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Masters Degrees in Ceramics

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The University of Sunderland has the largest glass and ceramics department in Europe. This programme is for individuals who wish to develop both their practice and critical understanding with regards to glass and ceramics. Read more
The University of Sunderland has the largest glass and ceramics department in Europe.

Course overview

This programme is for individuals who wish to develop both their practice and critical understanding with regards to glass and ceramics. The subject is explored and contextualized in its widest sense through both practical and theoretical investigation and application.

We do not have a ‘house style’, instead you will be encouraged and supported to develop your own focus, independent creativity, improve your technical skills through expert support, and develop academic skills in research and communication.

You’ll be joining the largest glass and ceramics department in Europe, made up of an international team of creative and experienced educators and practitioners. All academic staff on this course are engaged in professional practice or research and are at the forefront of their discipline.

Sunderland is a thriving research hub and hosts the Ceramics Arts Research Centre (CARCuos), which aims to develop, support and disseminate new knowledge and scholarly activity whilst also providing a platform both practically and theoretically for discussion aligned to the ceramic arts.

Graduates from Sunderland have gone on to work throughout the creative industries. MA graduates have also wished to extend their work through a research degree either at MPhil or PhD level and continue studies within CARCuos the ceramic arts research centre at the University.

This course can also be taken part time - for more information, please view this web-page: http://www.sunderland.ac.uk/courses/artsdesignandmedia/postgraduate/ceramics-part-time/

Course content

The content of the course is shaped by your personal interests with guidance and inspiration from Sunderland's supportive tutors.

Modules on this course include:
Stage 1 (60 Credits)
-Contextual Studies: Critical and Professional Contexts in Contemporary Art and Design (30 credits)
-Experimentation in Glass and Ceramics (30 credits)

Stage 2 (60 Credits)
-Contextual Studies: Professional Practice in Glass and Ceramics (30 credits)
-Developing Practice in Glass and Ceramics (30 credits)

Stage 3 (60 Credits)
-Contextual Studies: Research Project in Glass and Ceramics (30 credits)
-Synthesis in Glass and Ceramics Practice (30 credits)

Teaching and assessment

Compared to an undergraduate course, you will find that this Masters requires a higher level of independent working. The course aims to stretch your creativity and maximise your sense of personal fulfilment.

We use a wide variety of teaching and learning methods which include lectures, seminars, critiques, workshops and practical demonstrations. These are supported by a range of guest speakers from diverse academic and industry backgrounds. You will also have high levels of contact with tutors who give regular feedback and support.

Facilities & location

Facilities for this course include:
-26 glass kilns, including a large glass casting kiln
-13 ceramic kilns and two large gas kilns
-Ceramics mould-making and glaze workshops
-Hot glass workshop with international-quality equipment
-Two cold working studios (sandblasting, cutting, grinding and polishing)
-Printing facility for ceramics, glass and other surfaces
-Architectural glass studio
-Decal printer
-3D MakerBot Printer
-Water-jet machine/Computer Aided Design
-Project and exhibition space
-Multi-function creative and social space
-Lampworking and future light workshop
-Computer suite and project space
-Arts and Design Library
-Journals and research

We subscribe to a comprehensive range of print and electronic journals so you can access the most reliable and up-to-date articles. Some of the most important sources for your course are:
-Key Glass and Ceramics magazines and journals
-Art Full Text + Art Abstracts, which is a major resource for arts information
-Design and Applied Arts Index, which covers journals featuring both new designers and the development of design and the applied arts since the mid-19th century
-JSTOR (short for ‘Journal Storage’), which provides access to important journals across the humanities, social sciences and sciences

National Glass Centre
The Glass and Ceramics Department is based in National Glass Centre, a nationally recognised glass production and exhibition centre with a world-class programme of creative projects.

Studying here puts you at the heart of an international network of professionals in the ceramics sector. You will be exposed to the latest ways of working through visiting artists and designers, and you can become involved in exhibitions that help launch your career.

Employment & careers

Postgraduates are highly employable and, on average, earn more than individuals whose highest qualification is an undergraduate degree. On completing this course you will be equipped for roles throughout the creative industries.

Recent Sunderland graduates are now working as self-employed practitioners as well as being employed in arts administration and education.

During the course we encourage you to gain professional industry experience which will enhance your skills, build up a valuable network of contacts and boost your employability.

The University has close links with arts organisations including Arts Council England, the BALTIC, Northern Gallery for Contemporary Art, Tyne and Wear Museums Service and Middlesbrough Institute of Modern Art. We also have international links in USA, China and Czech Republic.

A Masters degree will also enhance career opportunities within Higher Education and prepare you for further postgraduate studies.

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The Ceramics and Glasses research degrees are part of a progressive research area within the school; we have close links with industry and research councils and we work collaboratively with them on many areas of research within the subject. Read more
The Ceramics and Glasses research degrees are part of a progressive research area within the school; we have close links with industry and research councils and we work collaboratively with them on many areas of research within the subject.

