• University of York Featured Masters Courses
  • Leeds Beckett University Featured Masters Courses
  • Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
  • Regent’s University London Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Glasgow Featured Masters Courses
University of Southampton Featured Masters Courses
University of Hertfordshire Featured Masters Courses
University of Bradford Featured Masters Courses
FindA University Ltd Featured Masters Courses
FindA University Ltd Featured Masters Courses
United Kingdom
Bangor×
0 miles
Law×

Full Time Masters Degrees in Law, Bangor, United Kingdom

  • Law×
  • United Kingdom
  • Bangor×
  • Full Time×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 22
Order by 
Bangor University School of Law
Distance from Bangor: 0 miles
This programme is designed to help students become experts in the areas of International Law that directly concern the human person - International Criminal Law & International Human Rights Law - whilst mastering the discipline of International Law of which they are part. Read more
This programme is designed to help students become experts in the areas of International Law that directly concern the human person - International Criminal Law & International Human Rights Law - whilst mastering the discipline of International Law of which they are part. In addition to the foundational courses in Legal Research Methods and Public International Law, students will be required to study International Criminal Law, International Human Rights Law and write a dissertation on a topic within the International Criminal Law or International Human Rights Law. The remaining courses can be chosen from a range of relevant options.

Through carefully designed course work and varied teaching approaches, students will acquire the intellectual open-ness, technical expertise and critical thinking abilities that are necessary for effectiveness in a globalising world. The programme will equip students to respond effectively to the wide range of intellectual and professional challenges facing those working on legal issues concerning the human person in International Law. The LLM in International Law (specialising in International Criminal Law & International Human Rights Law) will equip them to deal with both case work and policy making.

Employment Opportunities
Employment opportunities for graduates of the programme will include work with international law firms, international organisations such as the United Nations, World Bank, World Trade Organisation and European Union, international courts and tribunals, ‘think tanks’ and research centres, non-governmental organisations and government (eg. Ministries of Justice and Foreign Affairs). Having taken one of our programmes, there will, of course, also be possibilities for academically inclined students to pursue careers in teaching and research.

Compulsory Modules:

Legal Research Methods
Public International Law
International Criminal Law
International Human Rights Law
Dissertation on a topic within International Criminal Law or International Human Rights Law
Optional Modules (choose 2):

European Human Rights Law
Children’s Rights in Domestic and International Law
International Law of Armed Conflict
Dealing with the Legacies of the Past
Structure
January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Teaching will mostly be seminar-based which will promote group and individual interaction, which also ensures that every individual student is encouraged to contribute to discussions. Seminar-based teaching enables lecturers and students to discuss issues and investigate topics in greater depth, and develops critical thinking and solution-based learning skills in students; whilst also allowing the course teachers to monitor closely each individual’s progress. Emphasis will be placed on the use of virtual learning through the mechanism of the Blackboard computer-assisted learning system and databases such as Westlaw and LexisNexis. Throughout all modules, comparative elements with other legal systems will be emphasised.

Read less
Bangor University School of Law
Distance from Bangor: 0 miles
In today’s global competitive marketplace, the successful corporate executive needs to understand how the legal system and legal regulation can impact on their own area of expertise. Read more
In today’s global competitive marketplace, the successful corporate executive needs to understand how the legal system and legal regulation can impact on their own area of expertise. Accordingly, the BangorBusinessSchool and the Bangor School of Law have combined to offer an innovative suite of interdisciplinary MBA and MA programmes.

The MA in Banking and Law is an interdisciplinary programme that will enable the student to study key legal and regulatory developments affecting the financial sector. This includes the regulation of financial services, security instruments, corporate finance, arbitration and other issues affecting modern banks at UK, EU and international level. As well as the general principles of International Banking Law, you will also choose from a wide range of law and business. The programme will equip candidates with higher level knowledge in both the Banking and Law areas, as global Banking practice today is heavily influenced by the Law. In particular the financial and regulatory lessons to be drawn from the so-called ‘credit crunch’ in the USA and the UK will be examined. The MA degree is suitable for those who wish to adopt a predominantly non-quantitative approach to their studies.

Course Structure
January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Compulsory modules:

Research Methods: This module develops knowledge of intermediate and advanced research methods, and provides a basis in research methodology for those who may eventually wish to pursue research degrees.

Bank Financial Management: This module provides a grounding in the nature, strategic context and managerial functions of financial management in banks, and other financial services firms.

International Banking: This module examines the origins of international banking, the activities of international banks, the markets in which they participate, and the sources of risk.

Financial Institutions Strategic Management: This module examines the main theoretical and practical issues concerning banking business. You will develop a critical awareness of the theory of the banking firm, the motives for international banking, and regulatory and structural issues impacting on bank behaviour.

Financial Crises and Bank Regulation: This module examines why banks and financial markets are inherently vulnerable to crises, and analyses the role of policy makers and institutions. The roles of monetary policy, bank supervision and regulation, corporate governance and ratings agencies in mitigating or exacerbating crises are considered.

International Banking and Capital Markets Law: This module will provide a sound understanding of the law and practice of modern international banking, including the regulation and prudential supervision of banks in the UK and EU in the areas of capital adequacy and risk management.

Optional Law modules (choose 2):

Comparative Corporate Governance: Major corporate scandals in the US, Europe and the UK in recent years have raised questions about the organisation and governance of companies, in particular large multinational organisations. The growth of private equity buy-outs has also raised issues of transparency and accountability.

Credit and Security Law: The supply of credit is the lifeblood of industry but of course a lender will require security. This module will examine in detail the provisions relating to the regulation of the supply of credit to consumers and business.

International Corporate Finance Law and Merger Regulation Law: This module focuses on the study of leading case law and selected legislation, relating to international mergers and their financing from several common law countries such as the USA, Britain, Ireland, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, as well as China, India and the EU.

International Commercial Arbitration: This module considers the theoretical and institutional structure of arbitration and alternative dispute resolution, examines the legal framework within which disputes are resolved and reviews the practice of international commercial arbitration.

Consumer Law: This module focuses on the main areas of legal liability and the pitfalls that can arise if an organisation does not comply with the relevant consumer protection rules both in the UK and Europe.

