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Full Time Masters Degrees in Bournemouth, United Kingdom

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Bournemouth University Faculty of Science & Technology
Distance from Bournemouth: 0 miles
Biomedical signals provide useful metrics in a wide range of health care scenarios. However, these signals are often affected by noise and require extensive signal processing to extract useful clinical diagnostic metrics. Read more
Biomedical signals provide useful metrics in a wide range of health care scenarios. However, these signals are often affected by noise and require extensive signal processing to extract useful clinical diagnostic metrics. Current signal processing techniques are either fixed by design or adaptive to variations known a priori. However, because of normal physiological variation, the characteristics of these signals are often non-stationary and more robust adaptive signal processing techniques are required to track many types of biomedical signals. As a clinical example, complications of the diabetic foot result in 20 lower limb amputations per day in the UK. The problem is exacerbated by the vascular and neurological damage that occurs in the diabetic foot, and the consequent loss of feeling results in trauma being unnoticed. Previous work by the principal investigator has demonstrated the efficacy of detecting the pre-cursors of ulceration through non-invasive measurement of blood flow using optical and ultrasonic techniques. However, extensive signal processing is required to convert the signals into a clinically interpretable form and lengthy analysis and clinical expertise was required to make the clinical diagnosis. If clinical diagnostics can be made to operate reliably in real-time preventative measures could be taken before ulceration occurs.

Recent advances in machine learning offer potential for artificially intelligent adaptive signal processing algorithms to track time varying biomedical signals and provide real-time detection of physiological abnormalities in at risk patients. This will allow for more rapid detection of physiological abnormalities allowing preventative measures to be applied early reducing the risk of more serious complications.

How to apply: Applications are made via our website using the Apply Online button below. If you have an enquiry about this project please contact us via the Email NOW button below, however your application will only be processed once you have submitted an application form as opposed to emailing your CV to us. Application deadline: 24 July 2017.

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Bournemouth University Faculty of Health & Social Sciences
Distance from Bournemouth: 0 miles
On this course you will usually be taught by a range of staff with relevant expertise and knowledge appropriate to the content of the unit. Read more
On this course you will usually be taught by a range of staff with relevant expertise and knowledge appropriate to the content of the unit. This will include senior academic staff, lecturer practitioners who work at the university and are in practice and other qualified healthcare professionals.

The course will facilitate the development of your critical appraisal, analytical and reflective skills, and enable you to integrate new advanced clinical skills and knowledge with your existing experience within your practice setting, in order to support the provision of high quality care and service delivery as an autonomous practitioner within a multi-disciplinary healthcare team.You can either opt to exit the course at this point with a PGDip Advanced Clinical Practice or continue onto the Master's stage.

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Bournemouth University Faculty of Science & Technology
Distance from Bournemouth: 0 miles
The own-group biases are indicated by superior recognition for faces of one’s own group relative to another group. These groups include ethnicity (Meissner & Brigham, 2001), gender (Wright & Sladden, 2001), age (Anastasi & Rhodes, 2007), and even university (Hugenberg, Millar, & Claypool, 2008). Read more
The own-group biases are indicated by superior recognition for faces of one’s own group relative to another group. These groups include ethnicity (Meissner & Brigham, 2001), gender (Wright & Sladden, 2001), age (Anastasi & Rhodes, 2007), and even university (Hugenberg, Millar, & Claypool, 2008). There are two broad theories explaining these biases: socio-cognitive motivational theories (Sporer, 2001) and perceptual theories (Valentine & Endo, 2002). Eye-tracking has been used to find evidence for both theories but using different groups thereby making any general conclusions about the own-group biases impossible. Evidence suggests that ethnicity determines how faces are viewed (Caldara et al., 2010; Hills, Cooper, & Pake, 2013). However, Hills & Willis (2016) and Man & Hills (in press) have found that people view own- and other-age and gender faces differently. This, therefore, suggests that these biases may be based on different mechanisms.