Industrial application

Our research is concerned with the processing, characterisation and applications of structural and functional ceramic materials. Structural ceramics are used in engineering applications due to a combination of high strength, chemical / thermal resistance and extreme hardness. In contrast, functional ceramics exhibit unique electrical, magnetic and optical properties, which lead to applications in a diverse range of electronic components - filters in mobile telecommunications, exhaust gas sensors and pyroelectric thermal imaging cameras.

We are engaged in research to understand the structure-property relationships in a wide range of ceramic materials and to develop materials / components with enhanced properties. Materials are developed by conventional powder processing methods and by novel processing procedures.

Research projects

Active projects in this area involve a wide range of processing techniques for functional and structural materials - these techniques are employed in industries as diverse as power generation, mobile telecommunications, aerospace and medical implants. To understand the microstructure-property relationships for the ceramics, we make extensive use of specialist characterisation facilities available in the school and in partner institutions nationally and internationally.

Industrial links

Through our close relationship with industry, we ensure that the research we carry out is relevant and focused on the requirements of new technology. We currently collaborate on research with, amongst others, Rolls-Royce, British Nuclear Fuel, Xaar Printing Technology, Powerwave, Morgan Electroceramics, and BAE Systems. We are also supported by EPSRC, the European Commission, and British Energy.

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The Ceramics and Glasses research degrees are part of a progressive research area within the school; we have close links with industry and research councils and we work collaboratively with them on many areas of research within the subject. Read more
The Ceramics and Glasses research degrees are part of a progressive research area within the school; we have close links with industry and research councils and we work collaboratively with them on many areas of research within the subject.

Industrial application

Our research is concerned with the processing, characterisation and applications of structural and functional ceramic materials. Structural ceramics are used in engineering applications due to a combination of high strength, chemical / thermal resistance and extreme hardness. In contrast, functional ceramics exhibit unique electrical, magnetic and optical properties, which lead to applications in a diverse range of electronic components - filters in mobile telecommunications, exhaust gas sensors and pyroelectric thermal imaging cameras.

We are engaged in research to understand the structure-property relationships in a wide range of ceramic materials and to develop materials / components with enhanced properties. Materials are developed by conventional powder processing methods and by novel processing procedures.

Research projects

Active projects in this area involve a wide range of processing techniques for functional and structural materials - these techniques are employed in industries as diverse as power generation, mobile telecommunications, aerospace and medical implants. To understand the microstructure-property relationships for the ceramics, we make extensive use of specialist characterisation facilities available in the school and in partner institutions nationally and internationally.

Industrial links

Through our close relationship with industry, we ensure that the research we carry out is relevant and focused on the requirements of new technology. We currently collaborate on research with, amongst others, Rolls-Royce, British Nuclear Fuel, Xaar Printing Technology, Powerwave, Morgan Electroceramics, and BAE Systems. We are also supported by EPSRC, the European Commission, and British Energy.

Facilities

To underpin the research and teaching activities, we have established state-of-the-art laboratories, which allow comprehensive characterisation and development of materials. These facilities range from synthetic/textile fibre chemistry to materials processing and materials testing.

To complement our teaching resources, there is a comprehensive range of electrochemical, electronoptical imaging and surface and bulk analytical facilities and techniques.

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The spirit of Ceramics & Glass at the RCA springs from the heart of those media, and a belief in the transformative power of material thinking, research and making to enrich our world in imaginative and meaningful ways. Read more

The spirit of Ceramics & Glass at the RCA springs from the heart of those media, and a belief in the transformative power of material thinking, research and making to enrich our world in imaginative and meaningful ways. The programme is a site for contemporary discourse where personal concerns and global perspectives intersect. We seek those with passion to extend the possibilities and perspectives of ceramics and glass within and beyond traditional limitations, informed by their rich provenance of materials and practices.

The Ceramics & Glass MA at the RCA provides outstanding opportunities to develop a dynamic, informed and connected practice in a study environment that embraces diversity and depth. We believe in interrogating practices and challenging conventions. 

Our hyper-material age presents exciting and critical opportunities to explore cultures of production; to ask questions about what, why and how we make; to express ideas through the symbolic modes of things and transformative character of substances, and to consider how our work can influence physical, personal and psycho-social environments. We challenge and encourage you to stretch your imagination, expand your potential and find your voice.

The MA spectrum of enquiry includes art and design works, design for manufacture and the built environment, emerging experimental practices and applications. Curiosity is nurtured through the imaginative exploration of concepts, the investigation of material properties and technologies, the potential of interdisciplinary practice and collaboration. Making, thinking and writing skills are integrated to develop critical perspectives of practice and purpose, and to foster new understandings of our interaction with ‘things’.

The exceptional ceramic and glass facilities at the Royal College underpin a dynamic study environment led by outstanding teachers and technical experts, supported by contributions from peers, acclaimed visiting lecturers and graduates, who have shaped the programme’s leading research and international standing over many years.

The MA study experience integrates studio-based project learning with a formal dialogue in Critical & Historical Studies, scaffolded by the rigour of enquiry and reflective practice. Workshops, lectures, visiting experts and collaboration opportunities are supplemented by seminars and personal tutorials to provide guidance, foster critical reflection and encourage the development of individual trajectories and ambitions.