Intellectual Property Law: This module addresses the fundamentals of intellectual property law, the definition and scope of copyright; the authorship, ownership, duration and qualification for copyright protection.

Competition Law: This module focuses on the theory and law of competition, focusing on UK competition law, and EU competition law relating to the control of restrictive practices, vertical and horizontal restraints and abuse of a dominant position. Comparative regimes, in particular that of the US, are examined.

Industrial Property Law: This module examines the history and development of industrial property law in the UK, EU and internationally. It covers the law relating to trade secrets, patents, copyrights, design rights and trademarks.

World Trade Law: This module studies aspects of the regulation of international trade through the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and the World Trade Organisation.

International Insurance Law: Insurance plays an important role in commerce and risk management. Insurance contracts are governed by the rules of general law of contract. The module explores the nature and scope of the contract of insurance, considers the general principles of insurance, and examines the relationships between parties to a contract.

International Taxation Law: This module studies the basic principles of income taxation of international transactions involving taxpayers of several European countries (including the UK, the Netherlands, France, Germany, Ireland), the US, Australia, Canada and Japan.

Employment Law: Modern employment law is complex, and imposes major compliance costs on employers. This module covers contract of employment, minimum wage legislation, discrimination against employees, and unfair dismissal actions before Employment Tribunals.

International Environmental Law: This module focuses on internationally recognised principles and values concerning environmental protection, and how they are translated into legally enforceable tools. Methods of environmental regulation are analysed and compared.

Read less
Bangor University Bangor Business School
Distance from Bangor: 0 miles
In today’s global competitive marketplace, the successful corporate executive needs to understand how the legal system and legal regulation can impact on their own area of expertise. Read more
In today’s global competitive marketplace, the successful corporate executive needs to understand how the legal system and legal regulation can impact on their own area of expertise. Accordingly, the BangorBusinessSchool and the Bangor School of Law have combined to offer an innovative suite of interdisciplinary MBA and MA programmes.

The MA in Banking and Law is an interdisciplinary programme that will enable the student to study key legal and regulatory developments affecting the financial sector. This includes the regulation of financial services, security instruments, corporate finance, arbitration and other issues affecting modern banks at UK, EU and international level. As well as the general principles of International Banking Law, you will also choose from a wide range of law and business. The programme will equip candidates with higher level knowledge in both the Banking and Law areas, as global Banking practice today is heavily influenced by the Law. In particular the financial and regulatory lessons to be drawn from the so-called ‘credit crunch’ in the USA and the UK will be examined. The MA degree is suitable for those who wish to adopt a predominantly non-quantitative approach to their studies.
Course Structure

January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Compulsory modules:

Research Methods: This module develops knowledge of intermediate and advanced research methods, and provides a basis in research methodology for those who may eventually wish to pursue research degrees.

Bank Financial Management: This module provides a grounding in the nature, strategic context and managerial functions of financial management in banks, and other financial services firms.

International Banking: This module examines the origins of international banking, the activities of international banks, the markets in which they participate, and the sources of risk.

Financial Institutions Strategic Management: This module examines the main theoretical and practical issues concerning banking business. You will develop a critical awareness of the theory of the banking firm, the motives for international banking, and regulatory and structural issues impacting on bank behaviour.

Financial Crises and Bank Regulation: This module examines why banks and financial markets are inherently vulnerable to crises, and analyses the role of policy makers and institutions. The roles of monetary policy, bank supervision and regulation, corporate governance and ratings agencies in mitigating or exacerbating crises are considered.

International Banking and Capital Markets Law: This module will provide a sound understanding of the law and practice of modern international banking, including the regulation and prudential supervision of banks in the UK and EU in the areas of capital adequacy and risk management.

Optional Law modules (choose 2):

Comparative Corporate Governance: Major corporate scandals in the US, Europe and the UK in recent years have raised questions about the organisation and governance of companies, in particular large multinational organisations. The growth of private equity buy-outs has also raised issues of transparency and accountability.

Credit and Security Law: The supply of credit is the lifeblood of industry but of course a lender will require security. This module will examine in detail the provisions relating to the regulation of the supply of credit to consumers and business.

International Corporate Finance Law and Merger Regulation Law: This module focuses on the study of leading case law and selected legislation, relating to international mergers and their financing from several common law countries such as the USA, Britain, Ireland, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, as well as China, India and the EU.

International Commercial Arbitration: This module considers the theoretical and institutional structure of arbitration and alternative dispute resolution, examines the legal framework within which disputes are resolved and reviews the practice of international commercial arbitration.

Consumer Law: This module focuses on the main areas of legal liability and the pitfalls that can arise if an organisation does not comply with the relevant consumer protection rules both in the UK and Europe.

Intellectual Property Law: This module addresses the fundamentals of intellectual property law, the definition and scope of copyright; the authorship, ownership, duration and qualification for copyright protection.

Competition Law: This module focuses on the theory and law of competition, focusing on UK competition law, and EU competition law relating to the control of restrictive practices, vertical and horizontal restraints and abuse of a dominant position. Comparative regimes, in particular that of the US, are examined.

Industrial Property Law: This module examines the history and development of industrial property law in the UK, EU and internationally. It covers the law relating to trade secrets, patents, copyrights, design rights and trademarks.

World Trade Law: This module studies aspects of the regulation of international trade through the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and the World Trade Organisation.

International Insurance Law: Insurance plays an important role in commerce and risk management. Insurance contracts are governed by the rules of general law of contract. The module explores the nature and scope of the contract of insurance, considers the general principles of insurance, and examines the relationships between parties to a contract.

International Taxation Law: This module studies the basic principles of income taxation of international transactions involving taxpayers of several European countries (including the UK, the Netherlands, France, Germany, Ireland), the US, Australia, Canada and Japan.

Employment Law: Modern employment law is complex, and imposes major compliance costs on employers. This module covers contract of employment, minimum wage legislation, discrimination against employees, and unfair dismissal actions before Employment Tribunals.

International Environmental Law: This module focuses on internationally recognised principles and values concerning environmental protection, and how they are translated into legally enforceable tools. Methods of environmental regulation are analysed and compared.

