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Full Time Masters Degrees in Physics, Cambridge, United Kingdom

We have 11 Full Time Masters Degrees in Physics, Cambridge, United Kingdom

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University of Cambridge Faculty of Physics & Chemistry
Distance from Cambridge: 0 miles
The MASt in Physics is a taught masters level course in which candidates coming from outside Cambridge work alongside students taking the final year of the integrated Undergraduate + Masters course in Physics. Read more
The MASt in Physics is a taught masters level course in which candidates coming from outside Cambridge work alongside students taking the final year of the integrated Undergraduate + Masters course in Physics. It is designed to act as a top-up course for students who already hold a 3-year undergraduate degree in physics (or an equivalent subject with similar physics content) and who are likely to wish to subsequently pursue research in physics, either within the department or elsewhere.

The course aims to bring students close to the boundaries of current research, and is thus somewhat linked to the expertise from within the specific research groups in the Department of Physics. Candidates make a series of choices as the year proceeds which allow them to select a bias towards particular broad areas of physics such as condensed matter physics, particle physics, astrophysics, biophysics, or semiconductor physics. The emphasis can range over the spectrum from strongly experimental to highly theoretical physics, and a range of specialist options may be chosen.

All students also undertake a substantial research project, which is expected to take up one third of their time for the year. Details of the current Part III physics course can be found at http://www.phy.cam.ac.uk/students/teaching/current-courses/III_overview . Please note that the courses available to students do change from year to year (especially the Minor Topic courses taken in the Lent Term) and so this year's course listing should only be used as a guide to what courses might be available in future.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/pcphasphy

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the programme, students will have:

- reinforced their broad understanding of physics across the core areas studied in the Cambridge bachelors physics programme.
- developed their knowledge in specialised areas of physics bringing them close to the boundaries of current research.
- developed an understanding of the techniques and literature associated with the project area they have focussed on.
- demonstrated the application of knowledge in a research context and become familiar with the methods of research and enquiry used the further that knowledge.
- shown abilities in the critical evaluation of knowledge.
- demonstrated some level of self-direction and originality in tackling and solving research problems, and acted autonomously in the planning and execution of research.

Format

The course begins with taught courses offered in seven core areas: these "Major Topics" are lectured in the Michaelmas Term and cover substantial areas of physics. Students may choose to attend three or more of these for examination in the Lent term. In the Lent term, students take three or more shorter more specialised "Minor Topic" courses (from about twelve) for examination in the Easter Term. Substitutes for Major and Minor Topic courses are available from a small subset of courses taught by or shared with other departments. Throughout the year students also work on a research project that contributes to roughly a third of their mark and at the end of the year sit a three hour unseen paper on General Physics.

Depending on the lecturer for each course, students may be expected to submit work (i.e. problem sets) in advance of the small group sessions for scrutiny and/or present their work to those attending the sessions.

Assessment

The research project will be assessed on the basis of scrutiny of the student's project laboratory notebook and project report (typically 20-30 pages) and a short (approx 30 minute) oral examination with the project supervisor and another member of staff.

It is not usual for submitted work to be returned with detailed annotations. Rather, feedback will be predominantly oral, but lecturers are expected to submit a short written supervision report at the end of each term for each of their students.

Feedback on the research project will be be primarily oral, during the student/supervisor sessions, though a short written supervision report at the end of the Lent term will be provided by each supervisor

Candidates will normally take:

- A two hour unseen examination on three or more of the Major Topic courses. These will be taken at the start of the Lent Term.
- A one and a half hour unseen examination on three or more of the Minor Topic courses. These will normally be taken at the start of the Easter term.
- One three hour unseen General Physics Paper, taken towards the end of the Easter term.
- A number of additional unseen examination papers, if the candidate has chosen to take any of the interdisciplinary courses, Part III Mathematics courses, or other shared courses in lieu of any of the Major or Minor Topic papers.

Candidates who have chosen to substitute a Minor Topic paper with an additional External Project, will be assessed on that work via scrutiny of the student's project report (typically 20-30 pages) and a short (approx 30 minute) oral examination with two members of staff.