The programme offers:

  • individual studio work spaces
  • well-equipped workshops with facilities for undertaking an extensive range of ceramic and glass processes, both analogue and digital
  • access to specialist facilities across the Royal College of Art, including foundry, rapid form fabrication
  •  exceptional teaching by an international team of experienced, dedicated staff
  • a regular visiting lecturer and guest lecturer programme of leading artists, designers and craftspeople
  • outstanding technical support from a team of highly skilled specialist staff
  • a strong research culture with support for project and doctoral funding
  • alumni include Flavie Audi, Barnaby Barford, Neil Brownsword, Phoebe Cummings, Mike Eden, Malene Hartmann-Rasmussen, Hitomi Hosono, Shelley James, Studio Manifold, Nao Matsunaga, Katharine Morling, Zemer Peled, Rothschild/Bickers, James Rigler, Anders Ruhwald, Clare Twomey


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MA Ceramic Design is recognised worldwide as one of the leading postgraduate programmes in ceramic design for small and mass manufacture. Read more
MA Ceramic Design is recognised worldwide as one of the leading postgraduate programmes in ceramic design for small and mass manufacture. Taught in Stoke-on-Trent, the home of UK ceramics for over two centuries in the Potteries, this long-established course consistently produces career-ready graduates that are in demand by leading ceramic companies both in the UK and overseas. With world-famous ceramic manufacturers quite literally on the doorstep, Stoke-on-Trent provides a unique venue for the study of ceramic design.

This course provides a design-led creative experience of ceramics within a broad subject context. Designing through intelligent making allows you to access ideas through a unique material. The deep knowledge of one material helps you to appreciate the opportunities in ceramics but also its translation into other materials and professional opportunities. Whether your personal aspirations are embedded in 2D surface and pattern, and or 3D shape, form and function.

The relationship between the course and the global ceramic industry is mutually beneficial and is primarily responsible for the unique character and international reputation of the course. The strength of this award lies in the accumulated wealth of specialist knowledge and practical skills, which are the essential tools of the ceramics designer; and in the good working practices developed over many years. In the close working relationship with industry, and in the clarity of purpose that ensures academic coherence, and the credibility of the award.

Students are encouraged to pursue new and innovative ideas, redefining established ceramic craft and ceramic design market opportunities. These ideas may now be less wedded to the immediate perceived needs of the mass manufacturing industry and for the mass market. As a consequence encouraging students to take a wider perhaps more entrepreneurial, enterprising standpoint – working as designer-producers for example, engaging with small to medium sized factories in developing aspirational products of contemporary relevance with ‘added value’ aimed potentially at new and different niche markets.

The MA Ceramic Design course has in recent years provided the creative genesis for The New English ceramic design brand and the University’s unique Flux, blue and white fine bone china collection.

This course can be studied part time. For more information on part time study, see the website: http://www.staffs.ac.uk/course/SSTK-06801.jsp?utm_source=findamasters&utm_medium=courseprofile&utm_campaign=postgraduate

Course content

Semester 1
-Tools and Techniques
-Collaborative Project

Semester 2
-Ceramic Design, Professional Pathways
-Creativity & Innovation

Semester 3
The Masters Project

Graduate destinations

Many of our Ceramic Design graduates now work as designers or senior managers and creative directors within the ceramics and related creative industries. Some have set up in business as designer-producers or as freelance design consultants. And others have become retail developers, stylists, buyers, trend forecasters, lecturers and teachers.

Other admission requirements

For you to be able to execute your own ideas whilst on the course, You would be expected to demonstrate:
-Your ability to communicate your creative design ideas visually, this is critically important. Through traditional sketching and drawing (drawing with your own hand) and through digital techniques (the use of appropriate computer softwares).
-A broad understanding and experience of ceramic moulded techniques (the use of plaster moulds, typically slipcasting) or hand making techniques would be expected.
-Alternatively you may be interested in ceramic surface, ideas for surface pattern design whether this be for graphics; textiles or ceramics.
-Evidence that you have an awareness of the global marketplace for ceramic design, and as such develop innovative ceramic ideas informed by this knowledge.

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MA Ceramic Design is recognised worldwide as one of the leading postgraduate programmes in ceramic design for small and mass manufacture. Read more
MA Ceramic Design is recognised worldwide as one of the leading postgraduate programmes in ceramic design for small and mass manufacture. Taught in Stoke-on-Trent, the home of UK ceramics for over two centuries in the Potteries, this long-established course consistently produces career-ready graduates that are in demand by leading ceramic companies both in the UK and overseas. With world-famous ceramic manufacturers quite literally on the doorstep, Stoke-on-Trent provides a unique venue for the study of ceramic design.

This course provides a design-led creative experience of ceramics within a broad subject context. Designing through intelligent making allows you to access ideas through a unique material. The deep knowledge of one material helps you to appreciate the opportunities in ceramics but also its translation into other materials and professional opportunities. Whether your personal aspirations are embedded in 2D surface and pattern, and or 3D shape, form and function.