Read less
Bangor University School of Law
Distance from Bangor: 0 miles
The MBA in Banking and Law will develop knowledgeable and capable banking executives and banking lawyers who will move quickly into key positions in the financial sector. Read more
The MBA in Banking and Law will develop knowledgeable and capable banking executives and banking lawyers who will move quickly into key positions in the financial sector. The degree focuses on the financial and strategic management of banks and other financial institutions as well as the increasingly complex legal and regulatory structures within which banks and their executives have to operate. The legal issues will cover a wide range of topics at UK, EU and international level with which a modern banker needs to be familiar. As well as the general principles of International Banking Law, you will also choose from a wide range of law and business options. You will gain practical insight and skills in a range of financial, legal and strategic management topics in the supply of international financial services as well as key Law subjects which have a direct impact on Banking practice. Case studies and contemporary issues figure prominently in the programme, particularly focusing on the lessons to be learnt from the recent ‘credit crunch’ and the issues for international financing and regulation that this has thrown up.

Compulsory modules:

Organisations and People: This module examines key issues arising from contemporary research in organisational behaviour (OB) and human resource management (HRM). It provides an integrated analysis of management, organisations and people, developing the conceptual, strategic and practical skills necessary for managers in complex, global organisational contexts.

Management Research: This module analyses the philosophical basis for research in the management sciences, and examines a number of key methodological issues and approaches. Research designs for both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies are developed, including interviews, case studies, focus groups, surveys and experiments.

Bank Financial Management: This module provides a grounding in the nature, strategic context and managerial functions of financial management in banks and other financial services firms. Three key themes are: identification and management of the trade-off between risk and return; improvement of a bank’s value using market models; and external market-based tests of bank performance.

International Banking: This module examines the origins of international banking, the activities of international banks, the markets in which they participate, and the sources of risk. You will investigate the determinants of the efficiency of international banks, and evaluate the implications for banks’ strategic decision-making.

Financial Institutions Strategic Management: This module examines the main theoretical and practical issues concerning banking business. You will develop a critical awareness of the theory of the banking firm, the motives for international banking, and regulatory and structural issues impacting on bank behaviour.

International Banking and Capital Markets Law: This module will provide a sound understanding of the law and practice of modern international banking, including the regulation and prudential supervision of banks in the UK and EU in the areas of capital adequacy and risk management.

Optional modules (choose 2):

Comparative Corporate Governance: Major corporate scandals in the US, Europe and the UK in recent years have raised questions about the organisation and governance of companies, in particular large multinational organisations. The growth of private equity buy-outs has also raised issues of transparency and accountability.

Credit and Security Law: The supply of credit is the lifeblood of industry but of course a lender will require security. This module will examine in detail the provisions relating to the regulation of the supply of credit to consumers and business.

International Corporate Finance Law and Merger Regulation Law: This module focuses on the study of leading case law and selected legislation, relating to international mergers and their financing from several common law countries such as the USA, Britain, Ireland, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, as well as China, India and the EU.

International Commercial Arbitration: This module considers the theoretical and institutional structure of arbitration and alternative dispute resolution, examines the legal framework within which disputes are resolved and reviews the practice of international commercial arbitration.

Consumer Law: This module focuses on the main areas of legal liability and the pitfalls that can arise if an organisation does not comply with the relevant consumer protection rules both in the UK and Europe.

Intellectual Property Law: This module addresses the fundamentals of intellectual property law, the definition and scope of copyright; the authorship, ownership, duration and qualification for copyright protection.

Competition Law: This module focuses on the theory and law of competition, focusing on UK competition law, and EU competition law relating to the control of restrictive practices, vertical and horizontal restraints and abuse of a dominant position. Comparative regimes, in particular that of the US, are examined.

Industrial Property Law: This module examines the history and development of industrial property law in the UK, EU and internationally. It covers the law relating to trade secrets, patents, copyrights, design rights and trademarks.

World Trade Law: This module studies aspects of the regulation of international trade through the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and the World Trade Organisation.

International Insurance Law: Insurance plays an important role in commerce and risk management. Insurance contracts are governed by the rules of general law of contract. The module explores the nature and scope of the contract of insurance, considers the general principles of insurance, and examines the relationships between parties to a contract.

International Taxation Law: This module studies the basic principles of income taxation of international transactions involving taxpayers of several European countries (including the UK, the Netherlands, France, Germany, Ireland), the US, Australia, Canada and Japan.

Employment Law: Modern employment law is complex, and imposes major compliance costs on employers. This module covers contract of employment, minimum wage legislation, discrimination against employees, and unfair dismissal actions before Employment Tribunals.

International Environmental Law: This module focuses on internationally recognised principles and values concerning environmental protection, and how they are translated into legally enforceable tools. Methods of environmental regulation are analysed and compared.

Read less
Bangor University School of Law
Distance from Bangor: 0 miles
This programme is designed to help students become experts in Global Trade Law, whilst mastering the discipline of International Law of which it is part. Read more
This programme is designed to help students become experts in Global Trade Law, whilst mastering the discipline of International Law of which it is part. The programme will focus on key aspects of International Law and Global Trade Law and the development of skills and knowledge required to operate as International Lawyers in an increasingly globalised world.

Global Trade Law and Public International Law will be compulsory courses, and a range of carefully designed optional modules will allow students to focus more on their areas of interest. Throughout the course, basic principles and advanced level theories will be studied and the many traditional and contemporary challenges in International Law and Global Trade Law will be explored. The course will combine a balanced approach to law, theory, politics and practice.

Through carefully designed course work and varied teaching approaches, students will acquire the intellectual open-ness, technical expertise and critical thinking abilities that are necessary for effectiveness in a globalising world. The programme will equip students to respond effectively to the wide range of intellectual and professional challenges facing contemporary International Trade Lawyers. The LLM in International Law (specialising in Global Trade Law) will equip them to deal with both case work and policy making.

Compulsory Modules:

Legal Research Methods
Global Trade Law
Public International Law
Dissertation on a topic within Global Trade Law
Optional Modules (choose 3):

EU Internal Markets Law
Competition Law
International Commercial Arbitration
Intellectual Property Law
Comparative Corporate Governance
International Banking Law
Employment Opportunities
Employment opportunities for graduates of the programme will include work with international law firms, international organisations such as the United Nations, World Bank, World Trade Organisation and European Union, international courts and tribunals, ‘think tanks’ and research centres, non-governmental organisations and government (eg. Ministries of Justice and Foreign Affairs). Having taken one of our programmes, there will, of course, also be possibilities for academically inclined students to pursue careers in teaching and research.

