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    School of Anthropology and Conservation Logo
  • Study Type

    Full time & Part time available

  • Subject Areas

    Anthropology

  • Start Date

    September

  • Course Duration

    Full-time: 1 year; Part-time: 2 years

  • Course Type

    MA

  • Course Fees

    website

  • Last Updated

    20 September 2018

Course content

An original and exciting approach to learning about other cultures with a special focus on conflict, violence and other forms of suffering.

Visit the website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/787/social-anthropology-and-conflict#!overview

Course detail

This programme is grounded in the study of social anthropology, but offers students an in-depth exploration of conflict and violence between and within human communities. Studies include aspects of organised crime, land ownership conflict, war, post-conflict reconstruction and community divisions. It is particularly appropriate for students who want to make the world a better place by understanding and addressing the roots of human suffering.

This programme is designed as an advanced course in social anthropology and is for students who have already studied anthropology either as a degree course or as part of a degree course at undergraduate level. It provides in-depth generalist training in anthropology and is excellent preparation for those embarking on research degrees in anthropology or intending to enter professional fields in which anthropological training is advantageous.

Format and assessment

You will study six compulsory modules, a dissertation research project and also choose two additional modules in social anthropology from those offered by the School of Anthropology and Conservation

Assessment for most modules is an essay of 2,000-3,000 words plus participation and/or oral presentation. Some modules include other assessments such as critical book reviews.

Why study with us?

  • One year Master's programme
  • Committed to practice-led theory taught by active researchers.
  • Hands-on methods training to prepare you for independent research.
  • A wide choice of optional modules allows for further specialisation in areas of expertise.
  • Regional specialisms include Amazon, Southeast and Southern Asia, Europe, Middle East, Central America, New Guinea and Polynesia.
  • Opportunity to develop skills in visual anthropology through modules in the anthropological use of photography, film and video.
  • Specialism in the application of computers and IT to anthropological research and practice.
  • Small groups and excellent facilities
  • Opportunity to join our annual field trip to the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, Cambridge.

Careers

The School has a very good record for postgraduate employment and academic continuation. Studying anthropology, you develop an understanding of the complexity of all actions, beliefs and discourse by acquiring strong methodological and analytical skills. Anthropologists are increasingly being hired by companies and organisations that recognise the value of employing people who understand the complexities of societies and organisations.

As a School recognised for its excellence in research we are one of the partners in the South East Doctoral Training Partnership, which is recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC).

Many of our alumni teach in academic positions in universities across the world, whilst others work for a wide range of organisations. Examples of positions held by our alumni include:

  • Corporate anthropologist
  • Campaign developer for War Child
  • Project director for the Global Diversity Foundation
  • Curator at Beirut Botanic Gardens
  • Film producer for First German Television
  • Project manager for Porchlight Homelessness Charity
  • How to apply: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Research expertise

The regional expertise of our staff has a global reach, with field sites in Europe (including UK), the Middle East, the Balkans, South Asia, Amazonia and Central America, Oceania and Southeast Asia. Themes of conflict, violence, the economic crisis and precarity form a major focus of our current work in these areas, alongside new research on austerity and its social impact, and charity. We have emerging interests in the study of social inequality, work, and organised crime and corruption, and we are internationally recognised for our work on ethnicity, nationalism, and identity.

Our research extends to intercommunal violence, diasporas, pilgrimage, intercommunal trade, urban ethnogenesis, indigenous representation and the study of contemporary religions and their global connections (especially Islam). History and heritage is another key theme, with related interests in time and temporality, and the School hosts the leading journal History and Anthropology. Other research addresses the anthropology of natural resources; anthropology of tourism; and post-socialist economy and society in Europe and Central Asia.

We research issues in fieldwork and methodology more generally, with a strong interest in the field of visual anthropology. Our work on identity and locality links with growing strengths in kinship and parenthood. This is complemented by work on the language of relatedness and the cognitive bases of kinship terminologies

A final focus concerns science, medical anthropology and contemporary society. We work on the anthropology of business, biotechnology and mental health. Related research focuses on policy and advocacy issues and examines the connections between public health policy and local healing strategies. Staff collaborations and networks extend widely across these regions and thematic interests and Kent is well known for its pioneering engagement with the anthropology of Europe.

Study support

The School has a lively postgraduate community drawn together not only by shared resources such as postgraduate rooms, computer facilities (with a dedicated IT officer) and laboratories, but also by student-led events, societies, staff/postgraduate seminars, weekly research student seminars and a number of special lectures.

The School houses well-equipped research laboratories for genetics, ecology, visual anthropology, virtual paleoanthropology, Animal Postcranial Evolution, biological anthropology, anthropological computing, botany, osteology and ethnobiology. The state-of-the-art visual anthropology laboratory is stocked with digital editing programmes and other facilities for digital video and photographic work, and has a photographic darkroom for analogue developing and printing. 

Anthropology at Kent has close links with the nearby Powell-Cotton Museum, which has one of the largest ethnographic collections in the British Isles and is particularly strong in sub-Saharan African and Southeast Asian material. It also houses an extensive comparative collection of primate and other mammalian material. Human skeletal material is housed at the Kent Osteological Research and Analysis Centre within the School.

Postgraduate scholarships and funding

We have a scholarship fund of over £11 million to support our taught and research students with their tuition fees and living costs. Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/scholarships/postgraduate/


Visit the MA Social Anthropology and Conflict page on the University of Kent website for more details!

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