The relationship between the course and the global ceramic industry is mutually beneficial and is primarily responsible for the unique character and international reputation of the course. The strength of this award lies in the accumulated wealth of specialist knowledge and practical skills, which are the essential tools of the ceramics designer; and in the good working practices developed over many years. In the close working relationship with industry, and in the clarity of purpose that ensures academic coherence, and the credibility of the award.

Students are encouraged to pursue new and innovative ideas, redefining established ceramic craft and ceramic design market opportunities. These ideas may now be less wedded to the immediate perceived needs of the mass manufacturing industry and for the mass market. As a consequence encouraging students to take a wider perhaps more entrepreneurial, enterprising standpoint – working as designer-producers for example, engaging with small to medium sized factories in developing aspirational products of contemporary relevance with ‘added value’ aimed potentially at new and different niche markets.

The MA Ceramic Design course has in recent years provided the creative genesis for The New English ceramic design brand and the University’s unique Flux, blue and white fine bone china collection.

Course content

Semester 1
-Tools and Techniques
-Collaborative Project

Semester 2
-Ceramic Design, Professional Pathways
-Creativity & Innovation

Semester 3
-The Masters Project

Many of our Ceramic Design graduates now work as designers or senior managers and creative directors within the ceramics and related creative industries. Some have set up in business as designer-producers or as freelance design consultants. And others have become retail developers, stylists, buyers, trend forecasters, lecturers and teachers.

Other admission requirements

For you to be able to execute your own ideas whilst on the course, You would be expected to demonstrate:
-Your ability to communicate your creative design ideas visually, this is critically important. Through traditional sketching and drawing (drawing with your own hand) and through digital techniques (the use of appropriate computer softwares).
-A broad understanding and experience of ceramic moulded techniques (the use of plaster moulds, typically slipcasting) or hand making techniques would be expected.
-Alternatively you may be interested in ceramic surface, ideas for surface pattern design whether this be for graphics; textiles or ceramics.
-Evidence that you have an awareness of the global marketplace for ceramic design, and as such develop innovative ceramic ideas informed by this knowledge.

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This challenging inter-disciplinary programme spans the major classes of engineering materials used in modern high technology manufacturing and industry. Read more
This challenging inter-disciplinary programme spans the major classes of engineering materials used in modern high technology manufacturing and industry. The course has considerable variety and offers career opportunities across a wide range of industry sectors, where qualified materials scientists and engineers are highly sought after.

This course is accredited by the Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining (IOM3), allowing progression towards professional chartered status (CEng) after a period of relevant graduate-level employment.

Core study areas include advanced characterisation techniques, surface engineering, processing and properties of ceramics and metals, design with engineering materials, sustainability and a project.

Optional study areas include plastics processing technology, industrial case studies, materials modelling, adhesive bonding, rubber compounding and processing, and polymer properties.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/materials/materials-science-tech/

Programme modules

Full-time Modules:
Core Modules
- Advanced Characterisation Techniques (SL)
- Surface Engineering (SL)
- Ceramics: Processing and Properties (SL)
- Design with Engineering Materials (SL)
- Sustainable Use of Materials (OW)
- Metals: Processing and Properties (SL)
- MSc Project

Optional Modules
- Plastics Processing Technology (OW)
- Industrial Case Studies (OW)
- Materials Modelling (SL)

Part-time Modules:
Core Modules
- Ceramics: Processing and Properties (DL)
- Design with Engineering Materials (DL)
- Sustainable Use of Materials (OW or DL)
- Metals: Processing and Properties (DL)
- Surface Engineering (DL)
- Plastics Processing Technology (OW)
- MSc Project

Optional Modules
- Industrial Case Studies (OW)
- Adhesive Bonding (OW)
- Rubber Compounding and Processing (OW or DL)

Alternative modules:*
- Polymer Properties (DL)
- Advanced Characterisation Techniques (SL)
- Materials Modelling (SL)

Key: SL = Semester-long, OW = One week, DL = Distance-learning
Alternative modules* are only available under certain circumstances by agreement with the Programme Director.

Selection

Interviews may be held on consideration of a prospective student’s application form. Overseas students are often accepted on their grades and strong recommendation from suitable referees.

Course structure, assessment and accreditation

The MSc comprises a combination of semester-long and one week modules for full-time students, whilst part-time students study a mix of one week and distance-learning modules.

MSc students undertake a major project many of which are sponsored by our industrial partners. Part-time student projects are often specified in conjunction with their sponsoring company and undertaken at their place of work.

All modules are 15 credits. The MSc project is 60 credits.

MSc: 180 credits – six core and two optional modules, plus the MSc project.
PG Diploma: 120 credits – six core and two optional modules.
PG Certificate: 60 credits – four core modules.

- Assessment
Modules are assessed by a combination of written examination, set coursework exercises and laboratory reports. The project is assessed by a dissertation, literature review and oral presentation.

- Accreditation
Both MSc programmes are accredited by the Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining (IOM3), allowing progression towards professional chartered status (CEng) after a period of relevant graduate-level employment.