The proposed study will employ eye-tracking to explore four own-group biases described above using within-participant designs in order to rule out confounding variables and participant effects. Participants view 40 faces (half inverted to measure the face-inversion effect, Yin, 1969) and after a delay view 80 faces (half new) in a standard old/new recognition paradigm, repeated for each type of face.

How to apply: Applications are made via our website using the Apply Online button below. If you have an enquiry about this project please contact us via the Email NOW button below, however your application will only be processed once you have submitted an application form as opposed to emailing your CV to us. Application deadline: 24 July 2017.

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Bournemouth University Faculty of Health & Social Sciences
Distance from Bournemouth: 0 miles
This course will prepare practitioners to work in defined areas of community public health practice. You'll demonstrate achievement of the ‘Standards of Proficiency’ required by the Nursing & Midwifery Council (NMC 2004) for Registration as a Specialist Community Public Health Nurse (SCPHN) Health Visitor. Read more
This course will prepare practitioners to work in defined areas of community public health practice. You'll demonstrate achievement of the ‘Standards of Proficiency’ required by the Nursing & Midwifery Council (NMC 2004) for Registration as a Specialist Community Public Health Nurse (SCPHN) Health Visitor.

During the course you will be exposed to the breadth and depth of public health working and demonstrate your ability to participate safely in the practice of Health Visiting. You will be prepared to lead and manage the delivery of the Healthy Child Programme (DH 2009) provision in collaboration with other health and early year providers.

The course is equally divided between theory and practice based study, with attendance required at BU. 50% of the programme is practice based where your learning will be supported by a Practice Teacher within your seconding NHS Trust.

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Bournemouth University Faculty of Science & Technology
Distance from Bournemouth: 0 miles
This MRes Scholarship project aims to explore the methodologies behind the creation of location aware narrative and games. Read more
This MRes Scholarship project aims to explore the methodologies behind the creation of location aware narrative and games. The department of Creative Technology at Bournemouth University (where the student will be based) has a long history of excellence in teaching and research in games and was awarded the 2016 TIGA “Best Educational Institution Award” for Games. The department also includes multiple internationally recognised award-winning experts in interactive narrative who will be directly supervising the project making this an exciting opportunity for PhD study for a student with an interest in interactive entertainment, digital narratives, and game design.

The increasing prevalence of mobile technology has lead to an increase in consumption of digital content on devices that are portable but also have access to a rich variety of contextrual information through a variety of sensors. This includes locations aware stories and games such as dramatised tour guides and the highly successful pokemon go! Location aware narratives are an emerging form of digital storytelling that use location technologies to trigger content on smart devices according to a user’s location enabling an immersive context aware educational or entertainment experience. This prevalence has lead to an accelerating research field associated with it with seeking to understand the models behind this form of narrative as well as the associated poetics.This project seeks to explore the emerging authoring process behind location aware narrative and identify how the form changes the writing process. The project can be summarised by this research question:
How has location aware technology changed the writing and design process, and what can be done to better support location aware entertainment authorship and design?

How to apply: Applications are made via our website using the Apply Online button below. If you have an enquiry about this project please contact us via the Email NOW button below, however your application will only be processed once you have submitted an application form as opposed to emailing your CV to us. Application deadline: 24 July 2017.

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Bournemouth University Faculty of Science & Technology
Distance from Bournemouth: 0 miles
Interactive narrative techniques should be made compatible with the requirements of dialogue generation to support some of the aesthetic components of traditional media (intended as including humour, witticisms, etc.), however the challenges ahead remain complex. Read more
Interactive narrative techniques should be made compatible with the requirements of dialogue generation to support some of the aesthetic components of traditional media (intended as including humour, witticisms, etc.), however the challenges ahead remain complex.

