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Rochester Institute of Technology USA, Full Time Masters Degrees in Computer Science

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The computer science program is designed for students who have an undergraduate degree (or minor) in computer science, as well as those who have a strong background in a field in which computers are applied, such as engineering, science, or business. Read more

Program overview

The computer science program is designed for students who have an undergraduate degree (or minor) in computer science, as well as those who have a strong background in a field in which computers are applied, such as engineering, science, or business.

The degree is offered on a full- or part-time basis. Courses are generally offered in the afternoons and evenings to accommodate part-time students. Full-time students take three or four courses per semester and may be able to complete the course work in three semesters. Full-time students who are required to take additional bridge courses may be able to complete the course work in four semesters. Part-time students take one or two courses per semester and may be able to complete the course work in four to five semesters. The time required to complete a master's project is one semester, but can vary according to the student and the scope of the topic. Two semesters is typical.

Plan of study

The program consists of 30 credit hours of course work, which includes either a thesis or a project. Students complete one core course, three courses in a cluster, four electives, and a thesis. For those choosing to complete a project in place of a thesis, students complete one additional elective.

Clusters

Students select three cluster courses from the following areas (see website for individual area information):
-Computer graphics and visualization
-Data management
-Distributed systems
-Intelligent systems
-Languages and tools
-Security
-Theory

Electives

Electives provide breadth of experience in computer science and applications areas. Students who wish to include courses from departments outside of computer science need prior approval from the graduate program director. Refer to the course descriptions in the departments of computer science, engineering, mathematical sciences, and imaging science for possible elective courses.

Master's thesis/project

Students may choose the thesis or project option as the capstone to the program. Students who choose the project option must register for the Project course (CSCI-788). Students participate in required in-class presentations that are critiqued. A summary project report and public presentation of the student's project (in poster form) occurs at the end of the semester.

Curriculum

Thesis/project options differ in course sequence, see the website for a particular option's modules and a particular cluster's modules.

Other admission requirements

-Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
-Submit scores from the Graduate Record Exam.
-Have a minimum grade point average of 3.0 (B), and complete a graduate application.
-International applicants, whose native language is not English, must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. A minimum score of 570 (paper-based) or 88 (Internet-based) is required.
-Applicants must satisfy prerequisite requirements in mathematics (differential and integral calculus, probability and statistics, discrete mathematics, and computer science theory) and computing (experience with a modern high-level language [e.g., C++, Java], data structures, software design methodology, introductory computer architecture, operating systems, and programming language concepts).

Additional information

Bridge courses:
If an applicant lacks any prerequisites, bridge courses may be recommended to provide students with the required knowledge and skills needed for the program. If any bridge courses are indicated in a student's plan of study, the student may be admitted to the program on the condition that they successfully complete the recommended bridge courses with a grade of B (3.0) or better (courses with lower grades must be repeated). Generally, formal acceptance into the program is deferred until the applicant has made significant progress in this additional course work. Bridge program courses are not counted as part of the 30 credit hours required for the master's degree. During orientation, bridge exams are conducted. These exams are the equivalent to the finals of the bridge courses. Bridge courses will be waived if the exams are passed.

Faculty:
Faculty members in the department are actively engaged in research in the areas of artificial intelligence, computer networking, pattern recognition, computer vision, graphics, visualization, data management, theory, and distributed computing systems. There are many opportunities for graduate students to participate in these activities toward thesis or project work and independent study.

Facilities:
The computer science department provides extensive facilities that represent current technology, including:
-A graduate lab with more than 15 Mac’s and a graduate library.
-Specialized labs in graphics, computer vision, pattern recognition, security, database, and robotics.
-Six general purpose computing labs with more than 100 workstations running Linux, Windows, and OS X; plus campus-wide wireless access.

Maximum time limit:
University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program. Bridge courses are excluded.

