core Module: either Current Musicology (for musicologists) or Concepts of Composition (for composers) (depending on the Principal Subject) (30 Credits).
Open submissions: to be chosen from the optional modules (40 credits).
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits).
(Total of 120 credits)

Special Track

Principal Subject, to be chosen from the published list for that Academic Year (60 Credits). Study areas currently offered: Historical Musicology; Editorial Musicology; Music in the Christian Church; Celtic Traditional Music; Music in Wales; Studying Film Music).
Compulsory Core Module: either Current Musicology (for musicologists) or Concepts of Composition (for composers) (depending on the Principal Subject) (30 Credits).
Independent Special Study (must be in the same area as the Principal Subject) (20 credits)
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits)
(Total of 120 credits)

Optional modules:

Standard Track

Open Submissions (40 or 20 credits) may be chosen in any of the following study areas (but have to be different from the Principal Subject): Historical Musicology; Editorial Musicology; Ethnomusicology; Celtic Traditional Music; Music in Wales; Music and the Christian Church; Composition; Electroacoustic Composition / Sonic Arts; Composing Film Music; Studying Film Music; Solo Performance; Sacred Music Studies; Early Music; 20th-/21st-century Music; Analysis, Arts Administration, Music Studio Techniques, Popular Music Studies, Techniques and Practice of Instrumental or Vocal Teaching (20 credits only), Performance Practice (20 credits only), Music for Instruments and Electronics (20 credits only), Supporting Studies (20 credits only), ELCOS Language Skills (20 credits, international students only.ded study (e.g. portfolio of compositions, performance recital).

Read less
This programme offers you the opportunity to undertake in-depth study on a chosen aspect of film and cinema studies. Following first semester modules in Research Methods and in Media, Culture, and Creativity, you embark on a 40,000 word dissertation (or practice-based equivalent). Read more
This programme offers you the opportunity to undertake in-depth study on a chosen aspect of film and cinema studies. Following first semester modules in Research Methods and in Media, Culture, and Creativity, you embark on a 40,000 word dissertation (or practice-based equivalent). Specialist film staff across the College of Arts and Humanities at Bangor will be on hand to supervise, as you develop, sustain, consolidate and resolve a self-directed programme of work in the field of film studies, either creative or theoretical, over an extended period of time. The MRes is supported by a dedicated College-wide seminar series, which offers you the opportunity to present your own work in progress, and to develop an understanding of critical paradigms and research in Bangor and beyond.

Successful applicants for this programme will have an excellent first degree in a relevant discipline or equivalent practical/industrial experience, and a demonstrated ability to work independently to bring a self-directed project to completion.

Modules:

Media, Culture, and Creativity Theory: This module builds on one of the School of Creative Studies and Media Department’s greatest strengths, by bringing students together with other practitioners and researchers from other fields of study in a forum for a wider discourse about current research in the media and creative industries. The module will provide a systematic overview of major 20th and 21st century critical schools and theoretical approaches, which are key for an advanced understanding of how to read and analyse creative, cultural and media artefacts such as fiction, non-fiction, poetry, drama, film, video games and other new media texts.

Research Methods: This module equips you with an understanding and critical overview of key methodological issues associated with various types of research in the Media, Cultural and Creative Industries, in preparation for the dissertation.

MRes Humanities Dissertation: With guidance from academic staff, students following the MRes Humanities Dissertation module will be asked to choose a topic of their own, for further research. Students will be expected to produce an independently researched piece of work which will reflect the knowledge and skills acquired from the taught modules. The topic chosen may be specific to one culture or comparative.

Read less
A course may be the first step towards a writing career, or a chance for more experienced writers to develop their work from a new perspective. Read more
A course may be the first step towards a writing career, or a chance for more experienced writers to develop their work from a new perspective. The School of English at Bangor University offers a range of opportunities for postgraduate study in a dynamic critical and creative environment. One of the first institutions in the UK to offer creative writing at degree level, Bangor has significant experience in this discipline and a flourishing postgraduate community.