This project aims to investigate new methodologies for the purpose of automatic generation of narratively meaningful dialogues between a virtual character and a human. We will explore a range of approaches at the interface between affective embodied conversational agents and interactive storytelling for a natural interaction with a human interlocutor. One of the remaining challenges in narrative dialogue generation is how a conversational agent can adapt to its interlocutor by means of modifying its dialogue intentions and information provisions as part of the on-going narrative context. This project will explore and evaluate existing techniques in affective computing, agent-based communication and narrative systems related to the generation of real-time interactive conversations between a virtual agent and a human, as well as devising specific approaches through the development of a prototype which will provide the test-bed for a large-scale user evaluation for validation.

How to apply: Applications are made via our website using the Apply Online button below. If you have an enquiry about this project please contact us via the Email NOW button below, however your application will only be processed once you have submitted an application form as opposed to emailing your CV to us. Application deadline: 24 July 2017.

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Bournemouth University Faculty of Media & Communication
Distance from Bournemouth: 0 miles
This is a unique programme for the Digital Entertainment Industry in partnership with the University of Bath. The Centre for Digital Entertainment (CDE) is a joint initiative between the Department of Computer Science at the University of Bath and the National Centre for Computer Animation at Bournemouth University. Read more
This is a unique programme for the Digital Entertainment Industry in partnership with the University of Bath.

The Centre for Digital Entertainment (CDE) is a joint initiative between the Department of Computer Science at the University of Bath and the National Centre for Computer Animation at Bournemouth University.

Awarded over £6 million pounds by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) the CDE's mission is to train the next generation of leaders in the computer animation, games and visual effects industries.

The CDE's innovative approach is to place Doctoral Candidates directly into companies, where you will work on real projects finding solutions to the challenges that face industry, supported by quality training drawn from a range of respected taught programmes from both Bournemouth and Bath University.

Through critical engagement with these projects and by contributing to new knowledge, Doctoral Candidates will leave the four year course with either an Engineering or Professional Doctorate (dependent on artistic or technical focus) and invaluable high level industry experience.

Doctoral Candidates will receive their tuition fees and a generous yearly stipend. We also welcome applications from people already working in the industry whose companies wish to engage with the CDE''s work. There are restrictions on EPSRC funding for non Home/EU students and we ask that you contact us to discuss your situation.

The Engineering Doctorate in Digital Media (EngD) is the most appropriate route for technical research while the Professional Practice in Digital Media (DProf) allows a suitable pathway for research more explicitly focussed in creative or managerial areas.

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Bournemouth University Faculty of Science & Technology
Distance from Bournemouth: 0 miles
Face recognition impairments (prosopagnosia) can present throughout life as a result of acquired or developmental influences. Yet, very little is known about early influences on the developmental trajectory of face recognition skills. Read more
Face recognition impairments (prosopagnosia) can present throughout life as a result of acquired or developmental influences. Yet, very little is known about early influences on the developmental trajectory of face recognition skills. While existing evidence indicates that face recognition difficulties appear to be influenced by genetics and early periods of atypical visual experience, other early influences may also impact the development and specialization of the face recognition system. Very recent evidence raises the possibility that premature birth and low birth rate influences face recognition skills in later childhood (Perez-Roche et al., 2017), although the trajectory of these impairments is unclear and it is unknown if they persist through to adulthood or are merely delayed. Further, it is possible that atypicalities in face-processing may be detectable from birth, or instead may manifest at a particular stage in development. Understanding this trajectory and the plasticity of the face-processing system during childhood is of fundamental importance in order for intervention to be appropriately conducted.

The current project will investigate the development trajectory of face recognition impairments that result from premature birth or low gestational weight. A large study will use age-appropriate dominant tests of face and object recognition ability to assess relevant perceptual and mnemonic skills in adults and children at various stages of development. Participants will be recruited who were born prematurely and/or experienced a low gestational weight and compared to appropriate age-matched control groups. Eye-movement data will also be collected in order to detect any abnormalities in face-processing strategy itself.

