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Course Content

Course content

This intercollegiate MA is taught in collaboration with King's College London and Royal Holloway, University of London. The programme draws on the wealth of expertise across the three colleges and students benefit from full access to all modules. The programme attracts European students and other students from overseas as well as the UK.

About this degree

The programme enables students to study in depth key aspects of the languages, literatures and cultures of ancient Greece and Rome (and their reception). It provides students with the skills of critical and conceptual thinking and equips them with the tools necessary for further research (including training in the use of digital resources online, library catalogues and archives).

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of a research methods module (non credit-bearing), three taught modules (120 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Research Methods

Optional modules

Choose three modules in the following areas of study:

  • Language
  • Literature
  • Reception
  • Religion and Philosophy
  • History
  • Art and Archaeology
  • Late Antique and Byzantine Studies

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project in classical language, literature, thought or the classical tradition. The project culminates in a dissertation of 12,000 words (60 credits). The project must display advanced knowledge of at least one of the classical languages.

Teaching and learning

The programme is taught in small seminars or classes, rarely exceeding twelve participants. Students are expected to prepare for class each week, typically by reading preparatory material and texts in the original Greek or Latin. Student performance is assessed through coursework essays, unseen examination, and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Classics MA

Careers

The MA is an ideal springboard for a PhD programme, and students will find unique opportunities to acquire skills in the handling of documentary evidence particularly valuable for further research. Some students go on to pursue research at UCL or other institutions. Others have developed their skills in order to enter careers in e.g. teaching, publishing, the media, cultural heritage or the legal, business, charitable or financial sectors.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Project Administrator, Horticultural Trades Association
  • GDL (Graduate Diploma in Law), The University of Law
  • PhD in Classics, University of Cambridge
  • Associate Recruiter, Kite Consulting Group
  • PhD in Classical Studies, University of Michigan

Employability

The MA in Classics offers a wide range of skills highly valued by employers, such as advanced oral communication; the ability to abstract and synthesise information, and to construct and manage arguments; independent and critical thinking on difficult issues; IT skills (including the ability to access and evaluate electronic data); and good time management, organisational, and planning skills. Students go on to employment in many sectors including advertising, publishing, education, law, finance, libraries and museums, and the culture industries.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Greek & Latin is recognised as one of the leading international centres for postgraduate study and research in the ancient world, with a large staff of international experts in Greek and Latin literature, papyrology, historical linguistics, philosophy, ancient history and classical reception. Its MA programmes open a pathway to a wide variety of careers.

The department is very well resourced for the study of the ancient world and UCL's central location provides unrivalled access to the British Museum, British Library, Senate House Library, Warburg Institute and the Institute of Classical Studies. 

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Greek & Latin

76% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.


Visit the Classics (MA) page on the University College London website for more details!

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