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University of Buckingham, Full Time Masters Degrees in Computer Science

We have 5 University of Buckingham, Full Time Masters Degrees in Computer Science

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This programme of study is intended primarily for graduates from any non-computing background to obtain fundamental knowledge and understanding of a range of core subjects in Computing. Read more

Course outline

This programme of study is intended primarily for graduates from any non-computing background to obtain fundamental knowledge and understanding of a range of core subjects in Computing. The overall aim of education is to either equip the graduates who want to develop their careers in their own areas of speciality with additional understanding, awareness and skills of IT and Computing, or help those who want to change their careers into IT and Computing. The programme can also serve as a pre-requisite for advanced master programmes in Applied Computing at Buckingham.

Graduates who successfully complete the programmes are eligible for entry into the MSc in Innovative Computing degree programme.

The Graduate Diploma programme consists of 7 taught modules and an individual project. On completing the programmes, you will be able to understand:

- the role that computers and networked systems play in the modern world.
- the essential knowledge and skills in programming together with relevant structures and concepts to create such systems.
- fundamental concepts and principles of databases, networking, object-oriented programming, web design and human-computer interaction.
- advanced applications including data mining, multimedia, interactive computer graphics, and security systems.
- ethical, professional, social and legal issues in exploiting computing technology in practice.

The programme will also help you to develop skills in:

- Computing and web application
- Web design
- Programming and problem-solving for large scale or mobile applications
- Database and software development
- Developing usable GUIs
- Computer graphics
- Computer network issues

Find out more about our Department of Applied Computing on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/appliedcomputing.

Teaching methods

Our modules include a mixture of formal lectures, tutorial classes and practical classes. At the start of each module you will be given an up-to-date module outline and reading list. Most modules will provide two or three hours of lectures each week to introduce you to the basic concepts and techniques. These will be supported by lecture notes or handouts.

Lectures are supported by weekly tutorial classes, usually one hour in length, which are held in small groups so that all students can benefit from individual attention. You will be expected to prepare for these classes, for example by attempting a set of exercises or by reading a case study.

Many of our modules have supervised practical classes in the computer laboratories in which you can apply and practise the techniques you have learnt in the lectures. These practical sessions are usually two or three hours long.

You will also be expected to study on your own, using the library for reading research and the computer laboratories to improve your practical skills.

Course material is also available on the University’s own Virtual Learning Environment. This allows students to download lecture notes, submit assignments and share resources in an electronic forum both within the University’s computer network and remotely.

Study options

Students may take the diploma over 9 (April start) or 12 (January start) months. The course is also available on a part-time basis over two years (starting in January).

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This programme of study aims to train first-degree holders in computing-related areas into specialists in selected areas of IT and computing. Read more

Course outline

This programme of study aims to train first-degree holders in computing-related areas into specialists in selected areas of IT and computing. Based on the current expertise in the Department, the programme offers students opportunities for in-depth study in:

- Secure mobile and wireless communications
- Biometrics and authentication
- Data mining and knowledge discovery
- Imaging techniques and applications

The programme is carefully designed to suit the varied needs of different students from different backgrounds and with different career objectives.

Communications using mobile and wireless devices such as mobile phones, PDA s and laptops have become increasingly important in modern life and electronic commerce. Reliable, speedy and secure transmission of information over such devices is vital for the successful exploitation of the technologies.

Authentication, using biometric data as a sophisticated means to combat fraud, is increasingly accepted by both businesses and governments. Biometric authentication solutions require good use of imaging and data mining techniques in constructing and verifying customer profiles. Online organisations have accumulated large collections of online data that need speedy processing and analysis. If you are interested in finding out more about any of these technologies, then this programme is for you.

On graduating from this programme, you will be able to:

- Understand a range of modern computing technologies
- Apply these technologies in practice
- Describe the roles that modern computing technologies have in many areas of application
- Demonstrate the value of state-of-the-art development in one specific technology and its applications

Find out more about our Department of Applied Computing on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/appliedcomputing.

Teaching methods

Our modules include a mixture of formal lectures, tutorial classes and practical classes. At the start of each module you will be given an up-to-date module outline and reading list. Most modules will provide two or three hours of lectures each week to introduce you to the basic concepts and techniques. These will be supported by lecture notes or handouts.