Structure
January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Teaching will mostly be seminar-based which will promote group and individual interaction, which also ensures that every individual student is encouraged to contribute to discussions. Seminar-based teaching enables lecturers and students to discuss issues and investigate topics in greater depth, and develops critical thinking and solution-based learning skills in students; whilst also allowing the course teachers to monitor closely each individual’s progress. Emphasis will be placed on the use of virtual learning through the mechanism of the Blackboard computer-assisted learning system and databases such as Westlaw and LexisNexis. Throughout all modules, comparative elements with other legal systems will be emphasised.

Read less
Bangor University Bangor Business School
Distance from Bangor: 0 miles
In today’s global competitive marketplace, the successful corporate executive needs to understand how the legal system and legal regulation can impact on their own area of expertise. Read more
In today’s global competitive marketplace, the successful corporate executive needs to understand how the legal system and legal regulation can impact on their own area of expertise. Accordingly, the Bangor Business School and the Bangor School of Law have combined to offer an innovative suite of interdisciplinary MBA and MA programmes. The MBA in Banking and Law will develop knowledgeable and capable banking executives and banking lawyers who will move quickly into key positions in the financial sector.

Course Structure

January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Compulsory modules:

Organisations and People: This module examines key issues arising from contemporary research in organisational behaviour (OB) and human resource management (HRM). It provides an integrated analysis of management, organisations and people, developing the conceptual, strategic and practical skills necessary for managers in complex, global organisational contexts.

Management Research: This module analyses the philosophical basis for research in the management sciences, and examines a number of key methodological issues and approaches. Research designs for both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies are developed, including interviews, case studies, focus groups, surveys and experiments.

Bank Financial Management: This module provides a grounding in the nature, strategic context and managerial functions of financial management in banks and other financial services firms. Three key themes are: identification and management of the trade-off between risk and return; improvement of a bank’s value using market models; and external market-based tests of bank performance.

International Banking: This module examines the origins of international banking, the activities of international banks, the markets in which they participate, and the sources of risk. You will investigate the determinants of the efficiency of international banks, and evaluate the implications for banks’ strategic decision-making.

Financial Institutions Strategic Management: This module examines the main theoretical and practical issues concerning banking business. You will develop a critical awareness of the theory of the banking firm, the motives for international banking, and regulatory and structural issues impacting on bank behaviour.

International Banking and Capital Markets Law: This module will provide a sound understanding of the law and practice of modern international banking, including the regulation and prudential supervision of banks in the UK and EU in the areas of capital adequacy and risk management.

Optional modules (choose 2):

Comparative Corporate Governance: Major corporate scandals in the US, Europe and the UK in recent years have raised questions about the organisation and governance of companies, in particular large multinational organisations. The growth of private equity buy-outs has also raised issues of transparency and accountability.

Credit and Security Law: The supply of credit is the lifeblood of industry but of course a lender will require security. This module will examine in detail the provisions relating to the regulation of the supply of credit to consumers and business.

International Corporate Finance Law and Merger Regulation Law: This module focuses on the study of leading case law and selected legislation, relating to international mergers and their financing from several common law countries such as the USA, Britain, Ireland, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, as well as China, India and the EU.

International Commercial Arbitration: This module considers the theoretical and institutional structure of arbitration and alternative dispute resolution, examines the legal framework within which disputes are resolved and reviews the practice of international commercial arbitration.

Consumer Law: This module focuses on the main areas of legal liability and the pitfalls that can arise if an organisation does not comply with the relevant consumer protection rules both in the UK and Europe.

Intellectual Property Law: This module addresses the fundamentals of intellectual property law, the definition and scope of copyright; the authorship, ownership, duration and qualification for copyright protection.

Competition Law: This module focuses on the theory and law of competition, focusing on UK competition law, and EU competition law relating to the control of restrictive practices, vertical and horizontal restraints and abuse of a dominant position. Comparative regimes, in particular that of the US, are examined.

Industrial Property Law: This module examines the history and development of industrial property law in the UK, EU and internationally. It covers the law relating to trade secrets, patents, copyrights, design rights and trademarks.

World Trade Law: This module studies aspects of the regulation of international trade through the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and the World Trade Organisation.

International Insurance Law: Insurance plays an important role in commerce and risk management. Insurance contracts are governed by the rules of general law of contract. The module explores the nature and scope of the contract of insurance, considers the general principles of insurance, and examines the relationships between parties to a contract.

International Taxation Law: This module studies the basic principles of income taxation of international transactions involving taxpayers of several European countries (including the UK, the Netherlands, France, Germany, Ireland), the US, Australia, Canada and Japan.

Employment Law: Modern employment law is complex, and imposes major compliance costs on employers. This module covers contract of employment, minimum wage legislation, discrimination against employees, and unfair dismissal actions before Employment Tribunals.

International Environmental Law: This module focuses on internationally recognised principles and values concerning environmental protection, and how they are translated into legally enforceable tools. Methods of environmental regulation are analysed and compared.

Read less
Bangor University Bangor Business School
Distance from Bangor: 0 miles
In today’s global competitive marketplace, the successful corporate executive needs to understand how the legal system and legal regulation can impact on their own area of expertise. Read more
In today’s global competitive marketplace, the successful corporate executive needs to understand how the legal system and legal regulation can impact on their own area of expertise. Accordingly, the BangorBusinessSchool and the Bangor School of Law have combined to offer an innovative suite of interdisciplinary MBA and MA programmes.

The MBA in Law and Management emphasises both professional and vocational development as well as an awareness of key legal and regulatory issues that play a central role in the successful management of modern enterprises of all types and sizes. You will develop an understanding of higher-level managerial skills and concepts, and their application in practical situations. You will have the opportunity to examine the law and regulation that affects business in a wide range of key areas.

Course Structure

Compulsory modules:

Organisations and People: This module examines key issues arising from contemporary research in organisational behaviour (OB) and human resource management (HRM). It provides an integrated analysis of management, organisations and people, developing the conceptual, strategic and practical skills necessary for managers in complex, global organisational contexts.