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See the department website - http://www.se.rit.edu/grad. The master of science in software engineering is designed to attract professionals with a formal undergraduate background in software engineering, computer science, or computer engineering and at least one year of professional experience. Read more
See the department website - http://www.se.rit.edu/grad

The master of science in software engineering is designed to attract professionals with a formal undergraduate background in software engineering, computer science, or computer engineering and at least one year of professional experience. The program’s core content ensures that graduates will possess both breadth and depth of knowledge in software engineering. Specialization tracks in software quality and design provide students with the opportunity to match their graduate education with their professional goals.

Plan of study

The program comprises 36 semester credit hours, anchored by either a thesis or a capstone project.

Admission requirements

To be considered for admission to the MS program in software engineering, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

- Hold a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution,

- Have a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher (Prospective students from institutions that do not use the GPA scale are expected to demonstrate an equivalent level of academic accomplishment. Formal academic background in software engineering, computer science, or computer engineering is a plus.),

- Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work,

- Submit a professional essay (1-4 pages) describing current job (if applicable), relevant experience, and career plans,

- Submit a current resume (including descriptions of significant software projects in which the candidate participated),

- Submit two letters of recommendation, and

- Complete a graduate application.

- International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Minimum scores of 570 (paper-based) or 88 (Internet-based) are required. International applicants must provide Graduate Record Exam (GRE) scores. Domestic students are encouraged to provide GRE scores.

Professional experience developing software is preferred, but candidates without a background in computing will be considered. Additional bridge course work will be required, and may extend time to graduation.

Additional information

- Bridge courses

Based on the evaluation of academic and relevant experience, the graduate program director may require some applicants to successfully complete bridge courses to fill in any gaps in their background. Successful completion of bridge courses is necessary for registration in graduate-level courses.

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Human-computer interaction (HCI) addresses the design, evaluation, and implementation of interactive computing and computing-based systems for the benefit of human use. Read more

Program overview

Human-computer interaction (HCI) addresses the design, evaluation, and implementation of interactive computing and computing-based systems for the benefit of human use. HCI research is driven by technological advances and the increasing pervasiveness of computing devices in our society. With an emphasis on making computing technologies more user-friendly, HCI has emerged as a dynamic, multifaceted area of study that merges theory from science, engineering, and design––as well as concepts and methodologies from psychology, anthropology, sociology, and industrial design––with the technical concerns of computing.

The master of science degree in human-computer interaction provides the knowledge and skills necessary for conceptualizing, designing, implementing, and evaluating software applications and computing technologies for the benefit of the user, whether the user is an individual, a group, an organization, or a society. Human, technological, and organizational concerns are interwoven throughout the curriculum and addressed in team- and project-based learning experiences.

Plan of study

The program is comprised of four required core courses, up to three program electives (depending upon capstone option chosen), two application domain courses, and a capstone project or thesis.

Core courses

The core courses provide knowledge and skills in the conceptual and methodological frameworks of HCI and HCI research. Emphasis is on understanding human cognition as it applies to information systems plus interaction design, interface prototyping, and usability evaluation.

Electives

Student choose up to three electives, depending on which capstone option they choose to complete.

Program electives

Students will select two courses from the program electives list. In select cases, students can petition for approval to include a course complementray to the degree program as a program elective. See website for further details of available electives: https://www.rit.edu/programs/human-computer-interaction-ms

Application domain courses

To gain breadth in a technical area to which HCI concepts can be applied, students complete two courses in any of the following application domain areas. A special topics option is also available, with faculty approval, for individuals with interest in other HCI-related areas. See website for further details of available domain courses: https://www.rit.edu/programs/human-computer-interaction-ms

Thesis/Capstone project

Students may complete a thesis or capstone project. (Student who choose the capstone will complete one additional elective.) This experience is meant to be an empirical study of a HCI problem, which can be the development of a software product through user-centered design processes. The results are either published in a peer-reviewed journal or publicly disseminated in an appropriate professional venue.

