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Architecture, Building & P…×

Masters Degrees in Conservation of Buildings

We have 35 Masters Degrees in Conservation of Buildings

Masters degrees in the Conservation of Buildings implement training in the practical means of repairing, restoring, and conserving culturally significant buildings. Courses may also explore the philosophical and historical implications of conservation practices.

Some courses may be professionally accredited, with appropriate practical training. Entry requirements normally include an undergraduate degree in a relevant field, but relevant work experience may also be accepted (or expected).

Why study a Masters in Conservation of Buildings?

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The MSc in Conservation of Historic Buildings provides training in the fundamental principles of structural and architectural conservation, within an academic framework of architectural history and theory, including the philosophy of conservation. Read more
The MSc in Conservation of Historic Buildings provides training in the fundamental principles of structural and architectural conservation, within an academic framework of architectural history and theory, including the philosophy of conservation.

Our course is taught by leading architects, structural engineers and related professionals and is based on the Department's well established tradition of interdisciplinary education and training.

It will not only help prepare you for an exciting career in the industry, but it will also help prepare you to continue your studies onto a Doctor of Philosophy research programme.

Many distinction-level graduates from this programme stay on for a PhD, often funded in part by the University of Bath.

Visit the website http://www.bath.ac.uk/engineering/graduate-school/taught-programmes/conservation/index.html

Key programme features

- Provides technical training within an academic framework
- Taught by leading architects, structural engineers and related professionals
- Based on interdisciplinary co-operation between architects and engineers
- International leader in its field
- Proven track record of employability
- Accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS)
- Fully recognised by the Institute of Historic Buildings Conservation (IHBC)
- Suited to engineers, architects, surveyors, planners, geographers, archaeologists, historians and managers, but we also accept (and encourage) students who have either taken a non-vocational degree (usually history or history of art, but also geographers, archaeologists, etc.) or have a degree in a different field that they want to change from.

The programme draws profoundly on its unique location, the World Heritage City of Bath, an ideal study material and environment.

Structure and Content

See programme catalogue (http://www.bath.ac.uk/catalogues/2015-2016/ar/ar-proglist-pg.html#B) for more detail on individual units.

Teaching for taught units takes place on Wednesdays and Fridays, with one day given to each set of two units. The sequence in which units are taught is reversed each year so that part-time students attend on the same day over the period of their study.

- Full-time study: 12 months, with students attending two days a week (Wednesday and Friday)
- Part-time study: 24 months, with students attending one day a week (Wednesday or Friday)
- Extended part-time study: 48 months, with students attending one day/one semester per year.

Where students do not wish to write the dissertation, or are ineligible to progress, a PG Diploma is awarded after successful completion of the taught course only.

Dissertation:
During the final three months of the degree you will produce a dissertation. This is your opportunity to explore a particular topic that has been covered during the programme in far greater depth.

Transfer:
A student may request a transfer from part-time to extended part-time study. If approved, the transfer will take into account units completed already and will be applied on a pro rata basis. For example, if a part-time student completes four units in year one and then transfers to the extended part-time programme, they will be given two more years to complete.

Conservation techniques

- Structural conservation techniques: principles, faults and their causes, diagnoses and remedies, and surveying and analytical techniques
- Materials conservation techniques: technology and conservation of building elements from structure to finishes
- Information and awareness about related fields (including furniture and fabric conservation), and the experts who can be called upon
- The legal framework of conservation.

Philosophy

- A range of philosophies towards the repair and re-use of old buildings
- History of conservation, from John Wood and James Wyatt, the Victorian age, William Morris and the development of the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings through to present day policies and the listing of twentieth century buildings
Stimulating debate and the opportunity to develop an individual viewpoint
- A body of knowledge on the history of British architecture from town planning to interiors
- An awareness of adjacent related fields including garden conservation and archaeology.

Teaching of the Theory of Classical Architecture

- Visual training based around the teaching of classical architecture within the context of Bath as a classical city
- Aims to achieve a high level of architectural correctness and competence in detailing architectural elements.

Case studies

- You will attend six case studies (a combination of large and small buildings at sites both local to Bath and further afield)
- The case studies cover the philosophy upon which the conservation work is based, the architectural and engineering principles involved and a study of the techniques and technologies employed.

Career Options

Bath students have an excellent track record for getting jobs.


The MSc provides a short cut to becoming a Chartered Surveyor. Graduates get exemption from the RICS internal examinations and are eligible for entry to the RICS Assessment of Professional Competence (APC). This usually involves two years of structured training with an employer followed by the APC. Visit the RICS website for more information.

Graduate destinations:

- Inspector for the Victorian Society
- English Heritage (historic research department, inspectors, managers)
- Architects’ practices working on conservation and building new country houses in the classical style
- National Trust Manager of Uppark House
- Conservation officer, UNESCO, Paris
- Conservation architects with well-known practices working on every type of historic building from Salisbury cathedral to medieval timber-framed barns
- Development Officer with Turquoise Mountain repairing a mosque in Kabul
- Member of the Information Team, the Science Museum, South Kensington.

About the department

The Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering brings together the related disciplines of Architecture and Civil Engineering. It has an interdisciplinary approach to research, encompassing the fields of Architectural History and Theory, Architectural and Structural Conservation, Lightweight Structures, Hydraulics and Earthquake Engineering and Dynamics.

Our Department was ranked equal first in the Research Excellence Framework 2014 for its research submission in the Architecture, Built Environment and Planning unit of assessment.


Find out how to apply here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/study/pg/apply/

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The MSc in Architectural Conservation is a taught course aimed at professionals and academics world-wide with an interest in architectural heritage including architects, engineers, archaeologists, art historians, geographers and surveyors. Read more
The MSc in Architectural Conservation is a taught course aimed at professionals and academics world-wide with an interest in architectural heritage including architects, engineers, archaeologists, art historians, geographers and surveyors.

This course is fully recognised by The Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC). The course provides both a thorough understanding of architectural heritage and the skills required to contribute to the preservation and development of historic sites. Benefiting from its location in the historic town of Canterbury, the programme combines the study of conservation theory and philosophy with an exploration of the technical aspects of repair and reconstruction. The city’s stunning Cathedral provides students with an education resource, giving them the opportunity to learn from the conservation of a World Heritage Site.

Open to students and professionals with an interest in architectural heritage, the course represents an ideal gateway to a career in demanding professional fields, such as conservation-oriented architectural practice, conservation consultancy and heritage management. As the future leaders in these fields, the course’s graduates are expected to play a central role in disciplines that lie at the centre of the current economic, environmental and social agendas.

