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Politics & Government×

Full Time Masters Degrees in Politics & Government, Cambridge, United Kingdom

We have 10 Full Time Masters Degrees in Politics & Government, Cambridge, United Kingdom

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Discover how international relations theory affects real-world events, and develop crucial skills like decision making and debating. Read more
Discover how international relations theory affects real-world events, and develop crucial skills like decision making and debating. With prestigious guest lecturers and visits to key organisations, you’ll gain all the experience you need for a role in global politics.

Overview

This course will give you an understanding of how international relations theory is applied to real-world policy and strategy, and the practical problems involved in this.

You’ll examine the theory and definition of the ‘state’ and relations between different states, and the roles of other institutions and organisations, like multinational companies and transnational crime organisations. All your studies will contain a strong vocational element, with a focus on how theory affects, and is affected, by real events on the ground.

As well as this foundation in general international relations theory and practice, you’ll also have the chance to focus on your own areas of interest. Our optional modules will let you choose from subjects like the global risk society, policing and security, corruption and cross-border crime, war reporting, and terrorism.

To develop your decision-making, planning and debating skills, you’ll take part in interactive sessions, respond to specific scenarios and briefs, and undertake critical analysis. You’ll also receive advanced instruction in research methods, a vital skill both for your studies and your future career.

With a supporting team of lecturers who have academic and professional backgrounds in international relations, you can be sure you’re receiving the latest theory and careers advice.

Careers

Our course will prepare you for a career in many roles relating to international relations, such as diplomacy and the diplomatic services, strategy and strategic planning, public services, the Foreign Office, the UN and other international bodies, local government, NGOs, charities, education, journalism and press agencies.

Modules

Core modules:
International Relations Theory in Context
International Institutions and Policy
Major Project

Optional modules:
War, Peacekeeping and Military Intervention
Policing Transnational Crime
Communication and Conflict
Terror as Crime
Postgraduate Research Methods
Independent Learning Module

Assessment

We offer a range of core and optional modules, with optional modules sometimes changing depending on staff availability.

You’ll demonstrate your progress through a combination of role-play scenarios, briefs, written reports, poster presentations, group projects, dissertation, longer essays, case studies, research proposal, short analyses of global events, short review papers, practical data gathering exercises, and short abstracts of core course readings.

Events and activities

You’ll have the chance to attend cutting-edge lectures and seminars from prestigious guest speakers, practitioners and diplomats, and to visit organisations like the Ecole de Guerre in Paris, UN seminars, EU, UK government bodies, think tanks and media agencies.

Work placements

We’ll help you to arrange internships and placements.

Specialist facilities

Our campus in Cambridge features a mock courtroom for debates and role-playing.

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The MPhil in Public Policy provides an interdisciplinary grounding in public policy theory and practice, with courses ranging from philosophy and policy analysis through to media and politics. Read more
The MPhil in Public Policy provides an interdisciplinary grounding in public policy theory and practice, with courses ranging from philosophy and policy analysis through to media and politics.

The course is aimed at students who wish to have a leading role in government, companies or NGOs. The blend of theory and practice will help students to understand the mix of hard and soft skills they will need to be effective policy entrepreneurs and students will leave the course having broadended and strengthened their policy analysis and implementation skills.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hspimppup

Course detail

The Master's in Public Policy (MPP) is a practice oriented programme that was launched by the department in October 2013. The course runs for 9 months from October to June.

The course aims to strengthen the interconnections between science, research and innovation in public policy. Integral to these aims, the MPP will promote better awareness within policy circles of scientific developments and emerging technologies, which in turn will encourage long-term thinking and better strategic planning.

Purpose

The MPP programme will qualify its graduates to:

- Cope with different forms of information, qualitative and quantitative with varying degrees of precision, relevance and uncertainty
- Consider issues from a range of disciplinary perspectives
- Spot what is missing, and how to recognize when the picture is incomplete
- Critically appraise information from different kinds of experts
- Integrate different forms of thinking
- Consider the implications of complexity, risk and uncertainty in policy-making

The course seeks to attract students who want to build careers in public policy whether in government at national and international levels, or in the third sector or in the private sector. The MPP will provide students with a thorough intellectual grounding and practical experience in the processes of policy making, as well as an understanding of the range of knowledge and skills they need to be effective in the world of policy.