Candidates who have taken the Entrepreneurship course, in lieu of a Minor Topic, will be assessed on the basis of the course assignments set by the course co-ordinator.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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University of Cambridge Faculty of Physics & Chemistry
Distance from Cambridge: 0 miles
The M.Phil is offered by the Department of Physics as a full-time period of research and introduces students to research skills and specialist knowledge. Read more
The M.Phil is offered by the Department of Physics as a full-time period of research and introduces students to research skills and specialist knowledge. Its main aims are:

- to give students with relevant experience at first-degree level the opportunity to carry out focussed research in the discipline under close supervision; and
- to give students the opportunity to acquire or develop skills and expertise relevant to their research interests.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/pcphmpphy

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the programme, students will have:

- a comprehensive understanding of techniques, and a thorough knowledge of the literature, applicable to their own research;
- demonstrated originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- shown abilities in the critical evaluation of current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrated some self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and acted autonomously in the planning and implementation of research;
- produced a dissertation for examination.

Format

The MPhil in Physics is 12-month full-time and involves minimal formal teaching. Students are expected to attend the Department’s programme of research seminars and other graduate courses but most research training is provided within the group structure and overseen by their research supervisor. Informal opportunities to develop research skills also exist through mentoring and other opportunities by fellow students and members of staff.

A Principal Supervisor is appointed individually for each student. He or she will arrange supervisions as necessary with the student.
The University of Cambridge publishes an annual Code of Practice which sets out the University’s expectations regarding supervision:
http://www.cambridgestudents.cam.ac.uk/new-students/manage-your-student-information/graduate-students/code

Students will be advised by their supervisor which of these to attend based on their relevance to the chosen research project and also to best facilitate integration into the host research group.

Students will be advised by their supervisor which of these to attend based on their relevance to the chosen research project and also to best facilitate integration into the host research group.

Students will be advised by their supervisor which of these to attend based on their relevance to the chosen research project and also to best facilitate integration into the host research group.

Supervisors report termly on the progress of their students and these reports are available to the student. Graduate students are represented on the Department's Graduate Consultative Committee.

Assessment

The scheme of examination for the MPhil in Physics shall consist of a thesis, of not more than 15,000 words in length, exclusive of tables, footnotes, bibliography, and appendices, on a subject approved by the Degree Committee for the Faculty of Physics and Chemistry. The examination shall include an oral examination on the thesis and on the general field of knowledge within which it falls. The thesis shall provide evidence to satisfy the Examiners that a candidate can design and carry out investigations, assess and interpret the results obtained, and place the work in the wider perspectives of the subject.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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University of Cambridge Faculty of Physics & Chemistry
Distance from Cambridge: 0 miles
The IoA offers an exciting opportunity for suitably qualified students who have completed a Bachelors degree (or equivalent) in astronomy/physics/mathematics to study for a one year Masters level qualification in astro- physics working alongside 4th-year (Part III) students taking the final year of the integrated Masters undergraduate MSci Astrophysics Tripos. Read more
The IoA offers an exciting opportunity for suitably qualified students who have completed a Bachelors degree (or equivalent) in astronomy/physics/mathematics to study for a one year Masters level qualification in astro- physics working alongside 4th-year (Part III) students taking the final year of the integrated Masters undergraduate MSci Astrophysics Tripos.

The course consists of an extended project (either observational or theoretical, worth about a third of the total credit) and a choice of a range of high level specialist courses, most of which are examined in June. The course aims to provide an intellectually stimulating environment in which students have the opportunity to develop their skills and enthusiasms to the best of their potential. Owing to the demanding level of the course and the competition for a limited number of places, applicants should have achieved (or expect to achieve) a very good performance in their undergraduate degree. Although some bursary funding may be available, applicants should expect to arrange their own funding.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/pcasasast

Learning Outcomes

Students completing the year should have:

1. had experience of a number of areas of astrophysics from a choice of options taken to an advanced level, at which current research can be appreciated in some depth;

2. carried out a substantial research project amounting to about 1/3 of the work in the course;

3. enhanced their communications skills;

4. become well prepared for a career in academic research or one where independent research skills are required.

Format

Students experience a number of areas of astrophysics from a choice of options taken to an advanced level, at which current research can be appreciated in some depth. Two thirds of the student's assessment is via examinations and one-third is via the research project.

For the lecture courses there are large-group example classes organised by the course lecturers. The projects are specific to each student. i.e. every student is doing something different from the other students. Project supervisors meet their students individually. Supervisions for the project are one-on-one with at least 8 hours contact time.

Students can attend any of the numerous seminars given in the IoA, DAMTP and Physics. However these are not formally part of the course work.

Assessment

- Supervised research project with thesis of not more than 8000 words.

