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Full Time Masters Degrees in Law, Cambridge, United Kingdom

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Prepare for an international legal career with this LLM from Anglia Law School. Further your knowledge of the latest issues and case studies in international business law, supported by staff who are active researchers and qualified practitioners, alongside students from around the world. Read more
Prepare for an international legal career with this LLM from Anglia Law School. Further your knowledge of the latest issues and case studies in international business law, supported by staff who are active researchers and qualified practitioners, alongside students from around the world.

Overview

Our LLM course will give you an understanding of law in an international context. Through a combination of theory and practical application, you’ll explore issues of law and legal theory at an advanced level.

As well as investigating areas like trade law and dispute resolution, you’ll also have the chance to specialise in your own particular areas of interest, such as international governance or competition law.

Throughout the course you’ll develop research skills vital both to your assignments and your future career. Our teaching team consists of professionally qualified legal practitioners as well as research-active academics; in 2014, the Government acknowledged our ‘world-leading’ law research*. You can be confident you’ll receive up-to-date career advice as well as the latest legal theory and case studies.

You’ll also learn alongside students from all over the world, giving you first-hand experience of working in a global context.

Our facilities include modern teaching rooms and a mock courtroom. You’ll have access to all our campus libraries and digital resources, including our Virtual Learning Environment which has a range of online resources to complement your studies.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/international-business-law

Careers

This course will give you the legal skills and knowledge you’ll need to work in international law firms, legal departments of international corporations, government departments and international agencies.

Or you might decide to carry on in academia and take a research degree like our PhD Law.

Modules

Core modules:
Business Law in the Global Context
International Trade Law
International Law Research
Dispute Resolution
Major Research Project in International and European Business Law

Optional modules:
Competition Law in the International Context
International Governance
Comparative Company Law
Current Legal Issues in the International Business Arena

Assessment

You’ll show your progress through a combination of written essays, problem-solving assignments and presentations.

All students take our core modules, but please note that the availability of optional modules is subject to demand.

Where you'll study

Whether you aim to work in the creative industries or the social sciences, the legal profession or public service, the Faculty of Arts, Law & Social Sciences will provide you with the skills and knowledge you need for professional life.

Our lively, diverse community and ambitious academic environment will broaden your horizons and help you develop your full potential - many of our courses give you the chance to learn another language, study abroad or undertake work placements as you study.

If you’re interested in art, music, drama or film, check out our packed programme of events. Together with our partners in the creative and cultural industries, we’re always working to enrich the cultural life of the university and the wider community.

Our research is groundbreaking and internationally recognised, with real social impact. We support the Cultures of the Digital Economy Research Institute (CoDE), whose projects include interactive music apps and documenting lifesaving childbirth procedures, as well as nine international research clusters, such as the Centre for Children's Book Studies and the Labour History Research Unit.

In the Research Excellence Framework 2014, six of our subject areas were awarded world-leading status: Law; Art and Design; English Language and Literature, Communication, Cultural and Media Studies; History; Music, Drama, Dance and Performing Arts.

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Prepare for a legal career in international commerce with this LLM from Anglia Law School. Further your knowledge of the latest issues and case studies in commercial law, especially principles of international contracts related to commercial activities. Read more
Prepare for a legal career in international commerce with this LLM from Anglia Law School. Further your knowledge of the latest issues and case studies in commercial law, especially principles of international contracts related to commercial activities. You’ll be supported by research-active staff with backgrounds in professional practice, and work alongside students from around the world.

Overview

Our LLM course offers a combination of theory and practical application that's relevant to the demands of international commercial practice, and in particular the relationship between legal disciplines and commercial undertakings.

It will give you the necessary background and legal expertise to work in international commercial law, or a range of other intellectually demanding roles – or to pursue academic research at the highest level.

You’ll investigate areas like commercial contracts, transnational commercial law and dispute resolution, but will also have the chance to specialise in your own areas of interest, such as international governance or company law.

Throughout the course you’ll develop research skills vital both to your assignments and your future career. Our teaching team consists of professionally qualified legal practitioners as well as research-active academics; in 2014, the Government acknowledged our ‘world-leading’ law research*. You can be confident you’ll receive up-to-date advice career advice as well as the latest legal theory and case studies.