Curriculum

Course sequence differs according to selected thesis/project option, see website for further details of a particular option's modules and electives: https://www.rit.edu/programs/human-computer-interaction-ms

Other admission requirements

-Have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0* (B average).
-Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
-Have prior study or professional experience in computing; however, study in other disciplines will be given consideration.
-Complete a graduate application.
-International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 570 (paper-based) or 88 (Internet-based) are required.
-Applicants with undergraduate degrees from foreign universities are required to submit GRE scores.

*Applicants with a GPA below 3.0 may be considered, but are required to submit standard Graduate Record Exam (GRE) scores.

Additional information

Prerequisites:
The program requires strong technical and social science skills. Knowledge of quantitative statistical methodologies is important since students review research studies as well as analyze the results of their own usability evaluations. Students are also expected to have a solid background in computer programming. These competencies may be demonstrated by previous course work, technical certifications, or comparable work experience. Bridge courses are available to fulfill any gaps in an applicant's qualifications. Applicants will be made aware of any areas where additional course work may be necessary.

Maximum time limit:
University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program. Bridge courses are excluded.

Online option:
The program can be completed on campus or online.

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Developers of computing systems and practitioners in all computing disciplines need an understanding of the critical importance of building security and survivability into the hardware and software of computing systems they design, rather than trying to add it on once these systems have been designed, developed, and installed. Read more

Program overview

Developers of computing systems and practitioners in all computing disciplines need an understanding of the critical importance of building security and survivability into the hardware and software of computing systems they design, rather than trying to add it on once these systems have been designed, developed, and installed.

The MS in computing security gives students an understanding of the technological and ethical roles of computing security in today's society and its importance across the breadth of computing disciplines. Students can develop a specialization in one of several security-related areas by selecting technical electives under the guidance of a faculty adviser. The program enables students to develop a strong theoretical and practical foundation in secure computing, preparing them for leadership positions in both the private and public sectors of the computing security industry, for academic or research careers in computing security, or to pursue a more advanced degree in a computing discipline.

Plan of study

The program is designed for students who have an undergraduate computing degree in an area such as computing security, computer science, information technology, networking, or software engineering, as well as those who have a strong background in a field in which computers are applied, such as computer or electrical engineering. The curriculum consists of three required core courses, up to 6 technical electives (depending on the capstone option chosen), and a capstone thesis, project, or capstone course for a total of 30 semester credit hours.

Electives

Students are required to choose up to six technical electives, from:
-Advanced Computer Forensics
-Web Server and Application Security Audits
-Mobile Device Forensics
-Information Security Risk Management
-Sensor and SCADA Security
-Computer System Security
-Computer Viruses and Malicious Software
-Network Security
-Covert Communications
-Information Security Policy and Law
-Information Assurance Fundamentals
-Secure Data Management
-Secure Coding
-Foundations of Cryptography
-Foundations of Security Measurement and Evaluation
-Foundations of Intelligent Security Systems
-Advanced Cryptography
-Hardware and Software Design for Cryptographic Applications

Curriculum

Thesis/project/capstone course options differ in course sequence, see the website for a particular course's module information.

Other admission requirements

-Have a minimum grade point average equivalent to a 3.0/4.0.
-Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
-Submit a minimum of two recommendations from individuals who are well-qualified to assess the applicant's potential for success, and complete a graduate application.
-International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 570 (paper-based) or 88 (Internet-based) are required. Applicants who have completed undergraduate study at foreign universities must submit Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores. GRE scores are also recommended for applicants whose undergraduate GPA is below 3.0.
-Applicants must satisfy prerequisite requirements in mathematics (integral calculus, discrete mathematics), statistics, natural sciences (physics, chemistry, etc.), and computing (programming, computer networking theory and practice, and systems administration theory and practice).