This programme is offered jointly within two faculties, Humanities and Sciences.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/362/architectural-conservation

About Kent School of Architecture

Research at Kent School of Architecture achieves excellence in both the history and theory of architecture and in sustainable urban, peri-urban and environmental design. School staff have design expertise and specialist knowledge; they are at the forefront of current architectural issues, including sustainability, technology, professional practice and research. Our staff are active at academic and professional conferences, both nationally and internationally, and appear and publish in local and national media. The School promotes innovative and interdisciplinary research, emphasising sustainable design.

Much of the project work involved in the Kent School of Architecture is located on 'live' sites in the local region, using real clients and engaging challenging issues. Students in all stages of the school have been introduced to real urban and architectural design challenges in Lille, Margate, Folkestone, Dover, Rye, Chatham and, of course, Canterbury. Much of this work involves liaising with external bodies, such as architects, planners, council and development groups.

Course structure

The MSc is composed of four taught modules (two modules per term full-time, one module per term part-time) and a dissertation on the topic of your own choice.

The programme has a varied curriculum which reflects the multidisciplinary nature of conservation. The autumn term cultivates a critical understanding of historic buildings and provides an introduction to conservation philosophy and policy. The acquisition of a strong theoretical background is the basis for the study of practical techniques for the survey and preservation of architectural heritage.

Case studies and workshops carried out in collaboration with Canterbury Cathedral introduce you to the properties of historic building materials and the techniques employed in the repair of historic buildings. This aspect of the programme benefits from cutting-edge survey equipment and the use of conservation laboratories. A conservation project offers you the opportunity to design an intervention to an existing historic site in the historic centre of Canterbury. The dissertation that concludes the programme invites you to study an aspect of the conservation cycle of your choice, employing a high standard of scholarship.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

AR841 - Structural Appraisal of Historic Buildings (30 credits)
AR842 - The Legislative Framework (30 credits)
AR843 - Intervention at Historic Buildings (30 credits)
AR844 - Conservation Principles (30 credits)
AR898 - Dissertation: MSc in Architectural Conservation (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is mostly through coursework, with essays, reports, projects and the dissertation.

Programme aims

The programme aims to:

- ensure you are equipped with academic, professional, and personal skills and qualities that enable you to make a positive contribution related to the preservation of historic buildings.

- cultivate an appreciation of the different values that people can attach to historic buildings and places.

- promote an awareness of traditional building crafts as a valuable cultural resource.

- develop a thorough understanding of the processes that maintain and enhance historic places and the activities that change them.

- develop knowledge of the theoretical, historical, and professional context of architectural conservation.

- promote multidisciplinary collaboration and interaction with a wide range of professional bodies and individuals who have a role to play in the development of the built environment.

- ensure graduates develop the knowledge and confidence necessary to provide informed and specialist advice and to cultivate an awareness of their responsibility as consultants in the field of architectural conservation.

- understand the role that architectural conservation has to play as part of the modern ecological agenda.

- encourage the observation of the historic environment as a whole and its use as an educational resource.

- provide teaching informed by research and scholarship.

- develop an understanding of how the boundaries of knowledge are advanced through research.

- enable you to develop strategies for self-improvement and commitment to research and learning.

- build on close ties within Europe and elsewhere, reflecting Kent’s position as the UK’s European university.

- promote the understanding and preservation of local and national architectural heritage.

Careers

Our Master’s programmes have been devised to enhance your prospects in a competitive world. Professionals in the architectural, planning, environmental design and conservation fields who develop higher-level skills, accredited by relevant bodies, will find themselves well-placed to progress in their field. Our students have gone on to work for major public agencies and universities, as well as leading practitioners in the private sector.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The programme will enable you to gain the academic and professional competencies you need to succeed in this field. It offers a blend of academic rigour and applied practical application. Read more

The programme will enable you to gain the academic and professional competencies you need to succeed in this field. It offers a blend of academic rigour and applied practical application. Each module draws upon the specialist knowledge and skills of a number of outstanding experts in conservation and related fields.

The programme will enable you to gain the academic and professional competencies you need to succeed in this field. Your learning is based around interactive workshop sessions, practical demonstrations, site visits and personal study. Each module is introduced by a four-day block of lectures and site visits based at the University's Whiteknights campus, which has 19th and 20th century listed buildings.

The aim of the flexible MSc Conservation of the Historic Environment programme is to develop your understanding of this important field. It will enable you to approach the issues that you will face in a competent and professional manner.

This course is fully accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors, is accredited by the Royal Town Planning Institute as a specialist programme and is also fully recognised by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation. 

All modules on this programme can also be taken as stand-alone CPD courses attendees do not submit any coursework and therefore gain no credits towards the qualification.

Why Henley?

The Conservation of the Historic Environment Programme

The Conservation of the Historic Environment programme has a high reputation with former students going on to work in organisations such as Historic England, National Trust, English Heritage, Historic Royal Palaces, Prince's Regeneration Trust, local authorities as well as surveying, planning, architectural and engineering practices.

School of Real Estate and Planning

Our School is the largest in the UK for teaching and research in real estate and planning. Established in 1968 at the University of Reading, we are the only major UK real estate and planning centre to be located within a business school. Being part of the Henley Business School reflects our close and longstanding collaborative relationship with industry.

We enjoy a worldwide reputation for excellence in both teaching and research and we are consistently highly ranked in all major league tables. We undertake internationally recognised, leading edge research into real estate, planning and land and we offer a comprehensive range of undergraduate and postgraduate degree courses, all of which are accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS). Our planning courses are also accredited by the Royal Town Planning Institute.

Our programmes are held in high regard by leading employers, many of whom come to us each year to recruit our graduates. We are proud of our outstanding employment record, with more than 95% of our students entering graduate level jobs within 6 months of leaving us.

Henley Business School

  • Consistently maintain highest standards: Henley is in top 1% of business schools worldwide to hold accreditation from all three bodies in the UK, Europe and US
  • Excellent networking potential : 72,000 Henley alumni members in 150 countries
  • High calibre students: always oversubscribed, 1,000 ambitious new Masters students join Henley each year
  • Award winning campus: beautiful, green, 134 hectares, with state of the art facilities
  • World-leading faculty: widely published, frequently asked for expert comment by media and to speak at events
  • Henley is proud to be part of the University of Reading. The University is ranked within the top 200 universities worldwide (Times Higher Education World University Rankings 2016/17 and QS World University Rankings 2018) and 98% of the research is rated as being of international standard.

Course content

Module descriptions are correct for modules taught in the academic year 2017/18. Optional module listings are indicative, and may be subject to change.

Core Modules

Optional Modules

Careers and accreditations

Graduates from this programme will have the specialist knowledge and competence to find employment with a large number of conservation bodies such as Historic England, National Trust and Historic Royal Palaces, local and central government, planning, surveying and architectural, consultancies and corporate entities where their portfolios include historic buildings.

