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The UCL Division of Psychiatry is pleased to offer this programme focused on clinical practice in mental health and its evidence base. The Clinical Mental Health Sciences MSc integrates biological, psychological and social perspectives on mental health and caters both for psychology graduates and for clinicians wishing to undertake a broad-based, rigorous and flexible higher degree.

About this degree

Students will develop an in-depth understanding of current evidence regarding mental health problems and the interventions provided to address them, as well as enhancing their research skills. A wide range of options from across the School of Life and Medical Sciences at UCL allows students to tailor a programme that fully fits their needs.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of 1–2 core double modules (30–60 credits), 4–6 optional modules (60–90 credits) and a dissertation/report (60 credits).

A diploma may be awarded to students who complete the equivalent of 8 taught single modules, amounting to 120 credits.

A certificate may be awarded to students who complete the equivalent of 4 taught single modules, amounting to 60 credits.

Compulsory modules

  • Core Principles of Mental Health Research (double module)
  • Clinical Mental Health (double module; compulsory only for those who do not have at least six months’ full-time experience, or the equivalent, of working in mental health settings).

Optional modules

Students who take the Clinical Mental Health module will take four optional modules, including at least one from the Division of Psychiatry. Students who do not take this module will take six optional modules, including at least three from the Division of Psychiatry.

  • Students who take the Clinical Mental Health module will choose at least one option (15 credits) from the following:
  • Current Research in Depression and Anxiety
  • Current Research in Dementia
  • Current Research in Intellectual and Neurodevelopmental Disabilities
  • Current Research in Psychosis and Bipolar
  • Current Research in Children's and Young People's Mental Health
  • Mental Health Care: Policy and Evaluation
  • Culture in the Clinic
  • Advanced treatment and management of Dementia (appropriateness to be discussed with Module Lead if Current Research in Dementia not also taken
  • Ethnicity, Migration and Health (Department of Epidemiological and Social Methods in Public Health)
  • Social Determinants of Health (Department of Epidemiology and Public Health)
  • Higher Functions of the Brain (Institute of Neurology)
  • Neurodevelopmental Disorders in Child Mental Health (UCL Institute of Child Health)
  • Interventions in Child and Adolescent Mental Health – Psychological (UCL Institute of Child Health)
  • Quality Improvements in Health (UCL CHIME)
  • Neuroimaging: Introductory Science and Methods (Institute of Neurology)
  • Neuroimaging: Imaging Modalities (Institute of Neurology)
  • Interventions in Child and Adolescent Mental Health - Pharmacological (UCL Institute of Child Health)

NB: due to timetable clashes only one UCL Institute of Child Health module may be taken by each student.

Research project/report

All students undertake a final project. This may be a research project, to be reported as a paper of up to 7,000 words ready for submission to a specified journal, a blog of 1,000 words and a 20-minute talk, or a clinical project of 10,000 words reporting on a clinical topic or service evaluation.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through lectures, seminars and workshops, with considerable use of supporting online learning. Assessment methods include one unseen examination, coursework including designing questionnaires and protocols and analysing data, giving talks and presenting posters, and a final report in the format of a journal paper or brief for clinicians or service planners.

Funding

The Division of Psychiatry offers 5-6 awards worth up to £2,000 towards fees to students who show great promise as mental health researchers. 

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

For non-clinicians, the programme will be an excellent grounding for clinical training, such as in clinical psychology, or for embarking on a research career in mental health. Many graduates go on to research assistant, clinical support worker or assistant psychologist posts as a first destination. The programme is also intended to prepare students for PhD studies, also a major onward route. For clinicians, this is a great opportunity to gain a higher qualification through a programme based in a leading university department which can be closely tailored to your interests across clinical, research and management fields.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The programme is strongly focused on student participation, with much use of small-group learning, and the environment in the Division of Psychiatry is stimulating, friendly and supportive.

The wide range of options at UCL allows programmes to be tailored to students’ needs and interests in clinical, research and management domains.

Department: Division of Psychiatry

Applications

Students are advised to apply as early as possible due to competition for places. Those applying for scholarship funding should take note of application deadlines.

There is an application processing fee for this programme of £75 for online applications and £100 for paper applications. Further information can be found at: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/taught/application.

Who can apply?

The programme is designed both for graduates in psychology and other related subjects who wish to develop their clinically relevant knowledge and skills in the area of mental health, and for mental health practitioners, including trainees, who wish to enhance their advanced knowledge and skills.

Application deadlines

18 May 2019

For more information see our Applications page.

Apply now

What are we looking for?

When we assess your application we would like to learn:

  • why you want to study Clinical Mental Health Sciences at graduate level
  • why you want to study Clinical Mental Health Sciences at UCL
  • what particularly attracts you to this programme
  • how your personal, academic and professional background meets the demands of this challenging programme
  • where you would like to go professionally with your degree

Together with essential academic requirements, the personal statement is your opportunity to illustrate whether your reasons for applying to this programme match what the programme will deliver.


Visit the Clinical Mental Health Sciences MSc page on the University College London website for more details!

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