Management Research: This module analyses the philosophical basis for research in the management sciences, and examines a number of key methodological issues and approaches. Research designs for both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies are developed, including interviews, case studies, focus groups, surveys and experiments.

Comparative Corporate Governance: Major corporate scandals in the US, Europe and the UK in recent years have raised questions about the organisation and governance of companies, in particular large multinational organisations. The growth of private equity buy-outs has also raised issues of transparency and accountability.

Finance for Managers: This module is designed for those who aim to achieve a basic understanding of financial management and control, and who require an understanding of finance in order to manage an organisation effectively. Financial planning and control are central themes, as well as the appraisal techniques of investment projects.

Optional modules+ (choose 4):

Marketing Strategy: This module critically evaluates the contributions of various schools of thought in marketing, and examines the relevant analytical models and management practices, with emphasis on the strategic importance of marketing to all organisations.

International Strategic Management: This module introduces the language of strategy and explores the link between strategic and operational management.

Knowledge Management: This module examines the processes whereby organisations and individuals develop and utilise their knowledge bases. Successful knowledge management hinges on people, culture and technology. As such it has professional and academic links with organisational behaviour and organisational learning.

Contemporary Issues in Management: This module analyses strategic decision-making within business. You will develop a critical understanding of the strategic processes of business management, the interconnections with the functional domains of marketing, human resource management and corporate finance, and the management of knowledge systems.

New Venture Creation: This module examines the advantages and disadvantages of the various routes to business start-up, including new venture creation, or establishing a business based on your own expertise, experience and ideas; buying an established business; purchasing a franchise; and succession through a family firm, an increasingly common way of becoming involved in entrepreneurial activity.

Credit and Security Law: The supply of credit is the lifeblood of industry but of course a lender will require security. This module will examine in detail the provisions relating to the regulation of the supply of credit to consumers and business.

International Corporate Finance Law and Merger Regulation Law: This module focuses on the study of leading case law and selected legislation, relating to international mergers and their financing from several common law countries such as the USA, Britain, Ireland, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, as well as China, India and the EU.

International Commercial Arbitration: This module considers the theoretical and institutional structure of arbitration and alternative dispute resolution, examines the legal framework within which disputes are resolved and reviews the practice of international commercial arbitration.

Consumer Law: This module focuses on the main areas of legal liability and the pitfalls that can arise if an organisation does not comply with the relevant consumer protection rules both in the UK and Europe.

Intellectual Property Law: This module addresses the fundamentals of intellectual property law, the definition and scope of copyright; the authorship, ownership, duration and qualification for copyright protection.

Competition Law: This module focuses on the theory and law of competition, focusing on UK competition law, and EU competition law relating to the control of restrictive practices, vertical and horizontal restraints and abuse of a dominant position. Comparative regimes, in particular that of the US, are examined.

Industrial Property Law: This module examines the history and development of industrial property law in the UK, EU and internationally. It covers the law relating to trade secrets, patents, copyrights, design rights and trademarks.

World Trade Law: This module studies aspects of the regulation of international trade through the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and the World Trade Organisation.

International Insurance Law: Insurance plays an important role in commerce and risk management. Insurance contracts are governed by the rules of general law of contract. The module explores the nature and scope of the contract of insurance, considers the general principles of insurance, and examines the relationships between parties to a contract.

International Taxation Law: This module studies the basic principles of income taxation of international transactions involving taxpayers of several European countries (including the UK, the Netherlands, France, Germany, Ireland), the US, Australia, Canada and Japan.

Employment Law: Modern employment law is complex, and imposes major compliance costs on employers. This module covers contract of employment, minimum wage legislation, discrimination against employees, and unfair dismissal actions before Employment Tribunals.

International Environmental Law: This module focuses on internationally recognised principles and values concerning environmental protection, and how they are translated into legally enforceable tools. Methods of environmental regulation are analysed and compared.

+ Your optional modules must include either International Strategic Management or Marketing Strategy, and at least 2 Law options.

Read less
Bangor University School of Law
Distance from Bangor: 0 miles
This programme is designed to equip students with a comprehensive and specialist education in a range of areas within International Intellectual Property Law. Read more
This programme is designed to equip students with a comprehensive and specialist education in a range of areas within International Intellectual Property Law. The course will enable students to master the basic principles of the four main ‘pillars’ of IP Law, namely, Copyright, Patents, Trade marks and Industrial Designs. The four main components of IP Law will be examined from three distinct perspectives: domestic (UK), EU and International (global treaties/conventions) and will encompass analysis of legislation, case law (common law and civil law) and specific legal concepts. Where possible, comparative analysis will be carried out as between for example, specific EU IP Law developments and those of third country States e.g. India, Pakistan and China. In addition, certain third countries with well-developed, mature IP systems (e.g. the U.S., Canada and Australia) will be examined for a comparative assessment. The distinct themes of how the Internet has brought about new thinking in the IP world and, possible overlapping forms of IP protection (e.g. copyright and patent protection of computer software) will be examined.

Through carefully designed course work and varied teaching approaches, students from both a common law and civil law background will acquire the intellectual open-ness, technical expertise and critical thinking abilities that are necessary for effectiveness in a globalising world. The programme will equip students to respond effectively to the wide range of intellectual and professional challenges facing contemporary intellectual property lawyers. The LLM in International Intellectual Property Law will equip them to deal with both case work and policy making.

Employment Opportunities
Employment opportunities for graduates of the programme will include work with international law firms, patent and trade mark attorneys, local Intellectual Property Offices (e.g. the UK Intellectual Property Office, Chinese Patent and Trade Mark Office and the Office of the Controller General of Patents, Designs and Trade Marks in India),international organisations such as the World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO), World Trade Organisation (WTO) and the United Nations and specialist bodies within the EU e.g. the Office for the Harmonisation of the Internal Market (OHIM) and the European Patent Office (EPO). Directorate-General Internal Market and Services of the European Commission deals with IP matters and is also a potential employer. Other potential employers include international courts and tribunals, think tanks and research centres (e.g. the specialist Max Planck Institute for Intellectual Property and Competition Law (Munich), non-governmental organisations and government (eg. Ministries of Justice; Business, Innovation and Skills and; Foreign Affairs). Having taken one of our programmes, there will, of course, also be possibilities for academically inclined students to pursue careers in teaching and research.