This course is fully accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors, is accredited by the Royal Town Planning Institute as a specialist programme and is also fully recognised by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation.



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Architectural conservation - the action of conserving built heritage while maintaining its values - is practiced differently across the world; sometimes not at all due to cultural and economic constraints. Read more

Why this course?

Architectural conservation - the action of conserving built heritage while maintaining its values - is practiced differently across the world; sometimes not at all due to cultural and economic constraints.

It is an emerging area of work which requires specialist training and knowledge to deal with its multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary nature. It also requires the development of a critical approach for the analysis and design of the intervention, informed by the shared international principles and the specific nature and context of the historic building to be conserved.

We need to attract new talent to the field of architectural conservation. To work with historic buildings is an enriching experience, which combines the creative aspects of designing a new building with the in-depth research required to understand in full the building and its context. Working with historic buildings is also a great training to improve the design of new buildings, as you learn a great deal about the importance of design ideas, innovation, durability and care. It is also a very sociable work, interacting with a variety of people from all backgrounds, joining forces in helping current generations to enjoy historic buildings, to create community identities around them, and to transmit the buildings and their values to the future.

Glasgow and its surrounding area provide an excellent location for the course, with architectural heritage from all periods, from Roman to Medieval, Georgian, Victorian and contemporary, without forgetting the better known C. R. Mackintosh and Alexander ‘Greek’ Thomson’s buildings. Strathclyde has a lively international community of staff and students and we enjoy a privileged position in the centre of Glasgow.

Study mode and duration:
- MSc: 12 months full-time; 24 months part-time
- PgDip: 9 months full-time; 18 months part-time
- PgCert: 5 months full-time; 9 months part-time

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/architecturaldesignfortheconservationofbuiltheritage/

You’ll study

The course is a platform for:
- collaboration with both practice and research partners
- architectural critique
- discussion and debate

All full-time students take instructional classes and a design project in the first two semesters. MSc students then complete a dissertation project.

Compulsory taught classes are delivered intensively, making them more accessible to part-time students and Continuing Professional Development (CPD). Areas explored in classes include:
- theory
- history
- survey
- investigations
- legislation
- materials
- structures

The course is informed by the outcomes of the research being carried out at the Architectural Design and Conservation Research Unit (ADCRU). It is a platform for collaboration with both practice and research partners; architectural critique, discussion and debate are fundamental parts of the course.

Open Access

Open Access modules are offered on individual modules from the MSc programme. They can be taken as stand-alone CPD options or gradually built towards a qualification.

Open Access students may transfer onto a part-time MSc or PgDip programme to complete their studies (subject to a maximum period of time).

Guest Lecturers/speakers

You’ll benefit from a large number of government, local authority and industry partners, who’ll lecture on up-to-date current practices, with a diverse point of views.

Facilities

- Studios
There are two fully-networked design studios; one dedicated to student self-study, the other to interactive design teaching.

- Library
In addition to the main University library, we have our own, on-site, reference library. Our collection is developed in direct response to the teaching delivered in the department.

- Workshop
A full range of hand and portable power tools are available (complete with instruction).

- PC Lab
Our lab computers have AutoCad and InDesign.

We also offer plotter printing, scanning and laser cutting services.

Accreditation

The course is fully recognised by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC). The IHBC is the principal professional body for building conservation practitioners and historic environment specialists working in United Kingdom.

The course also conforms to the internationally recognised Guidelines for Education and Training in the Conservation of Monuments, Ensembles and Sites adopted by the International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS). These criteria are used by professional institutes for the assessment of evidence and professional accreditation in conservation.

Learning & teaching

The course is balanced between theory and practice. It’s delivered through:
- lectures
- workshops
- studio-based, and seminar-led learning, by staff and visiting experts from the UK and overseas

The course is a platform for collaboration with both practice and research partners; architectural critique, discussion and debate are fundamental parts of the course.

Assessment

Formative assessment will take place throughout the course.
You’ll be assessed through lectures, seminars, interim Studio Reviews and workshops, supported by student presentations, symposia and peer feedback.
Methods of teaching vary; some subjects are formally taught using lectures and seminars, others use a mix of methods which may incorporate small projects.
The main architectural conservation project is a studio based project which involves one-to-one tuition and appraisals in review seminars. Team teaching techniques are used in several projects and increasing use is made of student peer group reviews. Summative assessment will be through:
- studio reviews
- individual written essays and reports
- oral presentations
- dissertation - directly linked to the conservation project

Careers

Areas of employment for graduates are numerous. They can work as independent professionals in conservation or for architectural firms all over the worlds. The completion of the Masters will give a variety of opportunities:
- IHBC affiliate member with option to progress to full membership
- RIBA Conservation Registrant (CR) and/or RIAS Accredited Conservation Architect
- progress to RIBA Conservation architect (CA), RIBA Specialist Conservation architect (SCA) and/or RIAS Accredited or Advance Conservation Architect
- progress to Conservation Accreditation Register for Engineers (CARE), the joint register between the Institution of Civil Engineers (ICE) and Institution of Structural Engineers (IStructE)

"We work with a large number of government, local authority and industry partners, offering potential placement opportunities for students to work after their postgraduate degree study."

Heritage is recognised as a sector of international strategic importance. Local authorities and communities are also very interested in preserving their heritage. The conservation of historic buildings becomes more and more a day to day activity for architects and engineers.

Potential careers include:
- conservation architect in architectural firms
- conservation engineer in engineering firms
- conservation Officer in local authorities
- work in UK government agencies: Historic Scotland, English Heritage, CadW and the Environment and Heritage Service in Northern Ireland
- architect/conservation officer in other countries for government and local authorities
- work in UK and internationally architect/conservation officer for conservation organisations and charities such as UNESCO, ICOMOS, Council of Europe, ICCROM

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/

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Accredited training for building conservation professionals. The MA in Conservation Studies (Historic Buildings) is recognised by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC) and offers a bespoke route for UK practitioners to achieve full professional membership of the IHBC. Read more
Accredited training for building conservation professionals

Why choose this course?

The MA in Conservation Studies (Historic Buildings) is recognised by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC) and offers a bespoke route for UK practitioners to achieve full professional membership of the IHBC. The programme conforms with the international ICOMOS Guidelines for Education and Training in Conservation.

Having run successfully for more than 40 years, the programme is now supported by a network of specialist conservation and research organisations locally, nationally and internationally. Contributors to the course include national experts from English Heritage, Council for British Archaeology, ICOMOS-UK, Historic Scotland, and the National Trust and from a large number of local conservation and heritage organisations.
-Understand historic and evolving practice in heritage building conservation.
-Gain vital work experience and learn practical, hands-on skills.
-Build working relationships with national and international conservation specialists and research organisations.
-Develop careers-focused knowledge, practical experience and contacts.
-Study in the heritage capital of Britain – be part of conservation in action.
-Access state-of-the-art facilities, including laboratories, archives and libraries.
-Choose to study full-time over one year or part-time over two or three years.