Specialist writing staff are closely involved in teaching and supervision, and have a range of expertise in poetry, fiction, literary editing and the interface between creative and critical writing. Staff members are published and award-winning authors, and are also involved in a variety of editing and judging activities; Zoe Skoulding is editor of Poetry Wales, Ian Gregson is editor of Salt Wales and Kachi Ozumba was a judge for the Commonwealth Short Story competition in 2010 and 2011. The school benefits from the presence of the poet Professor Carol Rumens as a visiting professor, and the frequent visits of honorary professor Philip Pullman, who offers both readings and workshops.

Our students are successful. A number of recent or existing postgraduate students have successfully published collections of poems or short stories that have arisen from their studies here at Bangor. These include John Tanner, Zoe Skoulding, and Nessa O’Mahoney. Others have published stories including Terri Lee Hackman, Zoe Perrenoud, and Lisa Blower (who won the 2009 Guardian Short Story Competition) or individual poems and other forms of writing.

Read less
Description. This course aims at providing computer science graduates with the knowledge and skills to specialise in advanced computer graphics principles and practice, as well as gaining exposure to research activities in this field. Read more
Description

This course aims at providing computer science graduates with the knowledge and skills to specialise in advanced computer graphics principles and practice, as well as gaining exposure to research activities in this field. Students completing this course will have a firm grasp of the current practices and directions in computer graphics techniques and be able to apply them to scientific visualization, virtual environments, and computer animation.

Modules are:

* Computer Animation
* Java Programming
* Project Foundations
* Introduction to Computer Graphics
* Virtual Environments & Human Perception
* Scientific Visualization
* Computing Shape
* Sample Based Geometric Modelling
* MSc Project & Dissertation

Read less
The School of Creative Studies and Media has a strong reputation for its synthesis of critical/theoretical work and practice, and this degree lies at the heart of its activity. Read more
The School of Creative Studies and Media has a strong reputation for its synthesis of critical/theoretical work and practice, and this degree lies at the heart of its activity. You take first semester modules in creativity and research and in media theory, before embarking on the production of a substantial practice-based dissertation under the supervision of a specialist member of staff. The dissertation includes both a reflective/critical element and a portfolio, and can be undertaken in any of the practice-based disciplines taught in the School, including writing, screenwriting, performance, television and radio production, film and documentary making, digital media writing and production, and journalism. Successful applicants for this programme will have an excellent first degree in a relevant discipline or equivalent practical/industrial experience, and a demonstrated ability to work independently to bring a self-directed project to completion.

Modules:

Media, Culture, and Creativity Theory: This module builds on one of the School of Creative Studies and Media Department’s greatest strengths, by bringing students together with other practitioners and researchers from other fields of study in a forum for a wider discourse about current research in the media and creative industries. The module will provide a systematic overview of major 20th and 21st century critical schools and theoretical approaches, which are key for an advanced understanding of how to read and analyse creative, cultural and media artefacts such as fiction, non-fiction, poetry, drama, film, video games and other new media texts.

Research Methods: This module equips you with an understanding and critical overview of key methodological issues associated with various types of research in the Media, Cultural and Creative Industries, in preparation for the dissertation.

MRes Humanities Dissertation: With guidance from academic staff, students following the MRes Humanities Dissertation module will be asked to choose a topic of their own, for further research. Students will be expected to produce an independently researched piece of work which will reflect the knowledge and skills acquired from the taught modules. The topic chosen may be specific to one culture or comparative.

Read less
Study areas currently offered. Composition; Electroacoustic Composition; Composing Film Music. The course (Special Track) allows students to specialise in any one of area of composition, including Electro-acoustic Composition, Sonic Art and Composing for Film. Read more
Study areas currently offered:

Composition; Electroacoustic Composition; Composing Film Music
The course (Special Track) allows students to specialise in any one of area of composition, including Electro-acoustic Composition, Sonic Art and Composing for Film.