Bridge program

Students whose undergraduate preparation or employment experience does not satisfy the prerequisites required for the program may make up deficiencies through additional study. Bridge course work, designed to close gaps in a student's preparation, can be completed either before or after enrolling in the program as advised by the graduate program director. Generally, formal acceptance into the program is deferred until the applicant has made significant progress through this additional preparation.

If completed through academic study, bridge courses must be completed with a grade of B (3.0) or better. Courses with lower grades must be repeated. Bridge courses are not counted toward the 30 credit hours required for the master's degree. However, grades earned from bridge courses taken at RIT are included in a student's graduate grade point average. A bridge program can be designed in different ways. Courses may be substituted based upon availability, and courses at other colleges may be applied. All bridge course work must be approved in advance by the graduate program director.

Additional information

Study options:
Students may pursue the degree on a full-time basis, on-campus only.

Faculty:
The program faculty are actively engaged in consulting and research in various areas of secure computing and information assurance, such as cryptography, databases, networking, secure software development, and critical infrastructure security. There are opportunities for students to participate in research activities towards capstone completion or as independent study work.

Maximum time limit:
University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program. Bridge courses are excluded.

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The master of science degree in computer engineering provides students with a high level of specialized knowledge in computer engineering, strengthening… Read more

Program overview

The master of science degree in computer engineering provides students with a high level of specialized knowledge in computer engineering, strengthening their ability to successfully formulate solutions to current technical problems, and offers a significant independent learning experience in preparation for further graduate study or for continuing professional development at the leading edge of the discipline. The program accommodates applicants with undergraduate degrees in computer engineering or related programs such as electrical engineering or computer science. (Some additional bridge courses may be required for applicants from undergraduate degrees outside of computer engineering).

Plan of study

The degree requires 30 semester credit hours and includes Analytical Topics in Computer Engineering (CMPE-610), two core courses, four graduate electives, two semesters of graduate seminar, and the option of completing either a thesis research or a graduate project. The core courses and graduate electives provide breadth and depth of knowledge. The Computer Engineering Graduate Seminar (CMPE-795) provides students with exposure to a variety of topics presented by researchers from within RIT, industry, and other universities, and guides students to choose either a thesis or project as their culminating experience. The Project/Thesis Initiation Seminar (CMPE-796) guides students to complete their thesis proposal or project execution plan with their faculty adviser.

Students who pursue the thesis option complete nine semester credit hours of thesis research (CMPE-790) to conduct research with a faculty adviser to answer a fundamental science/engineering question that contributes to new knowledge in the field. Students are expected to formulate the problem under the faculty adviser's guidance and conduct extensive quantitative or qualitative analyses with sound methodology. Research findings should be repeatable and generalizable, with sufficient quality to make them publishable in technical conferences and/or journals. Students who pursue the project option take six semester credits of graduate electives directly related to their project deliverables and three semester credits of Graduate Project (CMPE-792) to professionally execute a project under the supervision of a faculty adviser. The project generally addresses an immediate and practical problem, a scholarly undertaking that can have tangible outcomes, where students are expected to give a presentation or demonstration of the final deliverables of the project.

Research tracks/Graduate electives

Students may select four graduate electives from within the following research tracks. Students are encouraged to choose most of their graduate electives within a single research track. At least two of the electives must be from the computer engineering department (computer engineering department courses begin with the prefix CMPE). Courses outside the lists below may be considered with approval from the department of computer engineering. Research tracks are available in the following areas (see website for research track details):
-Computer architecture
-Computer vision and machine intelligence
-Integrated circuits and systems
-Networks and security
-Signal processing, control and embedded systems
-Additional graduate-level math courses

Curriculum

Thesis and project options differ in course sequence, see website for a particular option's module information.

Other admission requirements

-Submit official transcripts (in English) from all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
-Have an GPA of 3.0 or higher.
-Submit scores from the Graduate Record Exam (GRE).
-Submit two letters of reference from individuals well qualified to judge the candidate's ability for graduate study, and complete a graduate application.
-International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or International English Language Testing System (IELTS).