- Candidates normally offer papers for 12 units or 4 lecture courses of 24 lectures each.

- Examined oral presentation for the project.

- One journal club per week

- A literature review is a component of every project.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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University of Cambridge Faculty of Physics & Chemistry
Distance from Cambridge: 0 miles
The Institute of Astronomy does not routinely offer the one-year MPhil degree. However, occasionally, it is possible for students with certain one-year scholarships, notably Churchill and Marshall Scholars, to pursue a one-year MPhil in Astronomy. Read more
The Institute of Astronomy does not routinely offer the one-year MPhil degree. However, occasionally, it is possible for students with certain one-year scholarships, notably Churchill and Marshall Scholars, to pursue a one-year MPhil in Astronomy. The degree is exclusively by research and a project and supervisor will have been identified during the application process. There is no taught element and this course is not suitable for physicists and mathematicians wishing to prepare for a research PhD in Astronomy.

The aims of the programme are:

- to give students with relevant experience at first-degree level the opportunity to carry out focussed research in the discipline under close supervision; and
- to give students the opportunity to acquire or develop skills and expertise relevant to their research interests.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/pcasmpmay

Course detail

By the end of the programme, students will have:

- a comprehensive understanding of techniques, and a thorough knowledge of the literature, applicable to their own research;
- demonstrated originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are - used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- shown abilities in the critical evaluation of current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrated some self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and acted autonomously in the planning and implementation of research.

Format

This course is entirely research with no taught elements however a Principal Supervisor is appointed for each student individually and the topic of research is approved by the Degree Committee with a view to producing a thesis after 11 months of research; a pattern of individual supervision, and other training as needed, is agreed with the student.

Assessment

The scheme of examination for the one-year course of study in Astronomy for the degree of Master of Philosophy shall consist of a thesis of not more than 15,000 words in length, exclusive of tables, footnotes, bibliography, and appendices, on a subject approved by the Degree Committee for the Faculty of Physics and Chemistry.

The examination shall include an oral examination on the thesis and on the general field of knowledge within which it falls. The thesis shall provide evidence to satisfy the Examiners that the candidate can design and carry out investigations, assess and interpret the results obtained, and place the work in the wider perspective of the subject.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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University of Cambridge Faculty of Physics & Chemistry
Distance from Cambridge: 0 miles
This full time course is designed to provide further training in research in Materials Science after a minimum of at least 3 years’ university-level education to UK Bachelor’s level, or overseas equivalent. Read more

Overview

This full time course is designed to provide further training in research in Materials Science after a minimum of at least 3 years’ university-level education to UK Bachelor’s level, or overseas equivalent. Students admitted to this course may apply to continue to PhD level research (which takes a minimum of a further 3 years) in Materials Science.

MPhil students are encouraged to participate in many of the training opportunities and other activities available to students in the University, and become fully integrated members of the Department’s Research School.

Students carry out a one-year research programme under the supervision of a member of the academic staff of the Department of Materials Science.

The main aims of the programme are:
- to give students with relevant experience at first-degree level the opportunity to carry out focussed research in the discipline under close supervision; and
- to give students the opportunity to acquire or develop skills and expertise relevant to their research interests.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/pcmmmpmsm

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the programme, students will have:
- a comprehensive understanding of techniques, and a thorough knowledge of the literature, applicable to their own research;
- demonstrated originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- shown abilities in the critical evaluation of current research, research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrated some self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and acted autonomously in the planning and implementation of research.

Continuing

Students wishing to continue to PhD level research (which takes a minimum of a further 3 years) may apply during the masters year. A conditional offer may be made, contingent on successful completion of the MPhil. Students will be expected to have demonstrated the potential to carry out a further programme of research during their MPhil programme.

Teaching

This course is exclusively by research. Applicants should identify potential supervisors, and provide a short project description, in section A(12) of the GradSAF, so that their papers can be considered by appropriate members of academic staff working in their field(s) of scientific interest.

- Feedback
Students can expect a formal discussion with their supervisor, and a written report (via the University's on-line system) on their progress, at least once a term. Written feedback will be provided on drafts of the dissertation.

Assessment

- Thesis
Assessment is based entirely on a viva voce examination of a 15,000 word dissertation which must be submitted by 31 August (students starting in October of each academic year) on a topic approved by the Degree Committee for the Faculty of Physics and Chemistry. The dissertation is examined in an oral examination by one external and one internal examiner appointed individually for each candidate.

