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Bangor University, Full Time Masters Degrees in Biological Sciences

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Molecular Biology with Biotechnology (MSc). This taught MSc course in the School of Biological Sciences provides intensive training in this important area of Biology and is designed both for fresh graduates and for those wishing to develop and extend their expertise in this area. Read more
Molecular Biology with Biotechnology (MSc)

This taught MSc course in the School of Biological Sciences provides intensive training in this important area of Biology and is designed both for fresh graduates and for those wishing to develop and extend their expertise in this area. The course has a strong practical emphasis and will provide the advanced theoretical and practical background necessary for employment in the Biotechnology industry, as well as equipping students with the knowledge required to pursue advanced studies in this area.
Course structure

The course consists of a taught component and a Research project. During the taught phase of the degree, you will take modules in Marine Biotechnology, Molecular and Medical Laboratory Techniques, Techniques of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology; Systems Biology; Plant Biotechnology, Environmental Biotechnology and Medical Biotechnology.

Topics covered in these modules will include Agrobacterium Ti plasmid based plant transformation vectors and the development of transgenic crops; the use and interpretation of microarrays and proteome systems; the development of transgenic fish and the diagnosis of fish diseases using molecular markers; bioremediation, biomining and the use of bacteria to degrade novel organic pollutants; stem cell technologies and the diagnosis of genetic disease using single nucleotide polymorphisms. image of students in the labDuring this part of the course, you will also take part in intensive laboratory exercises designed to introduce you to essential techniques in molecular biology and biotechnology including nucleic acid and protein extraction, PCR and QTL analysis, northern, southern and western blotting etc. In addition, most of the taught theory modules will have an associated practical component. The Research project will take place during the summer and will be conducted under the direct supervision of one of the staff involved in teaching the course. Students will be able to choose their Research project from a wide range of topics which will be related to the taught material.

Career options

The 21st century post genomics era offers a wide range of job opportunities in the agricultural, medical, pharmaceutical, aquaculture, forensics and environmental science areas. The rapidly developing economies of China and India in particular have recognised the enormous opportunities offered by Biotechnology. Job openings in sales and marketing with companies who have a science base are also common. Some graduates will also choose to extend their knowledge base by undertaking PhD programmes in relevant areas.

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The MRes program is a full-time 1 year degree by research, and differs from an MSc in placing more importance on the research project. Read more
The MRes program is a full-time 1 year degree by research, and differs from an MSc in placing more importance on the research project. This degree will equip you with confidence and competence in the latest research skills and allow you to apply for further research training (PhD) programmes or to directly apply for research positions in universities or research institutes.

Course Structure

The course is composed of a taught component covering important generic skills such as literature searching, health and safety aspects, grant proposal writing, introduction to statistical manipulation of data (60 credits), and a research dissertation (120 credits). Your project plans will be developed as part of the generic skills component in association with your supervisor. As this is an important component of your degree, you are encouraged to approach a potential supervisor (information on staff research interests can be found on the relevant websites: School of Ocean Sciences, School of the Environment and Natural Resources, School of Biological Sciences) before you make a formal application.

What sort of careers will this train me for?

As well as finding specific employment based on the specialist knowledge acquired during postgraduate training, your general employability will be enhanced by evidence of your ability to work independently, think analytically and innovatively, and ability to conceptualise and question. During your studies, you will also have the chance to develop essential professional skills such as good communication, teamwork and leadership skills and enhance your practical experience.

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This MSc is a full-time one-year course, consisting of 9 months taught course and 3 months research project, and examined by continuous assessment. Read more
This MSc is a full-time one-year course, consisting of 9 months taught course and 3 months research project, and examined by continuous assessment. The course provides advanced training in marine biology with a strong emphasis on practical training.

The course provides training addressing the following major themes:

Marine Ecology Skills
Habitat Ecology / Coastal Survey
Marine Fisheries
Marine Vertebrates
Marine Invertebrates
Research Design & Planning
Research Project / Dissertation
The programme is achieved through a series of compulsory modules encompassing theory, practical, private study and practical research.

The School of Ocean Sciences at Bangor University has over 50 years experience of teaching at postgraduate level, and excellent teaching and research facilities for the study of the marine biology. Undergraduate teaching was graded excellent in the last Teaching Quality Assessment, and research was graded 4* in the Research Assessment Exercise. NERC has designated the School as a Centre of Excellence in Coastal Seas, Marine Biology and Biological Oceanography.

The MSc course in Marine Biology is one of a suite of 4 focused MSc courses in marine science run within the School. New students on this course are inducted to the University and School via an introductory course consisting of orientation through site tours, excursions and social events, and 5 weeks of quantifying biological variability, learning Information Technology, and practising presentation skills. Pre-sessional English language training courses are also available for overseas students.

The MSc course is managed by a course team comprising of the Course Director, Deputy Course Director and Postgraduate Course Administrator. The team report to the School Course Board, which in turn reports to the College of Natural Sciences. Each student has a personal tutor drawn from the teaching staff. The School has 30 academics teaching and researching across the marine science disciplines of Marine Biology (15), Biogeochemistry (2), Physical Oceanography (6) and Geological Oceanography (7) with a similar overall number of technical staff. Teaching on the MSc Marine Biology will be provided from 'in house' in the main, but additional teaching will be provided from the University's School of Biological Sciences and the National Museum of Wales.