Lectures are supported by weekly tutorial classes, usually one hour in length, which are held in small groups so that all students can benefit from individual attention. You will be expected to prepare for these classes, for example by attempting a set of exercises or by reading a case study.

Many of our modules have supervised practical classes in the computer laboratories in which you can apply and practise the techniques you have learnt in the lectures. These practical sessions are usually two or three hours long.

You will also be expected to study on your own, using the library for reading research and the computer laboratories to improve your practical skills.

Course material is also available on the University’s own Virtual Learning Environment. This allows students to download lecture notes, submit assignments and share resources in an electronic forum both within the University’s computer network and remotely.

After your degree

The increasing specialisation which is frequently required in the employment market is no longer provided by just an undergraduate degree. A postgraduate degree provides these advanced skills and, in today’s competitive employment market, is becoming increasingly important in order to stand out from the crowd.

Any successful career choice in the market place will be dependent on a number of factors. Your academic qualification, while important, may not be the deciding factor. Your attitude, skills and experience matter too. Whatever your motivation in taking a postgraduate course, you should think about the transferable skills an employer is seeking, and taking advantage of every opportunity for self-development to improve your chances of success in your future career. The Careers Service has the resources to help you with this process.

Read less
This programme of study aims to train first-degree holders in computing-related areas into specialists in selected areas of IT and computing. Read more

Course outline

This programme of study aims to train first-degree holders in computing-related areas into specialists in selected areas of IT and computing. Based on the current expertise in the Department, the programme offers students opportunities for in-depth study in secure mobile and wireless communication systems, biometrics and authentication, data mining and knowledge discovery, and Software Project Management techniques and applications.

The programme is carefully designed to suit the varied needs of different students from different backgrounds and with different career objectives, in the IT fields.

On graduating from this programme, you will be able to:

- Understand a range of modern computing technologies
- Apply these technologies in practice
- Describe the roles that modern computing technologies have in many areas of application
- Demonstrate the value of state-of-the-art development in one specific technology and its applications

Find out more about our Department of Applied Computing on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/appliedcomputing.

Duration

The programme lasts for 18-month over 6 terms. It consists of 8 taught modules and an individual project totalling 195 units of credit. You can start the course in September, January or April each year.

Teaching methods

Our modules include a mixture of formal lectures, tutorial classes and practical classes. At the start of each module you will be given an up-to-date module outline and reading list. Most modules will provide two or three hours of lectures each week to introduce you to the basic concepts and techniques. These will be supported by lecture notes or handouts.

Lectures are supported by weekly tutorial classes, usually one hour in length, which are held in small groups so that all students can benefit from individual attention. You will be expected to prepare for these classes, for example by attempting a set of exercises or by reading a case study.

Many of our modules have supervised practical classes in the computer laboratories in which you can apply and practise the techniques you have learnt in the lectures. These practical sessions are usually two or three hours long.

You will also be expected to study on your own, using the library for reading research and the computer laboratories to improve your practical skills.

Course material is also available on the University’s own Virtual Learning Environment. This allows students to download lecture notes, submit assignments and share resources in an electronic forum both within the University’s computer network and remotely.

After your degree

The increasing specialisation which is frequently required in the employment market is no longer provided by just an undergraduate degree. A postgraduate degree provides these advanced skills and, in today’s competitive employment market, is becoming increasingly important in order to stand out from the crowd.

Any successful career choice in the market place will be dependent on a number of factors. Your academic qualification, while important, may not be the deciding factor. Your attitude, skills and experience matter too. Whatever your motivation in taking a postgraduate course, you should think about the transferable skills an employer is seeking, and taking advantage of every opportunity for self-development to improve your chances of success in your future career. The Careers Service has the resources to help you with this process.

Apply here http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/sciences/msc/appliedcomputing.

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The academic staff in the Applied Computing Department (ACD) are all engaged in research and publications. Considering its modest size, ACD has successfully attracted research funding from various sources in the UK and the EU, including industry, research councils, HEA and EU framework projects such as FP6. Read more

Research programme

The academic staff in the Applied Computing Department (ACD) are all engaged in research and publications. Considering its modest size, ACD has successfully attracted research funding from various sources in the UK and the EU, including industry, research councils, HEA and EU framework projects such as FP6. Furthermore, ACD has been working and collaborating with many European research institutions.

