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University of Cambridge, Full Time Masters Degrees in Business & Management

We have 13 University of Cambridge, Full Time Masters Degrees in Business & Management

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Intensive advanced study introduces students of this interdisciplinary programme to core concepts, techniques and debates in management. Read more

Intensive advanced study introduces students of this interdisciplinary programme to core concepts, techniques and debates in management. You take a total of 11 core courses and electives. The programme is aimed at students who have just finished their degree (in any discipline except business- and management-related majors), who have achieved the equivalent of a first class, and who have less than one year of professional experience at the start of the programme.

Educational aims:

  • to give students with a strong performance in other disciplines at first-degree level an understanding of the academic discipline of management; and
  • to give students the opportunity to acquire and develop skills and expertise relevant to high-level management practice.

This is achieved by:

  1. providing students with the guidance necessary to acquire a deep understanding of the theory and practice of management;
  2. analysing, in lectures, discussions and written work, the key techniques, conceptual issues and debates in the academic management literatures and in the practice of management;
  3. supporting students in the development of an understanding and a critical perspective of management;
  4. providing teaching in a range of technical/specialist subjects central to the study of the different branches of management; and
  5. examining students formally on their knowledge of the theory and practice of management.

Learning Outcomes

The MPhil in Management is a taught master's programme which offers new and recent graduates of any subject except business and management a thorough grounding in management. The normal expectation is that graduates of the MPhil in Management will seek a career in management. The programme is consequently conceived as a graduate conversion course which will prepare students for such a career. It sets high academic and intellectual standards and is based upon the latest academic research in the field.

The programme is designed throughout to help participants transition from students to professional managers, by providing them with the fundamental knowledge needed in a management career and with novel opportunities to develop their collaborative leadership skills and business creativity. The philosophy behind the programme is that while effective management requires experience, a good grounding in academic knowledge is an invaluable prerequisite for a managerial career. Because management involves such a wide array of skills, from the mathematical to the interpersonal, the MPhil in Management demands excellence across a wide range of applied disciplines.



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The Masters in Bioscience Enterprise (MBE) programme is an intensive, taught science and business course intended for those who have an interest in enterprise and the ambition to found technology companies or take up leadership, executive or consultancy roles in the life sciences sector. Read more
The Masters in Bioscience Enterprise (MBE) programme is an intensive, taught science and business course intended for those who have an interest in enterprise and the ambition to found technology companies or take up leadership, executive or consultancy roles in the life sciences sector. Practical experience is gained through individual and group professional practice assignments, a consulting project and an internship placement, both of which are conducted with host companies.

Applicants must have a good first degree in biological, medical or physical sciences or a financial or legal background and demonstrate a strong interest in pursuing a business career in the life science sector. MBE students are based at the Institute of Biotechnology and have a close affiliation to Judge Business School, a combination that provides an unparalleled educational experience and an opportunity to learn from leading scientists, entrepreneurs and academics at the University of Cambridge.

Learning is based on real business examples and lectures and case studies are frequently delivered by senior company executives. There are optional opportunities to gain a global perspective of the industry sector during a study tour to a international biotechnology business cluster, an event which may be planned and led by members of the class. Additional costs are incurred by students who elect to participate in these activities or incur other discretionary expenses associated with participation in the programme.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/egcempbse

Course detail

The educational aims of the M.Phil. programme in Bioscience Enterprise are to:

- Enhance understanding of life sciences and related technological developments;
- Foster research and analytical skills and methodologies;
- Develop written and verbal communication skills;
- Provide knowledge of the ethical, legal and regulatory issues associated with bringing scientific advances to market;
- Develop applied business skills, including those that enable students to:
*identify potential business opportunities arising from research in life sciences and related areas;
*exploit entrepreneurial opportunities;
*undertake senior executive roles within biotechnology companies and other commercial entities.

Other aims of the programme are to:

- Provide a coherent and supportive learning environment, with students working closely with teachers drawn from both academic and biotechnology business executive backgrounds and whose teaching is informed by their own knowledge and business expertise;
- Develop new areas of teaching in response to advances of scholarship and the community;
- Continue to attract outstanding students, irrespective of race, nationality, background, gender or physical disability.

Learning Outcomes

Students gain an understanding of:

- Life sciences, including fundamental concepts of basic science and demonstration of how contemporary biological and medical research leads to exploitable science and commercial products;
- Business, including commercial and analytical skills required in biotechnology and healthcare related businesses;
- Management, including strategy, organisation, leadership, marketing and financing of technology companies;
- Technology transfer, from academia to industry and from industry to industry, including the concepts of licensing, partnering, joint ventures, mergers and acquisitions;
- Law and intellectual property frameworks, relating to companies, individuals and shareholders in different jurisdictions;
- Social and ethical issues, including fundamental constraints when applying scientific research to the development of new bioscience products;
- Global biotechnology, including comparisons of the current industry status in the UK, Europe, USA and elsewhere.