Here in Cambridge, you’ll study alongside students from all over the world, giving you first-hand experience of working in a global context. Our facilities include modern teaching rooms and a mock courtroom.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/international-commercial-law

Careers

This course will give you the legal skills and knowledge you need to work in an international legal practice, as well as related careers. It will allow you to demonstrate a highly developed ability to conduct legal or legally-related academic research – a skill that’s in great demand in the legal profession and others.

Our past students enjoy careers in international law firms, legal departments of international corporations, government departments and international agencies.

Modules

Core modules:
Commercial Contracts
Business Law in the Global Context
International Law Research
Dispute Resolution
Transnational Commercial Law
Major Research Project in International and European Business Law

Optional modules:
International Governance
Comparative Company Law

Assessment

You’ll show your progress through a combination of assessments, such as coursework in which you’ll develop a critical view on a current issue in the area you're studying, and presentations.

All students take our core modules, but please note that the availability of optional modules is subject to demand.

Where you'll study

Whether you aim to work in the creative industries or the social sciences, the legal profession or public service, the Faculty of Arts, Law & Social Sciences will provide you with the skills and knowledge you need for professional life.

Our lively, diverse community and ambitious academic environment will broaden your horizons and help you develop your full potential - many of our courses give you the chance to learn another language, study abroad or undertake work placements as you study.

If you’re interested in art, music, drama or film, check out our packed programme of events. Together with our partners in the creative and cultural industries, we’re always working to enrich the cultural life of the university and the wider community.

Our research is groundbreaking and internationally recognised, with real social impact. We support the Cultures of the Digital Economy Research Institute (CoDE), whose projects include interactive music apps and documenting lifesaving childbirth procedures, as well as nine international research clusters, such as the Centre for Children's Book Studies and the Labour History Research Unit.

In the Research Excellence Framework 2014, six of our subject areas were awarded world-leading status: Law; Art and Design; English Language and Literature, Communication, Cultural and Media Studies; History; Music, Drama, Dance and Performing Arts.

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University of Cambridge Faculty of Law
Distance from Cambridge: 0 miles
The Cambridge LLM (Master of Law) is a nine-month taught programme commencing at the beginning of October each year and ending in June of the following year. Read more
The Cambridge LLM (Master of Law) is a nine-month taught programme commencing at the beginning of October each year and ending in June of the following year. The LLM, as a masters degree, is intended for those who wish to pursue further legal studies after completing their first degree in law, including those who are considering an academic career or intend to practise law. The advanced nature of the LLM is reflected in the fact that the programme is organised and taught separately from the undergraduate law degree at Cambridge. All of the LLM courses are specifically tailored for the LLM programme.

LLM students take four courses of their choice from a list of over 30 options, each most commonly assessed by means of a three-hour written examination at the end of the LLM year although students may elect to write an 18,000 word thesis in lieu of the written examination for one course only subject to prior formal approval of their dissertation topic.

Students may opt to specialise in commercial, European, international or intellectual property law by choosing at least three of their courses from those designated as being in one of these areas of specialism. Alternatively they may select from the entire range of LLM courses and obtain a non-specialised LLM degree.

See the website http://www.llm.law.cam.ac.uk/

Course detail

At the end of this postgraduate programme students can be expected to have greatly enhanced knowledge of their chosen specialist subjects areas, an increased ability to apply sophisticated and rigorous analytical techniques to primary and secondary legal materials, and a better facility in advancing robust evaluations of doctrinal and policy arguments in the fields of their studies and more generally.

Format

The LLM is a nine-month taught programme which begins in October and ends in the following June. Students must take four courses, but have a free choice as to which four they choose from a list of over 30 course offerings. In most courses student numbers do not exceed 35.

One-to-one supervisions are unlikely, except for those students who choose to write a thesis in lieu of examination for one their four courses. These students receive a number of one-to-one sessions with their thesis supervisors.

Teaching typically comprises a minimum of 16 two-hour seminars and lectures for each of their four courses, supplemented by teaching in small groups where course numbers are greater than 20.

There are no formal 'practicals', but all LLM students are expected to undertake substantial amounts of reading arising from seminars and lectures and to produce written work for some sessions.