Careers and further Study

Typical careers span many industrial sectors, including aerospace, power generation, automotive, construction and transport. Possible roles include technical and project management, R&D, technical support to manufacturing as well as sales and marketing.
Many of our best masters students continue their studies with us, joining our thriving community of PhD students engaged in materials projects of real-world significance

Bursaries and Scholarships

Bursaries are available for both UK / EU and international students, and scholarships are available for good overseas applicants.

Why Choose Materials at Loughborough?

The Department has contributed to the advancement and application of knowledge for well over 40 years. With 21 academics and a large support team, we have about 85 full and part-time MSc students, 70 PhD students and 20 research associates.

Our philosophy is based on the engineering application and use of materials which, when processed, are altered in structure and properties.
Our approach includes materials selection and design considerations as well as business and environmental implications.

- Facilities
We are also home to the Loughborough Materials Characterisation Centre – its state of-the-art equipment makes it one of the best suites of its kind in Europe used by academia and our industrial partners.
The Centre supports our research and teaching activities developing understanding of the interactions of structure and properties with processing and product performance.

- Research
Our research activity is organised into 4 main research groups; energy materials, advanced ceramics, surface engineering and advanced polymers. These cover a broad span of research areas working on today’s global challenges, including sustainability, nanomaterials, composites and processing. However, we adopt an interdisciplinary approach to our research and frequently interact with other departments and Research Schools.

- Career prospects
Over 90% of our graduates were in employment and / or further study six months after graduating. Our unrivalled links with industry are
hugely beneficial to our students. We also tailor our courses according to industrial feedback and needs, ensuring our graduates are well prepared

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/materials/materials-science-tech/

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The Department of Materials Engineering offers opportunities for study in the following fields. Read more

Program Overview

The Department of Materials Engineering offers opportunities for study in the following fields: casting and solidification of metals; ceramic processing and properties; refractories; corrosion; composites; high temperature coatings; biomaterials; extractive metallurgy including hydrometallurgy, bio-hydrometallurgy, electrometallurgy, and pyrometallurgy; physical metallurgy; thermo-mechanical processing related to materials production; environmental issues related to materials productions; electronic materials; nanofibers; textile structural composites.

Materials Engineers are experts on the entire life cycle of materials, including recovery of materials from minerals, making engineered materials, manufacturing materials into products, understanding and evaluating materials performance, proper disposal and recycling of materials, and evaluating societal and economic benefits.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Applied Science
- Specialization: Materials Engineering
- Subject: Engineering
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Thesis required
- Registration options: Full-time
- Faculty: Faculty of Applied Science

Research focus

Composites, Microstructure Engineering, Extractive Metallurgy, Solidification, Biomaterials & Ceramics

Research highlights

In our research, we work closely with industry partners internationally. We have faculty with world-renowned expertise in hydrometallurgy, sustainability, nanomaterials, biomaterials and ceramics. Recent research developments in the department are helping to reduce environmental impact in the mining industry and enabling new possibilities in medical treatments. We also have a leading role in MagNet, an initiative that aims to achieve significant reductions in carbon dioxide emissions in the transportation sector. We have a long history of providing excellence in education and offer one of the top-rated materials programs in North America. Graduates of our program are enjoying rewarding careers locally and internationally in a wide range of industries from mining to advanced electronics, health care and aerospace.

Related Study Areas

Biomaterials, Ceramics, Composites, Hydrometallurgy, Microstructure Engineering, Corrosion

Facilities

Research is carried out in both the Frank Forward Building and the Brimacombe Building (AMPEL) on UBC campus.

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Offered as part of the. Continuing Professional Development. (CPD) programme. Full-time and part-time students study a number of one-week short-course modules comprising lectures, laboratory sessions and tutorials. Read more

Offered as part of the Continuing Professional Development (CPD) programme.

Full-time and part-time students study a number of one-week short-course modules comprising lectures, laboratory sessions and tutorials.

The modules cover metals, polymers, ceramics, composites, nanomaterials, bonding, surfaces, corrosion, fracture, fatigue, analytical techniques and general research methods. Each module is followed by an open book assessment of approximately 120 hours.

There is also a materials-based research project, which is made up of the Research Project Planning and the Project modules.

The MSc in Advanced Materials is accredited by the Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining (IOM3) and by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE) when a Project is undertaken.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time over five academic years. It consists of eight taught modules and a compulsory Project.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Educational aims of the programme

  • To provide students with a broad knowledge of the manufacture, characterisation and properties of advanced materials
  • To address issues of sustainability such as degradation and recycling
  • To equip graduate scientists and engineers with specific expertise in the selection and use of materials for industry
  • To enable students to prepare, plan, execute and report an original piece of research
  • To develop a deeper understanding of a materials topic which is of particular interest (full-time students) or relevance to their work in industry (part-time students) by a project based or independent study based thesis

Programme learning outcomes

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding

  • The different major classes of advanced materials
  • Routes for manufacturing and processing of advanced materials
  • Characterisation techniques for analysing bonding and microstructure
  • Mechanical, chemical and physical properties of advanced materials
  • Processing -microstructure - property relationships of advanced materials
  • Material selection and use
  • Appropriate mathematical methods