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See the department website - http://www.cis.rit.edu/graduate-programs/master-science. The master of science program in imaging science prepares students for positions in research in the imaging industry or in the application of various imaging modalities to problems in engineering and science. Read more
See the department website - http://www.cis.rit.edu/graduate-programs/master-science

The master of science program in imaging science prepares students for positions in research in the imaging industry or in the application of various imaging modalities to problems in engineering and science. Formal course work includes consideration of the physical properties of radiation-sensitive materials and processes, the applications of physical and geometrical optics to electro-optical systems, the mathematical evaluation of image forming systems, digital image processing, and the statistical characterization of noise and system performance. Technical electives may be selected from courses offered in imaging science, color science, engineering, computer science, science, and mathematics. Both thesis and project options are available. In general, full-time students are required to pursue the thesis option, with the project option targeted to part-time and online students who can demonstrate that they have sufficient practical experience through their professional activities.

Faculty within the Center for Imaging Science supervise thesis research in areas of the physical properties of radiation-sensitive materials and processes, digital image processing, remote sensing, nanoimaging, electro-optical instrumentation, vision, medical imaging, color imaging systems, and astronomical imaging. Interdisciplinary efforts are possible with other colleges across the university.

The program can be completed on a full- or a part-time basis. Some courses are available online, specifically in the areas of color science, remote sensing, medical imaging, and digital image processing.

Plan of study

All students must earn 30 credit hours as a graduate student. The curriculum is a combination of required core courses in imaging science, elective courses appropriate for the candidate’s background and interests, and either a research thesis or graduate paper/project. Students must enroll in either the research thesis or graduate paper/project option at the beginning of their studies.

Core courses

Students are required to complete the following core courses: Fourier Methods for Imaging (IMGS-616), Image Processing and Computer Vision (IMGS-682), Optics for Imaging (IMGS-633), and either Radiometry (IMGS-619) or The Human Visual System (IMGS-620).

Speciality track courses

Students choose two courses from a variety of tracks such as: digital image processing, medical imaging, electro-optical imaging systems, remote sensing, color imaging, optics, hard copy materials and processes, and nanoimaging. Tracks may be created for students interested in pursuing additional fields of study.

Research thesis option

The research thesis is based on experimental evidence obtained by the student in an appropriate field, as arranged between the student and their adviser. The minimum number of thesis credits required is four and may be fulfilled by experiments in the university’s laboratories. In some cases, the requirement may be fulfilled by work done in other laboratories or the student's place of employment, under the following conditions:

1. The results must be fully publishable.

2. The student’s adviser must be approved by the graduate program coordinator.

3. The thesis must be based on independent, original work, as it would be if the work were done in the university’s laboratories.

A student’s thesis committee is composed of a minimum of three people: the student’s adviser and two additional members who hold at least a master's dgeree in a field relevant to the student’s research. Two committee members must be from the graduate faculty of the center.

Graduate paper/project option

Students with demonstrated practical or research experience, approved by the graduate program coordinator, may choose the graduate project option (3 credit hours). This option takes the form of a systems project course. The graduate paper is normally performed during the final semester of study. Both part- and full-time students may choose this option, with the approval of the graduate program coordinator.

Admission requirements

To be considered for admission to the MS in imaging science, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

- Hold a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution (undergraduate studies should include the following: mathematics, through calculus and including differential equations; and a full year of calculus-based physics, including modern physics. It is assumed that students can write a common computer program),

- Submit a one- to two-page statement of educational objectives,

- Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate or graduate course work,

- Submit letters of recommendation from individuals familiar with the applicant’s academic or research capabilities,

- Submit scores from the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) (requirement may be waived for those not seeking funding from the Center for Imaging Science), and

- Complete a graduate application.