In addition to the seminars and lectures for each course, provision is also made for discussion in smaller groups where the number taking a course exceed 20.

LLM students are encouraged to contribute to the student law review, the Cambridge Journal of International and Comparative Law. In addition many LLM students are involved in the Faculty's Graduate Law Society.

This style of presentation is reserved for PhD students, but LLM students are welcome to attend.

Placements

Placements are not organised through the Faculty, and are not part of the LLM programme, but many LLM students successfully organise placements for the period immediately following completion of their studies.

Assessment

LLM students have the option of writing a thesis of 18,000 words in lieu of examination for one of their four courses.

Certain LLM subjects may be assessed by an essay of 7,000 words plus a two-hour examination, rather than the more typical three-hour examination or 18,000-word thesis.

LLM students sit a three-hour written examination at the end of the LLM year for each of their four courses, unless they have already submitted a thesis in lieu of examination for one of their courses.

Formative assessment (ie assessment not contributing to final grades) is delivered by way of individual feedback on students' essays or partial thesis drafts (for those electing to write a thesis). Students may submit up to three essays for each course they are taking. Course convenors and lecturers will advise on topics, but the aim is to produce a short piece of writing which provides a concise, rigorous argument or analysis of the issues in question.

Continuing

A number of students wish to remain in Cambridge after completing their masters degree in order to pursue a further research degree. Cambridge offers research degrees of varying length: the Diploma in International Law, the Diploma in Legal Studies, the MLitt degree and the PhD degree.

Students wishing to continue their studies at Cambridge by undertaking a research degree in law should apply for their chosen course through the Graduate Admissions Office by completing a GRADSAF application form and submitting it by the relavant deadline.

The Faculty of Law website contains information about the options available at:
http://www.law.cam.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate-research

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Information about sources of funding is available from the Faculty of Law's LLM website at: http://www.llm.law.cam.ac.uk/scholarship_information.html

and from the University's Graduate Admissions Office website at:
http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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University of Cambridge Faculty of Law
Distance from Cambridge: 0 miles
The Cambridge MCL is a one-year taught masters programme commencing at the beginning of October each year and ending in June of the following year. Read more
The Cambridge MCL is a one-year taught masters programme commencing at the beginning of October each year and ending in June of the following year. It is designed for students wanting to pursue further legal studies after completing their first degree in law, both those intending to practise in the area of corporate law and those considering an academic career. The MCL has been structured so as to combine academic rigour with a diverse and flexible curriculum, enabling each student to tailor their MCL course selection to their own specific requirements.

MCL students take a combination of full-year and one-term modules during the course. All students take the compulsory full-year Deals course, which focuses on the legal and economic structuring of corporate transactions. They also choose one full-year LLM paper from a selection of corporate papers, including Corporate Finance and Corporate Governance. In conjunction with the full-year papers, students take four one- term modules, usually two in the Michaelmas Term and two in the Lent Term. The modules enable students to conduct a more detailed study of certain specialist areas of corporate law, such as shareholder litigation and international merger control.

See the website http://www.mcl.law.cam.ac.uk/

Course detail

MCL students are expected upon arrival to be familiar with corporate law and to be motivated to develop their expertise in this challenging area. Students who take the MCL should leave with a much enriched understanding of the topic. They will learn about areas of corporate law with which they were not previously familiar, will have an opportunity to reflect upon the theoretical and policy implications of the topic and will be challenged to think about the practical aspects of the subject in an academically rigorous manner.

Format

MCL students take the compulsory full-year Deals course and a full-year LLM paper from a selection of corporate papers. In addition they take four one-term MCL-specific modules from a selection of six on offer, usually two in the first term and two in the second term of the course.

Given that MCL enrolment is limited to 25 students, class sizes for the modules and the Deals course are small enough to mean seminar-style teaching occurs in classes formally organised as lectures.

MCL students receive one two-hour formal lecture per week for each of their four termly modules, for the full-year Deals course and for their full-year LLM course.

MCL students receive small group teaching for their full-year LLM paper alongside the LLM students taking the same paper if numbers are sufficiently large.