Format

Science and technology, business and transitionary modules are taught in each term, integrating commercial know-how with advances in research and demonstrating the many complex issues associated with bringing discovery and innovation from the laboratory to the market. The programme is highly participatory and includes practical elements in the form of interdisciplinary projects, workshops, case studies and business planning activities. Students have opportunities to undertake a consulting project and a technology company internship placement, and to gain an international perspective during a (self-funded, optional, student planned and led) study tour to a biotechnology business cluster in the EU or USA.

The MBE class is taught as a single entity. There are no elective components and all students follow the same syllabus. The class offers a professional practice experience and a high level of participation is expected. All lectures and course components are mandatory.

The department is renowned for its practical and successful approach to biotechnology entrepreneurship and the exploitation of bioscience inventions. Students benefit from a unique combination of teaching and mentoring from experienced business and academic contributors. The faculty pursue a variety of research interests and the application of the resulting technologies has led to the founding of many spin-out companies. Our innovative achievements and strong Master's teaching were recognised by the Queen's Anniversary Award (2007).

Placements

In April and May of each year, MBE students spend the majority of their time working in a company placement, carrying out research with a commercial or business dimension. Students are encouraged at this time to put into practice the lessons learnt from the academic aspects of the programme as well as to demonstrate originality of research and analysis. The MBE staff provides considerable support to students in regard to both identifying suitable projects and during the placement itself.

It is important that the project undertaken relates to the field of ‘bioscience enterprise’, addresses a defined research question and affords students the opportunity to collect quantitative and qualitative data. The subsequent analysis forms the basis of a substantial dissertation and the findings are also presented at a Symposium held at the end of the year, as well as in the form of conclusions and recommendations for the host company.

Assessment

A 10,000 word dissertation is an important aspect of course assessment. Passing this element of the course is crucial to attainment of the degree. The work is based on data collected during a research placement in a company, the analysis of which forms the basis of the work. The dissertation should show evidence of innovative thinking and must not be simply a review and subsequent extrapolation of previously published work.

Written submissions include in-depth science and technology in business papers, up to 10 essays of no more than 4000 words, a number of short reports and critical appraisals, a consulting project report and a dissertation of no more than 10,000 words based on research and analysis conducted during the internship placement. At the conclusion of the dissertation students make an assessed presentation. The Examiners may ask candidates to take an oral exam at the conclusion of the course.

Attainment is continuously assessed, with particular emphasis on practical activities, participation and learning through team-work in the research, preparation, and delivery of presentations. Where possible group work reflects the activities of a professional business environment.

Students are also encouraged to participate in extracurricular enterprise activities, including entrepreneurial competitions within the University and further afield, and submit a business development plan as one of the course assignments.

Continuing

Students completing this course usually continue their career in the life sciences commercial sector but a number also at the conclusion of the course apply for PhD research programmes in either science or management disciplines.

Find out how to apply here http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Students normally fund their studies through savings, loans, by a grant from their employer or by securing a scholarship from either a Cambridge Trust or other awarding body. The competition for scholarship awards is intense and candidates are advised that only a small percentage of the highest-achieving applicants are successful.

A limited number of bursaries are available to MBE students through the generosity of the Chris R. Lowe Carpe Diem Bursary programme and at times from other sources associated with the course. Candidates who meet the eligibility criteria set by the donors and are offered a place to study on the course will be automatically considered for these awards as part of their application process. Usually these awards are made to students on the basis of economic need, or those who live in or have studied in and intend to pursue their future careers in the UK.

Please note that the programme bursaries, whilst at times substantial, are not intended to cover all the costs associated with living and studying at Cambridge and therefore applicants must ensure they have access to sufficient funds to cover the balance of their tuition and College fees and maintenance needs.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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ISMM is very different to any other academic course. it combines traditional teaching material with a series of industrial visits, some of which will take place overseas. Read more
ISMM is very different to any other academic course: it combines traditional teaching material with a series of industrial visits, some of which will take place overseas. The course members work a full industrial week and conform to business dress codes. This intensive, practical programme gives direct experience of many different industries, cultures and working environments, and the projects present real challenges in genuine industrial and business environments. The aim of the course is to equip numerate graduates with the skills, personal development and industrial experience to be immediately effective in their early careers in industry.

ISMM will broaden your perspective and experience and open the door to a wide range of industrial careers. Many blue chip companies recognise the value of the course and target our graduates. Equally, for those who want to work in a smaller company, ISMM gives the confidence to start directly in a manufacturing engineering or management role. Those with entrepreneurial flair go on to set up their own companies.