The course draws on teaching from across six schools of the University, from the Department of Computer Science to the Department of Philosophy as well as from policy professionals from the public, private and voluntary sectors.

Candidates for the MPhil in Public Policy take 7 modules and 3 case studies across the course of the year. In addition they must complete two independent essays on topics agreed with their supervisor and a report on their work placement.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course students will be expected to have:

- An appreciation of the political and legal context of policy-making.
- An understanding of the economic and evidence aspects of policy making
- A solid grounding in the theory, practical tools and skills required for the implementation of policy

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Some bursaries are available to students each year, although numbers vary annually. Those wishing to be considered for the limited funding opportunities available should take note of the early deadlines.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The Politics MPhil focuses on empirical, and especially comparative, politics, offering a wide variety of topics in empirical politics in courses and dissertations. Read more
The Politics MPhil focuses on empirical, and especially comparative, politics, offering a wide variety of topics in empirical politics in courses and dissertations. The core module focuses on ‘the state’ – its formation, development, varying forms and functions in different parts of the world, and the challenges it faces. Often argued to be severely challenged by globalisation and related processes, the state is still a – if not the – crucial political institution in today’s world. Other modules focus on particular regions of the world or more specific themes.

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University of Cambridge Faculty of History
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The MPhil in Political Thought and Intellectual History is aimed at students who have an interest in both the theory and history of political thought (including those wider intellectual idioms which provide the context for its development). Read more
The MPhil in Political Thought and Intellectual History is aimed at students who have an interest in both the theory and history of political thought (including those wider intellectual idioms which provide the context for its development). It also welcomes students whose previous study had a more specialised historical or theoretical (or philosophical) bent, provided that while doing this course they are willing to engage themselves with both approaches to research.The MPhil in Political Thought and Intellectual History is aimed at students who have an interest in both the theory and history of political thought (including those wider intellectual idioms which provide the context for its development). It also welcomes students whose previous study had a more specialised historical or theoretical (or philosophical) bent, provided that while doing this course they are willing to engage themselves with both approaches to research.

This MPhil attracts students from all over the world, and its training provides an ideal foundation from which to proceed to doctoral research, not only in the United Kingdom, but in North American, European, Asian and Southern Hemisphere university systems.

Priority is given to the pursuit of the individual student’s research: all examined work derives from this research. Classes are provided in Methodology, in the reading of selected texts, and in selected concepts: these are intended to be ‘exemplary’, offering opportunities to explore different methods used in the field, different approaches to reading texts, and a variety of political concepts. Work done in classes is not examined.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hihimppth

Course detail

The MPhil in Political Thought and Intellectual History offers students a rounded and flexible Masters programme that provides them with an introduction to all three of the fields contained within its scope (History of Political Thought, Political Theory, Intellectual History), while allowing them to specialise in their own area of particular interest. It offers a thorough training in the key techniques of higher-level academic study and research.

The MPhil is inter-Faculty: History, Politics, and Classics are the participating departments. The teaching staff, and examiners, have diverse disciplinary backgrounds, as do students on the course.

Learning Outcomes

After completion of the MPhil in Political Thought and Intellectual History, students should have:

1. acquired an enhanced understanding of the history of political thought as well as an appreciation of the broader theoretical approaches and intellectual idioms that inform its study.
2. acquired the analytical capacity to pursue independent study of primary texts in the history of political thought and to evaluate the findings of secondary commentators
3. acquired the ability to situate their own research findings within the context of previous and current interpretative scholarly debates in the field of political thought and intellectual history

Format

The course comprises two kinds of work: group study and individually tailored supervised research training. Both persist simultaneously throughout the year, so that students are expected to attend the course classes, research seminar, and lectures while at the same time researching their essays. While there are no fixed course classes in Easter Term when students will be concentrating on their dissertation, they will be required to present their work at a Dissertation Seminar and encouraged to continue attending lectures and the research seminar. Postgraduate students in Cambridge are expected to work continuously throughout the year with the exception of a few days’ break at a time, so that the ‘vacation periods’ are in fact periods in which required work must be completed.

Students will receive the following feedback:

- oral supervision feedback
- writen termly CGSRS reports
- written essay feedback
- oral dissertation workshop feedback
- formal written feedback from two examiners after the submission and examination of their dissertation.