What does the course cover?

The MA in Conservation Studies (Historic Buildings) covers the history, ethics and philosophy of historic environment conservation together with a critical understanding of contemporary issues in building conservation practice. It is complemented by training in the systematic research, recording, analysis and interpretation of historic buildings. The practical ‘skills modules’ focus on specific aspects of professional practice, repair and conservation techniques, legislation and planning, policy, finance and managing conservation projects.

Who is it for?

This course attracts graduates in architecture, archaeology, history of art, architectural history and related subjects. It also appeals to experienced conservation practitioners from multi-disciplinary backgrounds, including architects, surveyors planners, conservators and practising craftsmen in various fields, who wish to advance their professional training.

What can it lead to?

The course provides the knowledge and practical skills required for a range of careers in historic building conservation and related fields. Recent students have gone on to employment with organisations ranging from the National Trust and English Heritage to building preservation trusts, local authority services, heritage consultancies and conservation practices.

Placement

The work placement module gives you a chance to gain practical experience of working in the professional heritage-conservation sector. The placement will draw on and develop the knowledge and experience gained on your taught courses, while enabling you to develop new skills in conservation and heritage management, to enhance your employability and confidence in practice.

Aims
-To provide students with experience of conservation within a professional environment.
-To consolidate students’ knowledge and understanding of conservation procedures and issues from one or more of the taught modules.

Learning outcomes
Upon completing the placement you should:
-Have gained knowledge and skills in evaluating historic buildings and environments, and be able to advise on their conservation requirements.
-Have an understanding of the practical applications of conservation principles and ethics.
-Be able to critically reflect on the issues raised in the core conservation modules through your work experience.

Careers

The MA in Conservation Studies (Historic Buildings) focuses on enhancing students’ employability and professional development with a combination of practical skills training and theoretical teaching. By the end of the course you will have:
-Enhanced your skills and knowledge so that your chances of employment as a conservation professional are improved.
-Developed both intellectually and personally as a result of having dealt directly with conservation professionals and completed a sustained independent research project.
-Developed the ability to work both within a group through seminar and placement experiences, and independently through research for a dissertation.

The accredited training provided by this course has led postgraduates into varied careers in historic building conservation across the UK, for organisations including:
-English Heritage
-Historic Scotland
-The National Trust
-Building Preservation Trusts
-Local authority conservation services in England and Scotland
-National Parks
-The Council for British Archaeology
-Architectural practices and heritage consultancies
-Traditional building conservation craft businesses

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Training for careers in heritage conservation. If you’re interested in a career in heritage or historic building conservation, the Conservation Studies course at York gives you the theoretical knowledge and practical, hands-on experience you will need for a professional role in the sector. Read more
Training for careers in heritage conservation

Why choose this course?

If you’re interested in a career in heritage or historic building conservation, the Conservation Studies course at York gives you the theoretical knowledge and practical, hands-on experience you will need for a professional role in the sector. Established in 1972, the course was the first of its kind in the UK, and has developed an international reputation for producing highly skilled and knowledgeable conservation practitioners.
-Understand historic and evolving practice in heritage conservation.
-Gain vital work experience and learn practical, hands-on skills.
-Build relationships with conservation specialists and research organisations locally, nationally and internationally.
-Develop careers-focused knowledge, experience and contacts.
-Study in the heritage capital of Britain – be part of conservation in action.
-Access state-of-the-art facilities, including laboratories, archives and libraries.
-Choose to study full-time over one year or part-time over two or three years.

York is one of the best places to study Archaeology, Heritage or Conservation. The Department has an excellent reputation and is one of the largest Archaeology teaching centres in the UK. The historic City of York is rich in architectural and archaeological treasures and resources which you will have easy access to during your studies.

The University also validates the MSc in Building Conservation and Timber Building Conservation at the Weald & Downland Open Air Museum in Sussex, more details from the Weald & Downland Museum webpage.

What does the course at York cover?

The core of the MA in Conservation Studies covers the history and philosophy of historic environment conservation, and provides a critical understanding of contemporary issues in building conservation practice. Theoretical elements of the course are complemented by a wide choice of short ‘skills modules’, which focus on developing your knowledge of the specialist skills that are an essential part of professional practice.

By choosing a specific set of accredited modules, you can gain the more specialised MA in Conservations Studies (Historic Buildings), which is recognised by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC). As such, it offers a bespoke route for UK practitioners working towards full professional membership of the IHBC.

Who is it for?

This course attracts a vibrant mix of UK and international students. These include graduates in architecture, archaeology, history of art, architectural history, and related subjects, as well as experienced conservation practitioners from multi-disciplinary backgrounds, including architects, surveyors planners, conservators and practising craftsmen in various fields. We welcome the diversity of our students’ backgrounds.

What can it lead to?

The course focuses on the knowledge and skills required for a wide range of careers in heritage conservation and related fields. Recent students have gone on to employment with organisations ranging from the National Trust, Historic England, English Heritage and ICCROM to building preservation trusts, local authority services, heritage consultancies and conservation practices.

Placement

The work placement module gives you a chance to gain practical experience of working in the professional heritage-conservation sector. The placement will draw on and develop the knowledge and experience gained on your taught courses, while enabling you to develop new skills in conservation and heritage management, to enhance your employability and confidence in practice.

Aims
-To provide students with experience of conservation within a professional environment.
-To consolidate students’ knowledge and understanding of conservation procedures and issues from one or more of the taught modules.

Learning outcomes
Upon completing the placement you should:
-Have gained knowledge and skills in evaluating historic buildings and environments, and be able to advise on their conservation requirements.
-Have an understanding of the practical applications of conservation principles and ethics.
-Be able to critically reflect on the issues raised in the core conservation modules through your work experience.

Careers

The MA in Conservation Studies has a strong focus on enhancing employability and professional development with a valuable combination of practical skills and theoretical understanding. By the end of the course you will have:
-Enhanced your skills and knowledge, improving your chances of employment as a heritage-conservation practitioner.
-Developed intellectually and personally through direct engagement with conservation professionals and specialists.
-Developed the ability to work in a team through group working and placement experiences, and independently through research for your dissertation
-Received guidance on career opportunities in the conservation sector and the key networks for employment
-Worked alongside our Regional Heritage Skills Coordinator with the National Heritage Training Academy

Course postgraduates have gone on to careers in heritage conservation roles across the UK, for organisations including:
-English Heritage
-Historic Scotland
-INTACH (Indian National Trust)
-The National Trust
-Building Preservation Trusts
-Local authority conservation services in England and Scotland
-National Parks
-The Council for British Archaeology
-Architectural practices and heritage consultancies
-Traditional building conservation craft businesses

Others have used the skills gained to pursue careers in other sectors, including:
-Chartered surveying
-Planning
-Business and administration
-Education
-International affairs
-Research

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If you have a passion and enthusiasm for the heritage of historic buildings and structures, and wish to specialise in this area, this course is ideal. Read more

Why take this course?