- International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 600 (paper-based) or 100 (Internet-based) are required. Students may also submit scores from the International English Language Testing System. The minimum IELTS score is 7.0. International students who are interested in applying for a teaching or research assistantship are advised to obtain as high a TOEFL or IELTS score as possible. These applicants also are encouraged to take the Test of Spoken English in order to be considered for financial assistance.

Applicants seeking financial assistance from the center must have all application documents submitted to the Office of Graduate Enrollment Services by January 15 for the next academic year.

Additional information

- Bridge courses

Applicants who lack adequate preparation may be required to complete bridge courses in mathematics or physics before matriculating with graduate status.

- Maximum time limit

University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program. Bridge courses are excluded.

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The master of science degree in game design and development explores the entertainment technology landscape, along with other related areas of software development. Read more

Program overview

The master of science degree in game design and development explores the entertainment technology landscape, along with other related areas of software development. The program has its technical roots in the computing and information science disciplines, while simultaneously covering the breadth of the game development field through course work in topics such as computer graphics, game engines, interactive narrative, and game design. The degree is specifically for students who aspire to careers within the professional gaming industry or a related field such as simulation, edutainment, or visualization.

This is a two-year, on-campus, cohort-based program in which students are admitted through a portfolio review process. During the second year, students form development teams that construct a working game engine and software title as the program capstone experience. This requirement includes both individual and group expectations. The capstone culminates in a defense before program faculty, as well as a public exhibition. Combined, these requirements provide a unique and comprehensive educational experience for individuals who aspire to a career in the game development industry.

Plan of study

The program's curriculum consists of required courses, a choice of five advanced electives, and a capstone experience.

Capstone experience

During the second year, students complete a team-based capstone experience where students present and defend their work. This presentation includes a faculty review, which constitutes the capstone defense, a public presentation, and a demonstration.

Curriculum

Game design and development, MS degree, typical course sequence:
First Year
-Game Development Processes
-Game Design
-Gameplay and Prototyping
-Colloquium in Game Design and Development
-Game Industry Themes and Perspectives
-Advanced Electives
Second Year
-Capstone Design
-Advanced Electives
-Game Industry Themes and Perspectives
-Capstone Development

See website for further details of available electives: https://www.rit.edu/programs/game-design-and-development-ms

Other admission requirements

-Submission of a portfolio and/or scores from the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) is required. If you choose to submit a portfolio it should include evidence of individual and group projects (clearly marked as such) relevant to the area you wish to study within the degree program.
-Complete a graduate application.
-International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). A minimum score of 570 (paper-based) or 88 (Internet-based) is required. International applicants also are required to submit scores from the Graduate Record Exam (GRE).

Due to the cohort nature of the program, students are admitted in the fall semester only. Admission to the program is highly competitive. While GRE scores are not required for domestic students, students may submit scores to strengthen their application. Those applicants with a GPA below 3.25 are required to submit GRE scores.

Additional information

Prerequisites:
Students are expected to have at least one year of significant programming experience in a current object-oriented language—preferably C++ or Java—and a solid working knowledge of website development and interactive multimedia concepts. If students do not have these prerequisites, additional course work may be recommended to bridge any educational gaps.

Maximum time limit:
University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program. Bridge courses are excluded.

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See the department website - http://nsa.rit.edu/. Read more
See the department website - http://nsa.rit.edu/

Trends in network communications–unifying wired and wireless infrastructures, Cloud computing, scalability, collaboration tools, and security–can only be coalesced into reliable communication services if there are highly educated and technically proficient networking and system administration professionals who understand both traditional and emerging communication technologies as well as how to apply these technologies to organizational needs and opportunities.

The explosion in ubiquitous computing today means an increased need for greater efficiency and for better management oversight in the provision of IT services. Network environments are not only becoming increasingly complex, there is a greater recognition of the power of information technology to be a strategic enabler of corporate growth and adaptation.