All the training will be centred on the student’s main area, aided by a broader look at compositional techniques and approaches as a whole (through the core module in Composition).

The programme is divided into two parts: two semesters of taught study (Part 1, 120 credits) and a substantial independent piece of work in the main area, produced over the summer (Part 2, 60 credits).

Part 1 is centred on the Principal Subject module (WMM4045, 60 credits) in a chosen area of composition. Another aspect of the same area or a different approach to composition will be explored in the Independent Special Study (WMP4049, 20 credits).

WMP4052 Preparing for the Part 2 project (10 credits) acts as a bridge between Parts 1 and 2.

Additionally students will attend a core module in composition (WMP4042 Contexts and Concepts in Composition, 30 credits). During these modules students will became familiar with up-to-date research and creative techniques and methodologies in the selected disciplines.

Subject-specific teaching is provided through a combination of individual tuition and seminar session in small groups. Within each of the chosen subject areas, students can identify their own projects, for which they will receive expert supervision.

Course Structure
Part 1 (Diploma):

Focuses on studies in composition and/or electroacoustic composition and/or sonic art.

(Total of 120 credits)

Part 2 (MMus):

Consists of a portfolio comprising at least one substantial composition (with or without electroacoustics) or work of sonic art.

(Total of 60 credits)

Compulsory modules:

Principal Subject Module: either Composition, Electroacoustic Composition / Sonic Arts or Composing for Film (60 credits)
Compulsory Core Module: Concepts of Composition (30 credits)
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits)
(Total 120 credits)

Optional modules:

Independent Special Study in either Composition, Composing for Film or Electroacoustic Composition / Sonic Arts (20 credits)

Read less
This course allows students to specialise in Solo Performance with further training in up to three complimentary areas. The programme is divided into two parts. Read more
This course allows students to specialise in Solo Performance with further training in up to three complimentary areas.

The programme is divided into two parts: two semesters of taught study (Part I, 120 credits) and a substantial recital prepared over the summer (Part II, 60 credits).

Part 1 is centred on the Principal Subject module (WMM4044, 40 credits) in Solo Performance. It lays the foundations of a Part 2 project, which will result in a major recital. WMP4052 Preparing for the Part 2 project (10 credits) acts as a bridge between Parts 1 and 2.

An additional 40 credits will be gained through submissions in other performance-related fields through either one Major Open Submission (WXM4046, 40 credits) or two Minor Open Submissions (WMP4047 and WMP4048, 20 credits each). These area available in the following subject areas:

Historical Performance Practice
Historical Musicology
Techniques of Vocal/Instrumental Teaching
Performing with Live Electronics.
The core module in musicology will make students acquainted with up-to-date research and creative techniques and methodologies.

Students will receive 42 hours of vocal/instrumental tuition. In other subject areas, teaching is provided through a combination of individual tuition and seminar session in small groups. Within each of the chosen subject areas, students can identify their own projects, for which they will receive expert supervision.

Course Structure
Part 1 (Diploma):

Performance study assessed by short recital with related supporting modules chosen from: performance practice; techniques of teaching; ensemble studies; conducting; editorial or historical studies.

(Total of 120 credits)

Part 2 (MA):

Normally consists of a substantial public recital or recital and related dissertation.

(60 credits)

Compulsory modules:

Principal Subject Module: Solo Performance (40 credits)
Compulsory Core Module: Current Musicology (30 credits)
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits)
Optional modules:

Open Submissions (40 or 20 credits) must be chosen from the following study areas:

Performance Practice (20 credits only);
Historical Musicology;
Techniques and Practice of Instrumental or Vocal Teaching (20 credits only);
Supporting Studies (20 credits only);
ELCOS Language Skills (20 credits, international students only).

