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MSc in Computing Science


Radboud University Masters Programmes

About the course

A solid, theoretical understanding of computer technology with plenty of attention for the wide range of ICT applications.

The enormous and rapidly growing power of ICT is the main driving force shaping our modern society. This goes beyond the technical and economical aspects. ICT is also essential in research as all sciences benefit from the raw power of software in processing huge quantities of data. But how do we manage and control the complexity of modern software? How can we make the most of the opportunities? And, not to be forgotten, how can we secure the ICT infrastructures we so heavily rely on? The Master’s programme in Computing Science covers all these aspects.

We offer specialisations in each terrain: security, software, data and the mathematics at the base of it all. These are

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Entry Requirements

1.A completed Bachelor's degree in Computing Science or related area
2.A proficiency in English:
a.A TOEFL score of ≥575 (paper based) or ≥90 (internet based)
b.An IELTS score of ≥6.5
c.Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE) or Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE) with a mark of C or higher


Fees

€2,143 (from EEA countries); €12,645 (from non-EEA countries).

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Student Profile(s)

Willem Elbers and Frank Koopmans

1646.jpg Willem and Frank

Frank and Willem are friends who got their BSc in Computer Science at the Avans University in Den Bosch before coming to Nijmegen. Because this programme was not at a university level, they had to complete a six-month transitional module before starting the two-year Master's programme.

Frank: "I'm now considering doing another degree after finishing this one, probably in Information Science. Computing Science is such an exciting subject - it's constantly evolving."

Willem had completed two internships during his four years of study, but he felt that he was not ready to start working full-time yet. "The Master's programme is great. It's so different from what we did before. There's a lot of freedom here, everything is small-scale and it's easy to interact with the professors. Most of the courses are not standard, and some of the professors even change the content of their courses halfway through if they notice that the students' interest is moving in a different direction."

Frank: "They encourage us to get off the beaten track, both in education and in research. In fact, it's basically up to you to decide what to do."
For their Master's research, Frank and Willem started working on the static structure of the Internet. "With research you never know where it will lead," says Frank. "I ended up focusing on web communities and the way in which you can see which sites belong together on the basis of their structure. I analyse these clusters and monitor them, in order to see how they evolve. This could be of interest to advertisers, for example."

Willem took a different path. He looked at optimising interest in websites. "When people position their site on the Web, they want to know where it will generate most interest. I devised a way of ranking this interest, so that people can optimise their location and thus optimise the volume of traffic to their site. Initially, I didn't expect that my research would attract so much attention. But, when I submitted an article based on my Master's thesis to the International Conference on the Theory of Information Retrieval, which was organised by Microsoft Research and Cambridge University, it was accepted. Microsoft and co-sponsor Yahoo are now very interested in my work. It's great when your ideas catch on, and you get serious interest from some of the biggest companies in the world.


Willem and Frank

Frank: "I wasn't entirely sure whether I wanted to carry on studying. I generally prefer practical work, but my curiosity got the better of me. I registered at the university and gave myself six months to see if this was for me. After this period, I decided to stay on and I gradually felt more and more at home. Computing Science is such an exciting subject - it's constantly evolving."

Willem had completed two internships during his four years of study, but he felt that he was not ready to start working full-time yet. "The Master's programme is great. It's so different from what we did before. There's a lot of freedom here, everything is small-scale and it's easy to interact with the professors. Most of the courses are not standard, and some of the professors even change the content of their courses halfway through if they notice that the students' interest is moving in a different direction." Frank: "They encourage us to get off the beaten track, both in education and in research. In fact, it's basically up to you to decide what to do."

For their Master's research, Frank and Willem started working on the static structure of the Internet. "With research you never know where it will lead," says Frank. "I ended up focusing on web communities and the way in which you can see which sites belong together on the basis of their structure. I analyse these clusters and monitor them, in order to see how they evolve. This could be of interest to advertisers, for example."

Willem took a different path. He looked at optimising interest in websites. "When people position their site on the Web, they want to know where it will generate most interest. I devised a way of ranking this interest, so that people can optimise their location and thus optimise the volume of traffic to their site. Initially, I didn't expect that my research would attract so much attention. But, when I submitted an article based on my Master's thesis to the International Conference on the Theory of Information Retrieval, which was organised by Microsoft Research and Cambridge University, it was accepted. Microsoft and co-sponsor Yahoo are now very interested in my work. It's great when your ideas catch on, and you get serious interest from some of the biggest companies in the world."



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