MCL students are entitled to submit up to three pieces of practice written work for the full-year LLM paper they take. This work might take the form of reflective essays or timed exam-practice essays. Course convenors and lecturers can advise on topics, but the aim is to produce a short piece of writing which provides a concise, rigorous argument or analysis of the issues in question. Students then benefit from specific and individual feedback, and can thereby hone their legal writing skills.

Assessment

- Students write three assignments during the MCL year as the formal assessment for the Deals course.

- A two-hour examination is required for each of their four termly modules, and a three-hour examination for their one full-year LLM course.

- All MCL students give a class presentation as part of a group within the Deals course. This forms part of the assessment for the Deals course, alongside students' individual written assignments.

Continuing

A number of students wish to remain in Cambridge after completing their Masters degree in order to pursue further advanced legal studies, either by undertaking research for the Diploma in International Law, the Diploma in Legal Studies, the MLitt degree or the PhD degree.

Students wishing to continue their studies at Cambridge by undertaking a research degree in law should apply for their chosen course through the Graduate Admissions Office by completing a GRADSAF application form and submitting it by the relevant deadline.

The Faculty of Law website contains information about the options available at:
http://www.law.cam.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate-research

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Faculty of Law, in conjunction with Herbert Smith Freehills, offers an annual MCL African Bursary, which is either awarded to one student to cover their entire tuition fee, or jointly to two students to pay half of the tuition fee for each student.

Information about other, non MCL-specific funding is available from the University's Graduate Admissions Office website at:

http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

General Funding Opportunities: http://www.2016.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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University of Cambridge Faculty of Law
Distance from Cambridge: 0 miles
The Postgraduate Diploma in International Law is a one-year full-time (or two-year part-time) research course and is awarded on the basis of a dissertation not exceeding 30,000 words, inclusive of footnotes but exclusive of appendices and bibliography. Read more
The Postgraduate Diploma in International Law is a one-year full-time (or two-year part-time) research course and is awarded on the basis of a dissertation not exceeding 30,000 words, inclusive of footnotes but exclusive of appendices and bibliography. Students are assigned a supervisor by the Faculty's Degree Committee. The main aims of the course are:

- To give students with relevant experience at first-degree and/or Master's level the opportunity to carry out focussed research on an approved research topic in the field of international law under close supervision;
- To give students the opportunity to acquire or develop skills and expertise relevant to their research interests;
- To enable students to engage in work which is innovative and at the leading edge of legal scholarship.

A dissertation submitted for the Diploma in International Law must afford evidence of serious study and the ability to discuss a difficult problem critically.

An applicant interested in writing a thesis in any other area of law should apply for the Postgraduate Diploma in Legal Studies.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/lwlwdpilw

Course detail

The course is exclusively by independent research. The proposed research topic is considered by the Degree Committee during the application process. While individual arrangements vary, the student should normally receive one-to-one supervision at least once a month.

Format

One to one supervision: While individual arrangements vary, the student may normally expect to receive one-to-one supervision at least once at month.

Lectures: Students are encouraged to attend lectures, especially at LLM level, within the general field of their research.

Journal clubs: The Cambridge Journal of International and Comparative Law (CJICL) is an open access, peer-reviewed academic journal founded and run by the postgraduate community at the Law Faculty.

Assessment

A thesis, not exceeding 30,000 words in length, including footnotes, but excluding appendices and bibliography, shall be referred to two Examiners, appointed by the Degree Committee, who may, at their discretion, examine the student orally on the thesis and on the general field of knowledge within which it falls.

Each Examiner shall submit a separate report to the Degree Committee on the student's thesis, and the Examiners shall submit a joint report on the student's performance in the oral examination, if held. The Degree Committee, after considering the reports of the Examiners, shall resolve whether or not the student is entitled to be awarded the Diploma.

Supervisors are required to submit termly reports to the Student Registry which students can access online via their self-service accounts on CamSIS.

Continuing

Diploma candidates may apply to continue to the MLitt or PhD by completing and submitting a Graduate and Scholarships Application Form (GRADSAF) by the relevant deadline.