Assessment

A thesis of 15,000 - 20,000 words is submitted at the end of the course. An oral examination will only be required in cases where one of the marks is a marginal fail.

Two essays of not more than 6,000 words each, one submitted at the end of Michaelmas Term, the second at the end of Lent Term. These essays constitute Part I of the MPhil, and contribute to the final overall mark.

Continuing

In order to be considered for continuation to the PhD, and always subject to satisfactory supervision arrangements being in place, students are expected to obtain an overall mark of 70 for the MPhil and a mark of at least 70 for their dissertation.

Please see the Faculty website for more information:

http://www.hist.cam.ac.uk/prospective-graduates/apply/apply-mphil-phd
http://www.hist.cam.ac.uk/prospective-graduates/apply/apply-ltc-home

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Please see the History Faculty’s Funding Guide via the History Faculty’s weblink below:

http://www.hist.cam.ac.uk/prospective-graduates/faculty-funding/funding-options

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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University of Cambridge Department of Land Economy
Distance from Cambridge: 0 miles
Successful environmental policy depends on the ability of its makers to bring together scientific information, analytical thinking and an awareness of the legal, social and political realities of environmental regulation. Read more
Successful environmental policy depends on the ability of its makers to bring together scientific information, analytical thinking and an awareness of the legal, social and political realities of environmental regulation. This course has been designed to provide an intensive training in the relevant economic and legal concepts and techniques to equip you with the tools that will help you successfully design, implement and assess environmental policy in a variety of settings.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/lelempepl

Course detail

MPhil courses offered by the Department of Land Economy share common aims. These are:

i) to enable students of a high calibre to pursue their education at an advanced applied level drawing on the primary disciplines of economics, planning and environmental policy, with additional specialisms in finance and law;

ii) to provide students with opportunities both to build on and develop material which they may have studied at undergraduate level as well as to broaden their knowledge base;

iii) to equip students with the necessary skills to pursue careers at a high level in a range of areas, including business and finance, civil service, public service, property professions, environmental agencies and organisations, national/international agencies and further study;

iv) to provide opportunities for education in a multidisciplinary environment so as to advance the understanding of cognate disciplines and their applications;

v) to provide opportunities for learning with colleagues from different social, economic and legal systems;

vi) to provide students with appropriate skills and experience to enable them to use information and resources critically and to equip them with the means to undertake their own research;

vii) to provide an educational environment with a strong research ethos that brings together students from a wide variety of backgrounds and fosters an international approach to common problems.

Learning Outcomes

On completion of the course, students will have acquired the following skills:

i) Knowledge and understanding of the subject matter of the various components of their course.

ii) Intellectual skills: the ability to study steadily, assimilate issues and large amounts of literature swiftly, evaluate countervailing positions and to produce succinct arguments to tight deadlines and to engage with those with whom they disagree. Particular methodologies used include: data evaluation, case evaluation, legal analysis, textual analysis, the convergence of theory and empirical data and advanced critical evaluation.

iii) Practical skills: identification and use of bibliographic materials, via libraries and electronically; taking notes effectively, thorough IT skills.

iv) Transferable skills: the ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing; to work to deadlines and under pressure; to manage time; to set priorities; to formulate an argument; to work independently and with initiative; basic IT skills (email, data analysis and internet use); critical analysis; to present material in a seminar context; skills of analysis and interpretation; self-discipline, self-direction; and respect for other views. The ability to develop and present a major piece of written work.

v) Research skills: the ability to locate, utilise and organise a wide range of materials independently, on paper and electronically. The ability to assess and evaluate such material, to develop and pursue a critique of existing material. The ability to develop, structure and sustain a line of argument. The establishment of relationships with researchers in related areas. The ethical use of research material.

vi) Communication skills: the ability to marshal arguments and present them succinctly and lucidly. The ability to effectively criticise the views of others powerfully but fairly. The presentation of written material in a persuasive and coherent manner.

vii) Interpersonal skills: the ability to work with others in seminars and smaller groups towards common goals. The ability to share research data ethically. The ability to respect the views of others and to acknowledge deficiencies in one's own argument.

