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LLM in Advanced Studies in European and International Human Rights Law


Leiden University Faculty of Law

Full time September LLM Full-time, Single Modules: 1 year

About the course

When human rights are violated by a particular state, is it more effective to use the national, regional or international human rights protection mechanisms to address the issue? And what mechanism will probably be most effective in addressing specific types of human rights violations?

What does this master's programme entail?

Human rights are at risk in all societies. Though various national, regional and international human rights instruments have been developed to protect the human rights of all people, some of these are more effective than others in particular situations. In the European and International Human Rights Law programme, you will compare the functionality of different protection mechanisms that are currently in place. To this end you will not just study 'the law the

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Entry Requirements

A bachelor’s degree from a university, equivalent to the level of a Dutch academic bachelor’s degree, or demonstrate to meet the requirements for such a degree. Sufficient command of English (IELTS 7.0, TOEFL 100 (internet-based) or Cambridge English: Proficiency (CPE)). This language requirement does not apply if you have: completed your education in Canada (except Quebec), USA, UK, Ireland, New Zealand or Australia, or an International Baccalaureate, or a Dutch VWO-diploma.

For more information about programme-specific admission requirements, click here:
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Student Profile(s)

Anya Yohana Aritonang

4835.jpg Choosing to study abroad is one of the most important and bravest decisions students can make during their lives. The experience is surrounded by all kinds of assumptions, so don’t be a victim to the “expectations vs. realities” syndrome that can dampen your time studying abroad. For those who will study in Leiden, let’s start with a warning: you are expected to write several “never know that saying goodbye would be so hard” posts in the following months, especially when you like nostalgic and a little emotional. So, be prepared!

I remember one day I was cycling around in Leiden and I saw a friend walking and saying “Hellooo!!”. As I greeted him back, I was smiling since this was not the kind of thing that would happen in Jakarta since the population is so crowded. In another day, you will jump into public transportation like bus or train and the driver or official will welcoming you with “hello” or “goedemiddag” (good afternoon in Dutch). They are very kind and friendly which make you feel warm, far away from feeling insecure with stranger. This feeling make me realize that I will miss this kind of belonging and peaceful community. You may not know people around you when you are strolling around alone in Leiden, but you will never feel lonely.

I am a Jakarta-born and I love its chaotic vibe. One year living in Leiden makes me admit that this past year have changed me to appreciate what a small city gives. You will comfortably appreciate your time, enjoying nature, walking and biking, smiling to stranger and care with your surroundings without curiosity. When and if you do come to study in Leiden, I can guarantee that you will be part of wonderful community and have big family before you know.


Manuela Ruegger

4838.jpg There are many activities provided at Leiden University to supplement the regular requirements of the different programmes. During my LL.M. Public International Law studies at Leiden University I had the chance to be selected for two of those. I can highly recommend both of them, which is why I will briefly introduce them here.

The first one is the International Humanitarian Law Clinic of the Kalshoven-Gieskes Forum of Leiden University. Every semester there is a new call for participants and this semester there was an intake of nine students. Selected students are split up in teams and work on a project which is commissioned by an external actor, such as for example the Netherlands Red Cross or the ICRC. My two team members and I have recently submitted our project, which was commissioned by Amnesty International. In the process of researching and drafting our final report we are gaining valuable experience in applying IHL theory to the practical issues raised by our commissioner. It is very gratifying to know that our research is valued and that it serves Amnesty International in their work.

The second one is the International Leiden Leadership Programme (ILLP) of the Leiden University Honours Academy. While the Dutch version (LLP) runs for the whole year, the ILLP is directed at international students and lasts for more or less one semester. Additionally to the analysis of our personalities and leadership styles we have become familiar with our strengths and weaknesses and matters such as team work, communication, types of conflict management and listening. During the ILLP students have the chance to work on two different projects, which are a self-evaluation and a “personal roadmap for leadership”. The seminars and the two projects have provided me with a solid framework for my personal development and have allowed me to become a more empathic and confident person.


Nadeshda Jayakody

4839.jpg I studied the Advanced Masters in European and International Human Rights Law at Leiden University. It was a challenging but incredibly rewarding experience. We only had 16 students in the Masters from all parts of the world, which meant that we could engage in interesting discussions in class. The small size also meant that we could have one on one time with professors to clarify things if needed. One of the highlights of the programme, for me, was our study trip to Strasbourg and Geneva where we got to see how human rights works in practice. We attended a hearing at the European Court of Human Rights and a session at the UN Human Rights Committee. Aside from the study trip, we had weekly lectures where we heard from professionals working in human rights. These were often inspiring!

I am not going to lie, the course is very difficult and we had to put in a lot of hard work. However, the end result is very rewarding! The course is very new as it was started only two years ago but the professors are always keen to see how things can be improved so that the experience is worthwhile. Overall it was a great experience and I am looking forward to putting everything I learnt during the Masters to practice!

The sports centre at Leiden University was one of my favourite things about my time at Leiden! A one-year subscription is really affordable for students and you then have unlimited access to the gym and all kinds of classes, such as, yoga, pilates, zumba and the list goes on! I tried different yoga classes throughout the year! I highly recommend signing up if you are looking to take up a sport during your studies.


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