Compulsory Modules:

Legal Research Methods
Intellectual Property Law
Data Protection Law
Dissertation on any topic within International Intellectual Property Law
Optional Modules (choose 4)

International Criminal Law
International Human Rights Law
Children’s Rights in Domestic and International Law
European Human Rights Law
EU Internal Markets Law
Competition Law
Global Trade Law
Comparative Corporate Governance
International Banking Law
International Commercial Arbitration
International Law of Armed Conflict
Dealing with the Legacies of the Past
Structure
January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Teaching will mostly be seminar-based which will promote group and individual interaction, which also ensures that every individual student is encouraged to contribute to discussions. Seminar-based teaching enables lecturers and students to discuss issues and investigate topics in greater depth, and develops critical thinking and solution-based learning skills in students; whilst also allowing the course teachers to monitor closely each individual’s progress. Emphasis will be placed on the use of virtual learning through the mechanism of the Blackboard computer-assisted learning system and databases such as Westlaw and LexisNexis. Throughout all modules, comparative elements with other legal systems will be emphasised.

Read less
Bangor University School of Law
Distance from Bangor: 0 miles
Bangor University is a major international research centre in relation to the operation of national and European law and policies on public procurement law. Read more
Bangor University is a major international research centre in relation to the operation of national and European law and policies on public procurement law.

1 year LLM option (Full time programme)
2 years (Executive intensive block release programme for professionals)
The main educational aims of the programme include:

To provide candidates with postgraduate level knowledge and skills in the area of national (UK and Irish), European and International (WTO, World Bank and UNCITRAL) Public Procurement Law and Strategy.
To build up specialist legal skills and knowledge to equip candidates to operate in the interface between legal principles that apply in the Public Procurement environment and the strategic objectives of interests to organisations in the public and private sectors.
To provide a flexible programme enabling candidates to develop national, european and international perspectives on Public Procurement law issues and practice, which will open up a whole new area of opportunity for graduates.
A strategic element of the programmes is the presentation of learning from the perspectives of both the public procurement function and private sector supplier organisations, to help advance understanding of the complex issues organisations involved in public sector tendering face, and to develop more creative legally compliant public procurement solutions.

This is achieved through carefully designed module options and collaborative teaching involving the use of academic and expert procurement law and strategy specialists.

Employment Opportunities
Employment opportunities for graduates of the programmes include opportunities with public and private sector organisations (all of which have a procurement function), law firms, research centres and international organisations such as the United Nations, World Bank, World Trade Organisation and European Union. Having taken one of our programmes, there will, also be possibilities for academically inclined candidates to pursue careers in teaching and research. Candidates may also find employment opportunities with Social and Environment Rights Groups, many of which see procurement as a way of advancing social and environmental agendas. Candidates who are already working will develop expertise on procurement law issues which would advance their career prospects and upgrade their skills in this extremely complex and rapidly changing area of law.

Programme Content
LLM in Public Procurement Law and Strategy (1 Year programme)

Compulsory modules:

Public Procurement Research and Writing Skills
National and European Public Procurement Law
Applied Procurement Research Projects – work placement and research project (s) on any topic within the programme
Optional modules: (choose 5)

Risk Management in Public Procurement
Sustainable and Social Procurement
Contract Design and Management
Innovation in Public Procurement
Litigation Strategies and the Remedies Regime
International Procurement Regimes
Procurement Relationships and Ethics
Strategic Procurement and Leadership
European Internal Market Law
Executive LLM in Public Procurement Law and Strategy (2 Year programme)

Compulsory modules:

Public Procurement Research and Writing Skills
National and European Public Procurement Law
Risk Management in Public Procurement
Sustainable and Social Procurement
Contract Design and Management
Innovation in Public Procurement
Applied Procurement Research Projects – work placement and research project (s) on any topic within the programme
Optional modules: (choose 1)

Strategic Procurement and Leadership
International Procurement Regimes
Structure
Part 1

LLM in Public Procurement Law and Strategy (1 Year programme)

Part 1 will involve the study of 120 credits.

September intake: Part 1 will be undertaken in the period of September to June.

Teaching will mostly be seminar based which will promote group and individual interaction, which also ensures that every individual candidate is encouraged to contribute to discussions.


Executive LLM in Public Procurement Law and Strategy (2 Year programme)

Taught modules are undertaken over two academic sessions and will involve the study of 120 credits.

Teaching on the Executive stream will be in the form of structured lectures facilitated by the Lecturer and driven by class discussions and case study analysis.

Delivery will be on a block release basis with classes delivered over weekends – on a Friday, Saturday or Sunday – during two academic sessions. Accommodation for participants on the Executive stream is included in the programme fee. Participants will be accommodated at the Management Centre at Bangor University.
Collaborative learning will be an important part of the learning process for the stream.
The module will be taught using a combination of expert Procurement Law academic staff and legal practitioners from leading law firms and in-house legal departments.
Case studies will be used to help the candidates to contextualise active procurement legal problems against a background of realistic scenarios where they get the opportunity to apply the relevant rules of law that they will have been lectured on.
Candidates will be expected to have prepared essential reading on case law, legislation, and other procurement rules prior to the seminar, and will discuss the legal issues raised by the reading in an interactive fashion in order that the class can engage in problem solving facilitated by the lecturer.
Part 2

The Applied Procurement Research Projects (APRP) which is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken on successful completion of Part 1.

Candidates on the one year full-time programme undertake their project during the period of June to September (September intake).

Candidates on the two year programme will undertake their project in the final year of their programme).

The research project comprises a two week work placement in a procurement function and the submission by candidates of either:

One essay with a maximum length of between 18,000 and 20,000 words OR
Two essays not exceeding 10,000-words per essay OR
Four essays not exceeding 5,000-words per essay.
The APRP will be used to familiarise candidates with a broad range of current themes in Public Procurement Law and Strategy. Indicative areas where candidates may undertake applied research projects include national and European Procurement Law, Litigation Strategies, relationship between European Internal Market Law and Public Procurement Law, International Procurement Regimes, Sustainable Procurement, Public Procurement and Innovation, Procurement Relations, Procurement Ethics, Risk Management in Public Procurement, and Contract Design and Management. Other topics proposed by candidates may be acceptable subject to ratification by the Course Leader.