Format

Candidates study a total of eight modules, some of which are compulsory and complete a dissertation of not more than 12,000 words. Taught modules may be assessed by either written examination or coursework or by a combination of assessment formats.

The modules offered for this course are confirmed on an annual basis but may include:
- Quantitative research methods I
- Mixed research methods
- Fundamentals of environmental economics
- International environmental law I
- Environmental values
- Environmental policy assessment and evaluation
- International environmental law II
- Energy and climate change
- Rural environment: property, planning and policy
- Economic development and land use policies
- Climate change policy and land development

Plus optional modules from other taught MPhil courses offered by the Department of Land Economy.

Feedback and guidance is given to assist students in developing and drafting the dissertation research project. Feedback sessions are arranged by module leaders following examinations.

Assessment

A dissertation of between 10,000 to 12,000 words.

Assessment of subject modules varies and includes written examinations, individual and group project work. Some modules may be assessed in more than one format.

Assessment of subject modules varies, written examinations are used for some modules, these will normally be two-hour papers.

Continuing

Approval of an application to continue to the PhD degree will depend on three criteria:

1. Availability of a supervisor
2. The approval by the Degree Committee of a research proposal
3. The achievement of a minimum overall mark and minimum dissertation mark in the MPhil examination as prescribed by the Degree Committee in any offer of admission.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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University of Cambridge Judge Business School
Distance from Cambridge: 0 miles
The MPhil in Technology Policy is an intensive, nine-month professional practice master's programme designed for people with a background in science or engineering who are interested in developing the skills needed to meet the challenges of integrating technology, management, economics and policy. Read more
The MPhil in Technology Policy is an intensive, nine-month professional practice master's programme designed for people with a background in science or engineering who are interested in developing the skills needed to meet the challenges of integrating technology, management, economics and policy. Although the programme straddles the boundary of business and government and has a strong common core taken by all students on the programme it features two main pathways: public sector and private enterprise.

The programme's focus is on business-government interactions, and its aim is to provide students with both the wider political and institutional context and the analytical skills delivered by Cambridge Judge Business School faculty working in operations, strategy and, most especially, in economics and policy. The MPhil in Technology Policy programme provides the context and skills needed to cope with the rapidly evolving environment in many technology-rich sectors, including information and communications technology, defence and aerospace, energy and electricity, manufacturing, transport and logistics, pharmaceuticals and health. The channels of communication between government and industry are often weak and there can be significant difficulties in spanning the divide. Our central goal, therefore, is to prepare our graduates to move along and across these frontiers and to understand, influence, intervene and shape the evolution of business, government and the intersection of the two. Beyond simply understanding and analysing policies, our goal is to teach students how to be proactive by making the case for alternative metrics, instruments and goals as a means of gaining competitive advantage.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/bmjbmptpl

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, students should:

- be able to anticipate technology trends, and to analyse and influence legislative developments
- be able to identify business opportunities created by policy initiatives, regulation, and legislation
- be able to analyse, influence and operate at the nexus of business and government.

Format

The programme is centred on six core courses, assessed by examination. In addition, students will take a total of six electives: two skills or sectorial electives; two stream electives (public sector or private enterprise); and two open electives (drawn from other skills, sectorial, and stream electives; or from a select list of other electives). During the Lent and Easter terms students will produce a written report for their Final Group Project, which will be based on a placement at a major public or private sector technology-intensive organisation. The Final Group Project is double-weighted.

Placements

The Final Group Project is based on a placement at a major public or private sector organisation.

Assessment

Students will undertake a Final Group Project (FGP). The FGP will be linked to Cambridge Judge Business School research groups and based on a placement at a major public or private technology-intensive organisation. Assessment is based on a 12,000 word final report produced under faculty supervision.

Students are assessed by formal examinations, term papers, regular written assignments, and some assessment of class participation (including bulletin board ‘discussion’). Some team grading is used, as appropriate. Assessment aims to measure assimilation and application of theory and to gauge experiential learning.

The six core courses will be assessed mainly by written examination.