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

Find out how to apply here http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/pcmmmpmsm/apply

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/pcmmmpmsm

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University of Cambridge Faculty of Physics & Chemistry
Distance from Cambridge: 0 miles
The development of new materials lies at the heart of many of the technological challenges we currently face, for example creating advanced materials for energy generation. Read more

Overview

The development of new materials lies at the heart of many of the technological challenges we currently face, for example creating advanced materials for energy generation. Computational modelling plays an increasingly important role in the understanding, development and optimisation of new materials. This four year Doctoral Training Programme on computational methods for material modelling aims to train scientists not only in the use of existing modelling methods but also in the underlying computational and mathematical techniques. This will allow students to develop and enhance existing methods, for instance by introducing new capabilities and functionalities, and also to create innovative new software tools for materials modelling in industrial and academic research. The first year of the CDT is a materials modelling option within the MPhil in Scientific Computing (please see the relevant entry) at the University of Cambridge and a range of additional training elements.

The MPhil in Scientific Computing is administered by the Department of Physics, but it serves the training needs of the Schools of Physical Sciences, Technology and Biological Sciences. The ability to have a single Master’s course for such a broad range of disciplines and applications is achieved by offering core (i.e. common for all students) numerical and High Performance Computing (HPC) lecture courses, and complementing them with elective courses relevant to the specific discipline applications.

In this way, it is possible to generate a bespoke training portfolio for each student without losing the benefits of a cohort training approach. This bespoke course is fully flexible in allowing each student to liaise with their academic or industrial supervisor to choose a study area of mutual interest.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/pcphpdcms

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, students will have:
- a comprehensive understanding of numerical methods, and a thorough knowledge of the literature, applicable to their own research;
- demonstrated originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- shown abilities in the critical evaluation of current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrated self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and acted autonomously in the planning and implementation of research.

Teaching

The first year of the CDT has a research as well as a taught element. The students attend lecture courses during the first five months (October-February) and then they will undertake a substantial Research Project over the next 6 months (from March to the end of August) in a participating Department. The research element aims to provide essential skills for a successful completion of the PhD, as well as to assess and enhance the research capacity of the students. It is based on a materials science topic which is studied by means of scientific computation. Research project topics will be provided by academic supervisors or by the industrial partners. Most of the projects are expected to make use the University’s High Performance Computing Service (for which CPU time for training and research has been budgeted for every student).

The taught element comprises core lecture courses on topics of all aspects of scientific computing, and elective lecture courses relevant to the topic of the research project. There is equal examination credit weighting between the taught and the research elements of the course, which is gained by submitting a dissertation on the project and by written assignments and examinations on the core and elective courses, respectively. Weighting of the assessed course components is as follows: Dissertation (research) 50%; written assignments 25%; written examinations 25%.

The core courses are on topics of high-performance scientific computing and advanced numerical methods and techniques; they are taught and examined during the first five months (October-February). Their purpose is to provide the students with essential background knowledge for completing their theses and for their general education in scientific computing.

Appropriate elective courses are selected from Master’s-level courses offered by the Departments of the School of Physical Sciences, Technology or Biological Sciences. The choice of courses will be such as to provide the students with essential background knowledge for completing their theses and for their general education in the materials science application of the project. They are decided in consultation with the project supervisor.

Depending on the materials science application of the research topic, students will follow one of the following two numerical methodology options: a) Continuum methods based on systems of partial differential equations (PDEs, e.g. finite-difference, element or volume methods); or b) atomistic approaches, which can be based on classical particle-based modelling (e.g. molecular dynamics) or on electronic structure- based methods (e.g. density functional theory). The students who take the atomistic modelling options will attend a 12-lecture course before continuing to classical particle-based methods or electronic structure methods. Irrespective of the numerical methodology option, students will attend lecture courses on High Performance Computing topics and elements of Numerical Analysis.

In addition to the comprehensive set of Masters-level courses provided by the MPhil and across the University in the field, which will be available to the CDT students, it will also be possible for students to take supplementary courses (not for examination) at undergraduate level, where a specific need is identified, in order to ensure that any prerequisite knowledge for the Masters courses is in place.

Moreover, depending on their background and circumstances, students may be offered places in the EPSRC-funded Autumn Academy, which takes place just before the start of the academic year (two weeks in September).