The programme is structured around taught modules, company visits and in-company projects solving live business or technical problems. An overseas study tour offers a broader international context and the individual research thesis allows greater depth of study in a specific area of manufacturing.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/egegmpimm

Course detail

During the year you will acquire a working understanding of the fundamentals of a business enterprise, with a particular emphasis on manufacturing disciplines. You will visit up to forty companies, large and small, chosen to cover all industrial sectors; you will absorb the different cultures and learn to identify strengths and weaknesses. By the end of the course you will be in a perfect position to choose your career direction.

Skills acquired during the course include:

- critical analysis;
- creativity – the generation of innovative solutions;
- evaluation of designs, processes and products;
- balancing theory and practice;
- problem identification, definition and solution;
- data gathering, evaluation and analysis;
- effective communication written, verbal and graphic;
- preparation of business and finance cases;
- presentation preparation and delivery;
- project management;
- report writing;
- a 'can do' attitude;
- teamworking;
- appreciating the responsibilities of leadership

Format

Teaching is delivered through a variety of media. During Cambridge termtimes, there will be traditional academic lectures and interactive seminars; the dissertation is based in one of the Institute for Manufacturing's research groups and will involve normal graduate-level supervision. However, much of the learning during the course takes place during the industrial visits (of which there are approximately forty annually), and on the projects themselves. During the projects, students can expect to receive substantial 'supervisory' feedback from their line managers and colleagues. Academic assessment of the course is split into three components: examinations on module material; assessment of project reports; examination of the dissertation.

Placements

In addition to the series of industrial visits, students will undertake four two-week industrial placements over the course of the programme. During this time they will be working on live business/technical issues relevant to the company, and will be treated as an employee. These placements will terminate in a presentation to the Senior Management of the company, and in the writing of a handover report that will be examined as part of the course assessment.

Assessment

All students will be required to write a dissertation of no greater than 15,000 words. Achieving a passing mark on this dissertation is a precondition for obtaining the degree.

All students are required to write four project reports, each of which will be based on two weeks of project work on an issue relevant to a host company.

Four taught modules will be assessed through written assessments under timed conditions.
At the discretion of the Examiners, candidates may be required to take an additional oral examination on the work submitted during the course, and on the general field of knowledge within which it falls.

Students can expect to receive reports at least termly on the Cambridge Graduate Supervision Reporting System. They will have access to a University supervisor for their dissertation, and can expect to receive input from their line managers during project placements.

Continuing

The MPhil is a professional practice programme and is not specifically designed to lead on to doctoral research. Nevertheless, students wishing to apply for continuation to a PhD in Engineering at Cambridge would normally be expected to attain an overall mark of at least 70%.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Bursaries are available to two categories of applicant.

Category A: Bursaries of between £1,200 and £1,800 are available to successful applicants who either (i) have UK citizenship; or (ii) have settled status in the UK, and have been ordinarily resident in the UK and Islands (for a purpose other than full-time education) for the three years prior to the 1 September immediately preceding the course.

Category B: Successful applicants who have secured sufficient funding from studentship providers to cover the standard University Composition Fee rate, but not the additional cost, may receive a bursary to cover the discrepancy.

All eligible applicants will be considered for bursaries. Students in Category B may wish to contact the course email to ensure that their situation is noticed.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The Cambridge MBA is academically rigorous and has its own distinct learning style. Inspired by the University's tradition of tutorial group discussion and lively debate, our programme is taught through workshops, seminars, lectures, discussion groups, and team and individual projects. Read more
The Cambridge MBA is academically rigorous and has its own distinct learning style. Inspired by the University's tradition of tutorial group discussion and lively debate, our programme is taught through workshops, seminars, lectures, discussion groups, and team and individual projects. We bring together a dynamic class of more than 40 nationalities from a wide range of sectors and our class sizes are small, allowing you to interact directly with our faculty.

We deliver an engaging and impactful learning experience in an intensive 12 month programme. Our approach combines core skills with specialist sector training; faculty-led teaching with live consulting projects; professional skills with personal development. It is a broad education designed to develop deep understanding, practical application and vital interpersonal skills.

The aim is to produce graduates who demonstrate intellectual rigour and who are skilled in the practice of management and core business principles in finance, strategy, marketing, operations, accounting, innovation and human resources within a global context. The skills and knowledge acquired on the MBA are achieved through a collaborative ethos—the core value of the Cambridge MBA.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/bmjbmbmba

Course detail

The MBA is taught through a blend of workshops, seminars, lectures, small group work, group discussion, presentations and experiential learning. There are 14 core courses which form the foundations of the degree, and a wide variety of elective subjects for students to choose from. In the third term specialist coaches run concentrations in (currently) eight key areas of interest, details of which can be found here: http://www.jbs.cam.ac.uk/programmes/mba/learning/tailored-learning/

Format

Students who opt for a dissertation as their summer option will receive formal supervision across the summer. Supervision by both a mentor and faculty member is also a key part of the practical project work that all students undertake. Given the structure of the degree and the Cambridge MBA demographic there are no formal supervisions through Colleges. However, there are a great many opportunities to link with academic and professional staff throughout the year, and students are encouraged to use these links.