How to apply: Applications are made via our website using the Apply Online button below. If you have an enquiry about this project please contact us via the Email NOW button below, however your application will only be processed once you have submitted an application form as opposed to emailing your CV to us. Application Deadline: 24 July 2017.

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Bournemouth University Faculty of Science & Technology
Distance from Bournemouth: 0 miles
The Stroop effect demonstrates that the identification of the colour a word is presented in is slowed down when the word spells out a different colour (i.e. Read more
The Stroop effect demonstrates that the identification of the colour a word is presented in is slowed down when the word spells out a different colour (i.e. it is incongruent; e.g. the word ‘RED’ presented in blue) compared to when the word spells out a word that is unrelated to colour (e.g. the word ’ TOP’ presented in red). It is a commonly used paradigm to measure selective attention (see MacLeod, 1991, for a review) and is thought to arise due to the need to inhibit the automatic action of reading a word and performing the less practiced action of colour naming (see Cattell, 1886; MacLeod & MacDonald, 2000; MacLeod, 2005; Posner & Snyder, 1975). It is one of the most commonly used paradigms in cognitive and clinical psychological research and therefore it is important to understand the cognitive and neural mechanisms underpinning the task. Since the idea was initially put forward by Klein (1964), there have been studies showing that the Stroop effect is made up of interference at multiple levels. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) assays have investigated the separable neural representations of response and semantic conflict using a paradigm that maps two responses to one response key. The have shown that separate neural regions underpin these types of conflict. However, recent work has criticized this manipulation as a method for indexing semantic conflict (Hasshim & Parris, 2014; 2015). An alternative method is to use response set membership to manipulate the response and semantic conflict present on any trial (Hasshim & Parris, 2017). In separate work it has been argued that Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) of the Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex effects task level conflict (Vanderhasselt et al., 2006). The aim of the present project is to use both fMRI and TMS establish the role of the dorsolateral lateral prefrontal cortex and the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) in processing response, semantic and task conflict in this important cognitive and clinical task.

How to apply: Applications are made via our website using the Apply Online button below. If you have an enquiry about this project please contact us via the Email NOW button below, however your application will only be processed once you have submitted an application form as opposed to emailing your CV to us. Application deadline: 24th July 2017.

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Bournemouth University Faculty of Media & Communication
Distance from Bournemouth: 0 miles
The Bournemouth University Graduate Diploma in Law/Common Professional Examination (GDL/CPE) is a one year (or two year part-time) course, intended primarily for non-law graduates planning to enter the legal profession. Read more
The Bournemouth University Graduate Diploma in Law/Common Professional Examination (GDL/CPE) is a one year (or two year part-time) course, intended primarily for non-law graduates planning to enter the legal profession.

This course is primarily aimed at non-law graduates from UK universities who are planning to enter the legal profession. If you do not have a UK or Irish undergraduate degree but do have relevant academic qualifications or significant vocational experience, you may also be eligible to join the course – contact us for more details.

Although it is fundamentally aimed at entry to the legal profession, it is a highly valued qualification in its own right and supports a wide range of career opportunities. The course is approved by both The Bar Council and the SRA.

The course offers a learning environment with focused support and attention. The course is based around a small group which means you will benefit from individual time with our academic staff. The teaching team is made up of experienced academics whose education is informed by their professional qualifications and experience and by their research and publication interests.

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Bournemouth University Faculty of Science & Technology
Distance from Bournemouth: 0 miles
With the maturity of 3D acquisition technologies in recent years, the method of building virtual environments has been extended from the use of high-end laser scanners to commodity sensors. Read more
With the maturity of 3D acquisition technologies in recent years, the method of building virtual environments has been extended from the use of high-end laser scanners to commodity sensors. The availability of complex 3D data sets has accelerated the need for realistic virtual environments that encompass environmental information of multimodality that is beyond the visual representation.

This project will investigate acoustic sampling and synthesising techniques and algorithms, and explore a range of approaches and evaluation strategies for acoustics within the context of virtual environments.