Funding Opportunities

Studentships funded by EPSRC and/or Industrial and other partners are available subject to eligibility criteria.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

Find out how to apply here http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/pcphpdcms/apply

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/pcphpdcms

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University of Cambridge Faculty of Mathematics
Distance from Cambridge: 0 miles
This course, commonly referred to as Part III, is a one-year taught Master's course in mathematics. Read more
This course, commonly referred to as Part III, is a one-year taught Master's course in mathematics. It is an excellent preparation for mathematical research and it is also a valuable course in mathematics and in its applications for those who want further training before taking posts in industry, teaching, or research establishments.

Students admitted from outside Cambridge to Part III study towards the Master of Advanced Study (MASt). Students continuing from the Cambridge Tripos for a fourth year, study towards the Master of Mathematics (MMath). The requirements and course structure for Part III are the same for all students irrespective of whether they are studying for the MASt or MMath degree.

There are over 200 Part III (MASt and MMath) students each year; almost all are in their fourth or fifth year of university studies. There are normally about 80 courses, covering an extensive range of pure mathematics, probability, statistics and the mathematics of operational research, applied mathematics and theoretical physics. They are designed to cover those advanced parts of the subjects that are not normally covered in a first degree course, but which are an indispensable preliminary to independent study and research. Students have a wide choice of the combination of courses that they offer, though naturally they tend to select groups of cognate courses. Normally classes are provided as back-up to lecture courses.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/maamasapm

Course detail

The structure of Part III is such that students prepare between six and nine lecture courses for examination. These lecture courses may be selected from the wide range offered by both Mathematics Departments. As an alternative to one lecture course, an essay may be submitted. Examinations usually begin in late May, and are scheduled in morning and afternoon sessions, over a period of about two weeks. Two or three hours are allocated per paper, depending on the subject. Details of the courses for the current academic year are available on the Faculty of Mathematics website. Details for subsequent years are expected to be broadly similar, although not identical.

Most courses in the Part III are self-contained. Students may freely mix courses offered by the two Mathematics Departments. Courses are worth either two or three credit units depending on whether they last for 16 or 24 lectures respectively. Candidates for Part III may offer a maximum of 19 credit units for examination. In the past it has been recommended that candidates offer between 17 and 19 units. An essay (should a candidate choose to submit one) counts for 3 credit units. Part III is graded Distinction, Merit, Pass or Fail. A Merit or above is the equivalent of a First Class in other Parts of the Mathematical Tripos.

Learning Outcomes

After completing Part III, students will be expected to have:

- Studied advanced material in the mathematical sciences to a level not normally covered in a first degree;
- Further developed the capacity for independent study of mathematics and problem solving at a higher level;
- Undertaken (in most cases) an extended essay normally chosen from a list covering a wide range of topics.

Format

Courses are delivered predominantly by either 16 or 24 hours of formal lectures, supported by additional examples classes. As an alternative to one lecture course, an essay may be submitted. There is also the possibility of taking a reading course for examination. There are normally additional non-examinable courses taught each year.

Twice a year students have an individual meeting with a member of academic staff to discuss their progress in Part III. Students offering an essay as part of their degree may meet their essay supervisor up to three times during the academic year.

Assessment

Candidates may substitute an essay for one lecture course. The essay counts for 3 credit units.

Lecture courses are assessed by formal examination. Courses are worth either two or three credit units depending on whether they are 16 or 24 hours in length respectively. A 16 hour course is assessed by a 2 hour examination and a 24 hour course, a 3 hour examination. Candidates for Part III may offer a maximum of 19 credit units for examination. In the past it has been recommended that candidates offer between 17 and 19 units.

Continuing

MASt students wishing to apply for the PhD must apply via the Graduate Admissions Office for readmission by the relevant deadline. Applicants will be considered on a case by case basis and offer of a place will usually include an academic condition on their Part III result.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

Read less
University of Cambridge Faculty of Mathematics
Distance from Cambridge: 0 miles
This course, commonly referred to as Part III, is a one-year taught Master's course in mathematics. Read more
This course, commonly referred to as Part III, is a one-year taught Master's course in mathematics. It is an excellent preparation for mathematical research and it is also a valuable course in mathematics and in its applications for those who want further training before taking posts in industry, teaching, or research establishments.

Students admitted from outside Cambridge to Part III study towards the Master of Advanced Study (MASt). Students continuing from the Cambridge Tripos for a fourth year, study towards the Master of Mathematics (MMath). The requirements and course structure for Part III are the same for all students irrespective of whether they are studying for the MASt or MMath degree.