The MSc course is housed in a fully serviced and dedicated postgraduate suite. The School is located on the shores of the Menai Strait which separates the Isle of Anglesey from the mainland. The Menai Strait is a proposed Statutory Marine Resource and EU Special Area of Conservation and there are unspoilt marine environments relatively close by.

The University's newly refurbished science library is located in nearby in Bangor. Specialist facilities in the School include temperate and tropical aquaria, satellite imaging processing and Geographical Information System computing, diving and field survey operations (including ROVs and sledges) and laboratories for benthic analysis, nutrition, microbiology, genetics, radiochemical analysis, stable isotopes, sediments and organic chemistry, scanning electron microscopy. An additional strength in our field teaching, is work at sea aboard the only ocean-going research vessel in the Higher Education sector (RV Prince Madog), which entered service in 2001.

MSc course students can benefit from the School's links with other institutions, especially for research project opportunities. Such links presently include the Virginia Institute of Marine Science, U.S.A., University of Mauritius, Catholic University Chile etc.

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This taught one-year course will give students a thorough understanding of all aspects of wetland science and ecology. Students will also gain experience and knowledge on the complex conservation, restoration and management issues associated with wetlands. Read more
This taught one-year course will give students a thorough understanding of all aspects of wetland science and ecology. Students will also gain experience and knowledge on the complex conservation, restoration and management issues associated with wetlands. Field and laboratory work will cover the latest techniques in environmental analysis needed for contemporary wetland monitoring and experimentation.

Taught wetland and conservation modules

Wetland ecology
Classification of wetland types
Properties and functions of wetlands
Wetland zoology and botanical adaptations
Wetland hydrology and biogeochemistry
Carbon sequestration in wetlands
Use of wetlands for carbon offsetting
Wetland conservation and restoration techniques
Use and design of constructed wetlands
Wetland plant identification

Instrumental and environmental analysis

Students will learn a variety of instrumental analysis techniques suitable for ecologists interested in environmental analysis and those studying a wide variety of aquatic and terrestrial habitats – not just wetlands. The theory, practical use and basic maintenance of the instruments will be covered, along with sample collection and analysis.

The lab and field based techniques covered include:

pH, conductivity and Redox potential
Greenhouse gas (GHG) collection and analysis using a gas chromatograph (GC) and infra-red gas analysis (IRGA)
Cation and anion concentration analysis using ion chromatography (IC)
Stable isotope analysis with an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS)

Wetland-based research project

The research project comprises a third of the MSc and is supervised by research active staff with excellent publication record and experience in their field.
Career Options

Students choosing this MSc will enjoy a modular course that will teach both the practical and theoretical aspects of wetland science and conservation. Successful students will therefore develop the skills and experience required to enable progression onto PhD studies in a wide-range of biological, biogeochemical, environmental and conservation based subjects.

The course will also allow students to seek employment in areas related to wetlands, soil science, water treatment and quality, conservation and environmental consultancy.

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Overview. Advances in molecular biology have enabled major developments in biotechnology which in turn has lead to huge advances in medicine, molecular biology and industry. Read more
Overview
Advances in molecular biology have enabled major developments in biotechnology which in turn has lead to huge advances in medicine, molecular biology and industry. Students choosing this MSc degree will enjoy a comprehensive course that covers the key aspects of practical and theoretical medically-related molecular biology, developing advanced skills in this area.

Description
The course is composed of a modular 120-credit taught component and a 60-credit research project and dissertation. The taught component covers a broad range of medical molecular topics and techniques and includes thorough laboratory training. The course is run in conjuncture with our School of Medicine to ensure that students gain a broad view of modern molecular biology and laboratory techniques.

Overseas Students
A two-year course aimed at students from non-European Union countries who come to the UK requiring pre-MSc level training in English language and basic pre-MSc molecular biology. The first year of this course will bring students up to a level where they will be capable of studying for a full MSc degree and it will develop English language skills to the minimum level required for MSc level learning. Year one will be run in conjunction with ELCOS (English Language Courses for Overseas Students). Students can obtain the minimal English certification for MSc entry.

Module list (1st year of English-life sciences modules)
The English language content and life sciences teaching are integrated to enable students to undertake MSc level life-sciences modules through the medium of English

Life-sciences for none native English speakers - 50 credits
Academic Writing & Grammar
Speaking & Listening
Ad.Vocabulary Use & Reading
Near Native English 1
Near Native English 2

Modules list: (for first year of 1 year course and 2nd year of 2 year course)

Semester 1
Molecular and Medical Techniques
Techniques of molecular biology and biotechnology
Medical microbes viruses and parasites
Development, cancer and the human body
Genomes and Genetics
IT skills for medical and molecular research

Semester2
Project preparation course
Medical Biotechnology
Cellular causes of disease
Biomarkers in autoimmunity

Summer term
Research Project (Experimental research into a medical/molecular or genetics research topic)

Aims and Objectives
* Provide an excellent grounding in laboratory techniques and a critical approach to research planning and implementation.
* Develop understanding of molecular biology and the molecular basis of disease.
* Develop transferable skills, including their ability to work as a member of a team, and communicate in scientific writing and speech.
* Provide the opportunity for students to gain and enhance skills required by research organisations and biotechnology companies.
*Provide the ability to attain a level required to carry out research for a higher degree (PhD) in medical molecular and related areas.