For the academic year 2012-2013, 2 DPhil and 6 MSc students (1 in Mathematics) have graduated, four of whom graduated with Distinction. The 2 DPhil students have made it for the March graduation and we expect to have 3 or 4 more completing their DPhil research programmes for the next graduation. One of our new MPhil/DPhil students in Computing joined the Department last October, and 3 other MPhil/DPhil students have joined us since. Over the last few years, the number of research students in ACD has grown steadily to (currently) 29 PhD and 2 Master’s research students.

We have had over 20 refereed conference and journal papers published during the last 12 months, and two of the papers have been awarded best paper awards.

ACD supports diverse research topics addressing varied applied computing technologies such as:

- Image processing and pattern recognition with applications in biometric-based person identification, image super-resolution, digital watermarking and steganography, content-based image / video indexing and retrieval, biomedical image analysis.
- Multi-factor authentication and security algorithms.
- Wireless networks technologies (Multi-frequency Software-Defined / Cognitive Radios, convergence and integration of different wireless technologies and standards such as WiFi and WiMax, IPv4 and IPv6, wireless mesh technologies, intrusion detection and prevention, efficiency and stability of ad hoc networks).
- Hybrid navigation and localisation integrations for mobile handsets, including using Cellular and WiFi in conjunction with GPS and Glonass for seamless positioning indoors, Multiplexed receive chain of GPS/Glonass with on-board handset Bluetooth/WiFi, GNSS signals multiplexing for real time simulation.
- Cloud computing, including the readiness of mobile operating systems for cloud services and focusing on techniques for fast computing handovers, efficient virtualisation and optimised security algorithms.
- Data mining techniques, including database systems, the application of data mining techniques in image and biological data, human-computer interaction and visual languages.
- Research and development of Apps for mobile devices and smart TVs, particularly for application in the areas of education and healthcare.
- Differential geometry – Einstein metrics, quasi-Einstein metrics, Ricci solitons, numerical methods in differential geometry.

As well as researching the chosen subject, our students engage in delivering seminars weekly, attending conferences and workshops, attending online webinars and discussion forums, attending training and focused group studies, supervising tutorial and laboratory sessions for undergraduate students, peer reviews and final year project supervision, among a host of technical and networking activities to enhance their skills and techniques.

Find out more about our Department of Applied Computing on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/appliedcomputing.
Apply here http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/sciences/msc/computingresearch.

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The Applied Computing Department is a young department of modest size but is successful in attracting research funding from various sources in the UK and the EU (including industry, research councils and charitable foundations). Read more

Course Outline

The Applied Computing Department is a young department of modest size but is successful in attracting research funding from various sources in the UK and the EU (including industry, research councils and charitable foundations). It supports a significant range of research interest and over the last few years the number of research students has grown steadily. The Department has a history of involvement in EU framework projects. More recently, we were partners in two EU FP6 funded projects: SecurePhone and BroadWan. We have been working and collaborating with many European research institutions including The Technical University Graz, CNUCE, Pisa, Thales, Thomson, TELENOR, RAL, Salzburg, Telephonica – Spain, Atos Origin, The University of Saarbrucken – Germany, INFORMA – Italy, and ENST – France.

The main research areas of interest in the Department cover image / video processing and analysis techniques and applications; wireless mobile network technologies; and biometric-based authentications for constrained devices / environments. In image processing we mainly, but not exclusively, use wavelet transform techniques for facial feature detection and recognition, online image / video compression for constrained devices, visual speech recognition, feature detection in biomedical images, digital watermarking, content-based video indexing for biometric video databases. In the wireless networking area, our research effort focuses on convergence and integration of different wireless technologies and standards, wireless mesh technologies, intrusion detection and prevention, efficiency and stability of ad hoc networks.

Currently the Department has a number of research groups consisting of 5 research active academics, 12 PhD and 3 MSc/MPhil students at various stages of their studies.

Find out more about our Department of Applied Computing on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/appliedcomputing.

Teaching Method

Candidates spend a considerable part of their studies undertaking supervised research, at the end of which they submit a thesis embodying the results of that research. This thesis must demonstrate familiarity with, and an understanding of the subject, its principal sources and authorities. It should display critical discrimination and a sense of proportion in evaluating evidence and the judgements of others. The subject should be dealt with in a competent and scholarly manner.

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