Read less
The course (Standard Track) allows students to specialise in music after 1900. Typically students this area will be approached through a combination of different angles, such as historical musicology, analysis, performance and composition. Read more
The course (Standard Track) allows students to specialise in music after 1900. Typically students this area will be approached through a combination of different angles, such as historical musicology, analysis, performance and composition.

This will be aided by a broader look at techniques, methodologies and approaches (through the core module in either Composition or Musicology).

The programme is divided into two parts: two semesters of taught study (Part 1, 120 credits) and a substantial independent piece of work in the main area, produced over the summer (Part 2, 60 credits).

Part 1 is centred on the Principal Subject module (WMM4044, 40 credits) in 20th-/21st-Century Music. It lays the foundations of a Part 2 project in the same area.

WMP4052: Preparing for the Part 2 project (10 credits) acts as a bridge between Parts 1 and 2.

An additional 40 credits will be gained through submissions in other fields through either one Major Open Submission (WXM4046, 40 credits) or two Minor Open Submissions (WMP4047 and WMP4048, 20 credits each). Students can select from a number of subject areas related to music after 1900, including:

Historical Musicology
Editorial Musicology
Ethnomusicology
Music in Wales
Music and the Christian Church
Composition
Electroacoustic Composition / Sonic Arts
Composing Film Music
Studying Film Music
Solo Performance
Performance / Composition with Live Electronics
Sacred Music Studies
Analysis
Arts Administration
Music Studio Techniques
Popular Music Studies
Course Structure
Part 1 (Diploma):

In addition to the Principal Subject, in which the student specialises; up to three additional subjects (with a focus on music after 1900) can be studied.

(Total of 120 credits)

Part 2 (MA):

Normally consists of a dissertation or critical edition.

(60 credits)

Compulsory modules:

Standard Track

Principal Subject: 20th-/21st-Century Music (40 Credits).
Compulsory Core Module: Current Musicology (30 credits)
Open submission: to be chosen from the optional modules (40 credits)
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits)
(Total of 120 credits)

Special Track

Principal Subject: 20th-/21st-Century Music (60 Credits)
Compulsory Core Module: either Current Musicology (for musicologists) or Concepts of Composition (for composers) (30 credits)
Independent Special Study (must be in the same area as the Principal Subject) (20 credits)
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits)
(Total of 120 credits)

Optional modules:

Standard Track

Open Submissions (40 or 20 credits) are chosen from the following areas (with emphasis on music after 1900):

Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Ethnomusicology, Music in Wales, Music and the Christian Church, Composition, Electroacoustic Composition / Sonic Arts, Composing Film Music, Studying Film Music, Solo Performance, Sacred Music Studies, Analysis, Arts Administration, Music Studio Techniques, Popular Music Studies, ELCOS Language Skills (20 credits, international students only)

Read less
What is the course about?. The course aims to train you to become effective and enthusiastic teachers of Music at secondary school level. Read more
What is the course about?

The course aims to train you to become effective and enthusiastic teachers of Music at secondary school level.
You will be given the opportunity to develop your existing experience and skills and learn how to apply them in the classroom.
You will be encouraged to adopt a positive attitude and to think creatively and critically about your work.

What is it like?

The course is school-focused and there will be a strong emphasis on practical work. Composing, performing, and appraising will form important areas of activity.

Teaching music in schools

Much of your time will be spent in schools where you will be supported by your tutors and by mentors who are experienced teachers.
Schools today and tomorrow

You will learn of the many aspects of school life, including personal and social education, and you will be encouraged to take part in extra-curricular activities.
Gaining new skills

Through a combination of workshops, seminars, and visits you will learn how to

implement the requirements of the National Curriculum for Music;
organise and manage music lessons at the different key stages;
plan and develop lessons and classroom materials;
develop creative and practical work in the classroom;
use music technology in the classroom;
monitor and assess pupils' progress;
plan for extra-curricular music

Assessment

Your work is assessed on the basis of the competences expected of a newly qualified teacher. There are no examinations but your coursework is continually assessed.