The core MBA courses start in September during the Orientation period, beginning with Foundation modules, and for this reason all students are expected to be present for the full two weeks of Orientation. You will work closely with faculty, business practitioners and your student colleagues; you will build a solid core of knowledge and enrich your personal understanding of management issues.
For electives we bring in experts from both the University of Cambridge and the wider business and academic worlds to teach our extensive portfolio of advanced specialist courses. This is the ideal opportunity to broaden your experience, focus on subjects in which you are particularly interested, and make it your Cambridge MBA.

Please refer to our website for further details: http://www.jbs.cam.ac.uk/mba.

Placements

Across the course students are given the opportunity to engage in practical opportunities for experiential learning. This includes two live consulting projects, with real clients, a capstone project as part of the concentration and an individual project or work placement, often self-sourced, during the summer.

Assessment

- Students are given the option to work on a dissertation on any aspect of business or management, of between 8,000 and 10,000 words during the summer term (July-September); the assessment does not include a viva.

- Assessment varies between courses and includes a range of formal exams, written assignments, class participation, short in class tests, group projects and presentations.

- Essays and written papers are an integral part of the assessment of the MBA and are part of the assessment in some core classes and electives.

- Projects are a fundamental part of the programme and students are expected to undertake two live consulting projects in groups during the first half of the course; the assessment for these are a presentation and a project report which is marked by Faculty. A similar group project is undertaken as part of the Concentration and assessment is based on presentations and written reports. A further optional opportunity to do an individual project is available during the summer term.

- There are currently formal written examinations at the end of Michaelmas and Lent terms in the core subjects of Corporate Finance, Accounting, Marketing, Strategy and Operations Management.

- Projects form the backbone of the experiential, practical learning on the MBA and are assessed as outlined above. Often presentations are made in front of clients or a panel of practitioner experts, as well as the Faculty assessor; this is also considered to be an important part of a student's personal and professional development.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Some scholarships are available for MBA students and more information can be found here:

http://www.jbs.cam.ac.uk/programmes/mba/funding-your-mba/

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The MRes in Management Studies is offered by Cambridge Judge Business School as a full-time period of study and research, during which students with experience at master's level will receive training in research methods and the foundations of their chosen discipline. Read more

The MRes in Management Studies is offered by Cambridge Judge Business School as a full-time period of study and research, during which students with experience at master's level will receive training in research methods and the foundations of their chosen discipline. The goal of the MRes programme is to lay the foundations that will enable students to contribute to the academic debate in their discipline through publications in leading journals, which they will develop during their PhD.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the programme, students will have:

  • gained in-depth knowledge of research methods used in management research;
  • developed strong awareness of the current academic debates in their chosen discipline, and in-depth knowledge of the underlying theories of management;
  • gained practical knowledge of management research through close supervision of their dissertation project;
  • developed strong methodological expertise across a spectrum of research methods and applied these methodologies as part of the dissertation research project;
  • developed a strong awareness of the imperative of social impact with management research, through a dissertation; and
  • received training in transferable skills, eg communication skills, presentation skills, writing skills, research project management skills, literature review skills.

Continuing

In order to continue to the PhD, MRes students are required to achieve an average mark of 60 per cent in each module separately and 70 per cent in the dissertation alone. Note that, as for all Cambridge PhDs, the first year of the PhD (the year after the MRes) is still probationary and students will be required to pass a first-year assessment. 

Visit the PhD in Management Studies page for information on that element of this programme.



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The MPhil in Technology Policy is an intensive, nine-month professional practice master's programme designed for people with a background in science or engineering who are interested in developing the skills needed to meet the challenges of integrating technology, management, economics and policy. Read more

The MPhil in Technology Policy is an intensive, nine-month professional practice master's programme designed for people with a background in science or engineering who are interested in developing the skills needed to meet the challenges of integrating technology, management, economics and policy. Although the programme straddles the boundary of business and government and has a strong common core taken by all students on the programme, it allows for more in-depth study of public and private enterprise perspectives.

The programme's focus is on business–government interactions, and its aim is to provide students with both the wider political and institutional context and the analytical skills delivered by Cambridge Judge Business School faculty working in operations, strategy and, most especially, economics and policy. The MPhil in Technology Policy programme provides the context and skills needed to cope with the rapidly evolving environment in many technology-rich sectors, including information and communications technology, defence and aerospace, energy and electricity, manufacturing, transport and logistics, pharmaceuticals and health.