Continuation to the MLitt or PhD is subject to (a) a satisfactory outcome in the examination for the Diploma in International Law, (b) a satisfactory recommendation on the clarity and feasibility of the applicant's proposed MLitt/doctoral research following its assessment by the Diploma examiners through an informal discussion with the applicant and (c) the availability of a supervisor.

In appropriate circumstances, a student may be allowed to count not more than three full-time terms or five part-time terms towards the requirements for the MLitt or PhD.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

For detailed information about all possible funding sources (Faculty funding, University funding, and College funding) please refer to the Faculty of Law's website and the Fees and Graduate Funding section of the Student Registry's website.

General Funding Opportunities: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Prepare to practice as a solicitor in England or Wales. completing our course will allow you to move on to take a training contract. Read more
Prepare to practice as a solicitor in England or Wales: completing our course will allow you to move on to take a training contract. We’ll explore a number of areas of legal practice, and keep you up to date with the latest opportunities in the legal profession. Thanks to our flexible teaching, you’ll have time to follow these opportunities up, too.

Overview

On our Legal Practice Course at Anglia Law School, you’ll explore civil litigation and dispute resolution, criminal law, property law and business law. As well as this, our range of optional modules will give you the chance to learn about family law, employment law, child care, commercial dispute resolution and private client work.

You’ll benefit from extra support and training, too. We offer non-assessed training in areas like billing, file management, commercial awareness and negotiation skills, plus a specialist non-assessed course in careers and professional development.

With our links to practitioners, who also help to develop the course, you’ll have access to the latest careers advice and maybe even the opportunity to be interviewed for a training contract. We’ll also keep you up to date on vacancies in the legal job market through our monthly email bulletin.

Our high staff-to-student ratio means we can give you an excellent level of pastoral care, addressing your individual needs and supporting your transition from undergraduate study to the Legal Practice Course, and from the Legal Practice Course to training contracts and employment.

And thanks to our flexible teaching, you’ll be able to fit study around other commitments such as employment or training. Most of our large group sessions are delivered by i-lecture, so you can join remotely from wherever you want.

When you're studying on-campus in Cambridge, you'll benefit from a range of facilities including our mock courtroom, which will allow you to practice advocacy in a realistic setting.

We're the only university in East Anglia to offer the Legal Practice Course. We were also the first university in England and Wales to have our course accredited by Skillsmark.

Teaching times: Tuesdays and Thursdays from 9am-6pm. You'll also attend a five-day induction week at the beginning of the course.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/legal-practice-course

Careers

This course will prepare you for life as a practising solicitor in England or Wales, and allow you to continue on to the two-year training contract that will fully qualify you for professional practice*.

You will most likely choose to complete your two-year training contract with a firm of solicitors in private practice, but might prefer to take one with an alternative employer, such as the UK government (through the Government Legal Service), local government, the Crown Prosecution Service or a law centre. Whatever you decide, you can be sure of receiving specialised careers guidance on our Legal Practice Course.

*unless you have a FILEX qualification and exemption from the SRA.

Modules

Core modules:
Litigation
Property Law and Practice
Business Law and Practice
Interviewing and Advising
Writing
Practical Legal Research
Advocacy
Drafting
Professional Conduct and Regulation
Solicitors Accounts
Wills and Administration of Estates
Career Development
Billing, File Management and Commercial Awareness
Negotiation

Optional modules:
Family Law and Practice
Employment Law and Practice
Child Care
Private Client
Commercial Dispute Resolution

NB optional modules will only run if there is enough demand.

Assessment

You’ll show your progress through a combination of timed open book supervised assessments, oral practical and coursework-style assessments across the course. You’ll also undertake full-scale mock assessments in all areas, including all skills subjects.

All students take our core modules, plus three vocational subjects from the list of optional modules. Please note that the availability of optional modules is subject to demand.

Where you'll study

Whether you aim to work in the creative industries or the social sciences, the legal profession or public service, the Faculty of Arts, Law & Social Sciences will provide you with the skills and knowledge you need for professional life.

Our lively, diverse community and ambitious academic environment will broaden your horizons and help you develop your full potential - many of our courses give you the chance to learn another language, study abroad or undertake work placements as you study.