If you have a passion and enthusiasm for the heritage of historic buildings and structures, and wish to specialise in this area, this course is ideal.

You can explore why it is important to retain such heritage sites, the financial constraints and consequences of doing so, the methods available to restore them and how heritage can be managed to best effect.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Get involved with some of our regional regeneration projects to test and develop your ideas
Undertake studio-based design projects and engage with our other collaborative projects with academic institutions in a range of countries including Turkey, Spain and Australia
Have the opportunity to ‘earn and learn’ by working on real-life contracts through our Projects Office

What opportunities might it lead to?

The course is also professionally accredited and follows the education guidelines of the International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS ), UNESCO and Council of Europe requirements. It is recognised by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC) and covers its areas of competence. It is also accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS), and prepares architects and surveyors to accreditation standards (AABC and RICS Building Conservation Forum), facilitating work on English Heritage and Heritage Lottery Fund-funded projects. Students can also apply for full IHBC membership after two years of professional experience, as opposed to five years.

Here are some routes our graduates have pursued:

Conservation work
Consultancy
Regeneration projects
Heritage management

Module Details

This course uses the experience and skills of teaching staff with a proven track record in interior historic building and conservation studies, practice and research. You will also benefit from an inter-disciplinary learning environment where more than 100 postgraduate students in architecture, interior design, urban design, sustainable architecture and historic building conservation can meet and work.

Here are the units you will study:

Practice: In this unit you will focus mainly on the practical aspects of the conservation, with an emphasis on raising awareness in conservation skills. It is delivered in collaboration with regional, national and internationals bodies specialising in conservation and is mainly fieldwork based, enabling you to analyse practical aspects and skills in different situations. Assessment is by means of submission of a number of different projects and reports related to practice.

Theory: You will learn the theoretical aspects of historic building conservation, such as historical aspects related to built heritage and relevant legislative frameworks to ensure their protection for future generations. You will look at the international historic preservation principles based on UNESCO/ICOMOS criteria.

Research Methods and Research Proposal: In this unit you will develop research skills, which will aid you throughout your course and particularly in producing your thesis. You will be asked to establish a critical position within an Outline Research Proposal. You will develop techniques, which will allow you to engage proactively within your area of study. You will be encouraged to explore methods of investigation that are responsive to, as well as inquisitive of, the conditions presented and which therefore speculate around possible critical scenarios. Implicit within these explorations is the need to investigate diverse means of representation and depiction through a variety of possible media and discourse.

Integration: This unit allows you to work in a multi-disciplinary context through groups within your own subject area and across the areas of interior design, urban design, sustainable architecture and historic building conservation, as well as explore the interrelationships of all disciplines. You will need to work collectively on given projects or problems related to staff run studios, which explore a range of given themes. You will be introduced to these themes at the start of the course and connect to research areas within the School.

Work-Based Learning: This unit gives you the opportunity to replace a 30-credit core unit with a work-based version of that unit. Not all units can be replaced and you will need to discuss the appropriateness of a unit with tutors. Work-based learning requires you to engage in critical and reflective learning in the workplace. This will be developed through a learning contract, negotiated by you, your employer and School.

Thesis: Your thesis is a substantial research-based project that enables you to carry out an in-depth investigation into a subject area of personal interest, which is related to or developed from a theme studied during the course. The proposed research theme should have a clearly defined focus to allow for in-depth theoretical, contextual and visual research. An initial seminar programme will help you develop your research proposal, define a research question and locate suitable primary and secondary sources. You will be allocated an appropriate supervisor on the basis of this proposal, who will work with you toward the final submission.

Programme Assessment

This course is lecture and studio-based, culminating in a research-based thesis project. It will involve case study investigations, group work, discussion and planning of conservation environments, as well as independent study to develop design or research-based responses to conservation problems.

Design assessment is through studio review and taught courses are assessed by various forms of evidence-based conservation design decisions and proposals. You will also carry out an in-depth research project into an area of your choice.

Student Destinations

On completing this course, you will be equipped with specialist skills to find careers within the architectural and planning professions. You will obtain professional, legal, craft, management and administration skills relevant to historic building conservation. In addition, you’ll develop historical and technical knowledge, and understand research methodologies applicable to conservation.

The creative skills, professional competencies and expansive learning environment that we provide has also led graduates into a range of careers in marketing, advertising, journalism, virtual design and modelling through to people-centred careers such as project management.

Alternatively, you can choose to continue your studies to PhD level.

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Want a programme with true pedigree? Try the Master of Conservation of Monuments and Sites, run by the RLICC (Raymond Lemaire International Centre for Conservation), founded by Raymond Lemaire. Read more

Want a programme with true pedigree? Try the Master of Conservation of Monuments and Sites, run by the RLICC (Raymond Lemaire International Centre for Conservation), founded by Raymond Lemaire. The RLICC has more than 40 years of experience in training, research and consulting in the field of preservation of constructed heritage. Its advanced international and interdisciplinary study programme in the conservation and restoration of historic monuments and sites is a three-semester programme.

Structure 

The Master of Conservation of Monuments and Sites, 90 credits, is a three-semester, research-based academic degree spread over two years. The first academic year consists of theoretical courses, seminars and project work. 

The first semester is chiefly dedicated to the establishing of a common theoretical framework, providing students from different backgrounds with a common basis, according to the interdisciplinary character of the programme. Optional courses offered by the other Advanced Master’s programmes of the Department of Architecture, and project-based education oriented towards building archaeology, documenting and surveying heritage, and larger-scale urban sites and landscapes, complete his semester.

In the second semester, the theoretical framework is dedicated to the technical and policy aspects of heritage. On the project level, its backbone consists of interdisciplinary project work integrating all aspects of conservation, based on a group work format, this is completed with a workshop abroad.

The third semester consists mainly of the Master’s thesis, i.e. individual research work in the field of conservation, supported by an ad hoc study programme. This semester concentrates on research training with seminars, including a thematic week (open to first and second year’s students), supporting the writing of the Master’s thesis. It is completed with a professional internship, which aims to introduce students to the world of heritage practice.

Objectives

The master after master programme offered by the Raymond Lemaire International Centre for Conservation aims at educating young professionals in the conservation and restoration of immovable heritage (buildings, structures and sites), both into the tradition of the discipline and into the new scientific methods.