The channels of communication between government and industry are often weak and there can be significant difficulties in spanning the divide. Our central goal, therefore, is to prepare our graduates to move along and across these frontiers and to understand, influence, intervene and shape the evolution of business, government and the intersection of the two. Beyond simply understanding and analysing policies, our goal is to teach students how to be proactive by making the case for alternative metrics, instruments and goals as a means of gaining competitive advantage.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, students should:

  • be able to anticipate technology trends, and to analyse and influence legislative developments;
  • be able to identify business opportunities created by policy initiatives, regulation, and legislation; and
  • be able to analyse, influence and operate at the nexus of business and government.


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The MPhil in Economics is a one-year master’s degree that runs from mid-September to late July. Read more
The MPhil in Economics is a one-year master’s degree that runs from mid-September to late July. This degree is specifically aimed at candidates who are interested in undertaking a master’s degree that will give them the technical training required to undertake a career as a professional economist working for, say, the UK Government Economic Service or an economics consultancy.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/ececmpmec

Course detail

On completion of the MPhil degree students should have:

1. acquired an advanced technical training in microeconomics, macroeconomics, and econometrics;
2. acquired, through optional papers, some knowledge of work at the frontiers of the subject in particular areas;
3. begun to acquire independent research skills and experience of putting them into practice;
4. acquired experience and guidance in formulating a realistic research topic and prepared written work to a strict timetable;
5. acquired sufficient knowledge and understanding of advanced economics to proceed to a career as a professional economist in business or government, or to a research degree.

Format

Each student will take eight modules plus a dissertation. One module is equivalent to eighteen hours of lectures.

Requirements:

- to attend the preparatory course in mathematics and statistics
- one compulsory module in each of the three core areas [3]
- Three more modules which can be taken from any of the core areas [3]
- two additional modules, either from the core areas or from the list of additional options [2]
- a dissertation of up to 10,000 words.

There is an internal examination on the material covered in the preparatory course which is assessed on a pass/fail basis. Classes in problem sets take place for core compulsory modules - one problem set for each of the compulsory modules is formally assessed. Mid-course examinations in microeconomics I, macroeconomics I and econometric methods take place in January; marks are recorded but do not count towards the final degree result. Each student receives 2 hours of supervision for the dissertation component of the MPhil in Economics.

Assessment

Students submit a 10,000 word dissertation at the end of July worth 20% of the final overall mark.

Students are examined on 8 coursework modules in May/June worth 80% of the final overall mark.

Continuing

Although the MPhil in Economics is designed for students who wish to obtain a one-year master’s qualification before leaving academic economics, it will be possible for students to continue from the MPhil in Economics onto the PhD programme. To do this, students will be expected to perform at a standard similar to that required for continuation from the MPhil in Economic Research; this means that as well as achieving continuation marks, students would need to have taken the advanced modules that are compulsory for MPhil in Economic Research students. Continuation is also conditional on the appointment of a supervisor.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The MPhil in Strategy, Marketing and Operations (SMO) is an intensive nine-month programme that prepares you for continuation to the Cambridge Judge Business School (CJBS) PhD in the fields of strategy, marketing or operations. Read more

The MPhil in Strategy, Marketing and Operations (SMO) is an intensive nine-month programme that prepares you for continuation to the Cambridge Judge Business School (CJBS) PhD in the fields of strategy, marketing or operations.

Educational aims of the programme are to prepare students for doctoral work in the fields of strategy, marketing or operations at CJBS (the programme is an integral part of the CJBS PhD programme for these fields, by:

  • providing teaching in research methodology, in particular in econometrics and mathematical modelling;
  • providing teaching in foundational subjects, such as economics; and
  • providing research seminars in which students will learn about the current debates in their field of specialisation and about the canonical literature that underpins these debates.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course students should have:

  • acquired or consolidated foundational knowledge and methodological skills necessary for research in their chosen field of specialisation;
  • demonstrated an ability to critique research papers; and
  • presented their own ideas in a public forum and learned to contribute constructively within an international environment.

Continuing

Following their application for PhD continuation by the end of the first term, students will be interviewed by a panel of faculty members early in the second term. The PhD admissions committee will make PhD admission decisions on the basis of the interview report, the strength of the overall application with particular weight on academic reference letters and the performance in the Michaelmas term MPhil courses, and the fit of the student's research interest with faculty expertise. Students will receive confirmation of a PhD offer in February.

All admitted PhD students are fully funded. PhD offers are usually conditional on the final performance on the MPhil – candidates are required to achieve over 70 per cent in their MPhil. Students are also required to achieve at least 70 per cent in their dissertation (if any).