A presentation forms part of the Final Group Project assessment. Presentations may also be required on certain electives, at the discretion of individual lecturers.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Bursaries for UK students.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Do you want a career which can change people’s lives? With the focus on social welfare and social policy issues in the local, national and international context, our course will give you the skills and understanding to really make a difference. Read more
Do you want a career which can change people’s lives? With the focus on social welfare and social policy issues in the local, national and international context, our course will give you the skills and understanding to really make a difference.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/international-social-welfare-and-social-policy

How does globalisation impact on social welfare provision and planning in different countries? Do issues like poverty and social exclusion, street living and migration need to be culturally and locally specific, or could there be global solutions? You’ll explore these and many other issues in our MSc which will prepare you for a career in social welfare and policy. The emphasis is on comparative and global analysis, exploring social welfare and planning responses to issues such as street children, criminal justice and social welfare in areas of political conflict. You’ll have the chance to build and expand on skills relating to policy making, social sciences, leadership and strategies of change. An understanding of comparative and global welfare policies is important for national and international organisations. Therefore, our course is a positive step towards a career in a national and international context, working within the area of social welfare and policy.

Careers

Career possibilities once you’ve graduated are likely to be in the fields of community development social policy, social welfare, youth work, education, higher education, consultancy or policy making in local, regional and international governmental and non-governmental bodies. You’ll also be prepared to carry out further research and study towards a PhD.

- Links with industry and professional recognition
Our Faculty of Health, Social Care & Education works in collaboration with a number of universities from across Europe on the International Doctoral Studies in Social Work (INDOSOW) project. This is the first European Doctoral Programme of its kind and offers the opportunity to take part in an international interdisciplinary study of social work, welfare systems and social policies. For further information about the INDOSOW project visit: http://www.indosow.net.

Core modules

Globalisation, Social Welfare & Social Policy
Comparative Social Policy & Social Welfare
Research Studies
Major Project

Optional modules:
Global Leadership
Collaborative Practice for Integrated Care
Essential Issues in Public Health Policy

You will choose one optional module from the above list. Modules are subject to change.

Assessment

You’ll be assessed in a range of ways to examine the development of your skills throughout our course, leading to the submission of your Major Project bringing together aspects of learning from earlier modules. Assessment strategies include essays, reports, case studies and debates; there are no exams in this course. You’ll have plenty of group workshop and individual supervised support for your Major Project.

Special features

The course leader is a specialist in research and teaching within an international context.

Our students come from across the globe including Bangladesh, Columbia, Ghana, India, Kenya and the UK. Each of our students brings their individual experience in areas as varied as international relations, psychology, social work, social policy, sociology and economics. With lively classroom debates at the top of our agenda, you can be sure that each topic is discussed from multiple perspectives.

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The course is structured around five core papers and a number of option papers, so that study pathways suited to a range of differing interests and needs can be explored. Read more
The course is structured around five core papers and a number of option papers, so that study pathways suited to a range of differing interests and needs can be explored. Each of the core papers (Development Economics; Institutions and Development; Sociology and Politics of Development; Globalisation, Business and Development: Cities and Development ) is taught by a member of Development Studies' academic staff. Some option papers are full papers and some are half papers. Students take four full papers (or their equivalent in half papers) concurrently. At least two papers must be core papers. One (full) option paper may be replaced by a 12,000 word dissertation. A number of option papers are shared with other MPhil Courses (Economic and Social History; Planning, Growth and Regeneration, Management, and Politics.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hsdvmpmdv

Course detail

The MPhil provides a framework within which students can construct a pathway suited to a wide range of differing interests and needs: those for whom the MPhil represents a one year preparation for a career in development policy can select a broad inter disciplinary set of subjects, while those who wish to continue their studies at the doctoral level can select a more specialised set of options concentrating on the analytical tools of their subject, and discover which university department or faculty is most suited to their research plan.

Format

The course is structured around five core papers and a number of option papers, so that study pathways suited to a range of differing interests and needs can be explored. Each of the core papers (Development Economics; Institutions and Development; Sociology and Politics of Development; Globalisation, Business and Development: Cities and Developmant ) is taught by a member of Development Studies' academic staff. Some option papers are full papers and some are half papers. Students take four full papers (or their equivalent in half papers) concurrently. At least two papers must be core papers. One (full) option paper may be replaced by a 12,000 word dissertation. A number of option papers are shared with other MPhil Courses (Economic and Social History; Planning, Growth and Regeneration, Management, and Politics.