If you’re interested in art, music, drama or film, check out our packed programme of events. Together with our partners in the creative and cultural industries, we’re always working to enrich the cultural life of the university and the wider community.

Our research is groundbreaking and internationally recognised, with real social impact. We support the Cultures of the Digital Economy Research Institute (CoDE), whose projects include interactive music apps and documenting lifesaving childbirth procedures, as well as nine international research clusters, such as the Centre for Children's Book Studies and the Labour History Research Unit.

In the Research Excellence Framework 2014, six of our subject areas were awarded world-leading status: Law; Art and Design; English Language and Literature, Communication, Cultural and Media Studies; History; Music, Drama, Dance and Performing Arts.

Read less
University of Cambridge Faculty of Law
Distance from Cambridge: 0 miles
The MLitt in Law is a full-time course and may be awarded after two years of supervised research on the basis of a dissertation not exceeding 60,000 words inclusive of footnotes but exclusive of appendices, bibliography, table of contents and any other preliminary matter. Read more
The MLitt in Law is a full-time course and may be awarded after two years of supervised research on the basis of a dissertation not exceeding 60,000 words inclusive of footnotes but exclusive of appendices, bibliography, table of contents and any other preliminary matter. An MLitt dissertation must take due account of previously published work on the subject and must represent a useful contribution to learning. Candidates for the MLitt are registered in the first instance for the Certificate of Postgraduate Study in Legal Studies which provides training in legal research.

It is a requirement of the Certificate that candidates attend the weekly classes (during term-time only) provided by the Faculty's Research Training and Development Programme that offers instruction on research techniques and advice on matters such as getting work published and obtaining academic jobs. Candidates are required to submit, normally towards the end of May of their first year, four items for a progress review: a personal progress log, a 15,000-word dissertation, a short explanation of the proposed topic of the MLitt and copies of termly supervision reports. The work is formally assessed (normally by two teaching members of the Faculty) and candidates must attend an oral examination.

After this examination, the assessors' reports, along with a recommendation from the supervisor(s), are considered by the Faculty's Degree Committee whose members then decide whether to register the candidate for the MLitt Degree. The MLitt registration date is normally backdated so as to include the year spent working on the Certificate.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/lwlwmllaw

Fromat

The course is exclusively by research although students are required to attend, in their first year of study, the weekly(term-time only) two-hour research training classes provided by the Faculty's Research Training and Development Programme.

While individual arrangements vary, MLitt students may normally expect to receive one-to-one supervision at least once a month.

Students are required to attend, in their first year of study, the weekly (term-time only) two-hour research training classes provided by the Faculty's Research Training Programme.

Students are encouraged to attend Lectures, especially at LLM level, within the general field of their research.

The Cambridge Journal of International and Comparative Law (CJICL) is an open access, peer-reviewed academic journal founded and run by the postgraduate community at the Faculty of Law.

Students have the opportunity to give a presentation on their current research at the termly Graduate Research Seminars.

Supervisors are required to submit termly reports to the Student Registry which students can access via their self-service accounts on CamSIS.

Assessment

A thesis, not exceeding 60,000 words inclusive of footnotes but exclusive of appendices, bibliography, table of contents and any other preliminary matter, is referred to two Examiners, appointed by the Degree Committee for the Faculty of Law. Each Examiner shall make an independent report to the Degree Committee on the dissertation. Students are required to attend an oral examination and, following the oral examination, the Examiners submit a joint report to the Degree Committee stating whether or not they recommend the award of the degree.

Continuing

MLitt candidates may apply to continue to the PhD by completing and submitting a Graduate and Scholarships Application Form (GRADSAF) by the relevant deadline.