Read less
*Welsh language course*. Mae’r cwrs Ysgifennu Creadigol wedi ei rannu’n Rhan 1 a Rhan 2 a rhaid pasio’r rhan gyntaf yn llwyddiannus er mwyn cael mynediad i’r ail ran. Read more
*Welsh language course*

Mae’r cwrs Ysgifennu Creadigol wedi ei rannu’n Rhan 1 a Rhan 2 a rhaid pasio’r rhan gyntaf yn llwyddiannus er mwyn cael mynediad i’r ail ran. Mae Rhan 1 yn cynnwys 3 modiwl 40 credyd yr un sef ‘Themâu Creadigol’, ‘Technegau Cyfansoddi’ a ‘Mathau Llenyddol’. Mae Rhan 2 y cwrs yn cynnwys 1 modiwl 60 credyd sef portffolio o waith creadigol hyd at 20,000 o eiriau, a phennir canlyniad y cwrs cyfan ar farc cyfartalog dwy ran y cynllun. Mater i’w drafod rhwng y myfyriwr a’i gyfarwyddwr academaidd fydd union natur y portffolio, ac mae amryw fodelau’n bosib, e.e. nofel fer, casgliad o storïau byrion neu gerddi, cyfuniad o farddoniaeth a rhyddiaith. Rhoddir ystyriaeth ofalus i ofynion unigol pob myfyriwr wrth bennu union gynnwys y modiwlau, a chynllunnir rhan gyntaf y rhaglen gyda golwg ar y posibiliadau creadigol a all fwydo’r ail ran.

Y prif gyswllt dysgu yw hwnnw gyda’r cyfarwyddwr academaidd a threfnir i’w gyfarfod yn rheolaidd drwy gydol cofrestriad y myfyriwr. At hynny, mae cymuned ôl-radd fywiog o fewn Ysgol y Gymraeg a threfnir cyfres o seminarau wythnosol yn ystod Semester 1 a 2. Yn y seminarau hyn cynigir arweiniad i faterion technegol sy’n berthnasol i’r holl fyfyrwyr ôl-radd, bydd cyfle i glywed cyd-fyfyrwyr yn cyflwyno papurau am eu projectau unigol, a hefyd i ddysgu am ymchwil gyfredol gan staff Ysgol y Gymraeg ac ysgolion academaidd eraill. At hynny, cynhelir seminarau ysgrifennu creadigol rheolaidd a bydd cyfle i glywed awduron gwadd fel Wiliam Owen Roberts, Lloyd Jones, Angharad Tomos ac Ifor ap Glyn yn trafod eu gwaith. Yn ogystal, os yw myfyriwr ôl-radd am ddilyn yn anffurfiol unrhyw un o fodiwlau israddedig yr ysgol er mwyn cyfoethogi ei brofiad dysgu, bydd cyfle iddo wneud hynny.

Cysylltiadau Ymchwil / Cysylltiadau Diwydiannol
Ers rhai blynyddoedd, bu nifer o fyfyrwyr yn Ysgol y Gymraeg yn dilyn cyrsiau MA a noddwyd gan arian o ffynonellau Ewropeaidd, ac y mae hynny wedi arwain at nifer o gysylltiadau gwerthfawr gyda chwmnïau a sefydliadau fel Cwmni Da, Rondo Media, Gwasg Carreg Gwalch, Gwasg y Bwthyn, Canolfan Ysgrifennu Tŷ Newydd, a’r cylchgrawn Barn. Mae’r profiadau gwaith a gafwyd gyda’r cwmnïau a’r sefydliadau hyn wedi cryfhau cyflogadwyedd y myfyrwyr ôl-radd yn fawr.