The master of science program in networking and system administration is designed to provide both the knowledge and the technical skills needed to successfully compete in this environment. It is uniquely focused to address current issues in networking and systems administration through investigation of both the theoretical and the practical aspects of this continually evolving field. Course work examines the organizational and technological issues involved in enterprise scale networking, including emerging network technologies, network processing, high performance computing, network programming, and security.

The program is intended to prepare graduates to assume leadership positions in for-profit and not-for-profit organizations dealing with evolving networking solutions or to continue their education through advanced degrees. It is available for full- and part-time study in both an online format as well as a traditional on-campus setting.

Plan of study

The program consists of two required core courses, a three-course knowledge domain sequence, up to four technical electives (depending upon the capstone option chosen), and a capstone thesis or project.

- Knowledge domains

Students are required to complete a three-course sequence in one of the following knowledge domains.

- Electives

Students are required to choose up to four electives from the following choices.

Additional information

- Bridge courses

Students must have solid backgrounds in computer programming (C++ required); networking and systems administration theory and practice; and statistics. Students whose undergraduate preparation or industrial experience does not satisfy these prerequisites can make up deficiencies through additional study. The graduate program director will make recommendations on prerequisite course work. Formal acceptance into the program may be possible even though the applicant must complete bridge courses.

Bridge courses are not part of the required curriculum for the master’s degree. Grades for these courses are only included in the student's GPA if courses are completed after matriculation. Bridge course work can be designed in a variety of ways. Other courses can be substituted, or courses at other colleges can be applied. Contact the graduate program director for more information.

- Study options

This program may be completed on a full- or part-time basis, through on-campus instruction or via online learning. Full-time students may be able to complete the program in two years; part-time students may take approximately four years.

- Maximum time limit

University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program. Bridge courses are excluded.

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The master of science in health systems administration provides strategic skills for today’s health care management professionals. Read more

Program overview

The master of science in health systems administration provides strategic skills for today’s health care management professionals. Now, as never before, health care is rapidly transforming. The pace of technology and innovation are changing how, when, and where healthcare is provided, and who is providing it. Concurrently, health care consumers have high expectations for quality and responsiveness to their needs—delivered in a cost-effective manner. To provide these strategic skills, this post-graduate degree builds on a foundation of courses in policy and law formation, healthcare economics, finance, insurance reform, innovation, information technology, systems, operations and leadership. The course work is built on a foundation of skills and knowledge sets identified and endorsed by national health care leadership organizations. Graduates of the program are prepared to assume clinical and business leadership roles across the diverse healthcare industry.

The health care industry is changing rapidly due to healthcare reform and the Affordable Care Act. The MS degree encompasses course work that provides the graduate with a breadth of knowledge in areas key required for effective management of healthcare organizations: research, governance and economics, finance, health insurance, process improvement, project management and informatics. The curriculum also provides graduates a broad view of health care issues that administrators and leaders must be prepared to deal with effectively: change and innovation, leadership theory and application, bioethics, and human resources. Finally, the curriculum prepares the graduate to develop and implement plans designed to create and steer health care organizations of the future. Graduates will not only lead today’s healthcare organizations, they will create patient-centered facilities of the future.

Plan of study

The program requires 39 credit hours at the graduate level and can be completed in two years or less. Students may complete the program on a part-time basis. Students must maintain a 3.0 grade point average. Toward the end of their program of study, students complete a capstone project consisting of a community research experience. Upon matriculation, each student works with the program chair to develop a plan of study for their research experience.

Curriculum

Health systems administration, MS degree, typical course sequence:
First Year
-Research Methods
-Reinventing Health Care
-Health Care Operations Management
-Bioethics
-Lean Sigma in Health Care (summer)
Second Year
-Human Resources in Health Care
-Finance for Health Care Professionals
-Health Insurance and Reimbursement
-Health Care Informatics
-Elective (summer)
Third Year
-Health Care Leadership
-Health Systems Planning
-Capstone

Other admission requirements

-Submit two letters of reference from individuals who have the opportunity to observe the applicant’s work output.
-Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
-Complete an interview with the program chair (for those without health care experience).
-Complete a graduate application.