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The MRes program is a full-time 1 year degree by research, and differs from an MSc in placing more importance on the research project. Read more
The MRes program is a full-time 1 year degree by research, and differs from an MSc in placing more importance on the research project. However, the MRes in Ecology is built on the strong foundation of the former MSc in Ecology which ran at Bangor for over 40 years and which has an excellent reputation in the UK and internationally, among employers and academics in the field. Many of them have been through the course at Bangor! This degree will equip you with confidence and competence in the latest research skills and allow you to apply for further research training (PhD) programmes or to directly apply for research positions in universities or research institutes. Note that this course title is subject to validation and the programme described here is currently running under the MRes in Natural Sciences degree.

Course Structure

The course is composed of a modular taught component (100 credits) and a research dissertation (80 credits). The taught component covers important generic skills such as literature searching, health and safety aspects, grant proposal writing, introduction to statistical manipulation of data (60 credits), as well as theoretical and practical skills in molecular ecology and evolutionary ecology (40 credits), including the opportunity for a tropical field course in Dominica, West Indies, or equivalent fieldwork locally.

What sort of projects would be available to me?

As a result of extensive national and international staff contacts, range of research topics and experience, students are often able to carry out their research projects in association with commercial consultancies, local councils, environmental organisations in the UK (eg the Environment Agency, Countryside Council for Wales, RSPB), government research institutes (eg Centre for Ecology and Hydrology) and abroad (past projects have involved fieldwork in the West Indies, Africa, Maldives, and various European countries). We are situated in an area of outstanding natural beauty and a rich variety of habitats are within easy reach. We also have excellent facilities for undertaking top quality research, such as the state-of-the art molecular ecology laboratories in the Environment Centre Wales (shared with the CEH Bangor), a purpose-built environmentally-friendly building that was opened by PM Gordon Brown in 2008. Topics on offer cover the whole range of ecology and include projects in both pure and applied research. Due to the extended nature of the MRes research project, a module on project planning precedes the start of their dissertation period, providing guidance and support for the development of their research project.

Projects offered in previous years include:

* Energetics and flight performance of homing pigeons
* Evolution, behaviour and ecology of tropical fish
* Investigating mimetic relationships in Amazonian Corydoras catfish
* Molecular phylogeny and phylogeography of anacondas
* New approaches to the study of the evolution of venom genes in pitvipers
* Biodiversity and multiple ecosystem services in low productivity coastal habitats
* Growth patterns and life history in migratory brown trout, Salmo trutta, in rivers around the Irish Sea
* Genetic basis of life history shifts in guppies

What sort of careers will this train me for?

As well as finding specific employment based on the specialist knowledge acquired during postgraduate training, your general employability will be enhanced by evidence of your ability to work independently, think analytically and innovatively, and ability to conceptualise and question. During your studies, you will also have the chance to develop essential professional skills such as good communication, teamwork and leadership skills and enhance your practical experience. Our past graduates (in MSc Ecology) have gone on to careers in research (both in academia and research institutes) as well as in commercial environmental consultancies, DEFRA, water authorities, landscape architects and many others.

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The emergence of the Law of the Sea Convention and establishment of Exclusive Economic Zones has given coastal states extensive and comprehensive rights and obligations over marine resources in vast areas of ocean. Read more
The emergence of the Law of the Sea Convention and establishment of Exclusive Economic Zones has given coastal states extensive and comprehensive rights and obligations over marine resources in vast areas of ocean. Wise management of ocean resources is essential if the full economic potential of these new entitlements is to be realised. To ensure the continuing biological productivity of these areas, the level and type of development of activities such as waste dumping, mineral extraction, recreation, industrial and urban growth, fisheries and aquaculture, need to be controlled, and interactions of these often conflicting activities resolved by management.

This MSc is a full-time one-year course, consisting of 9 months taught course and 3 months research project, and examined by continuous assessment. The course provides theoretical and practical training in measuring and quantifying marine resources and the effects of conflicting usage upon them. It provides a sound scientific basis on which to develop policy and make decisions on marine resource exploitation and protection around the world.

Course Aims
To broaden the student's awareness of the economic potential of the ocean, to generate an understanding of the major marine biological resources and the physical processes controlling these resources, to provide theoretical and practical training in measuring and quantifying these resources and the effects of conflicting usage upon them, to enhance those skills necessary to manage effectively the sea area of national jurisdiction, and to produce graduates with appropriate experience for developing policy and making decisions on marine resources and other marine uses for their individual countries or regions. To date, most graduates have taken up employment in the field of marine environmental protection in the UK and abroad.

You will receive training in the following major modules:

Marine Ecology Skills
Marine Fisheries
Coastal Habitat Ecology and Survey
Marine Environmental Impacts and their Assessment
Marine Conservation and Coastal Zone Management
Research Project design and Planning
Research Project and Dissertation
Modules combine different learning approaches, including taught lectures, seminars and working groups, practicals in the laboratory, on the shore or at sea, as well as personal study and practical research.

Skills Trained
The broad areas covered in each module are outlined below. For more detail on what our current students are studying you can take a look at our online module information.