The teaching for all papers, whether core or option, takes place over the first two of the three terms in the academic year (Michaelmas and Lent terms) and, in some cases, extends into the first four weeks of the third (Easter) term. Students who choose to write a dissertation must complete and submit their dissertations along with the rest of their course work before the written examinations begin in the third (Easter) term.

Assessment

One (full) option paper may be replaced by a 12,000 word dissertation on a subject of your choice.

Papers are examined either by assessed essays written and submitted during the course of the year, or by a take-home project, or by a formal written examination. At the discretion of the Examiners there may also be an oral examination.

All five core papers have a written examination. The examinations for these core papers are two-hours and for each paper you will be required to answer two questions out of a total of eight. At the discretion of the Examiners there may also be an oral examination.

Continuing

6 - 8 students annually continue to the PhD in Development Studies. For continuation on to the PhD candidates will have to achieve on average of 70 (high pass) in their overall mark in the MPhil course. They will also need an acceptable PhD proposal.

In recent years Development Studies students have been accepted as PhD students by the Faculties of Education, Social and Political Sciences, and History, by the Departments of Social Anthropology, Geography, and Land Economy, by POLIS , and by the Judge Business School.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Funding is available for two students from sub-Sahara Africa or from other developing countries. Funding will be allocated to those students to whom an offer to study the MPhil in Development Studies has been made and who have not secured other funding and scholarships.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Among graduate courses in international relations and politics at British universities, the Cambridge MPhil in International Relations and Politics is distinctive in its multidisciplinary approach and breadth. Read more
Among graduate courses in international relations and politics at British universities, the Cambridge MPhil in International Relations and Politics is distinctive in its multidisciplinary approach and breadth. Teaching takes the form of lectures and seminars in theory, politics, history, economics, law, security and various regional and area studies, as well as individual thesis supervision. The taught part of the course aims to familiarize you with the range and variety of disciplines required for a thorough critical understanding of the field in all its complexity and of the means and methods that have been devised to understand it better.

The programme is suitable both for students who have just completed their first degree and for mature students from, for example, industry, teaching, the civil service or the armed forces.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hspimpirp

Course detail

The fields of study for the one-year course of study in International Relations and Politics currently consist of the following:

- Comparative Politics of Western Europe
- Politics of Africa
- Comparative Politics of Religion
- Middle East and North Africa
- International Relations Theory
- International Organization
- International Security
- International Political Economy
- International Constitutional Law
- Globalization and Development (from the Centre of Development Studies)
- Urban Governance and Development (from the Centre of Development Studies)
- Research Methods

This list is subject to change.

Candidates take three courses without restriction as to field of study, and write a 20 -25,000 word dissertation over 10 months. In addition, there is a research-methods and thesis writing training element. Candidates may seek a special subject designation if the majority of their work has fallen within one field of study (e.g. European Studies, International Politics etc.)

The department is looking to attract between 60-70 highly qualified candidates for the MPhil programme each academic year.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course participants will have:

- Developed a critical view of the contribution made by the subject of International Relations, and its related disciplines, to social science more broadly conceived and to practice.
- An in-depth knowledge of specific subjects and themes in Politics
- Have become familiar with some of the main themes of the contemporary analysis of International Relations and Politics.
- Have tested their ability to produce a piece of advanced scholarship in conformity with the scientific methods, research techniques, standards of argument and accepted style of presentation of an academic discipline. They will thus be prepared to continue, if necessary, with research at the doctoral level.

Format

Such knowledge and understanding are developed through the lectures and seminars associated with the various course options, of which students study three; and by writing three mandatory practice essays, one for each of their chosen taught course options, in preparation for the examinations or course essays. Research skills are developed through a research methods course offered by POLIS and quantitative methods modules taught through the Social Sciences Research Methods Course (SSRMC). These research skills are assessed through an essay in which students reflect on specific methods relevant to their dissertation research .

Assessment

The dissertation is an important element of the MPhil. The examination process and criteria for assessment are accordingly more stringent than on many Master’s programmes. In particular, there is a requirement for originality, which must be met either by research using primary sources (documents, interviews, official publications, or the like) and/or by developing a fresh approach to an existing debate or literature. This supports the general aim of the dissertation, which is to develop advanced skills of research and expression.

Each student is required to submit an original thesis on an approved topic of between 20,000 and 25,000 words in length.