Specifically a large set of challenges arises in this domain when considering a point set. Rendering of light paths in point clouds is currently approximated with surfels, this project will aim to solve the inherent problem of this approach when considering the broadband nature of the frequency content of sound in combination with the approaches for light path propagation.

The aim of this project is to interrogate this challenging area and synergise a range of solutions to the issue of psychoacoustics and interactive acoustic spatialisation in virtual environments. At each stage, human factor approaches may be required to evaluate the efficacy of the approaches developed.
How to apply: Applications are made via our website using the Apply Online button below. If you have an enquiry about this project please contact us via the Email NOW button below, however your application will only be processed once you have submitted an application form as opposed to emailing your CV to us. Application deadline: 24 July 2017.

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Bournemouth University Faculty of Science & Technology
Distance from Bournemouth: 0 miles
While digital game technology has been widely adopted for different application domains such as healthcare, training and education, creating and making changes to bespoke games remain a big challenge. Read more
While digital game technology has been widely adopted for different application domains such as healthcare, training and education, creating and making changes to bespoke games remain a big challenge. Game development using traditional design methods can add significant burden and costs to the research development process.

This project will investigate novel game scenario authoring methodologies, and explore a range of approaches and evaluation strategies for interactive editing and authoring of game scenarios in the context of character dialogues and game narratives. Specifically dialogue generations that give rise to in-game interactions will be investigated. Using the abstraction of scenario based training, dialogue authoring will create experiences where specific dramatic interactions between game characters will occur. This project will investigate the authoring and design considerations for game based training and aim to develop a node-based visual editing tool for scenario modification and variations with author-centric approaches. At each stage, HCI techniques may be required to evaluate the efficacy of the approaches developed.

How to apply: Applications are made via our website using the Apply Online button below. If you have an enquiry about this project please contact us via the Email NOW button below, however your application will only be processed once you have submitted an application form as opposed to emailing your CV to us. Application deadline: 24 July 2017.

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Bournemouth University Faculty of Media & Communication
Distance from Bournemouth: 0 miles
The purpose of the LPC is to equip you with the skills and knowledge necessary to enable you to enter your training contract with confidence and to feel at home in the exciting, demanding and rewarding world of legal practice. Read more
The purpose of the LPC is to equip you with the skills and knowledge necessary to enable you to enter your training contract with confidence and to feel at home in the exciting, demanding and rewarding world of legal practice. We offer the latest version of the LPC, which enables you to study the course in one year full-time, or over two years part-time, but whichever option suits you best, you’ll benefit from the supportive team environment that we work hard to cultivate.

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Bournemouth University Faculty of Media & Communication
Distance from Bournemouth: 0 miles
This course has been developed in collaboration with the Joint Examination Board of The Chartered Institute of Patent Attorneys (CIPA) and The Institute of Trade Mark Attorneys (ITMA). Read more
This course has been developed in collaboration with the Joint Examination Board of The Chartered Institute of Patent Attorneys (CIPA) and The Institute of Trade Mark Attorneys (ITMA).

The LLM in Intellectual Property can be achieved through a year-long programme that has been developed for both UK and international students.

The course is taught by academics of the renowned Centre for Intellectual Property Policy & Management, and enjoys input from intellectual property practitioners from some of the UK’s leading companies and practices.

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Bournemouth University Faculty of Media & Communication
Distance from Bournemouth: 0 miles
​Founded in the ancient silk and spice routes, international trade and commerce has spread to become the most significant activity of any modern economy. Read more
​Founded in the ancient silk and spice routes, international trade and commerce has spread to become the most significant activity of any modern economy.

The provision of goods and services in other countries increased dramatically in the second half of the 20th century, and today continues to reveal new markets, products and commercial practices.

Our LLM in International Commercial Law focuses on the legal regulation from the perspective of a common law jurisdiction, and the challenges presented through membership of the international and European communities.

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