Marine Ecology Skills
Experimental and survey design
Statistical techniques
Ship work
Taxonomic Workshop
Marine benthos survey
Statistical analysis
Report writing
Marine Fisheries
Fisheries biology
Fisheries resources
Fisheries survey at sea
Population dynamics of fin fish
Coastal Habitat Ecology and Survey
Coastal habitat ecology
Survey techniques
Planning biological surveys
Risk assessment
Team field survey
Marine Environmental Impacts and their Assessment
Physical and chemical processes causing impacts
Development of the coastal zone
Environmental Impact Assessment
Preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement
Consultant / Developer interviews
EIA public meeting
Marine Conservation and Coastal Zone Management
Environmental remote sensing and Geographical Information Systems
Coastal Zone Law
Socioeconomics
Biodiversity
Conservation
Sustainability
Integrated Coastal Zone Management
Coastal Zone Management Conference
Research Project Design and Planning
Literature review
Project proposal development
Scientific peer review
Research Project and Dissertation
Health and Safety
Practical research at home or overseas
20,000 word dissertation

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Part 1 (120 credits). runs from September to May and consists of four taught modules, a Field Visit, and a Research Methods module component. Read more
Part 1 (120 credits): runs from September to May and consists of four taught modules, a Field Visit, and a Research Methods module component. They must be completed successfully before proceeding to Part 2.

Part 2 (60 credits): is the dissertation phase and runs from end of May to September. This is a supervised project phase which gives students further opportunity for specialisation in their chosen field. Dissertation topics are related to the interests and needs of the individual and must show evidence of wide reading and understanding as well as critical analysis or appropriate use of advanced techniques. The quality of the dissertation is taken into account in the award of the Masters degree. Bangor University regulations prescribe a maximum word limit of 20,000 words for Masters Dissertations. A length of 12,000 to 15,000 words is suggested for Masters programmes in our School.

Summary of modules taken in Part 1:

All students undertake 6 modules of 20 credits each which are described below.

Conservation Science considers questions such as ‘in a post-wild world what should be the focus of conservation attention?’ ‘What are the relative roles of ecology, economics and social science in conservation?’ ‘What are the advantage and disadvantages of the introduction of market-like mechanisms into conservation policy?’ We look closely at the current and emerging drivers of biodiversity loss world-wide, while carefully analysing the range of responses.

Insect Pollinators and Plants is at the interface between agriculture and conservation, this module introduces students to plant ecology and insect pollinators. Students will gain unique understanding of the ecological interactions between plants and insect pollinators including honey-bees to implement more sensitive conservation management. The module explores the current conservation status of insect pollinators and their corresponding plant groups; how populations are monitored, and how interventions in the broader landscape can contribute to improving their conservation status. Module components relate specifically to ecosystem pollination services, apiculture and habitat restoration and/or maintenance. The module has a strong practical skills focus, which includes beekeeping and contemporary challenges to apiculture; plant and insect sampling and habitat surveying. Consequently, there is a strong emphasis on “learning by doing.

Agriculture and the Environment reviews the impact of agricultural systems and practices on the environment and the scientific principles involved. It includes examples from a range of geographical areas. It is now recognised that many of the farming practices adopted in the 1980’s and early 1990’s, aimed at maximising production and profit, have had adverse effects on the environment. These include water and air pollution, soil degradation, loss of certain habitats and decreased biodiversity. In the UK and Europe this has led to the introduction of regulatory instruments and codes of practice aimed at minimising these problems and the promotion of new approaches to managing farmland. However, as world population continues to rise, there are increased concerns about food security, particularly in stressful environments such as arid zones where farmers have to cope with natural problems of low rainfall and poor soils. Although new technologies including the use of GM crops have potential to resolve some of these issues, concerns have been expressed about the impact of the release of these new genetically-engineered crops into the environment.

Management Planning for Conservation provides students with an understanding of the Conservation Management System approach to management planning. This involves describing a major habitat feature at a high level of definition; the preparation of a conservation objective (with performance indicators) for the habitat; identification and consideration of the implications of all factors and thus the main management activities; preparation of a conceptual model of the planning process for a case study site and creating maps using spatial data within a desktop GIS.

Research Methods Module: this prepares students for the dissertation stage of their MSc course. The module provides students with an introduction to principles of hypothesis generation, sampling, study design, spatial methods, social research methods, quantitative & qualitative analysis and presentation of research findings. Practicals and field visits illustrate examples of these principles. Course assessment is aligned to the research process from the proposal stage, through study write up to presentation of results. The module is in two phases. The taught content phase is until the period following Christmas. This is followed by a project planning phase for dissertation title choice and plan preparation.

Field Visit Module: this is an annual programme of scientific visits related to Conservation and Land Management. The main purpose of the trip will be to appreciate the range of activities different conservation organisations are undertaking, to understand their different management objectives and constraints. Previous field trips have visited farms, forests and reserves run by Scottish Wildlife Trust, National Trust, RSPB, local authorities, community groups and private individuals.

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The course is a two-year world-class integrated programme aimed at qualifying graduates to deal with the huge challenges facing temperate forestry, agriculture and sustainable land use. Read more
The course is a two-year world-class integrated programme aimed at qualifying graduates to deal with the huge challenges facing temperate forestry, agriculture and sustainable land use. The teaching staff are research active and the students will benefit from our wide range of research activities and contacts in the UK and overseas.

By joining the teaching and research experiences of five European leading educational institutions, this unique course will constitute an in-depth educational programme with inherent impetus to stay at the forefront of research-based teaching strongly linked to realities in many European and non-European countries.

The SUFONAMA course is offered by a consortium consisting of five institutions:

Danish Centre for Forest, Landscape and Planning,
Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark,
School of the Environment and Natural Resources, Bangor University, Bangor, Wales, UK,
of Forest Sciences and Ecology, University of Goettingen, Faculty Goettingen, Germany,
Southern Swedish Forest Research Centre, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Alnarp, Sweden, and
Faculty of Agriculture, University of Padova, Padova, Italy.
Detailed information on the SUFONAMA Masters course is available at: http://www.sufonama.eu/

ICF logoThis course is accredited by the Institute of Chartered Foresters and gives partial fulfilment of Professional Membership Entry.