Graduates of the MCMS have acquired and developed skills that allow for the necessary interdisciplinary research, communication and collaboration between the various disciplines involved in the restoration of architectural heritage as for example : archaeology, history, urbanism, architecture, engineering, human sciences, conservation and restoration sciences, .... They have learned to use relevant source material, to approach a problem in a scientific way, to understand the approaches and possibilities of other disciplines than their own, and they have developed the necessary common terminology, methodology and skills to carry out research and to prepare jointly restoration studies, projects, and long-term programs. They have learned to reflect critically about ongoing concepts and debates on heritage preservation. Based on the above they have acquired the necessary common language and they master with a critical attitude the research methodologies and practices used in conservation of monuments and sites, as reflected in international guidelines, charters and literature. They have obtained knowledge and experience (through project works) that strengthens them to be part of interdisciplinary research and to communicate in a restoration team.

Career perspectives

Employment options for graduates from the RLICC are numerous and wide-spread. Alumni are currently working as independent professionals in conservation and restoration of architectural heritage all over the world. They display highly appreciated professional experience in private architecture and restoration offices as well as in leadership and policymaking positions in regional, national and international conservation institutions such as UNESCO, ICOMOS and the Council of Europe. All levels of the heritage administration, be they regional, national or international, count RLICC alumni among their ranks.



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Spatial Planning determines the design of places, the relationships between land uses, and identifies infrastructure requirements. Read more
Spatial Planning determines the design of places, the relationships between land uses, and identifies infrastructure requirements. The planning process makes provision for the needs of households and the requirements of the economy, and planning aims to mitigate the adverse impacts of development upon our natural environment.

The planning system is currently undergoing change to be better able to address the challenges of competitiveness and sustainability. There is a pressing requirement in both the public and private sectors for planners with appropriate understanding and skills to plan for development and protect the environment.

The University is a long-established provider of planning education. MSc Spatial Planning will be attractive to individuals with a real interest in tackling the challenges of important urban planning issues; MSc Spatial Planning with Urban Conservation is designed to equip graduates for professional management roles concerned with the critical interplay of transport and spatial planning.

Why choose spatial planning?

Spatial Planning is concerned with creating sustainable places. Planners achieve this in a number of ways:

Planners work with building firms and housing organisations to help make available sites addressing the housing needs of local areas. They meet with local communities to learn about their concerns and to discuss ways of tackling issues such as the protection of homes from flood risk. They provide guidance on how to promote quality in the design of places and buildings.

Planning makes possible investment in sustainable economic development. Through preparing medium and long-term plans, planners ensure that land is available for development within and around our cities and towns. Planners often lead on regeneration projects and work in partnership with engineers to bring forward the infrastructures necessary to relieve transport congestion and to provide for long-term energy solutions.

Climate change is making achieving sustainability increasingly important. Planners, work with the environmental agencies and with conservation interests to ensure that the potential environmental impacts arising from development proposals are first established and then they use planning powers to promote a sustainable balance between social and economic development and the protection of the environment.

Who becomes a planning student?

Spatial Planning is a multi-disciplinary activity and attracts a wide mix of graduates. Often these are geography graduates, but increasingly graduates with social science, law, architecture and surveying degrees, as well as graduates from the environmental sciences find that Spatial Planning makes use of their knowledge and training.

Aims of the Programme

The Spatial Planning programmes are designed to provide the knowledge, skills and understanding required for graduates wishing to enter into professional careers in urban planning and development.

Programme Content

Semester 1:
Spatial Analysis has two key components. The first component analyses built and natural environments particularly from a conservation perspective. The second part of the module focuses on socio-economic analysis of data at a city scale and the relevance of this to planning.

Statutory Planning is a practice based approach to learning processes, processes of plan-making and the management of development.

Property Development Processes deals with complexities and challenges in the property development sector and the role of different stakeholders involved.

Semester 2:
Concepts of spatial planning introduces students to the role of planning and planning systems. The other part of this module introduces you to various planning theories and their relevance to practice.

Sustainability in Contemporary Cities examines various challenges facing the growth of cities globally and the implications of these to planning of cities and the countryside.

The third second semester module is optional depending on the selected specialism. You'll select one specialist module from the following:

Environmental Assessment
Marine Spatial Planning
Sustainable Urban Design
Urban Conservation
Applied Geographic Information Systems and Geospatial Data Analysis

Semester 3:
A 60 credit dissertation in line with the selected specialism

Methods of Assessment

Assessment methods cover a mix of formats including 'live' project-work and a research project. There are no written examinations. The educational aims are to develop subject understanding and to equip students with research and practice skills. Assignments call for visioning, problem-solving, forward-planning and critical reflection. Assignments are informed by students making effective use of available literature, conducting investigations and accessing sources of data. Attention is paid to building the effective communication and partnering skills vital for practicing professional planners.

Sources of Funding

Information about the School of the Environment scholarships can be found on the School of the Environment scholarships webpage. Other sources of funding for postgraduate students can be found on our Scholarships webpage.
SAAS tuition fee loans are available for this course for students who meet the eligibility criteria. Visit our SAAS tuition fee loan webpage for more information and links.

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The Brookes MSc offers a comprehensive grounding in the conservation of historic buildings and sites. Read more
The Brookes MSc offers a comprehensive grounding in the conservation of historic buildings and sites. Focusing on the UK, but also drawing on other national and international paradigms, it introduces you to a range of theoretical and practical disciplines, including the relevant aspects of architectural history, historical geography, spatial planning, urban design, construction, surveying, economics and finance, and research methodology.

This course follows the International Commission on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS) guidelines on education and training, and covers the knowledge, skills and professional capabilities identified by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC) as the foundation for professional practice. Our programme draws students from a wide range of backgrounds, and provides an ideal training for those wishing to pursue a career in this fascinating but competitive field. For information on recent field trips, please visit our Planning and Urban Design blog.

Why choose this course?

Established in 1990, the Brookes Historic Conservation MSc is one of the longest-running and most highly-regarded courses of its type, and our graduates have gone on to work in senior roles across the sector, both in the UK and internationally. Our programme draws on the expertise of built environment teaching staff at Brookes and from the University of Oxford's Department for Continuing Education.

The Historic Conservation team has an excellent record of research for organisations such as the EU, English Heritage and the UK government Department for Culture, Media and Sport. Visiting speakers from central and local government, conservation agencies, business and industry, consultancies, research bodies and other university departments provide further input, bringing real-world experience to the course.

The Department of Planning - now part of the School of the Built Environment - is renowned internationally for its research. In REF 2014, 69% of our research was rated as either world leading or internationally excellent. Oxford is internationally renowned for its cultural heritage and for the beauty and variety of its architecture, presenting valuable learning opportunities for Historic Conservation students.

This course in detail

This course is offered at three levels: a Master of Science (MSc) degree, a Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) and a Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert). The MSc and PGDip can be studied on either a full-time (1-year) or a part-time (2-year) basis. The introductory PGCert is a 9-month part-time course.