Read less
Bangor University School of Law
Distance from Bangor: 0 miles
This programme will focus on developing expertise within European Law, on top of a broad understanding of International Law. Students will develop the skills and knowledge required to operate as European legal specialists. Read more
This programme will focus on developing expertise within European Law, on top of a broad understanding of International Law. Students will develop the skills and knowledge required to operate as European legal specialists.

In addition to the foundational courses in Legal Research Methods and Public International Law, students will be required to study EU Internal Markets Law, Competition Law, and write a dissertation on a topic within European law. The remaining courses can be chosen from a range of relevant options.

Through carefully designed course work and varied teaching approaches, students will acquire the intellectual open-ness, technical expertise and critical thinking abilities that are necessary for effectiveness in a globalising world. The programme will equip students to respond effectively to the wide range of intellectual and professional challenges facing those working on European legal issues. The LLM in International Law (specialising in European Law) will equip them to deal with both case work and policy making.

Employment Opportunities
Employment opportunities for graduates of the programme will include work with international law firms, international organisations such as the United Nations, World Bank, World Trade Organisation and European Union, international courts and tribunals, ‘think tanks’ and research centres, non-governmental organisations and government (eg. Ministries of Justice and Foreign Affairs). Having taken one of our programmes, there will, of course, also be possibilities for academically inclined students to pursue careers in teaching and research.

Compulsory Modules:

Legal Research Methods
Public International Law
EU Internal Markets Law
Competition Law
Dissertation on a topic within European Law
Optional Modules (choose 2):

European Human Rights Law
Global Trade Law
International Commercial Arbitration
Intellectual Property Law
Structure
January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Teaching will mostly be seminar-based which will promote group and individual interaction, which also ensures that every individual student is encouraged to contribute to discussions. Seminar-based teaching enables lecturers and students to discuss issues and investigate topics in greater depth, and develops critical thinking and solution-based learning skills in students; whilst also allowing the course teachers to monitor closely each individual’s progress. Emphasis will be placed on the use of virtual learning through the mechanism of the Blackboard computer-assisted learning system and databases such as Westlaw and LexisNexis. Throughout all modules, comparative elements with other legal systems will be emphasised.

Read less
Bangor University School of Law
Distance from Bangor: 0 miles
Law affects all of our lives and the knowledge of law increases our understanding of the society and the world in which we live. Read more
Law affects all of our lives and the knowledge of law increases our understanding of the society and the world in which we live. These Law (LLB) degree programmes provide a liberal education in Law, or in Law combined with another discipline, to promote such an awareness and to allow those who so wish to progress to careers in the legal professions.

This course is especially designed for people who have previously undertaken higher education and wish to study for a bachelor degree in Law. This may include:

Graduates who have successfully completed an honours degree in another subject at Bangor or another accredited institution
IELTS 6.5 (International Candidates)
Equivalent experience
As this is a qualifying law degree, on a successful completion of the 2 year programme, LLB graduates may progress onto a Legal Practice Course (LPC) to become a solicitor or onto BVC training to become a barrister.

In each academic year, students will undertake modules to the value of 120 credits in a combination of law courses addressing the issues of Public Law, Private Law and Property Law.

The first year involves the study of 6 compulsory double-modules (20 credits each) in law across Semesters 1 and 2. The second year will also consist of three compulsory double-modules and three optional modules from an approved list of modules according to students’ individual interests.


Modules
During the Law (LLB) degree you will study the seven foundation subjects to obtain a Qualifying Law Degree plus additional legal and/or non-legal subjects which allow for specialisation. You will be encouraged to study in areas which complement your chosen degree scheme.

The Foundations of Legal Knowledge are:

Public Law
Law of the European Union
Criminal Law
Obligations (including Contract, Restitution and Tort)
Property Law
Equity and the Law of Trusts
Legal Research
Year 1
Core modules:

Contract Law
Public Law
Equity and the Law of Trusts
Introduction to Law
Criminal Law
Legal Skills
2nd and Final Year
Core modules:

European Union Law
Land Law
Tort
International Law of Human Rights
2 x Optional modules in Law
Assessment
Each module is assessed separately by means of course work and end of module examination. In Year 1, course work will account for 25% and examinations for 75% of the final mark, whilst in Year 2 and 3, course work will normally account for 33% and examinations for 67% of the final mark. The pass mark in all assessment is 40%.

Second year and final year grades will both contribute to the final degree classification. At the end of Year 3, your final degree classification depends on your overall mark: a weighted average of your Year 2 average mark (one-third weighting) and your Year 3 average mark (two-thirds weighting).

Your final degree classification is determined by your overall mark.

Read less
Bangor University School of Law
Distance from Bangor: 0 miles
For the non-specialist student, the Law School offers a general LLM which permits the students to pick and mix modules from the specialist schemes. Read more
For the non-specialist student, the Law School offers a general LLM which permits the students to pick and mix modules from the specialist schemes. The general LLM consists of a compulsory module in Legal Research Methods plus taught modules, selected from the list below. The dissertation could be on any legal topic subject to approval of the Law School.

Structure
January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Teaching will mostly be seminar-based which will promote group and individual interaction, which also ensures that every individual student is encouraged to contribute to discussions. Seminar-based teaching enables lecturers and students to discuss issues and investigate topics in greater depth, and develops critical thinking and solution-based learning skills in students; whilst also allowing the course teachers to monitor closely each individual’s progress. Emphasis will be placed on the use of virtual learning through the mechanism of the Blackboard computer-assisted learning system and databases such as Westlaw and LexisNexis. Throughout all modules, comparative elements with other legal systems will be emphasised.

Teaching will be in English; however, according to the University’s Welsh language policy, students who so wish may be examined and present essays, coursework and dissertations through the medium of Welsh.