There are over 200 Part III (MASt and MMath) students each year; almost all are in their fourth or fifth year of university studies. There are normally about 80 courses, covering an extensive range of pure mathematics, probability, statistics and the mathematics of operational research, applied mathematics and theoretical physics. They are designed to cover those advanced parts of the subjects that are not normally covered in a first degree course, but which are an indispensable preliminary to independent study and research. Students have a wide choice of the combination of courses that they offer, though naturally they tend to select groups of cognate courses. Normally classes are provided as back-up to lecture courses.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/mapmasmst

Course detail

The structure of Part III is such that students prepare between six and nine lecture courses for examination. These lecture courses may be selected from the wide range offered by both Mathematics Departments. As an alternative to one lecture course, an essay may be submitted. Examinations usually begin in late May, and are scheduled in morning and afternoon sessions, over a period of about two weeks. Two or three hours are allocated per paper, depending on the subject. Details of the courses for the current academic year are available on the Faculty of Mathematics website. Details for subsequent years are expected to be broadly similar, although not identical.

Most courses in the Part III are self-contained. Students may freely mix courses offered by the two Mathematics Departments. Courses are worth either two or three credit units depending on whether they last for 16 or 24 lectures respectively. Candidates for Part III may offer a maximum of 19 credit units for examination. In the past it has been recommended that candidates offer between 17 and 19 units. An essay (should a candidate choose to submit one) counts for 3 credit units. Part III is graded Distinction, Merit, Pass or Fail. A Merit or above is the equivalent of a First Class in other Parts of the Mathematical Tripos.

Learning Outcomes

After completing Part III, students will be expected to have:

- Studied advanced material in the mathematical sciences to a level not normally covered in a first degree;
- Further developed the capacity for independent study of mathematics and problem solving at a higher level;
- Undertaken (in most cases) an extended essay normally chosen from a list covering a wide range of topics.

Students are also expected to have acquired general transferable skills relevant to mathematics as outlined in the Faculty
Transferable Skills Statement http://www.maths.cam.ac.uk/undergrad/course/transferable_skills.pdf .

Format

Courses are delivered predominantly by either 16 or 24 hours of formal lectures, supported by additional examples classes. As an alternative to one lecture course, an essay may be submitted. There is also the possibiltiy of taking a reading course for examination. There are normally additional non-examinable courses taught each year.

Twice a year students have an individual meeting with a member of academic staff to discuss their progress in Part III. Students offering an essay as part of their degree may meet their essay supervisor up to three times during the academic year.

Assessment

Candidates may substitute an essay for one lecture course. The essay counts for 3 credit units.

Lecture courses are assessed by formal examination. Courses are worth either two or three credit units depending on whether they are 16 or 24 hours in length respectively. A 16 hour course is assessed by a 2 hour examination and a 24 hour course, a 3 hour examination. Candidates for Part III may offer a maximum of 19 credit units for examination. In the past it has been recommended that candidates offer between 17 and 19 units.

Continuing

MASt students wishing to apply for the PhD must apply via the Graduate Admissions Office for readmission by the relevant deadline. Applicants will be considered on a case by case basis and offer of a place will usually include an academic condition on their Part III result.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

Read less
University of Cambridge Faculty of Mathematics
Distance from Cambridge: 0 miles
This course, commonly referred to as Part III, is a one-year taught Master's course in mathematics. Read more
This course, commonly referred to as Part III, is a one-year taught Master's course in mathematics. It is an excellent preparation for mathematical research and it is also a valuable course in mathematics and in its applications for those who want further training before taking posts in industry, teaching, or research establishments.

Students admitted from outside Cambridge to Part III study towards the Master of Advanced Study (MASt). Students continuing from the Cambridge Tripos for a fourth year, study towards the Master of Mathematics (MMath). The requirements and course structure for Part III are the same for all students irrespective of whether they are studying for the MASt or MMath degree.

There are over 200 Part III (MASt and MMath) students each year; almost all are in their fourth or fifth year of university studies. There are normally about 80 courses, covering an extensive range of pure mathematics, probability, statistics and the mathematics of operational research, applied mathematics and theoretical physics. They are designed to cover those advanced parts of the subjects that are not normally covered in a first degree course, but which are an indispensable preliminary to independent study and research. Students have a wide choice of the combination of courses that they offer, though naturally they tend to select groups of cognate courses. Normally classes are provided as back-up to lecture courses.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/mapmaspmm

Course detail

The structure of Part III is such that students prepare between six and nine lecture courses for examination. These lecture courses may be selected from the wide range offered by both Mathematics Departments. As an alternative to one lecture course, an essay may be submitted. Examinations usually begin in late May, and are scheduled in morning and afternoon sessions, over a period of about two weeks. Two or three hours are allocated per paper, depending on the subject. Details of the courses for the current academic year are available on the Faculty of Mathematics website. Details for subsequent years are expected to be broadly similar, although not identical.