This web-page describes the Sustainable Forest and Nature Management course as structured in the current academic session. While the aims of the programme and the broad structure of the degree are similar from year to year, details may change over time to meet the requirements of the profession and of academic audits, and to ensure that the programme remains effective and up-to-date.

First Year

The Course consists of a first study year at one of three institutions (Bangor, Copenhagen, Goettingen) and a specialising second study year with different topics offered by each of the five institutions. The students are required to spend the second year at another university than the first one. The aim of the first study year is to provide a thorough and broad introduction to sustainable forest and nature management. The learning outcomes are similar for the three first year institutions and allow students to choose freely among the five specialisation options in the second year. The first study year ends with a Joint Summer Module, run as a two-week excursion to a Consortium country.

Second Year

You can specialise in the second year within the following topics:

Conservation and Land Management (Bangor)
Management of Forest and Nature for Society Copenhagen)
Forest and Nature Management in Changing Climate (Göttingen)
Forest Management in Scandinavia and the Baltic Region (Alnarp)
Mountain Forestry and Watershed Management (Padova).
The specialisation includes a master thesis based on research and fieldwork inside or outside the EU. When students have acquired 120 ECTS by studying at two Consortium institutions (at least 60 ECTS at each) they will obtain a SUFONAMA double degree and the Diploma Supplement. All SUFONAMA modular activities can be completed in English. The following degrees are awarded: MSc in Forestry in Copenhagen, MSc in Environmental Forestry and MSc in Conservation and Land Management in Bangor, MSc in Forestry in Goettingen, MSc in Forestry in Alnarp, and MSc in Forestry and Environmental Sciences in Padova.

Bangor Compulsory Modules:

Forest Resource Assessment: This module provides an introduction to world forest resources and policy
Silviculture: this module provides an understanding of temperate silviculture and forest management. It also highlights the interaction of management systems with the physical environment
Natural Resource Management: This module provides students a theoretical & practical understanding of the systems approach to managing natural resources to provide various ecosystem services.
Location Specific Knowledge and fieldwork in temperate forest and nature management: This module is essentially designed to allow for in-depth preparation for field work in temperate forest and nature management.
Contemporary temperate forest and nature management: climate change and management strategies: This module deals with a current hot topic and can take in students globally through its e-learning format
Preparing Field Work in the Temperate: This module develops in-depth factual location specific knowledge relevant to temperate forestry issues
Sustainable Temperate Forestry Management Summer School – this module applies data collection and evaluation methods in the field.

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Medical Molecular Biology is the application of modern molecular biology and genetics in medical research, medical sciences and the clinic has led to huge advances in the understanding, diagnosis and treatment of human disease. Read more
Medical Molecular Biology is the application of modern molecular biology and genetics in medical research, medical sciences and the clinic has led to huge advances in the understanding, diagnosis and treatment of human disease. Students choosing to study the Medical Molecular Biology with Genetics program will enjoy a modular, but highly integrated course that delivers the theoretical knowledge and extensive practical laboratory experience required for progress on to PhD studies in medical molecular research and/or employment in molecular diagnostics or medical sciences industries.

Successful graduates will also have attained transferable skills required to independently adapt and optimize scientific methodologies, critically interpret and evaluate self-generated and published scientific literature and data and undertake a predominantly self-reliant approach to laboratory based work, study and research.

Modules:

Research Skills
Medical Biotechnology
Human Molecular Genetics
Human Immunology & Disease
Laboratory Molecular Research
Stem Cells, Disease & Therapy
Applied Anatomy & Histopathology
Research projects are run in the Robert Edwards laboratory and the laboratories of the North West Cancer Research Institute.

Semester 3 consists of a 60-credit laboratory based research project and dissertation.

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This course aims to develop students’ theoretical understanding of issues at the forefront of research in sport and exercise physiology. Read more
This course aims to develop students’ theoretical understanding of issues at the forefront of research in sport and exercise physiology. It has been designed to be flexible and relevant to the student’s individual needs and interests, with a strong emphasis on developing students’ ability to question current thinking and propose alternative evidence based actions/hypotheses.

Within the modular structure all students undertake core/compulsory modules in:

Supervised Experience – a module tailored to the needs of the individual and include directed work with a specified client group or individual;
MA Research Skills;
Dissertation Proposal and Dissertation relevant to the programme being studied.
Supervised Experience
The content of this module will be largely student specific and include activities (workshops, directed reading, client based work) that will develop the individual’s personal applied support skills. Initially, students complete an individual self-assessment of their current skills/knowledge base and set personal goals to enable them to improve their applied support skills. All students will attend units (workshops) on Ethics in Research and consultancy, communication and counselling skills and how to conduct a needs assessment. Specific physiology and psychology workshops (eg Imagery) will also take place.

Students will complete a contract of intended activities agreed with their supervisor in the first four weeks of their programme of study. This contract may, where appropriate, include the intention to apply to British Association of Sport and Exercise Science (BASES) to commence a formally logged Supervised Experience.

A portfolio will then be developed; the portfolio records activities including meetings with supervisor, attendance at workshops, meetings and a plan of work with at least one client, and thought/evaluations of all meetings and workshops (ie evidence of reflective practice).