Rhagolygon Gyrfaoedd
I amryw fyfyrwyr mae cwrs MA yn gyfle i ymestyn eu hastudiaethau israddedig drwy ganolbwyntio ar broject ôl-radd a chyn ymgymryd â chwrs hyfforddiant pellach, e.e. ymarfer dysgu. Yn ddiweddar, mae’r profiadau a’r sgiliau a enillir drwy gwrs MA wedi bod o gymorth i fyfyrwyr wrth sicrhau swyddi gyda chyfnodolion fel Golwg 360 a’r Cymro, gwasg fel Y Lolfa, rhaglen deledu fel Hacio, a Chanolfan Bedwyr ym Mhrifysgol Bangor. I fyfyrwyr eraill, mae MA wedi cynnig sylfaen i ymchwil bellach ar lefel MPhil a PhD.

Read less
This programme offers you the opportunity to conduct in-depth practice-based, empirical or critical research into the process and product of professional writing. Read more
This programme offers you the opportunity to conduct in-depth practice-based, empirical or critical research into the process and product of professional writing. You will work towards the production of a practice-based portfolio or independently researched piece of work which will explore the creative and critical styles, contexts and attitudes of professional writing. You will develop, sustain, consolidate and resolve a self-directed programme of work in professional writing over an extended period of time, supervised by specialist professional staff in the field.

Successful applicants for this programme will have an excellent first degree in a relevant discipline or equivalent practical/industrial experience, and a demonstrated ability to work independently to bring a self-directed project to completion.

Modules:

Media, Culture, and Creativity Theory: This module builds on one of the School of Creative Studies and Media Department’s greatest strengths, by bringing students together with other practitioners and researchers from other fields of study in a forum for a wider discourse about current research in the media and creative industries. The module will provide a systematic overview of major 20th and 21st century critical schools and theoretical approaches, which are key for an advanced understanding of how to read and analyse creative, cultural and media artefacts such as fiction, non-fiction, poetry, drama, film, video games and other new media texts.

Research Methods: This module equips you with an understanding and critical overview of key methodological issues associated with various types of research in the Media, Cultural and Creative Industries, in preparation for the dissertation.

MRes Humanities Dissertation: With guidance from academic staff, students following the MRes Humanities Dissertation module will be asked to choose a topic of their own, for further research. Students will be expected to produce an independently researched piece of work which will reflect the knowledge and skills acquired from the taught modules. The topic chosen may be specific to one culture or comparative.

Read less
This taught degree programme has a unique focus, offering training in all aspects of filmmaking, from concept and creative development through the filmmaking process and on to distribution and marketing. Read more
This taught degree programme has a unique focus, offering training in all aspects of filmmaking, from concept and creative development through the filmmaking process and on to distribution and marketing. By the end of the degree, students will have developed a competition and festival-ready calling-card short film, together with transferrable skills in developing and marketing their product and an understanding of the nature of the film industry.

Teaching on this degree conforms to current industry practice, and includes training and mentoring in standard development documents, such as screenplay, treatment and storyboards, and in areas such as risk assessment and budget management. Visiting guest speakers from various areas of the film industry provide an essential context on changing practices, as well as offering useful information of their own experiences in film. The programme does not include training in basic production techniques, and successful applicants will have a first degree in Media Studies or a related discipline, and/or equivalent industry experience.

All students on this programme receive a production budget.

Modules:

The Film Industry: The aim of this module is to foster an understanding of the workings of the international film industry; film production, distribution, exhibition, marketing and consumption will all be examined. There will be an initial focus on the historical development of the film industry on an international scale, with a particular emphasis on Hollywood and its relationship with the rest of the world. Various aspects and traditions within the modern day film industry will be examined, including ‘independent’ and ‘world’ cinema, and the situation in the UK, as well as Hollywood today.

Concept Development: This module introduces students to the practical and theoretical aspects of developing concepts for film, as well as the craft of screenwriting including script formatting, style, structure, genre, plotting, characterisation and dialogue. Students will be encouraged to develop professional writing habits and to give and receive critically constructive comment and advice, as well an understanding of storytelling in visual media at postgraduate level.