Most courses in the Part III are self-contained. Students may freely mix courses offered by the two Mathematics Departments. Courses are worth either two or three credit units depending on whether they last for 16 or 24 lectures respectively. Candidates for Part III may offer a maximum of 19 credit units for examination. In the past it has been recommended that candidates offer between 17 and 19 units. An essay (should a candidate choose to submit one) counts for 3 credit units. Part III is graded Distinction, Merit, Pass or Fail. A Merit or above is the equivalent of a First Class in other Parts of the Mathematical Tripos.

Learning Outcomes

After completing Part III, students will be expected to have:

- Studied advanced material in the mathematical sciences to a level not normally covered in a first degree;
- Further developed the capacity for independent study of mathematics and problem solving at a higher level;
- Undertaken (in most cases) an extended essay normally chosen from a list covering a wide range of topics.

Students are also expected to have acquired general transferable skills relevant to mathematics as outlined in the Faculty Transferable Skills Statement http://www.maths.cam.ac.uk/undergrad/course/transferable_skills.pdf .

Format

Courses are delivered predominantly by either 16 or 24 hours of formal lectures, supported by additional examples classes. As an alternative to one lecture course, an essay may be submitted. There is also the possibility of taking a reading course for examination. There are normally additional non-examinable courses taught each year.

Essay supervision and support for lectures by means of examples classes is approximately 30 hours per year.

Formal examinable lectures and non-examinable lectures total approximately 184 hours per year, of which on average 112 hours are for examinable courses.

Some statistics courses may involve practical data analysis sessions.

There is an opportunity to participate in the Part III seminar series, either by giving a talk or through attendance. This is encouraged but does not contribute to the formal assessment.

Twice a year students have an individual meeting with a member of academic staff to discuss their progress in Part III. Students offering an essay as part of their degree may meet their essay supervisor up to three times during the academic year.

Assessment

Candidates may substitute an essay for one lecture course. The essay counts for 3 credit units.

Lecture courses are assessed by formal examination. Courses are worth either two or three credit units depending on whether they are 16 or 24 hours in length respectively. A 16 hour course is assessed by a 2 hour examination and a 24 hour course, a 3 hour examination. Candidates for Part III may offer a maximum of 19 credit units for examination. In the past it has been recommended that candidates offer between 17 and 19 units.

Continuing

MASt students wishing to apply for the PhD must apply via the Graduate Admissions Office for readmission by the relevant deadline. Applicants will be considered on a case by case basis and offer of a place will usually include an academic condition on their Part III result.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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University of Cambridge Faculty of Physics & Chemistry
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The Master’s Programme in Micro- & Nanotechnology Enterprise is an exciting opportunity in which world-leading scientists and successful entrepreneurs are… Read more
The Master’s Programme in Micro- & Nanotechnology Enterprise is an exciting opportunity in which world-leading scientists and successful entrepreneurs are brought together to deliver a one-year Master’s degree combining an in-depth multidisciplinary scientific programme with a global perspective on the commercial opportunities and business practice necessary for the successful exploitation in the rapidly developing fields of nanotechnology and micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS).

The programme is intended for those with a good first degree in the physical sciences and engineering who wish to develop research skills and a commercial awareness in micro- and nanotechnology. It combines cutting-edge science with business practice skills, giving students knowledge and experience of a range of disciplines. This should enable students graduating from the course to evaluate the scientific importance and technological potential of new developments in the field of the field of Micro and Nanotechnology and provides an unparalleled educational experience for entrepreneurs in these fields.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/pcmmmpmne

Course detail

Students will:

- be able to develop a discipline-specific terminology to describe and discuss relevant aspects of Micro and Nanotechnology, as well as Business;
- be able to develop their scientific writing skills through lab reports, literature survey, project dissertation, and scientific communication skills through oral presentations;
- be able to develop independence and critical thinking, as well as project management skills;
- have the opportunity develop team project skills.