Intellectual / cognitive skills

  • Reason systematically about the behaviour of materials
  • Select materials for an application
  • Predict material properties
  • Understand mathematical relationships relating to material properties
  • Plan experiments, interpret experimental data and discuss experimental results in the context of present understanding in the field

Professional practical skills

  • Research information to develop ideas and understanding
  • Develop an understanding of, and competence, in using laboratory equipment and instrumentation
  • Apply mathematical methods, as appropriate

Key / transferable skills

  • Use the scientific process to reason through to a sound conclusion
  • Write clear reports
  • Communicate ideas clearly and in an appropriate format
  • Design and carry out experimental work

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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Due to the high volume of applications, this course is now over-subscribed. Applications for this course can still be made, and successful applicants will be added to a waiting list. Read more
Due to the high volume of applications, this course is now over-subscribed. Applications for this course can still be made, and successful applicants will be added to a waiting list. Places will be allocated from the waiting list on a first-come, first-served basis should places become available.

Please note, having a space on the waiting list is not a guarantee of an offer.

Aims

The programme aims to convey detailed knowledge of state-of-the-art materials systems, with a focus on composites, advanced alloys and functional and engineering ceramics. The students explore the technologies used in the manufacture and processing of advanced materials and develop an understanding of the relationships between composition, microstructure, processing and performance. The student learn how to assess materials performance in service and develop an understanding of the processes of degradation in hostile conditions. They are also trained in the essential skills needed to design and develop the next generation of high performance engineering materials, establishing a strong foundation for a future career in industry or research.

Course unit details

The taught units cover the structure and design of advanced engineering materials and provide graduates with an increased depth and breadth of knowledge of materials science, technology and engineering.

Taught units include:
-Introduction to Materials Science
-Industrial Processing of Materials
-Advanced Composite Materials
-High Performance Alloys
-Advanced Analytical Techniques
-Functional and Engineering Ceramics

Facilities

To underpin the research and teaching activities at the School, we have established state-of-the-art laboratories, which allow comprehensive characterisation and development of materials. These facilities range from synthetic/textile fibre chemistry to materials processing and materials testing.

To complement our teaching resources, there is a comprehensive range of electrochemical, electronoptical imaging and surface and bulk analytical facilities and techniques.

Career opportunities

Our graduates of this programme have gone on to fill key posts as materials scientists, engineers, managers and consultants in academia, industry and research and development. You may also be able to advance to PhD programmes within the School.

Accrediting organisations

The MSc in Advanced Engineering Materials is accredited by the Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining (IoM3) with the award of Further Learning.

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The Research Masters (MRes) programme in Materials Research is designed following guidelines provided by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), to provide graduates with the foundations for a research career in industry, the service sector, the public sector or academia. Read more
The Research Masters (MRes) programme in Materials Research is designed following guidelines provided by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), to provide graduates with the foundations for a research career in industry, the service sector, the public sector or academia. It serves both as a qualification in its own right for an immediate entry into a research career or as an enhanced route to a PhD through further research.

The taught modules within this programme are designed to provide high quality training in the methods and practice of research, as well as providing complementary transferable skills through the optional modules which focus on business and management related topics.

A substantial component of the MRes Materials Research programme is the research project. This is undertaken alongside taught modules throughout the academic year, and will be based within one of the materials-based research groups of the School of Engineering and Materials Science. The MRes Materials Research may be focused in the fields of ceramics, polymers,composites, elastomers, functional materials or manufacturing technologies.


MSc

This long established programme provides rigorous training in both theoretical and applied research for those who wish to pursue their career as a professional materials scientist. Technological advances, as well as methodological issues, have contributed to the transformation of materials and their functions. A number of challenges lie ahead, as manufacturing supply chains become global, involving companies in strategic alliances and partnerships. Materials research is of great use here, as competition can only be achieved through the development of innovative approaches to the design, development and manufacture of novel materials and their characterisation.

The MSc in Materials Research will provide an insight into areas of manufacturing, planning and control systems, knowledge based systems and measurements and manufacturing systems. The course is interdisciplinary in nature and involves a combination of theoretical and practical approaches.

A substantial component of the programme is the research project. The research project is undertaken alongside taught modules throughout the academic year, and will be based within one of the materials-based research groups of the School of Engineering and Materials Science. The research project may be focused in the fields of Ceramics, Polymers, Composites, Elastomers, Functional Materials or Manufacturing Technologies.

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Ceramic materials range from new electroceramics and high-temperature materials for aerospace, as well as other engineering applications, to the more traditional refractories and cements where new systems are being developed. Read more

About the course

Ceramic materials range from new electroceramics and high-temperature materials for aerospace, as well as other engineering applications, to the more traditional refractories and cements where new systems are being developed. Our course introduces you to the theories and concepts that make it all possible.

A welcoming department

A friendly, forward-thinking community, our students and staff are on hand to welcome you to the department and ensure you settle into student life.

Your project supervisor will support you throughout your course. Plus you’ll have access to our extensive network of alumni, offering industry insight and valuable career advice to support your own career pathway.

Your career

Prospective employers recognise the value of our courses, and know that our students can apply their knowledge to industry. Our graduates work for organisations including Airbus, Rolls-Royce, the National Nuclear Laboratory and Saint-Gobain. Roles include materials development engineer, reactor engineer and research manager. They also work in academia in the UK and abroad.