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Advanced study and research in this degree focuses on innovation and change through three interconnecting themes. innovation and work practices, innovation and strategic change, and organisation theory. Read more

Advanced study and research in this degree focuses on innovation and change through three interconnecting themes: innovation and work practices, innovation and strategic change, and organisation theory. One taught module is provided in each of these areas. You also have the option to either write a dissertation or an extended research project, and take modules in research methods and taught electives. The MPhil ISO degree offers a route to a PhD.

Learning Outcomes

Educational aims of this programme are:

  • to give students, with relevant experience at first-degree level, the opportunity to carry out focused research under close supervision in the fields of strategy, organisational behaviour and information systems relevant to innovation; and
  • to give students the opportunity to acquire or develop skills and expertise relevant to their research interests.

Continuing

Following their application for PhD continuation by the end of the first term, students will be interviewed by a panel of faculty members early in the second term. The PhD admissions committee will make PhD admission decisions on the basis of the interview report, the strength of the overall application with particular weight on academic reference letters and the performance in the Michaelmas term MPhil courses, and the fit of the student's research interest with faculty expertise. Students will receive confirmation of a PhD offer in February.

All admitted PhD students are fully funded. PhD offers are usually conditional on the final performance on the MPhil – candidates are required to achieve over 70 per cent in their MPhil. Students are also required to achieve at least 70 per cent in their dissertation (if any).



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Combining advanced study and research, this programme is designed for students who wish to extend their knowledge of finance or financial engineering. Read more

Combining advanced study and research, this programme is designed for students who wish to extend their knowledge of finance or financial engineering. The programme provides research-led teaching and is particularly suitable for those intending to continue to a PhD. The degree also provides a strong academic background for those aiming for a career in finance.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course students should have:

  • acquired or consolidated statistical, mathematical and other skills appropriate for research in their chosen area;
  • demonstrated independent judgement, based on their own research; and
  • presented their own ideas in a public forum and learned to contribute constructively within an international environment.

Continuing

Students may apply to continue to the PhD, but success is subject to satisfactory performance at the admissions interview in Lent term 2018, and achieving a minimum average grade of at least 70 per cent on the MPhil in Finance programme. Students are required to also achieve at least 70 per cent in their dissertation (if any). 



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This is a thesis-only MPhil and the Department will not admit students to it unless it can be satisfied that they have the necessary research skills, together with a clear vision of their topic and a good grasp of the appropriate methodology to explore it. Read more
This is a thesis-only MPhil and the Department will not admit students to it unless it can be satisfied that they have the necessary research skills, together with a clear vision of their topic and a good grasp of the appropriate methodology to explore it. Further details are given on our website.

MPhil courses offered by the Department of Land Economy share common aims. These are:

i) to enable students of a high calibre to pursue their education at an advanced applied level drawing on the primary disciplines of economics, planning and environmental policy, with additional specialisms in finance and law;

ii) to provide students with opportunities both to build on and develop material which they may have studied at undergraduate level as well as to broaden their knowledge base;

iii) to equip students with the necessary skills to pursue careers at a high level in a range of areas, including business and finance, civil service, public service, property professions, environmental agencies and organisations, national/international agencies and further study;

iv) to provide opportunities for education in a multidisciplinary environment so as to advance the understanding of cognate disciplines and their applications;

v) to provide opportunities for learning with colleagues from different social, economic and legal systems;

vi) to provide students with appropriate skills and experience to enable them to use information and resources critically and to equip them with the means to undertake their own research;

vii) to provide an educational environment with a strong research ethos that brings together students from a wide variety of backgrounds and fosters an international approach to common problems.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/lelemplec

Course detail

On completion of the course, students will have acquired the following skills:

i) Intellectual skills: the ability to study steadily, assimilate issues and large amounts of literature swiftly, evaluate countervailing positions and to produce succinct arguments to tight deadlines and to engage with those with whom they disagree. Particular methodologies used include: data evaluation, case evaluation, legal analysis, textual analysis, the convergence o theory and empirical data and advanced critical evaluation.

ii) Practical skills: identification and use of bibliographic materials, via libraries and electronically; taking notes effectively, thorough IT skills.

iii) Transferable skills: the ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing; to work to deadlines and under pressure; to manage time; to set priorities; to formulate an argument; to work independently and with initiative; basic IT skills (email, data analysis and internet use); critical analysis; to present material in a seminar context; skills of analysis and interpretation; self-discipline, self-direction; and respect for other views. The ability to develop and present a major piece of written work.

iv) Research skills: the ability to locate, utilise and organise a wide range of materials independently, on paper and electronically. The ability to assess and evaluate such material, to develop and pursue a critique of existing material. The ability to develop, structure and sustain a line of argument. The establishment of relationships with researchers in related areas. The ethical use of research material.

v) Communication skills: the ability to marshal arguments and present them succinctly and lucidly. The ability to effectively criticise the views of others powerfully but fairly. The presentation of written material in a persuasive and coherent manner.