With the exception of certain field trips, all core teaching is on Mondays and Tuesdays, allowing you to fit your studies around other commitments. Part-time students take the Monday modules in their first year and the Tuesday modules in their second.

The course comprises a series of modules, each addressing a different set of questions in the theory and/or practice of historic conservation. (As courses are reviewed regularly as part of our quality assurance framework, the modules you take may vary from those shown here.)

The following modules are compulsory for the MSc and PGDip:
-Conservation and Regeneration: Theory, Law and Practice
-Historical Studies I and II
-Design for Conservation
-Building Construction and Repair
-Historic Building Analysis and Recording
-Conservation Economics and Finance

The MSc also requires you undertake the following:
-Research Methods in Design
-MSc Dissertation

The PGCert comprises Conservation and Regeneration: Theory, Law and Practice; Building Construction and Repair; and Historic Building Analysis and Recording (details as above).

Teaching and learning

Teaching and learning methods reflect the variety of topics and techniques associated with historic conservation. These include lectures, directed reading, workshops, seminars, and practical and project work. Most modules also include site visits and/or fieldwork, which provide you with direct experience of the practical application of conservation principles.

Careers and professional development

The course provides an excellent grounding for those wishing to pursue a career in the conservation sector. Our tutors have wide experience in the field, and the broad variety of visiting speakers from national and local government, private practice, the voluntary sector, the law and academia add greatly to this range. We have excellent links with heritage organisations across the country, giving you opportunities for placements and other work experience. Graduates have gone on to work in many different roles across the sector, including:
-Central government bodies, eg English Heritage and Historic England.
-Local government roles, eg conservation and design officer.
-Charitable organisations, eg the National Trust and the Landmark Trust.
-Campaign groups, eg Victorian Society and SAVE Britain's Heritage.
-Private consultancies, eg CgMs and Alan Baxter & Associates.

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The course, which is offered on both a part-time and a full-time basis, aims to be unique amongst schools in Britain in two ways. Read more
The course, which is offered on both a part-time and a full-time basis, aims to be unique amongst schools in Britain in two ways. Firstly, the teaching offers a design-based iterative element, thereby testing the formulation of informed decisions. Secondly, it places emphasis on the role of sustainability within the historic context at both technical and strategic levels. By using the Welsh School of Architecture’s established expertise as a research locus for sustainable design, it addresses these concerns which have been identified internationally by ICOMOS as the critical future direction of conservation education.

The course seeks to attract a broad range of students with varied levels of experience in professional practice who share an interest in the conservation of architecture, urbanism and the environment. Candidates may be graduates with a degree in architecture and/or RIBA part 2 exemption embarking on their professional careers or have been professionals in practice for some time seeking to refine or augment their career paths.

Distinctive features

The course is both RIBA approved and IHBC accredited. Completion of the RIBA approved course for RIBA and ARB registered Architects entitles them to apply to become 'Conservation Registrants' immediately. As an RIBA approved course, it reduces the number of years in practice required to be entitled to apply for registration as 'Specialist Conservation Architect' to 4 years (from 5) and 2 years (from 3) for 'Conservation Architect'. Completion of the IHBC accredited course enables suitably qualified candidates to achieve full IHBC accreditation in 2 as opposed to 5 years.

As a part of the fourth module, students are taken to Rome for a two day intensive visit during which we meet with tutors from the 2nd level International Masters in Architectural Restoration and Cultural Heritage at Roma TRE University. Travel to Rome, entrance fees and accommodation are covered in the course fee but travel to and from the UK airport is not.

Structure

The programme is offered on both a full-time and a part-time basis. The taught modules are all delivered over six two-day sessions per year thereby attracting part-time candidates who are employed in full-time practice. Part-time students will complete three modules (i.e. 60 credits) in the first year and two modules in the second year. They will be given until the following December to submit their dissertation module.

Core modules:

The Conservator's Role
Tools of Interpretation
Energy Use in Historic Buildings
Case Studies and Regional Work
Design Tools: Methods of Repair
Dissertation

Teaching

The taught material is largely delivered by a range of specially selected guest speakers, all prestigious within their particular field. The speaker’s presentation is followed by lively debate and discussion with the group, taking the opportunity to learn from a range of perspectives. We undertake several relevant site visits during the course of the programme, engaging with practitioners, clients and statutory authorities.

Assessment

Each piece of work or report is assessed at an outline stage and at completion stage, with feedback given to guide future submissions. There are no class tests or exams during the programme, however, students are required to submit written and project work on time and also on occasion to be able to present their work orally to the group.

The course briefs are designed to enable students from differing backgrounds to pursue paths relevant to their chosen or existing career progression.

Each 20-credit module is assessed via a combination of written assignments (4,000 words approx. each) and presentations.

Career Prospects

The course is both RIBA approved and IHBC accredited. Completion of the RIBA approved course for RIBA and ARB registered Architects entitles them to apply to become 'Conservation Registrants' immediately. As an RIBA approved course, it reduces the number of years in practice required to be entitled to apply for registration as 'Specialist Conservation Architect' to 4 years (from 5) and 2 years (from 3) for 'Conservation Architect'. Completion of the IHBC accredited course enables suitably qualified candidates to achieve full IHBC accreditation in 2 as opposed to 5 years.

Experienced professionals are provided with an opportunity to adjust their career path by gaining specialised expertise in an area of practice that increasingly demands proof of capability. Recent graduates are offered the chance to focus the skills and credentials they can offer to prospective employers or indeed to lay foundations in a specialised area in which they may choose to start up their own businesses.

Our students have gone on to be employed by the National Trust, the Planning Inspectorate, to be promoted within local authorities and to set up new divisions in their practices and businesses.

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Conservation of historic buildings and structures presents many challenges to professionals working in this specialist field, from identifying cultural significance, through to understanding the technical performance of historic buildings and the materials they use. Read more

Programme Background

Conservation of historic buildings and structures presents many challenges to professionals working in this specialist field, from identifying cultural significance, through to understanding the technical performance of historic buildings and the materials they use. Increasingly, conservation practitioners have to understand the environmental impact of historic structures and energy use in buildings. This relies on the sensitive design and integration of modern building services.

The Building Conservation (Technology and Management) programme is a combination of social, historic, philosophical, technical and legislative processes and has been specifically designed to encapsulate these core areas. Delivered only by Independent Distance Learning (IDL) this programme is ideal for those in employment or with other commitments, providing flexible study options that fit around work or family.

Professional Recognition

The MSc programme is fully accredited by the Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB) and the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS). The MSc also has full accreditation from the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC). This means that students who successfully complete the programme need only two years of professional experience to apply for full accredited membership.