In appropriate circumstances, the terms spent working on the MLitt may be counted towards the PhD.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

For detailed information about all possible funding sources (Faculty funding, University funding, and College funding) please refer to the Faculty of Law's website and the Fees and Graduate Funding section of the Graduate Admissions Office website.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

Read less
University of Cambridge Faculty of Law
Distance from Cambridge: 0 miles
The Postgraduate Diploma in Legal Studies is a one-year full-time (or two-year part-time) research course and is awarded on the basis of a dissertation not exceeding 30,000 words, inclusive of footnotes but exclusive of appendices and bibliography. Read more
The Postgraduate Diploma in Legal Studies is a one-year full-time (or two-year part-time) research course and is awarded on the basis of a dissertation not exceeding 30,000 words, inclusive of footnotes but exclusive of appendices and bibliography. Students are assigned a supervisor by the Faculty's Degree Committee.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/lwlwdplgs

Course detail

The main aims of the course are:

- To give students with relevant experience at first-degree and/or Master's level the opportunity to carry out focussed research on an approved research topic in the field of Law under close supervision;
- To give students the opportunity to acquire or develop skills and expertise relevant to their research interests;
- To enable students to engage in work which is innovative and at the leading edge of legal scholarship

A dissertation submitted for the Diploma in Legal Studies must afford evidence of serious study and the ability to discuss a difficult problem critically.

An applicant interested in writing a thesis on international law should apply for the Postgraduate Diploma in International Law.

Format

The course is exclusively by independent research. The proposed research topic is considered by the Degree Committee during the application process. While individual arrangements vary, the student should normally receive one-to-one supervision at least once a month.

There are no compulsory seminars or classes, however, students are encouraged to attend some or all of the classes provided by the Faculty's Research Training and Development Programme.

Students are encouraged to attend Lectures, especially at LLM level, within the general field of their research.

The Cambridge Journal of International and Comparative Law (CJICL) is an open access, peer-reviewed academic journal founded and run by the postgraduate community at the Faculty of Law.

Students have the opportunity to give a presentation on their current research at the termly Graduate Research Seminars.

Supervisors are required to submit termly reports to the Student Registry which students can access online via their self-service accounts on CamSIS.

Assessment

A thesis, not exceeding 30,000 words in length, including footnotes, but excluding appendices and bibliography, shall be referred to two Examiners, appointed by the Degree Committee, who may, at their discretion, examine the student orally on the thesis and on the general field of knowledge within which it falls. Each Examiner shall submit a separate report to the Degree Committee on the student's thesis, and the Examiners shall submit a joint report on the student's performance in the oral examination, if held. The Degree Committee, after considering the reports of the Examiners, shall resolve whether or not the student is entitled to be awarded the Diploma.

Continuing

Diploma candidates may apply to continue to the MLitt or PhD by completing and submitting a Graduate and Scholarships Application Form (GRADSAF) by the relevant deadline.

Continuation to the MLitt or PhD is subject to (a) a satisfactory outcome in the examination for the Diploma in Legal Studies, (b) a satisfactory recommendation on the clarity and feasibility of the applicant's proposed MLitt/doctoral research following its assessment by the Diploma examiners through an informal discussion with the applicant and (c) the availability of a supervisor.

In appropriate circumstances, a student may be allowed to count not more than three full-time terms or five part-time terms towards the requirements for the MLitt or PhD.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

For detailed information about all possible funding sources (Faculty funding, University funding, and College funding) please refer to the Faculty of Law's website.

General Funding Opportunities: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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NB This course is closed for 2016, but you can still apply for January or September 2017. Study the legal, economic and business background to the regulation of infrastructure, content and trading relations across the digital economy globally. Read more
NB This course is closed for 2016, but you can still apply for January or September 2017

Study the legal, economic and business background to the regulation of infrastructure, content and trading relations across the digital economy globally. LLM Digital Economy will help develop your analytical tools in assessing different governance and legal claims, and develop rational and consistent argument in discourse about dilemmas in regulation of digital content, information and infrastructure. The course provides a strong emphasis on the evaluation and development of communications (infrastructure) and content (intellectual property) and information law (including social networks) practice to promote knowledge of transactional and regulatory work in the digital economy. You will study alongside students from across the globe and interact with tutors and guest speakers working at the highest level of digital economy / industry.

You will study specialist modules in the Digital Economy, as well as Information Law, Intellectual Property & Social Networks. You’ll study some modules alongside other students on our other LLM courses, which will give you a broad understanding of the context of international commerce and business which provides the essential underpinning for an understanding of the Digital Economy. In addition you’ll have the opportunity to choose optional modules in topics such as globalisation and world trade, transnational law, competition law or corporate governance.

