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    College of Engineering Logo
  • Study Type

    Full time available

  • Subject Areas

    Computer Science

    Engineering

  • Start Date

    September

  • Course Duration

    2 years full-time

  • Course Type

    MSc

  • Course Fees

    For current fees visit our website

  • Last Updated

    06 September 2018

Course content

Swansea University has gained a significant international profile as one of the key international centres for research and training in computational mechanics and engineering. As a student on the Master's course in Erasmus Mundus Computational Mechanics, you will be provided with in-depth, multidisciplinary training in the application of the finite element method and related state-of-the-art numerical and computational techniques to the solution and simulation of highly challenging problems in engineering analysis and design.

Key Features of Erasmus Mundus MSc Computational Mechanics

The Zienkiewicz Centre for Computational Engineering is acknowledged internationally as the leading UK centre for computational engineering research. It represents an interdisciplinary group of researchers who are active in computational or applied mechanics. It is unrivalled concentration of knowledge and expertise in this field. Many numerical techniques currently in use in commercial simulation software have originated from Swansea University.

The Erasmus Mundus MSc in Computational Mechanics course is a two-year postgraduate programme run by an international consortium of four leading European Universities, namely Swansea University, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (Spain), École Centrale de Nantes (France) and University of Stuttgart (Germany) in cooperation with the International Centre for Numerical Methods in Engineering (CIMNE, Spain).

As a student on the Erasmus Mundus MSc Computational Mechanics course, you will gain a general knowledge of the theory of computational mechanics, including the strengths and weaknesses of the approach, appreciate the worth of undertaking a computational simulation in an industrial context, and be provided with training in the development of new software for the improved simulation of current engineering problems.

Erasmus Mundus MSc Computational Mechanics Course Structure

In the first year of the Erasmus Mundus MSc in Computational Mechanics course, you will follow an agreed common set of core modules leading to common examinations in Swansea or Barcelona. In addition, an industrial placement will take place during this year, where you will have the opportunity to be exposed to the use of computational mechanics within an industrial context. For the second year of the Erasmus Mundus MSc in Computational Mechanics, you will move to one of the other Universities, depending upon your preferred specialisation, to complete a series of taught modules and the research thesis. There will be a wide choice of specialisation areas (i.e. fluids, structures, aerospace, biomedical) by incorporating modules from the four Universities. This allows you to experience postgraduate education in more than one European institution.

Modules

Modules on the Erasmus Mundus MSc in Computational Mechanics course can vary each year but you could expect to study the following core modules (together with elective modules):

  • Continuum Mechanics
  • Numerical Methods for Partial Differential Equations
  • Advanced Fluid Mechanics
  • Industrial project
  • Finite Element Computational Analysis
  • Leadership Development
  • Fluid-Structure Interaction
  • Nonlinear Continuum Mechanics
  • Computational Fluid Dynamics
  • Dynamics and Transient Analysis
  • Computational Plasticity
  • Reservoir Modelling and Simulation
  • Communications skills in a foreign language - French
  • Communications skills in a foreign language - German
  • Communications skills in a foreign language - Spanish

Accreditation

The Erasmus Mundus MSc in Computational Mechanics course is accredited by the Joint Board of Moderators (JBM).

The Joint Board of Moderators (JBM) is composed of the Institution of Civil Engineers (ICE), the Institution of Structural Engineers (IStructE), the Chartered Institution of Highways and Transportation (CIHT), and the Institute of Highway Engineers (IHE).

The Erasmus Mundus MSc in Computational Mechanics is accredited as meeting the requirements for Further Learning for a Chartered Engineer (CEng) for candidates who have already acquired an Accredited CEng (Partial) BEng(Hons) or an Accredited IEng (Full) BEng/BSc (Hons) undergraduate first degree.

This degree has been accredited by the JBM under licence from the UK regulator, the Engineering Council. 

Accreditation is a mark of assurance that the degree meets the standards set by the Engineering Council in the UK Standard for Professional Engineering Competence (UK-SPEC). An accredited degree will provide you with some or all of the underpinning knowledge, understanding and skills for eventual registration as an Incorporated (IEng) or Chartered Engineer (CEng). Some employers recruit preferentially from accredited degrees, and an accredited degree is likely to be recognised by other countries that are signatories to international accords.

Computational Engineering

The Bay Campus includes an extensive Engineering Quarter, designed to capitalise on our research expertise and our collaboration with major companies.

The £450 million development project includes specialist laboratories and excellent computing facilities.

Computational facilities

High Performance Computing

The College of Engineering has always maintained state-of-the-art computing facilities in order to support the leading edge research in the area of computational engineering. All of these facilities are available to researchers within the centre and for contract work to external clients.

Linux Cluster

The Linux cluster was installed in order to provide a performance increase for large parallel applications. It currently comprises:

  • 260 AMD Opteron 64-bit processor cores
  • Memory ranging from 2Gb - 8Gb per node
  • Myrinet interconnect for maximum communication performance

Engineering Quarter

At the College of Engineering, we continually strive for excellence in our teaching and research. The Bay Campus provides the space for growth and enable us to build on our current success, co-locating industry with our academic staff and students including those in Computer Modelling and Finite Elements in Engineering Mechanics.

The Bay Campus includes purpose built facilities for students, staff and businesses allowing for the benefits of co-location, enabling applied research, an accelerated innovation pathway and employment opportunities. 

The seven buildings that form the College of Engineering house high-tech teaching and research laboratories. There are brand new lecture theatres, smaller tutorial and seminar rooms, teaching laboratories and PC facilities.


Visit the Erasmus Mundus Computational Mechanics MSc page on the Swansea University website for more details!

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