Format

This is a research degree, students will be expected to attend Departmental Research Methods training sessions unless they can demonstrate that they have previous experience in this area.

Graduate student Supervisors provide formal feedback on progress via the Cambridge Graduate Student Reporting System (termly reports) and more informally through face to face meetings or by email.

Assessment

A thesis of 30,000 words

Continuing

- Approval of an application to continue to the PhD will depend on three criteria:
- Availability of a supervisor
- Approval by the Degree Committee of a research proposal
- Successful completion of the MPhil programme.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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This course combines taught elements and research methods training with a significant level of independent research. Students admitted to this course will be those who have a strong background in Land Economy related subjects and who may already have some research experience. Read more
This course combines taught elements and research methods training with a significant level of independent research. Students admitted to this course will be those who have a strong background in Land Economy related subjects and who may already have some research experience. They will normally be those aspiring to and who have good prospects of proceeding to the PhD prior to an academic career.

Candidates study two modules chosen from a list of options taught by the Department of Land Economy. They are also required to attend the Social Sciences Research Methods Centre (SSRMC) Training programme, which is compulsory, and to complete a 20,000 word dissertation, supervised by one of the academic staff within the department. The dissertation will review the literature and develop research hypotheses, and possibly involve some preliminary data collection and analysis. The SSRMC programme is described on their website. Candidates must take six SSRMC core modules and undertake a research methods essay as part of this programme. It is anticipated that the research training provided by the SSRMC plus the dissertation (20,000 words) and the choice of specialised modules from the other Land Economy MPhils will provide the necessary and sufficient background for commencing PhD research.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/lelempler

Course detail

MPhil courses offered by the Department of Land Economy share common aims. These are:

i) to enable students of a high calibre to pursue their education at an advanced applied level drawing on the primary disciplines of economics, planning and environmental policy, with additional specialisms in finance and law;

ii) to provide students with opportunities both to build on and develop material which they may have studied at undergraduate level as well as to broaden their knowledge base;

iii) to equip students with the necessary skills to pursue careers at a high level in a range of areas, including business and finance, civil service, public service, property professions, environmental agencies and organisations, national/international agencies and further study;

iv) to provide opportunities for education in a multidisciplinary environment so as to advance the understanding of cognate disciplines and their applications;

v) to provide opportunities for learning with colleagues from different social, economic and legal systems;

vi) to provide students with appropriate skills and experience to enable them to use information and resources critically and to equip them with the means to undertake their own research;

vii) to provide an educational environment with a strong research ethos that brings together students from a wide variety of backgrounds and fosters an international approach to common problems.

Learning Outcomes

On completion of the course, students will have acquired the following skills:

i) Intellectual skills: the ability to study steadily, assimilate issues and large amounts of literature swiftly, evaluate countervailing positions and to produce succinct arguments to tight deadlines and to engage with those with whom they disagree. Particular methodologies used include: data evaluation, case evaluation, legal analysis, textual analysis, the convergence o theory and empirical data and advanced critical evaluation.

ii) Practical skills: identification and use of bibliographic materials, via libraries and electronically; taking notes effectively, thorough IT skills.

iii) Transferable skills: the ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing; to work to deadlines and under pressure; to manage time; to set priorities; to formulate an argument; to work independently and with initiative; basic IT skills (email, data analysis and internet use); critical analysis; to present material in a seminar context; skills of analysis and interpretation; self-discipline, self-direction; and respect for other views. The ability to develop and present a major piece of written work.

iv) Research skills: the ability to locate, utilise and organise a wide range of materials independently, on paper and electronically. The ability to assess and evaluate such material, to develop and pursue a critique of existing material. The ability to develop, structure and sustain a line of argument. The establishment of relationships with researchers in related areas. The ethical use of research material.

v) Communication skills: the ability to marshal arguments and present them succinctly and lucidly. The ability to effectively criticise the views of others powerfully but fairly. The presentation of written material in a persuasive and coherent manner.

Format

Students are required to take two taught MPhil modules from the range offered within the Department and to complete taught modules offered by the Social Sciences Research Methods Centre.

Students will receive up to four hours of supervision for each taught module and additional supervision relating specifically to their dissertation.

Each MPhil module typically consists of 16 hours of lectures, students undertaking the MPhil in Land Economy, Research take two modules equating to 32 hours across the year. Taught components offered by the SSRMC vary in length, more details on contact time can be found on the SSRMC webpages.

Graduate student Supervisors provide formal feedback on progress via the Cambridge Graduate Student Reporting System (termly reports) and more informally through face to face meetings or by email.

Assessment

A dissertation of 20,000 words.

An essay of no more than 4000 words as assessment of research methods teaching. Students also take two optional modules which will be assessed by coursework. Assignments or practical assessments may be set for modules offered by the SSRMC.

