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Oxford Brookes University, Full Time Masters Degrees in Architecture, Building & Planning

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This course is run by the School of the Built Environment. Read more
This course is run by the School of the Built Environment

This programme has been designed to meet the challenging demands of the modern learner and the rapidly evolving needs of the built environment sector in respect to the emergence of Building Information Modelling (BIM) as a working practice, the MSc in Buiding Information Modelling and Management , through its intelligent use of the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE), is designed to deliver a flexible and innovative programme of study.

The MSc is available both as a one year full-time programme, and in open-learning mode that is normally taken over two years (extendable up to 5 years). The course consists of four core modules plus research methods and a final dissertation. As each of these core modules is entirely self-contained students may enter the program in either September or January.

Prior to September 2016 entry, this programme was named Construction Project Management and BIM.

Why choose this course?

- We use an ‘applied approach’ to teaching, and our students work on real-life or reality based problems as experienced within the construction sector and its associated industries, consultants and clients.

- You are also exposed to behavioural aspects of managing projects, which most construction project managers only experience when their careers are well-advanced.

- This provides a more interesting and engaging learning environment than the traditional ‘study and examination’ approach to learning.

Teaching and learning

Teaching, learning and assessment methods are largely determined by the use of the applied learning approach which leads to a more challenging and industrially relevant course than the traditional lecture approach. Learning takes place through groups of students working through problems together. These are often adapted from real situations with much of the complexity and content intact, using published resources or reference to experts who are available to offer advice.

Full-time mode: new material is delivered weekly with intermediate tutorial or seminar sessions. The intensive study weeks and a European field trip, when students in both modes of study come together, complement this delivery pattern.

Open learning mode: the virtual learning environment (VLE) is the primary mode of delivery. Communication with open learning students is supplemented by email and telephone during the periods off campus.

Approach to assessment

Assessment is 100% coursework, which includes a great variety of types of work, including quizzes taken remotely on Moodle (Brookes online learning environment). Material can be downloaded from our virtual learning environment and closed discussions can take place. It also enables on campus and open learning students to remain in contact with each other.

Field trips

A European field trip is a compulsory element of the PGCert modules. It typically takes place over a five day period towards the end of January and is heavily subsidised by the department.

The aim of the field trip is to consolidate the knowledge gained in the early part of the course and to develop team and other relationships through exposing you to European project management practices and to assess their ability to observe and report on the different approaches to project management in the UK and in a European country.

The field trip normally consists of visits to prominent construction/engineering projects and sites, plus architectural attractions, both en route and at the destination. You are introduced to the development and planning practices at the destination, as well as having the opportunity to visit major complex projects.

About our students

The programme attracts students from diverse backgrounds and locations. They normally hold degrees in fields relating to built environment including civil engineering, construction, architecture and building, and have decided to contribute to the development of the built environment around us by effectively managing construction projects.

Our students come from as far afield as Nigeria, Russia and India, with backgrounds ranging from recently graduated at undergraduate level, to working with small local companies, to fully established managers in large international construction companies. This diverse group brings with them individual responses to the applied learning approach that is at the core of our course delivery.

Typically the open learning students are employed by a number of different organisations from the private and public sectors in different countries. They have the opportunity to share their experiences to gain better understanding of the industry, the range of challenges that construction project managers face, and therefore the breadth of skills that they need to develop to perform successfully.

Our full time students benefit from contact with the open learning students engaged in construction project management roles in a variety of built environment projects across many countries.

Careers

Graduates of our postgraduate construction programmes have an outstanding employment record. Our graduates are recognised as having excellent levels of communication, presentation and problem-solving skills. Consequently, our students go on to be project managers right across the broad spectrum of the construction industries both locally and internationally.

Many of these companies visit the department annually to meet students for graduate positions as Assistant project managers whilst all of our open-learning students are employed full-time by prominent companies in the sector.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

Many of our academic staff are involved in academic research and/or professional/commercial consultancy work. In the recent Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014), our Unit of Assessment (UoA 16) ranked 4th within the University in terms of its Grade Point Average (GPA). We hold the 11th position in terms of Research Impact and Power Rating (GPA x number of full-time equivalent staff submitted) among the 45 institutions that submitted to our unit of assessment.