90 per cent of our graduates are employed or in further study 6 months after graduating, with an average starting salary of £27,000, the highest being £50,000.

Equipment and facilities

We have invested in extensive, world-class equipment and facilities to provide a stimulating learning environment. Our laboratories are equipped to a high standard, with specialist facilities for each area of research.

Materials processing

Tools and production facilities for materials processing, fabrication and testing, including wet chemical processing for ceramics and polymers, rapid solidification and water atomisation for nanoscale metallic materials, and extensive facilities for deposition of functional and structural coatings.

Radioactive nuclear waste and disposal

Our £3million advanced nuclear materials research facility provides a high-quality environment for research on radioactive waste and disposal. Our unique thermomechanical compression and arbitrary strain path equipment is used for simulation of hot deformation.

Characterisation

You’ll have access to newly refurbished array of microscopy and analysis equipment, x-ray facilities, and surface analysis techniques covering state-of-the-art XPS and SIMS. There are also laboratories for cell and tissue culture, and facilities for measuring electrical, magnetic and mechanical properties.

The Kroto Research Institute and the Nanoscience and Technology Centre enhance our capabilities in materials fabrication and characterisation, and we have a computer cluster for modelling from the atomistic through nano and mesoscopic to the macroscopic.

Stimulating learning environment

An interdisciplinary research-led department; our network of world leading academics at the cutting edge of their research inform our courses providing a stimulating, dynamic environment in which to study.

Teaching and assessment

Working alongside students and staff from across the globe, you’ll tackle real-world projects, and attend lectures, seminars and laboratory classes delivered by academic and industry experts.

You’ll be assessed by formal examinations, coursework assignments and a dissertation.

Core modules

Functional and Structural Ceramics; Glasses and Cements; Science of Materials; Materials Processing and Characterisation; Materials Selection, Properties and Applications; Technical Skills Development; Heat and Materials; Research project in an area of 
your choice.

Examples of optional modules

Solid State Chemistry; Materials for Energy; Nanomaterials.

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It is estimated 70 per cent of innovations are due to an advance in materials. This course provides a solid grounding in all types of man-made materials, and aims to prepare you for a career in industry by teaching you the concepts and theories that make materials science and engineering possible. Read more

About the course

It is estimated 70 per cent of innovations are due to an advance in materials. This course provides a solid grounding in all types of man-made materials, and aims to prepare you for a career in industry by teaching you the concepts and theories that make materials science and engineering possible.

Our research-led teaching introduces you to all the latest developments, and you’ll have the option to specialise in the area that interests you the most.

A welcoming department

A friendly, forward-thinking community, our students and staff are on hand to welcome you to the department and ensure you settle into student life.

Your project supervisor will support you throughout your course. Plus you’ll have access to our extensive network of alumni, offering industry insight and valuable career advice to support your own career pathway.

Your career

Prospective employers recognise the value of our courses, and know that our students can apply their knowledge to industry. Our graduates work for organisations including Airbus, Rolls-Royce, the National Nuclear Laboratory and Saint-Gobain. Roles include materials development engineer, reactor engineer and research manager. They also work in academia in the UK and abroad.

90 per cent of our graduates are employed or in further study 6 months after graduating, with an average starting salary of £27,000, the highest being £50,000.

Equipment and facilities

We have invested in extensive, world-class equipment and facilities to provide a stimulating learning environment. Our laboratories are equipped to a high standard, with specialist facilities for each area of research.

Materials processing

Tools and production facilities for materials processing, fabrication and testing, including wet chemical processing for ceramics and polymers, rapid solidification and water atomisation for nanoscale metallic materials, and extensive facilities for deposition of functional and structural coatings.

Radioactive nuclear waste and disposal

Our £3million advanced nuclear materials research facility provides a high-quality environment for research on radioactive waste and disposal. Our unique thermomechanical compression and arbitrary strain path equipment is used for simulation of hot deformation.

Characterisation

You’ll have access to newly refurbished array of microscopy and analysis equipment, x-ray facilities, and surface analysis techniques covering state-of-the-art XPS and SIMS. There are also laboratories for cell and tissue culture, and facilities for measuring electrical, magnetic and mechanical properties.

The Kroto Research Institute and the Nanoscience and Technology Centre enhance our capabilities in materials fabrication and characterisation, and we have a computer cluster for modelling from the atomistic through nano and mesoscopic to the macroscopic.

Stimulating learning environment

An interdisciplinary research-led department; our network of world leading academics at the cutting edge of their research inform our courses providing a stimulating, dynamic environment in which to study.

Teaching and assessment

Working alongside students and staff from across the globe, you’ll tackle real-world projects, and attend lectures, seminars and laboratory classes delivered by academic and industry experts.

You’ll be assessed by formal examinations, coursework assignments and a dissertation.

Core modules

Science of Materials; Materials Processing and Characterisation; Materials Selection, Properties and Applications; Technical Skills Development; Heat and Materials; Research project in an area of your choice.