MA Research Skills
This module covers material relevant to the design and analysis of both quantitative and qualitative research. It aims to enable students to critically evaluate the statistical procedures that have been used by other quantitative researchers; design and statistically analyse their own true experiments, quasi-experiments and non-experimental hypothesis testing studies and appreciate the assumptions of qualitative research and demonstrate knowledge of data collection and analysis procedures.

Overview and Format of the MA Dissertation related modules
The goal of the Dissertation Proposal module is to fully prepare the student for successful completion of the subsequent MA Dissertation. Literature searching, presentation, and scholarly writing skills will be honed. To achieve this, the student will work along side a supervisor to identify a broad topic ripe for review. Upon development of an initial layout for the Dissertation, one or possibly two areas of the topic are reviewed. As such a deliberately narrow and abbreviated review is conducted better allowing the student to gain clear and progressive understanding of the levels of thoroughness and critical thinking associated with a MA Dissertation.

Students will receive tutorials and guidance in planning a literature search, identifying and gathering a literature, preparing a literature review, developing a dissertation proposal, and making an oral presentation of the proposal.

In their Dissertation module, students will compose a literature review and develop a proposition that they will advance as an argument. The resulting written report will demonstrate in-depth knowledge of the chosen topic.

Students also study two additional compulsory modules in Clinical Exercise Physiology and Performance Physiology, plus one module from:

Sport Psychology;
Effective Coaching;
Disability and Rehabilitation;
Rehabilitation of the Injured Athlete.
The programme is delivered using a variety of teaching methods, including lectures, seminars, workshops, group activities, practical work, tutorials and role play. Each module comprises approximately 200 hours of student time (including formal contact).

Future Career
This course could enable students to develop their careers in a number of ways. The course is primarily aimed at students who wish to pursue sport or health related careers that do not involve conducting empirical research.

The MA is especially recommended to graduates who want to pursue a career in sport or health related fields, such as rehabilitation, coaching, leisure and fitness; pursue a career in related fields such as education and social services; give their CV an additional boost; explore a particular area of sport or health sciences in detail through researching and writing a literature review.

NB – This course is not appropriate for students wishing to progress onto academic research via a science based PhD.

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This course aims to develop students’ theoretical understanding of issues at the forefront of research in sport and exercise psychology. Read more
This course aims to develop students’ theoretical understanding of issues at the forefront of research in sport and exercise psychology. It has been designed to be flexible and relevant to the student’s individual needs and interests, with a strong emphasis on developing students’ ability to question current thinking and propose alternative evidence based actions/hypotheses.

Within the modular structure all students undertake core/compulsory modules in:

Supervised Experience – a module tailored to the needs of the individual and include directed work with a specified client group or individual;
MA Research Skills;
Dissertation Proposal and Dissertation relevant to the programme being studied.
Supervised Experience
The content of this module will be largely student specific and include activities (workshops, directed reading, client based work) that will develop the individual’s personal applied support skills. Initially, students complete an individual self-assessment of their current skills/knowledge base and set personal goals to enable them to improve their applied support skills. All students will attend units (workshops) on Ethics in Research and consultancy, communication and counselling skills and how to conduct a needs assessment. Specific physiology and psychology workshops (eg Imagery) will also take place.

Students will complete a contract of intended activities agreed with their supervisor in the first four weeks of their programme of study. This contract may, where appropriate, include the intention to apply to British Association of Sport and Exercise Science (BASES) to commence a formally logged Supervised Experience.

A portfolio will then be developed; the portfolio records activities including meetings with supervisor, attendance at workshops, meetings and a plan of work with at least one client, and thought/evaluations of all meetings and workshops (ie evidence of reflective practice).

MA Research Skills
This module covers material relevant to the design and analysis of both quantitative and qualitative research. It aims to enable students to critically evaluate the statistical procedures that have been used by other quantitative researchers; design and statistically analyse their own true experiments, quasi-experiments and non-experimental hypothesis testing studies and appreciate the assumptions of qualitative research and demonstrate knowledge of data collection and analysis procedures.

Overview and Format of the MA Dissertation related modules
The goal of the Dissertation Proposal module is to fully prepare the student for successful completion of the subsequent MA Dissertation. Literature searching, presentation, and scholarly writing skills will be honed. To achieve this, the student will work along side a supervisor to identify a broad topic ripe for review. Upon development of an initial layout for the Dissertation, one or possibly two areas of the topic are reviewed. As such a deliberately narrow and abbreviated review is conducted better allowing the student to gain clear and progressive understanding of the levels of thoroughness and critical thinking associated with a MA Dissertation.

Students will receive tutorials and guidance in planning a literature search, identifying and gathering a literature, preparing a literature review, developing a dissertation proposal, and making an oral presentation of the proposal.

In their Dissertation module, students will compose a literature review and develop a proposition that they will advance as an argument. The resulting written report will demonstrate in-depth knowledge of the chosen topic.

Students also study two additional compulsory modules in Sport Psychology and Exercise Psychology, plus one module from:

Effective Coaching;
Rehabilitation of the Injured Athlete.
The programme is delivered using a variety of teaching methods, including lectures, seminars, workshops, group activities, practical work, tutorials and role play. Each module comprises approximately 200 hours of student time (including formal contact).

Future Career
This course could enable students to develop their careers in a number of ways. The course is primarily aimed at students who wish to pursue sport or health related careers that do not involve conducting empirical research.

The MA is especially recommended to graduates who want to pursue a career in sport or health related fields, such as rehabilitation, coaching, leisure and fitness; pursue a career in related fields such as education and social services; give their CV an additional boost; explore a particular area of sport or health sciences in detail through researching and writing a literature review.