Format

The programme is modular in structure and lasts ten months. It is envisaged that students attend all modules, which consist of no more than 16 hours of lectures per module with additional discussion groups and personal study time. The students will be examined on all core modules and may select which elective modules they are examined on. The modules are taught in the first two terms and will be followed by formal examinations. The modules are drawn from Science and Technology, Business Management and Innovation strands and so cover the many complexities involved in the processes of discovery and exploitation.

Written or oral feedback is provided after completion of assessed course work. In addition students must sit a mock exam at the beginning of the Lent Term; detailed individual feedback is provided by the Course Directors, who are also available for consultation throughout the academic year.

Assessment

A dissertation of not more than 15,000 words in length (including tables, figure legends and appendices, but excluding bibliography) on a major project, involving (i) in-depth scientific research (following a literature survey in the same scientific field), or (ii) an in-depth case study concerned with a topic in science, business, ethics, law or policy (related to the topic covered during the literature survey). The assessment will include a viva voce examination.

No more than eight essays, each of not more than 3,000 words in length, covering the fields of science, ethics, law, and policy, and the interface of micro- and nanoscience and business.

A literature survey report of not more than 5000 words in length on a scientific topic, to be followed by either a major research project in the same field, or a business, ethics, law, or policy-related case study, concerning the scientific topic.

Course work, which may include written work, group work, and class participation.

Two unseen written examination papers, which may cover all core and elective scientific subjects prescribed in the syllabus.

Five practical assessments.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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University of Cambridge Faculty of Physics & Chemistry
Distance from Cambridge: 0 miles
The MASt in Materials Science aims to train to Masters level students who already have a bachelors' degree in Materials Science. It is a predominantly taught course in which candidates work alongside the 4th-year students taking the integrated Cambridge BA/MSci Materials Science course. Read more

Overview

The MASt in Materials Science aims to train to Masters level students who already have a bachelors' degree in Materials Science. It is a predominantly taught course in which candidates work alongside the 4th-year students taking the integrated Cambridge BA/MSci Materials Science course. It is designed for students who may wish to pursue a professional career in Materials Science / Materials Engineering or related areas (in academic or industrial research) and who are already familiar with the subject.

The course allows students to continue a broad Materials Science education across a range of topics : the taught element consists of a series of approximately 16 modular lecture courses, covering a broad range of aspects of Materials Science, including Structural Materials, Device Materials, Materials Characterisation, Materials Chemistry and Biological & Pharmaceutical Materials. A research project is undertaken over 6 months, between October and March.

Specific aims are:
1. to build on the knowledge and ideas gained in prior Materials Science courses;
2. to develop a more specialised and in-depth understanding of Materials Science in selected areas;
3. to further develop analytical and presentational skills, both orally and in writing;
4. to provide training in investigating research problems, including gaining an understanding of relevant research techniques and also of the design and interpretation of experiments.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/pcmmasmsc

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course students should:
1. be able to apply the ideas and concepts introduced in the course to solve problems, do calculations, make predictions and critically evaluate information and ideas;
2. be able to demonstrate an understanding of the courses attended, and of their individual research projects;
3. be able to demonstrate practical, organisational and presentational skills that will enable them to continue successfully with research or in other professional careers;
4. be able to demonstrate the necessary skills and understanding required for a career in Materials Science.

Continuing

Students wishing to continue to PhD studies will usually be required to obtain at least a 'Commendable' result in the MASt.

Teaching

There are approximately 16 lecture modules focusing on advanced topics across a broad range of aspects of Materials Science, including Structural Materials, Device Materials, Materials Characterisation, Materials Chemistry and Biological & Pharmaceutical Materials. Details of the modules available this year can be found at: http://www.msm.cam.ac.uk/teaching/partIII.php.

Students may choose which lecture modules they wish to attend, and must prepare a minimum of 10 courses for examination.

Students also undertake a substantial individual research project, chosen from a set of topics proposed by academic staff. Work on this project accounts for about a third of the final credit.

- Feedback
The MASt is treated as an undergraduate course for the purposes of supervisions, such that on average students should expect to have at least one supervision per week during term, with written and verbal feedback on their work within 24 hours.

Online written reports are provided at the end of each term.

Students should expect to meet daily to weekly with their project demonstrator and weekly to termly with their project supervisor.

Students receive written feedback on all aspects of work submitted for summative assessment (reports, oral presentations, poster), within two weeks of the work being submitted.

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

Find out how to apply here http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/pcmmasmsc/apply

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/pcmmasmsc

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