Examples of optional modules

Functional and Structural Ceramics; Design and Manufacture of Composites; Materials 
for Energy Applications; Metals Processing Case Studies; Glasses and Cements; Metallurgical Processing; Nanostructures 
and Nanostructuring.

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The FAME Master provides high-level academic and research oriented education about the synthesis, characterization and processing of all classes of materials with special emphasis on “Advanced Hybrid Materials and Ceramics by Design” in Bordeaux. . Read more

The FAME Master provides high-level academic and research oriented education about the synthesis, characterization and processing of all classes of materials with special emphasis on “Advanced Hybrid Materials and Ceramics by Design” in Bordeaux. 

European mobility is mandatory during the two-year Master program thus taking advantage of the complementary skills of the universities in the network. In the last decade, more than 200 students have graduated from the FAME Master.

Program structure

The FAME program consists of four semesters (30 ECTS each) including a Master thesis in a European research laboratory.

  • The first two semesters deal with general topics about material science (Augsburg or Grenoble).
  • The third semester is dedicated to a specialization provided by one of the partner universities as world-leading expert. It is composed of mandatory and optional courses. For students studying in Bordeaux, the specialization is “Advanced Hybrid Materials and Ceramics by Design”.
  • The last semester is spent in one of the laboratories of the European Network of Excellence FAME or in a related industry.

Strengths of this Master program

High-level academic and research-oriented education about the synthesis, characterization and processing of all classes of materials including:

  • Chemistry and Physics of Materials during the first year.
  • Specialization in one of the seven programs offered by the partner universities.

Strengthening of an international culture, including fluency in English, mobility as well as experience of the languages and culture of the countries visited.

Improved integration capacity into either Academic or Industrial R&D teams.

After this Master program?

After completion of this Master, students are encouraged to apply for Ph.D programs in Europe, including those offered by IDSFunMat, in the framework of EMMI.

Graduates may also start working as scientists or R&D engineers within the industrial sector.

Since 2009, more than 70% of the FAME Master graduates from Bordeaux have successfully pursued their studies with a PhD opportunity. These PhDs have been carried out in Bordeaux (~33%), in France (~50%) and in Europe (~87%) (data from 2015).



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Materials are at the forefront of new technologies in medicine and dentistry, both in preventative and restorative treatment. Read more
Materials are at the forefront of new technologies in medicine and dentistry, both in preventative and restorative treatment. This programme features joint teaching within the School of Engineering and Materials Science and the Institute of Dentistry, bringing together expertise in the two schools to offer students a fresh perspective on opportunities that are available in the fields of dental materials.

* This programme will equip you with a deep understanding of the field of dental materials and the knowledge necessary to participate in research, or product development.
* An advanced programme designed to develop a broad knowledge of the principles underlying the mechanical, physical and chemical properties of Dental Materials.
* Special emphasis is placed on materials-structure correlations in the context of both clinical and non clinical applications.
* Provides an introduction to materials science, focusing on the major classes of materials used in dentistry including polymers, metals, ceramics and composites.
* Provides up-to-date information on dental materials currently used in Clinical Dentistry and in developments for the future It covers the underlying principles of their functional properties, bioactivity and biocompatibility, and also covers specific dental materials applications such as drug delivery, tissue engineering and regulatory affairs.

Why study with us?

Dental Materials is taught jointly by staff from the School of Medicine and Dentistry (SMD), and School of Engineering and Materials Science (SEMS).

Our school of medicine and dentistry is comprised of two world renowned teaching hospitals, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, which have made, and continue to make, an outstanding contribution to modern medicine. We are ranked sixth in the UK for medicine (Complete University Guide 2012), and Dentistry was placed at number two in the UK in last Research Assessment Exercise (2008). Our Materials Department was the first of its kind established in the UK, and was placed at number 1 in the UK in the 2011 National Student Survey.

This degree is aimed at dental surgeons, dental technicians, materials scientists and engineers wishing to work in the dental support industries, and the materials health sector generally. On completion of the course you should have a good knowledge of topics related to dental materials, and in addition, be competent in justifying selection criteria and manipulation instructions for all classes of materials relevant to the practice of dentistry.

There has been a general move away from destructive techniques and interventions towards less damaging cures and preventative techniques. This programme will update your knowledge of exciting new technologies and their applications.

* The programme is taught by experts in the field of dentistry and materials; they work closely together on the latest developments in dental materials.
* Innovations in medical practice, drug development and diagnostic tools are often tested in the mouth due to simpler regulatory pathways in dentistry.
* The programme allows practitioners the opportunity to update their knowledge in the latest developments in dental materials.

Facilities

You will have access to state-of-the-art laboratories and equipment, including:

* Cell & Tissue Engineering Laboratories; five dedicated cell culture laboratories, a molecular biology facility and general purpose laboratorie
* Confocal microscopy unit incorporating two confocal microscopes, enabling advanced 3D imaging of living cells
* Mechanical Testing Facilities
* NanoVision Centre; our state-of-the-art microscopy unit bringing together the latest microscope techniques for structural, chemical and mechanical analysis at the nanometer scale
* Spectroscopy Lab
* Thermal Analysis Lab.

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