NB – This course is not appropriate for students wishing to progress onto academic research via a science based PhD.

Read less
This course aims to develop students’ theoretical understanding of issues at the forefront of research in sport science. Read more
This course aims to develop students’ theoretical understanding of issues at the forefront of research in sport science. It has been designed to be flexible and relevant to the student’s individual needs and interests, with a strong emphasis on developing students’ ability to question current thinking and propose alternative evidence based actions/hypotheses.

Within the modular structure all students undertake core/compulsory modules in:

Supervised Experience – a module tailored to the needs of the individual and include directed work with a specified client group or individual;
MA Research Skills;
Dissertation Proposal and Dissertation relevant to the programme being studied.
Supervised Experience
The content of this module will be largely student specific and include activities (workshops, directed reading, client based work) that will develop the individual’s personal applied support skills. Initially, students complete an individual self-assessment of their current skills/knowledge base and set personal goals to enable them to improve their applied support skills. All students will attend units (workshops) on Ethics in Research and consultancy, communication and counselling skills and how to conduct a needs assessment. Specific physiology and psychology workshops (eg Imagery) will also take place.

Students will complete a contract of intended activities agreed with their supervisor in the first four weeks of their programme of study. This contract may, where appropriate, include the intention to apply to British Association of Sport and Exercise Science (BASES) to commence a formally logged Supervised Experience.

A portfolio will then be developed; the portfolio records activities including meetings with supervisor, attendance at workshops, meetings and a plan of work with at least one client, and thought/evaluations of all meetings and workshops (ie evidence of reflective practice).

MA Research Skills
This module covers material relevant to the design and analysis of both quantitative and qualitative research. It aims to enable students to critically evaluate the statistical procedures that have been used by other quantitative researchers; design and statistically analyse their own true experiments, quasi-experiments and non-experimental hypothesis testing studies and appreciate the assumptions of qualitative research and demonstrate knowledge of data collection and analysis procedures.

Overview and Format of the MA Dissertation related modules
The goal of the Dissertation Proposal module is to fully prepare the student for successful completion of the subsequent MA Dissertation. Literature searching, presentation, and scholarly writing skills will be honed. To achieve this, the student will work along side a supervisor to identify a broad topic ripe for review. Upon development of an initial layout for the Dissertation, one or possibly two areas of the topic are reviewed. As such a deliberately narrow and abbreviated review is conducted better allowing the student to gain clear and progressive understanding of the levels of thoroughness and critical thinking associated with a MA Dissertation.

Students will receive tutorials and guidance in planning a literature search, identifying and gathering a literature, preparing a literature review, developing a dissertation proposal, and making an oral presentation of the proposal.

In their Dissertation module, students will compose a literature review and develop a proposition that they will advance as an argument. The resulting written report will demonstrate in-depth knowledge of the chosen topic.

Students also choose three modules from:

Clinical Exercise Physiology;
Sport Psychology;
Effective Coaching;
Exercise Psychology;
Disability and Rehabilitation;
Rehabilitation of the Injured Athlete.
The programme is delivered using a variety of teaching methods, including lectures, seminars, workshops, group activities, practical work, tutorials and role play. Each module comprises approximately 200 hours of student time (including formal contact).

Future Career
This course could enable students to develop their careers in a number of ways. The course is primarily aimed at students who wish to pursue sport or health related careers that do not involve conducting empirical research.

The MA is especially recommended to graduates who want to pursue a career in sport or health related fields, such as rehabilitation, coaching, leisure and fitness; pursue a career in related fields such as education and social services; give their CV an additional boost; explore a particular area of sport or health sciences in detail through researching and writing a literature review.

NB – This course is not appropriate for students wishing to progress onto academic research via a science based PhD.

Read less
This course aims to develop students’ theoretical understanding of issues at the forefront of research in sport science and outdoor activities. Read more
This course aims to develop students’ theoretical understanding of issues at the forefront of research in sport science and outdoor activities. It has been designed to be flexible and relevant to the student’s individual needs and interests, with a strong emphasis on developing students’ ability to question current thinking and propose alternative evidence based actions/hypotheses.

Within the modular structure all students undertake core/compulsory modules in:

Supervised Experience – a module tailored to the needs of the individual and include directed work with a specified client group or individual;
MA Research Skills;
Dissertation Proposal and Dissertation relevant to the programme being studied.
Supervised Experience
The content of this module will be largely student specific and include activities (workshops, directed reading, client based work) that will develop the individual’s personal applied support skills. Initially, students complete an individual self-assessment of their current skills/knowledge base and set personal goals to enable them to improve their applied support skills. All students will attend units (workshops) on Ethics in Research and consultancy, communication and counselling skills and how to conduct a needs assessment. Specific physiology and psychology workshops (eg Imagery) will also take place.

Students will complete a contract of intended activities agreed with their supervisor in the first four weeks of their programme of study. This contract may, where appropriate, include the intention to apply to British Association of Sport and Exercise Science (BASES) to commence a formally logged Supervised Experience.

A portfolio will then be developed; the portfolio records activities including meetings with supervisor, attendance at workshops, meetings and a plan of work with at least one client, and thought/evaluations of all meetings and workshops (ie evidence of reflective practice).

MA Research Skills
This module covers material relevant to the design and analysis of both quantitative and qualitative research. It aims to enable students to critically evaluate the statistical procedures that have been used by other quantitative researchers; design and statistically analyse their own true experiments, quasi-experiments and non-experimental hypothesis testing studies and appreciate the assumptions of qualitative research and demonstrate knowledge of data collection and analysis procedures.