Continuing

Approval of an application to continue to the PhD degree will depend on three criteria:

- Availability of a supervisor
- The approval by the Degree Committee of a research proposal
- The achievement of a minimum overall mark and minimum dissertation mark in the MPhil examination as prescribed by the Degree Committee in any offer of admission.

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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In a competitive international business environment, real estate professionals need a sophisticated understanding of finance, economics and law to succeed. Read more
In a competitive international business environment, real estate professionals need a sophisticated understanding of finance, economics and law to succeed. The MPhil in Real Estate Finance has been designed to provide rigorous training in the latest concepts from these three key areas as applied to international real estate markets.

The course is aimed at those who may already have some experience or interest in real estate markets, banking or investment and wish to upgrade their skills or for those who are looking to commence a career in this area. The programme offers an opportunity to study theoretical and practical finance, investment and law applied to global commercial real estate markets, while enjoying the cultural, social and recreational facilities of Cambridge. The course takes students from a wide variety of backgrounds: finance, geography, economics, law, biology, international business, mathematics. These students have in common a strong desire to work in property and investments coupled with strong academic skills.

Tuition in the programme is based around classroom lectures, case studies and field trips to ensure students can apply the theoretical concepts taught. The programme can also serve as an entry point into PhD training for those interested in pursuing research in real estate finance in greater depth.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/lelempref

Course detail

MPhil courses offered by the Department of Land Economy share common aims. These are:

i) to enable students of a high calibre to pursue their education at an advanced applied level drawing on the primary disciplines of economics, planning and environmental policy, with additional specialisms in finance and law;

ii) to provide students with opportunities both to build on and develop material which they may have studied at undergraduate level as well as to broaden their knowledge base;

iii) to equip students with the necessary skills to pursue careers at a high level in a range of areas, including business and finance, civil service, public service, property professions, environmental agencies and organisations, national/international agencies and further study;

iv) to provide opportunities for education in a multidisciplinary environment so as to advance the understanding of cognate disciplines and their applications;

v) to provide opportunities for learning with colleagues from different social, economic and legal systems;

vi) to provide students with appropriate skills and experience to enable them to use information and resources critically and to equip them with the means to undertake their own research;

vii) to provide an educational environment with a strong research ethos that brings together students from a wide variety of backgrounds and fosters an international approach to common problems.

Learning Outcomes

On completion of the course, students will have acquired the following skills:
i) Knowledge and understanding of the subject matter of the various components of their course.

ii) Intellectual skills: the ability to study steadily, assimilate issues and large amounts of literature swiftly, evaluate countervailing positions and to produce succinct arguments to tight deadlines and to engage with those with whom they disagree. Particular methodologies used include: data evaluation, case evaluation, legal analysis, textual analysis, the convergence o theory and empirical data and advanced critical evaluation.

iii) Practical skills: identification and use of bibliographic materials, via libraries and electronically; taking notes effectively, thorough IT skills.

iv) Transferable skills: the ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing; to work to deadlines and under pressure; to manage time; to set priorities; to formulate an argument; to work independently and with initiative; basic IT skills (email, data analysis and internet use); critical analysis; to present material in a seminar context; skills of analysis and interpretation; self-discipline, self-direction; and respect for other views. The ability to develop and present a major piece of written work.

v) Research skills: the ability to locate, utilise and organise a wide range of materials independently, on paper and electronically. The ability to assess and evaluate such material, to develop and pursue a critique of existing material. The ability to develop, structure and sustain a line of argument. The establishment of relationships with researchers in related areas. The ethical use of research material.

vi) Communication skills: the ability to marshal arguments and present them succinctly and lucidly. The ability to effectively criticise the views of others powerfully but fairly. The presentation of written material in a persuasive and coherent manner.

vii) Interpersonal skills: the ability to work with others in seminars and smaller groups towards common goals. The ability to share research data ethically. The ability to respect the views of others and to acknowledge deficiencies in one's own argument.

Format

Candidates study a total of eight modules, some of which are compulsory, and submit a 12,000 word dissertation.

The modules offered for this course are confirmed on an annual basis but may include:
- Quantitative research methods I
- Introduction to real estate finance
- Real estate securities, securitisation and investment
- Private real estate investment
- Real estate development
- Legal issues in land use and finance
- The macroeconomy and housing
- Real estate project modelling and decision methods
- Urban and environmental planning
- Spatial economics

Plus optional modules from other taught MPhil courses offered by the Department of Land Economy.

Continuing

Continuation to the PhD degree - Approval of an application to continue to the PhD degree will depend on three criteria:

1. Availability of a supervisor
2. The approval by the Degree Committee of a research proposal
3. The achievement of a minimum overall mark and minimum dissertation mark in the MPhil Examination as prescribed by the Degree Committee in any offer of admission

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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