It is recommended that applicants have a minimum of three years of experience in a health care or health-related organization as either a practitioner or manager. Applicants who do not meet this requirement may be asked to complete certain undergraduate courses as a bridge for the content knowledge required for the graduate program. They may also be required to complete a graduate level internship in health care prior to graduation. All credentials must be submitted and reviewed by faculty prior to the completion of 12 credit hours of graduate work in the program.

Additional information

Maximum time limit:
University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program. Bridge courses are excluded.

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See the department website - http://it.rit.edu/. The Internet has brought a new kind of democracy where all information is created equal. Read more
See the department website - http://it.rit.edu/

The Internet has brought a new kind of democracy where all information is created equal. No longer the sole province of experts and the traditional media, it has become grassroots, viral, and global. The sheer volume and lightning speed of information transfer has changed how the world communicates, educates, learns, and ultimately solves problems. As the Web and its related technologies evolve, users will need help in managing these new tools.

Graduate study in a computing discipline that only focuses on traditional computing approaches is not flexible enough to meet the needs of the real world. New hardware and software tools are continually introduced into the market. IT professionals must have a specific area of expertise as well as be adaptable and ready to tackle to the next new thing—or just as often, retrofit available technologies to help their users adapt to the latest trends. The MS in information sciences and technologies provides an opportunity for in-depth study to prepare for today’s high-demand computing careers. Companies are drowning in data—structured, semi-structured, and unstructured. Big data is not just high transaction volumes; it is also data in various formats, with high velocity change, and increasing complexity. Information is gleaned from unstructured sources—such as Web traffic or social networks—as well as traditional ones; and information delivery must be immediate and on demand.

As the users' advocate, IT professionals also need the critical thinking skills to problem-solve in a wide variety of computing situations, combined with an understanding of the needs of their audience. Just knowing how technology works is no longer enough. Today, computing professionals need to know how to make it all work.

The information sciences and technologies program addresses the Web systems and integration technologies, and the information management and database technology pillars, of the IT academic discipline, along with the additional option of discovery informatics. A special topics option is available to support the creation of a customized area of study. The program is offered full- or part-time, on-campus only.

Plan of study

The program consists of 30 semester credit hours of graduate study and includes four core courses, four or five track or domain electives (depending upon capstone option chosen), and either a capstone experience, thesis, or project.

- Track or domain electives

Students choose track or domain electives from the following tracks. With permission of the graduate program director, students may select the special topics track to fulfill the track or domain electives requirement. See the graduate program director for more information.

- Capstone options

Students may choose between a course-based capstone, a thesis, or a project that builds upon their domain study. The course-based capstone option is 3 semester credit hours. Students who choose this option are required to complete one additional track or domain elective. The thesis and project capstone options are both 6 semester credit hours.

International Students

International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 570 (paper-based) or 88 (Internet-based) are required. Applicants with a lower TOEFL score may be admitted conditionally and will be required to complete a prescribed program in English, along with a reduced program course load.

Additional information

- Prerequisites

It is expected that prospective students will have a background in fundamental information technology concepts including object-oriented programming, website development, database theory and practice, and statistics. Students without the necessary background should complete the prerequisites before applying to the program. However, bridge courses are available to satisfy the prerequisites.

- Bridge program

Students whose undergraduate preparation or employment experience does not satisfy the prerequisites can make up these deficiencies by completing prerequisite bridge courses as prescribed by the graduate program director. The bridge courses are not part of the 30 semester credit hours required for the master’s degree. Grades for bridge courses are not included in a student’s GPA if the courses are taken before matriculation; they are included if completed after matriculation. Since bridge programs can be designed in a variety of ways, the graduate program director will assist students in planning and course selection.

- Maximum time limit

University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program. Bridge courses are excluded.

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