Overview and Format of the MA Dissertation related modules
The goal of the Dissertation Proposal module is to fully prepare the student for successful completion of the subsequent MA Dissertation. Literature searching, presentation, and scholarly writing skills will be honed. To achieve this, the student will work along side a supervisor to identify a broad topic ripe for review. Upon development of an initial layout for the Dissertation, one or possibly two areas of the topic are reviewed. As such a deliberately narrow and abbreviated review is conducted better allowing the student to gain clear and progressive understanding of the levels of thoroughness and critical thinking associated with a MA Dissertation.

Students will receive tutorials and guidance in planning a literature search, identifying and gathering a literature, preparing a literature review, developing a dissertation proposal, and making an oral presentation of the proposal.

In their Dissertation module, students will compose a literature review and develop a proposition that they will advance as an argument. The resulting written report will demonstrate in-depth knowledge of the chosen topic.

Students also study an additional compulsory module in Higher Skills, plus choose two modules from:

Sport Psychology;
Effective Coaching;
Performance Physiology;
Rehabilitation of the Injured Athlete.
The programme is delivered using a variety of teaching methods, including lectures, seminars, workshops, group activities, practical work, tutorials and role play. Each module comprises approximately 200 hours of student time (including formal contact).

Future Career
This course could enable students to develop their careers in a number of ways. The course is primarily aimed at students who wish to pursue sport or health related careers that do not involve conducting empirical research.

The MA is especially recommended to graduates who want to pursue a career in sport or health related fields, such as rehabilitation, coaching, leisure and fitness; pursue a career in related fields such as education and social services; give their CV an additional boost; explore a particular area of sport or health sciences in detail through researching and writing a literature review.

NB – This course is not appropriate for students wishing to progress onto academic research via a science based PhD.

Read less
This course aims to develop students’ theoretical understanding of issues at the forefront of research in exercise rehabilitation. Read more
This course aims to develop students’ theoretical understanding of issues at the forefront of research in exercise rehabilitation. It has been designed to be flexible and relevant to the student’s individual needs and interests, with a strong emphasis on developing students’ ability to question current thinking and propose alternative evidence based actions/hypotheses.

Within the modular structure all students undertake core/compulsory modules in:

Supervised Experience – a module tailored to the needs of the individual and include directed work with a specified client group or individual;
MA Research Skills;
Dissertation Proposal and Dissertation relevant to the programme being studied.
Supervised Experience
The content of this module will be largely student specific and include activities (workshops, directed reading, client based work) that will develop the individual’s personal applied support skills. Initially, students complete an individual self-assessment of their current skills/knowledge base and set personal goals to enable them to improve their applied support skills. All students will attend units (workshops) on Ethics in Research and consultancy, communication and counselling skills and how to conduct a needs assessment. Specific physiology and psychology workshops (eg Imagery) will also take place.

Students will complete a contract of intended activities agreed with their supervisor in the first four weeks of their programme of study. This contract may, where appropriate, include the intention to apply to British Association of Sport and Exercise Science (BASES) to commence a formally logged Supervised Experience.

A portfolio will then be developed; the portfolio records activities including meetings with supervisor, attendance at workshops, meetings and a plan of work with at least one client, and thought/evaluations of all meetings and workshops (ie evidence of reflective practice).

MA Research Skills
This module covers material relevant to the design and analysis of both quantitative and qualitative research. It aims to enable students to critically evaluate the statistical procedures that have been used by other quantitative researchers; design and statistically analyse their own true experiments, quasi-experiments and non-experimental hypothesis testing studies and appreciate the assumptions of qualitative research and demonstrate knowledge of data collection and analysis procedures.

Overview and Format of the MA Dissertation related modules
The goal of the Dissertation Proposal module is to fully prepare the student for successful completion of the subsequent MA Dissertation. Literature searching, presentation, and scholarly writing skills will be honed. To achieve this, the student will work along side a supervisor to identify a broad topic ripe for review. Upon development of an initial layout for the Dissertation, one or possibly two areas of the topic are reviewed. As such a deliberately narrow and abbreviated review is conducted better allowing the student to gain clear and progressive understanding of the levels of thoroughness and critical thinking associated with a MA Dissertation.

Students will receive tutorials and guidance in planning a literature search, identifying and gathering a literature, preparing a literature review, developing a dissertation proposal, and making an oral presentation of the proposal.

In their Dissertation module, students will compose a literature review and develop a proposition that they will advance as an argument. The resulting written report will demonstrate in-depth knowledge of the chosen topic.

Students also study additional compulsory modules in:

Clinical Exercise Physiology;
Disability and Rehabilitation;
Rehabilitation of the Injured Athlete.
The programme is delivered using a variety of teaching methods, including lectures, seminars, workshops, group activities, practical work, tutorials and role play. Each module comprises approximately 200 hours of student time (including formal contact).

Future Career
This course could enable students to develop their careers in a number of ways. The course is primarily aimed at students who wish to pursue sport or health related careers that do not involve conducting empirical research.

The MA is especially recommended to graduates who want to pursue a career in sport or health related fields, such as rehabilitation, coaching, leisure and fitness; pursue a career in related fields such as education and social services; give their CV an additional boost; explore a particular area of sport or health sciences in detail through researching and writing a literature review.

NB – This course is not appropriate for students wishing to progress onto academic research via a science based PhD.

Read less

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