Throughout the course you’ll develop research skills vital both to your assignments and your future career. Our teaching team consists of professionally qualified legal practitioners as well as research-active academics; in 2014, the Government acknowledged our ‘world-leading’ law research*. You can be confident you’ll receive up-to-date career advice as well as the latest legal theory and case studies.

The course develops three inter-related knowledge and skills sets. Firstly, you will critically apply legal discourse to legal dilemmas in the regulation of communications infrastructure. Secondly, students will gain skills to critically appraise how intellectual property and information is protected, and importantly how international trade structures impact on digital economy goods and services. And thirdly, students will understand governance structures, either corporate governance mechanisms or the regulation of anti-competitive practices.

Finally, the new LLM Digital Economy aims to critically evaluate the relationship between theoretical and evidence based practice. Students will be required to demonstrate skills of independent thinking through the completion of a research project. A key theme will be to develop professional skills to become the independent researchers in the digital economy who understand the complex interplay between infrastructure, content, competition and trade in digital goods and services.

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Conduct an independent research project in your chosen area of professional legal practice*, and top up your current qualification to an LLM in just six months to a year. Read more
Conduct an independent research project in your chosen area of professional legal practice*, and top up your current qualification to an LLM in just six months to a year. We’ll give you training in research skills that will prove invaluable in your future career, and a dedicated supervisor for advice and support.

Overview

If you’ve completed the Legal Practice Course or Bar Professional Training Course, or you’re a practising solicitor or barrister who has taken the former Law Society Final Examinations or BVC, this course will top up your qualification to an LLM Legal Practice.

If you’re an overseas lawyer then, subject to taking the Qualified Lawyers' Transfer Scheme (QLTS/QLTT) and/or gaining university accreditation of prior learning and experience, you could also be eligible to apply.

Our course lets you explore your chosen area of legal professional practice in depth. You could focus on part of your current professional practice, an area that you wish to work in, or one that’s of academic interest to you.* Whichever you choose, you'll develop your research skills over a four-day seminar series. You'll learn to interrogate hard-copy and electronic sources; create and conduct surveys, questionnaires and interviews; and write-up and present your research findings. You’ll then apply these skills when researching and writing a 15,000-word dissertation.

The research skills you develop on this course are in great demand by employers in the legal profession.

We have three study days on campus in Chelmsford, but at other times you'll work independently with support from a dedicated supervisor. Your supervisor will help you to develop your research proposal or hypothesis, discuss your methodology (including ethics clearance) and act as a mentor throughout your time with us.

Our staff have been recognised for the quality of their work. In 2014, the Government acknowledged our ‘world-leading’ research in its Research Excellence Framework.

Teaching times: two Fridays from 10am-4pm in semester 1; one Friday from 10am-1pm in semester 2.

*choice of topics subject to approval and availability of supervision within Anglia Law School.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/legal-practice-top-up

Careers

This course will give you an in-depth understanding of your chosen area of legal practice to use in your future career, and teach you vital research skills that are in great demand in the legal profession and beyond.

Assessment

You’ll demonstrate your understanding of your chosen research area through a 15,000-word dissertation, which you’ll normally submit by the end of March if you study full-time, or September if you study part-time.

Where you'll study

Whether you aim to work in the creative industries or the social sciences, the legal profession or public service, the Faculty of Arts, Law & Social Sciences will provide you with the skills and knowledge you need for professional life.

Our lively, diverse community and ambitious academic environment will broaden your horizons and help you develop your full potential - many of our courses give you the chance to learn another language, study abroad or undertake work placements as you study.

If you’re interested in art, music, drama or film, check out our packed programme of events. Together with our partners in the creative and cultural industries, we’re always working to enrich the cultural life of the university and the wider community.

Our research is groundbreaking and internationally recognised, with real social impact. We support the Cultures of the Digital Economy Research Institute (CoDE), whose projects include interactive music apps and documenting lifesaving childbirth procedures, as well as nine international research clusters, such as the Centre for Children's Book Studies and the Labour History Research Unit.

In the Research Excellence Framework 2014, six of our subject areas were awarded world-leading status: Law; Art and Design; English Language and Literature, Communication, Cultural and Media Studies; History; Music, Drama, Dance and Performing Arts.

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