Programme Content

The programme structure follows the International Council on Monuments and Sites’ (ICOMOS) education and training guidelines. It is also closely aligned with the recently introduced accreditation schemes for building conservation within the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) and Chartered Institute of Builders (CIOB). The programme consists of seven mandatory courses as well as one optional course.

Mandatory Courses

· Conservation Philosophy and Practice
· History of the Built Environment
· Building and Contextual Investigation
· Services and Technology for Conservation
· Applied Building Pathology
· Materials and Structures for Conservation
· People and Organisation Management in the Built Environment

Optional Courses

· Contracts and Procurement
· Project Management Theory and Practice

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This is a flexible course, allowing students to study and develop their continual professional development (CPD) while working. Read more

Summary

This is a flexible course, allowing students to study and develop their continual professional development (CPD) while working.

The CPD element to this course is delivered in lectures and seminars as well as practical workshops, enabling students to develop and enhance their practical knowledge and skills of conservation practice as well as building materials and conservation. These courses are also offered as part of the course at MA level.

The course structure includes the built environment but takes into account wider issues such as conservation areas, historic landscape characterisation, local identity, the rural environment, and collections management.

It also covers key skills such as the legislative background, presentation and advocacy, and financing conservation. All the courses are delivered over 2 days on a Friday and Saturday.

Modules

Core modules: Basic concepts in conservation; Key Skills in Conservation; Conservation of Historic Materials; Project Design and Management; Building Elements and the Historic Environment; Major Project (Dissertation).

Skills-based workshops: The Use of Lime in Historic Buildings; Stone Conservation; 20th Century Materials; Ceramic Building Materials; Ferrous and Non-ferrous Metals in Construction; Structural and Non-Structural Timber; An Introduction to Traditional Estates; Parks and Gardens; Building Recording; Historic Interiors.

Assessment

Written assignments, practical workshops and dissertation.

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This course enables you to become a professional within the specialist field of historic building conservation. London is rich in its collection of historic buildings, and the course team places great emphasis on using these to illustrate and inform elements of the course. Read more
This course enables you to become a professional within the specialist field of historic building conservation. London is rich in its collection of historic buildings, and the course team places great emphasis on using these to illustrate and inform elements of the course. In particular, past and ongoing works at the Historic Royal Palaces, together with several national and local heritage organisations and practitioners, are used as the basis for project work.

Key features
-The course is fully accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS), and on successful completion graduates will be able to register for the RICS final assessment programme. The course is also recognised by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC).
-The course team works closely with a variety of different organisations, including Historic Royal Palaces, building preservation trusts, Historic England, specialist practitioners, craftsmen and contractors.
-The course is consciously interdisciplinary and international. Current and former students include archaeologists, architects, architectural technologists, chartered surveyors, craftsmen, engineers, and project and construction managers.
-The course provides opportunities to work alongside other postgraduates in the Faculty and the wider university, including those studying architecture, landscape architecture and building surveying.

What will you study?

The course is designed to balance strategic analysis with a good working knowledge of core techniques. You will acquire the skills and knowledge to extend your current practice and/or gain knowledge and expertise in new areas. You will work with a range of professionals and specialists to broaden your understanding of the interdisciplinary nature of the field. A week-long field trip to a European city will provide the opportunity to further develop your technical knowledge and embed it within a practice scenario.

Assessment

Essays, reports, seminars, workshops, group field trip, project work, presentations, and dissertation.
Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list. Those listed here may also be a mixture of core and optional modules.

Modules
-Analysing and Condition of Historic Buildings
-Defects and Pathology, Repair and Renewal
-Legislation and Economics for Historic Buildings
-Regeneration and Conservation of Historic Environments
-Research Principles and Application
-Research Project

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Designed for a new generation of heritage leaders, this programme provides the interdisciplinary skills needed to deliver the heritage programmes and projects of the future. Read more
Designed for a new generation of heritage leaders, this programme provides the interdisciplinary skills needed to deliver the heritage programmes and projects of the future. The programme combines aspects of cultural heritage - historic buildings, museums, collections, sites and landscapes - with the best preventive conservation and heritage management policies, projects, methodologies and practices.

Degree information

Students are encouraged to take a long view of preservation and heritage management, and challenged to define problems, set objectives and explore a range of sustainability issues and strategies. Concepts of value, sustainability, life expectancy, stewardship, ownership, vulnerability and risk are interwoven with the scientific study of historic materials, assemblies, technologies and systems.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (120 credits), a research report (60 credits) and an optional project placement (not credit bearing). A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits, full-time nine months) is offered. There are no optional modules for this programme.

Core modules
-Sustainability and Heritage Value
-Heritage Materials and Assemblies
-Sustainable Strategies
-Project Planning, Management and Maintenance

Dissertation/report
All MSc students submit a 10,000-word dissertation on a topic related to the main themes of the programme. The topic can be chosen to enhance career development or for its inherent interest.

Teaching and learning
The programme is taught using a variety of media and strategies including problem-based and case-based learning, discussion groups, project work, exercises, coursework and reports. Assessment is through written assignments, oral examination and the 10,000-word dissertation.

Fieldwork
A two-week study visit to Malta forms an integral part of the degree. This is hosted by Heritage Malta, the national agency responsible for the management of national museums, heritage sites and their collections in Malta and Gozo.
Travel and accomodation expenses for the visit to Malta are covered by the programme.

Careers

Most graduates are expected to assume responsibility for directing major projects within museums, libraries, archives, or organisations responsible for historic buildings and archaeological sites; or as a part of interdisciplinary architectural, engineering or project management practices. Additional career enhancement may be achieved by using the MSc as a foundation for PhD research.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Senior Project Manager, National Trust
-Consultant to Ministry of Culture India, Advisory Committee on World Heritage Matters
-Carbon Consultant, Sturgis Carbon Profiling
-Project Planner, Transport for London
-Green Building Consultant, ECADI (East China Architectural Design & Research Institute)

Employability
The programme, which is accredited by RICS, is an internationally recognised qualification from a world-leading university that improves equips students with the skills and expertise needed to contribute to heritage projects at an advanced level.
There is an opportunity to undertake a placement at a leading heritage organisation or practice during the programme.
Students gain access to an extensive alumni network of professionals who have studied on the programme and are currently leaders in the field.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Bartlett is the UK's largest multidisciplinary Faculty of the Built Environment, bringing together scientific and professional specialisms required to research, understand, design, construct and operate the buildings and urban environments of the future.

Students on this programme benefit from: international, interdisciplinary teachers who are leading professionals in their field; real-life heritage case studies as the basis for discussing complex and demanding issues; access to public stewards and private owners of heritage - in order to learn from practice and leading heritage stakeholders; a fully funded study visit to Malta; project placement opportunities with leading international heritage organisations.

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