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Course content

Course overview

  • Enjoy a strong focus on theory, methodology and current debates in ethnomusicology and world music studies.
  • Develop advanced research skills and presentational techniques suitable for doctoral study or applied work.
  • Study in a city that is home to more professional music-making than any UK city outside of London, with three professional orchestras and internationally recognised institutions such as the BBC and Opera North.
  • Study at one of the top 2 university Music departments in the UK (Complete University Guide 2019).

Fees

For entry in the academic year beginning September 2019, the tuition fees are as follows:

  • MusM (full-time)
  • UK/EU students (per annum): £9,500 
  • International students (per annum): £18,500
  • MusM (part-time)
  • UK/EU students (per annum): £4,750

Scholarships/sponsorships

Each year the School of Arts, Languages and Cultures offer a number of  School awards  and  Subject-specific bursaries  (the values of which are usually set at Home/EU fees level), open to both Home/EU and international students. The deadline for these is early February each year.

See also  the University's postgraduate funding database  to see if you are eligible for any other funding opportunities.

Entry requirements

English language

An overall grade of 7.0 (with a minimum writing score of 7) in IELTS is required or 100+ in the TOEFL iBT with a minimum writing score of 25.

If you have obtained a different qualification, please check our English language requirements.

English language test validity

Your English Language test report must be valid on the start date of the course.

Application and selection

How to apply

Please refer to the following School page regarding subject-specific requirements. These are in addition to the basic prerequisites as shown under entry requirements:     

http://www.alc.manchester.ac.uk/study/masters/applying/

For references, please email the following link to your referees:

References for master's applications

Please use the Online Application Form to apply. 

How your application is considered

Applications are mainly considered on the basis of an assessment of past and predicted academic achievements, the academic reference(s) and any other supplementary evidence that supports the application.

We therefore strongly recommend you include a personal statement (no more than 500 words) that demonstrates your understanding of the subject and your motivation for wanting to study the programme.

If your academic background is not directly related to the programme or If English is not your native language, then you should provide an academic-standard writing sample in English directly related to the subject.

Portfolio requirements

Applicants for the Ethnomusicology pathway should provide a 500-word personal statement, outlining their reasons for applying to the programme and their preliminary ideas about a potential area of research to be undertaken for the dissertation.

Teaching and learning

Most taught course units are delivered via weekly seminars and/or tutorials. Full-time students take two 30-credit course units per semester; part-time students take one.

The dissertation or critical edition is supported by one-to-one supervision and is submitted at the beginning of September. Part-time students may submit in either September or December following their second year of study.

Seminars feature a range of presentation formats and activities, including presentations by course tutors, student presentations, discussion and debate based on prepared reading or coursework tasks, and workshop-style activities.

Alongside your taught units, you will have access to a range of non-assessed seminars, workshops and training sessions offered by the Graduate School.

Coursework and assessment

There are no formal examinations. Taught course units are assessed by coursework essays or other tasks, normally submitted at the end of each semester (January and May).

The precise nature of the assessment varies according to what is appropriate to the course unit in question. In most cases, a choice of questions or topics is offered. All taught units must be satisfactorily completed.

The dissertation or critical edition (12,000-15,000 words or equivalent) is based on independent research into a topic agreed in consultation with the supervisor. A Research Outline needs to be presented and approved (usually in February) before you proceed with the dissertation.

Course unit details

You will undertake units totalling 180 credits. Core and optional units combine to make 120 credits, with the remaining 60 credits allocated to a dissertation or critical edition.

The dissertation or critical edition offers the opportunity to work with world-leading experts in a range of specialist areas. Alternatively, you may pursue their own chosen topic, subject to initial approval and the availability of a suitable supervisor; this may be informed by topics and approaches encountered in the course of the Semester 1 taught units.

All students take Advanced Music Studies: Skills and Methodologies and Texts and Studying World Music Cultures: Themes and Debates and, usually, Ethno/Musicology in Action: Fieldwork and Ethnography. A range of optional units are available (see the course unit list below).

Possible options include From Papyrus to Print: The History of the Book; Perspectives on Medieval and Renaissance Studies; and Gender, Sexuality and the Body.

If you choose to take the placement unit, placements will be established in Semester 1 to take place early in Semester 2 and will be supervised by a work-based mentor and overseen by an academic staff member.

You will spend a minimum of 20 days over a period of up to 12 weeks with an arts and cultural organisation, business or service provider. The placement may take the form of an investigation of a specific business idea, development strategy or management proposition to resolve a problem or particular issue, and will result in a placement report, proposal or essay.

Career opportunities

Our graduates have pursued successful careers in musical and non-musical fields. Some continue to further study via a PhD before securing an academic position. Some go on to teach in schools or further education, both in the UK and overseas.

Other areas of work for which advanced musical training has been directly relevant include arts management and the culture industries, music publishing, music, journalism, librarianship, music therapy and performance.


Visit the MusM Music (Ethnomusicology) page on the University of Manchester website for more details!

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