Examination of individual course-options will be EITHER by a three-hour invigilated examination OR a 5000 word long research paper.

Continuing

MPhil students are registered as ‘MPhil one-year only’. Those who hope to read for a PhD at Cambridge immediately after the MPhil will need to obtain support from a potential supervisor. This need not be the same person who supervises your MPhil thesis. However, in view of the early deadlines, you will need to work extra hard to let the potential PhD supervisor see substantial work that you have written, in addition to your draft thesis proposal, at an early stage in the academic year.

Once you have applied for the PhD a definite decision will only be taken once your performance in the MPhil can be fully assessed. That is to say, the Committee will set conditions for you related to the entry requirements of the PhD - one of which is a distinction in the MPhil. If you do not achieve these targets, it is unlikely that you can continue to read towards a PhD at POLIS.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Funded by the Cambridge Trust and the Potter Foundation, there is a studentship available for one student from Africa on the MPhil in International Relations and Politics course in 2016-17.

Applicants who are interested in studying an aspect of Anglo-American Relations or US foreign policy should also be aware of the following sources of funds run out of Magdalene College; The Donner Scholarship, The Halper Bursary , The Roosevelt Scholarship.

The Gabrielle Sacconaghi Bacon Scholarship is available to applicants in 2016-17 who are either final year students at McGill who are currently enrolled in the International Relations Programme; or alumni of the Page Programme (House of Commons or Senate) in Canada. Further information, including the criteria and how to apply, is available through Hughes Hall.

Those wishing to be considered for the limited funding opportunities available should take note of the early deadlines.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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This MPhil pathway is designed to give students a basic understanding of major themes and debates in political and economic sociology. Read more
This MPhil pathway is designed to give students a basic understanding of major themes and debates in political and economic sociology. There are four core substantive modules on political and economic sociology that students are expected to attend, taught by Dr. Manali Desai, Dr. Hazem Kandil, Prof. Lawrence King, and Dr. Jeff Miley.

Other substantive modules may also have an economic sociology component, and these would complement the core modules well. In addition, all students must attend the module on comparative historical research methods taught by Dr. Miley as well as one other methods module to be decided in consultation with their supervisor.

Students have the option of doing one of their coursework essays on a topic taught on any sociology MPhil module (for instance, media, culture, globalisation or reproduction); all of the rest of the coursework essays and the dissertation (based on original research) must relate to the political and economic sociology options.

Topics to be covered include: the Marxist critique of capitalism; Weber’s theory of legitimacy; the transition from feudalism to capitalism; the emergence of the modern state; theories of the capitalist state; class structure and class formation under capitalism; the rise of democracy and dictatorship; theories of revolution; the rise of the welfare state; social movement theory; theories of imperialism; theories of development and underdevelopment; gender and ethnicity in post-colonial states; nationalisms; war and militarism, and state violence and genocide.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hssomppes

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the programme students should have:

- an advanced understanding of current sociological research in selected topics;
- skills necessary to conduct independent social research and experience in their use;
- an ability to apply and develop modern social theory with respect to empirical topics;
- a deeper understanding of their chosen specialist area, including command of the literature and current research;
- the ability to situate their own research within current developments in the field.

Format

The course offers teaching on Social Theory, Substantive modules and Research Methods. Students work towards a written dissertation supported by supervisions and a dissertation workshop.

Students receive written feedback on each essay and the dissertation. Feedback is also given during the dissertation workshop on the direction and progress of the dissertation research.

Assessment

Students write a dissertation of not less than 15,000 and not more than 20,000 words on a subject approved by the Degree Committee.

Students write one methods essay of not less than 2,500 and not more than 3,000 words (or prescribed course work) and two substantive essays of not less than 4,000 and not more than 5,000 words.

Continuing

Students are encouraged to proceed to the Faculty's PhD programme, provided they reach a high level of achievement in all parts of the course. MPhil students who would like to continue to the PhD would normally need to have a final mark of at least 70% overall and 70% on the dissertation.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Department of Sociology holds ESRC funding awards. Sociology is a recognised Doctoral Training Centre pathway toward a PhD. Therefore candidates for the MPhil in Sociology (Political and Economic Sociology) can apply for 1+3 ESRC funding.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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