Compulsory modules:

Legal Research Methods (Exemptions from this module may be granted if a student has achieved the learning outcomes in another way, e.g. already having done and LLM or LLB with a research or dissertation element. Requests for exemption should be made to the Director of Postgraduate Studies.)
Optional modules:

Any five modules offered by the Law School up to the value of 100 credits may be undertaken subject to approval and timetabling. Up to 20 credits may be taken from the list of modules offered by Bangor Business School, Bangor School of Social Sciences and Welsh Institute of Social and Cultural Affairs subject to approval of both schools and timetabling.

Welsh Public Law
The Legal Regulation of Health And Social Care in England and Wales
Law of Devolution in Wales and Europe
World Trade Law
Intellectual Property Law
Industrial Property Law
Competition Law
International Banking Law and Capital Markets
International Corporate Finance and Merger Regulation Law
Comparative Corporate Governance
Employment Law
International Financial Instruments Law
International Environmental La
International Taxation Law
European Union Internal Market Law
International Insurance Law
International Commercial Arbitration Law
Bilingualism in Wales and Other European Countries

Read less
Bangor University School of Law
Distance from Bangor: 0 miles
This programme is designed to equip students with a general yet comprehensive education in a range of areas within International Law. Read more
This programme is designed to equip students with a general yet comprehensive education in a range of areas within International Law. The course will enable students to master the basic principles of the discipline and explore advanced level theories, as well as understand the many traditional and contemporary challenges in International Law. They will have a wide range of International Law options to choose from, and may therefore acquire broad as opposed to specialised knowledge.

Through carefully designed course work and varied teaching approaches, students will acquire the intellectual open-ness, technical expertise and critical thinking abilities that are necessary for effectiveness in a globalising world. The programme will equip students to respond effectively to the wide range of intellectual and professional challenges facing contemporary International Lawyers. The LLM in International Law will equip them to deal with both case work and policy making.

Employment Opportunities
Employment opportunities for graduates of the programme will include work with international law firms, international organisations such as the United Nations, World Bank, World Trade Organisation and European Union, international courts and tribunals, ‘think tanks’ and research centres, non-governmental organisations and government (eg. Ministries of Justice and Foreign Affairs). Having taken one of our programmes, there will, of course, also be possibilities for academically inclined students to pursue careers in teaching and research.

Compulsory Modules:

Legal Research Methods
Public International Law
Dissertation on any topic within International Law
Optional Modules (choose 4):

International Criminal Law
International Human Rights Law
Children’s Rights in Domestic and International Law
European Human Rights Law
EU Internal Markets Law
Competition Law
Global Trade Law
Comparative Corporate Governance
International Banking Law
International Commercial Arbitration
Intellectual Property Law
International Law of Armed Conflict
Dealing with the Legacies of the Past
Structure
January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Teaching will mostly be seminar-based which will promote group and individual interaction, which also ensures that every individual student is encouraged to contribute to discussions. Seminar-based teaching enables lecturers and students to discuss issues and investigate topics in greater depth, and develops critical thinking and solution-based learning skills in students; whilst also allowing the course teachers to monitor closely each individual’s progress. Emphasis will be placed on the use of virtual learning through the mechanism of the Blackboard computer-assisted learning system and databases such as Westlaw and LexisNexis. Throughout all modules, comparative elements with other legal systems will be emphasised.

Read less
Bangor University School of Law
Distance from Bangor: 0 miles
The course will appeal to applicants who are interested in the law of the sea and international law, but who do not necessarily want to study the commercial aspects of a Maritime Law degree. Read more
The course will appeal to applicants who are interested in the law of the sea and international law, but who do not necessarily want to study the commercial aspects of a Maritime Law degree.

The course focusses predominantly on international law, with a particular emphasis on the law of the sea. Students will acquire expertise in the multifaceted interface between the different fields of international law, whilst also developing specialist knowledge of the law pertaining to the sea. The skills learnt on this programme are adaptable to work in international bodies (e.g. the UN), international courts and tribunals, and international law firms; as well as in roles relating to piracy or marine pollution (e.g. the ICC Commercial Crime Services, the International Maritime Organisation, the Marine Management Organisation and the Maritime and Coastguard Agency).

Employment Opportunities
Graduates of this programme will have employment opportunities with international law firms; international organisations (e.g. United Nations, World Bank, World Trade Organisation, European Union); international courts and tribunals; ‘think tanks’ and research centres; and non-governmental organisations and government (e.g. Ministries of Justice and Foreign Affairs). Some graduates may also progress to teaching and/or research.

Compulsory modules:

Research Methods
Public International Law
International Law of the Sea
Dissertation (on a topic within the international law of the sea)
Optional modules (choose three):

International Environmental Law
International Criminal Law
International Law of Armed Conflict
Admiralty Law
International Human Rights Law
Structure
Programmes commencing in September:

Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits.

The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Programmes commencing in January:

Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits.

The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.undertaken during the period of June to September.

Read less
Bangor University School of Law
Distance from Bangor: 0 miles
This course provides advanced level knowledge and skills in the areas of Maritime Law and Commercial Law. Students will develop international and commercial perspectives on issues relating to Maritime Law, and will learn to operate with expertise in the multifaceted interface between the different areas of the field. Read more
This course provides advanced level knowledge and skills in the areas of Maritime Law and Commercial Law. Students will develop international and commercial perspectives on issues relating to Maritime Law, and will learn to operate with expertise in the multifaceted interface between the different areas of the field.

Students will acquire a broad understanding of Maritime Law, including its fundamental principles and values, the influences upon it, the substantive rules of the discipline and the underpinning architecture and institutions; as well as an understanding of the different areas within the discipline, such as wet shipping law and dry shipping law. Critical awareness will be fostered by the study of the latest literature, international legislation, international conventions, EU law, and international case law.

Employment Opportunities
This programme will provide a springboard for graduates to enter into key positions in International Law firms, international organisations, non-governmental organisations, and positions in public administrations. There is likely to be high demand for professionals in the area going forward, particularly in rapidly growing emerging markets.

Compulsory modules:

Legal Research Methods
Students choose at least three from:

Admiralty Law
Law of the Sea
Carriage of Goods by Sea
Marine Insurance
Optional modules:

Global Trade Law
International Environmental Law
International Sales Law
Intellectual Property Law
Competition Law
International Commercial Arbitration
Structure
Programmes commencing in September:

Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits.

The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Programmes commencing in January:

Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits.

The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page


Share this page:

Cookie Policy    X