Film Production: The micro short: This module aims to develop students’ knowledge of the technical aspects of filmmaking, including direction, camera-work, lighting, music and editing, with the aim of producing a high-quality two-minute short film. Students will also gain understanding of the economic forces that frame the film industry and an understanding of the role of technology in production, content manipulation, distribution, access and use.

Writing the Short Film: This module expands students’ practical experience of screenwriting, and advances core theories on the synthesis of creative and industry practice, as well as focusing specifically on the history, format, aesthetics and demands of the short film. Students will also learn how to present and communicate their concepts in industry standard documents such as beat sheets, treatments and storyboards, in order to facilitate the filming of short film screenplays in the latter part of the MA course.

Pre-Production: The short film: This module aims to develop knowledge on the practical and budgetary aspects of pre-producing a festival quality short film, including commissioning strategies, casting, rehearsals, risk assessment, location scouting, and the managing and co-ordination of a production crew. Students will also manage a production budget in order to understand the economic practicalities of filmmaking and the importance of the commissioning and funding structures of the creative industries.

Film Production - Dissertation: This module utilises the skills and knowledge developed during the previous modules on this MA; providing students with funding and the opportunity to recruit a crew from undergraduate students to produce a short film. Students will generate work that displays exceptional capability in operational aspects of media production technologies, systems, techniques and professional practices to produce a competition and festival-ready calling-card short film.

Read less
The MA in Music with Education is a flexible programme which allows you to develop a deeper understanding of the theory and practice of teaching music to others. Read more
The MA in Music with Education is a flexible programme which allows you to develop a deeper understanding of the theory and practice of teaching music to others. The course is intended for students with backgrounds in music or education (or both) who wish to develop skills and knowledge in both disciplines while exploring some of the ways in which the two fields are related.

On this programme you will develop your musical skills at an advanced level through performance, composition or musicology, while enhancing your knowledge and conceptual understanding of a range of issues relating to music education. You will hone personal and professional skills valued in the music education sector, and will develop skills and methodologies to undertake specialist research in your chosen area of expertise.

You will work closely with established researchers, most of whom have international profiles. The School of Music enjoys close links with industrial and third-sector parties. In addition both the School of Music and the School of Education share well established partnerships with local primary and secondary schools, where many teachers of music are our graduates.

Read less
Research Areas. Music with specialisations in. Musicology. Welsh Music. Performance. Normally the research project will be limited to any one area. Read more

Research Areas

Music with specialisations in:

  • Musicology
  • Welsh Music
  • Performance

Normally the research project will be limited to any one area. Performers, however, will follow, in addition to their practical studies (60%), an agreed programme of original research into historical study, performance practice, editing or analysis, focusing on aspects related or central to repertoire performed (40%).

Programme Structure 

As a research programme, the course does not have a modular outline. Each student receives close supervision on an individual and original project, which has the potential to make a new and substantial contribution to the field.

Each student has a supervisory committee, led by the main supervisor, assisted by two other staff members with relevant expertise.

Research students have regular meetings with their supervisor and are entitled to consult other members of their committee as appropriate. They are also encouraged to present reports on their work in seminars and colloquia during each of their period of study.

Final assessment will be through viva voce examination through an appointed panel. The panel consists of one internal examiner from within the University/School (not identical with members of the supervisory committee), one external examiner, who is an expert in the field, and a chair.

Submission

  • Historical Musicology / Editorial Musicology: Thesis of 100,000 words or equivalent
  • Composition: Portfolio of compositions, consisting of around 120 minutes of music (depending on complexity); accompanying essay of 7,000-10,000 words on style, technique and aesthetic which contextualises the submitted portfolio
  • Performance: (i) two full-length public recitals (40-50 mins) and one CD (40-50 mins), featuring different repertoire (60%); (ii) dissertation on a related area (40,000 words) or a composition of comparable length for the instrument in question (40%).


Read less

  • 1
Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X