Many members of staff are part of the Oxford Institute of Sustainable Development (OISD). This research and promotional organisation is noted for its work on sustainable technology in buildings and sustainable urban form among many on-going projects.

A recent HEFCE report into sustainable development in higher education in England suggests that the OISD is one of the key players in sustainable development research.

Research areas and clusters

Areas of interest include:
- sustainability, adaptation and resilience to climate change
- Building Information Modelling (BIM)
- collaborative supply networks for procurement and delivery of project
- building economics
- forecasting techniques
- risk management
- social networks in project environments
- managing complex projects
- management of knowledge and innovation as a source of competitive advantage
- adaptive re-use of existing buildings
- facilities management
- health and safety.

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The Brookes MSc offers a comprehensive grounding in the conservation of historic buildings and sites. Read more
The Brookes MSc offers a comprehensive grounding in the conservation of historic buildings and sites. Focusing on the UK, but also drawing on other national and international paradigms, it introduces you to a range of theoretical and practical disciplines, including the relevant aspects of architectural history, historical geography, spatial planning, urban design, construction, surveying, economics and finance, and research methodology.

This course follows the International Commission on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS) guidelines on education and training, and covers the knowledge, skills and professional capabilities identified by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC) as the foundation for professional practice. Our programme draws students from a wide range of backgrounds, and provides an ideal training for those wishing to pursue a career in this fascinating but competitive field. For information on recent field trips, please visit our Planning and Urban Design blog.

Why choose this course?

Established in 1990, the Brookes Historic Conservation MSc is one of the longest-running and most highly-regarded courses of its type, and our graduates have gone on to work in senior roles across the sector, both in the UK and internationally. Our programme draws on the expertise of built environment teaching staff at Brookes and from the University of Oxford's Department for Continuing Education.

The Historic Conservation team has an excellent record of research for organisations such as the EU, English Heritage and the UK government Department for Culture, Media and Sport. Visiting speakers from central and local government, conservation agencies, business and industry, consultancies, research bodies and other university departments provide further input, bringing real-world experience to the course.

The Department of Planning - now part of the School of the Built Environment - is renowned internationally for its research. In REF 2014, 69% of our research was rated as either world leading or internationally excellent. Oxford is internationally renowned for its cultural heritage and for the beauty and variety of its architecture, presenting valuable learning opportunities for Historic Conservation students.

This course in detail

This course is offered at three levels: a Master of Science (MSc) degree, a Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) and a Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert). The MSc and PGDip can be studied on either a full-time (1-year) or a part-time (2-year) basis. The introductory PGCert is a 9-month part-time course.

With the exception of certain field trips, all core teaching is on Mondays and Tuesdays, allowing you to fit your studies around other commitments. Part-time students take the Monday modules in their first year and the Tuesday modules in their second.

The course comprises a series of modules, each addressing a different set of questions in the theory and/or practice of historic conservation. (As courses are reviewed regularly as part of our quality assurance framework, the modules you take may vary from those shown here.)

The following modules are compulsory for the MSc and PGDip:
-Conservation and Regeneration: Theory, Law and Practice
-Historical Studies I and II
-Design for Conservation
-Building Construction and Repair
-Historic Building Analysis and Recording
-Conservation Economics and Finance

The MSc also requires you undertake the following:
-Research Methods in Design
-MSc Dissertation

The PGCert comprises Conservation and Regeneration: Theory, Law and Practice; Building Construction and Repair; and Historic Building Analysis and Recording (details as above).

Teaching and learning

Teaching and learning methods reflect the variety of topics and techniques associated with historic conservation. These include lectures, directed reading, workshops, seminars, and practical and project work. Most modules also include site visits and/or fieldwork, which provide you with direct experience of the practical application of conservation principles.

Careers and professional development

The course provides an excellent grounding for those wishing to pursue a career in the conservation sector. Our tutors have wide experience in the field, and the broad variety of visiting speakers from national and local government, private practice, the voluntary sector, the law and academia add greatly to this range. We have excellent links with heritage organisations across the country, giving you opportunities for placements and other work experience. Graduates have gone on to work in many different roles across the sector, including:
-Central government bodies, eg English Heritage and Historic England.
-Local government roles, eg conservation and design officer.
-Charitable organisations, eg the National Trust and the Landmark Trust.
-Campaign groups, eg Victorian Society and SAVE Britain's Heritage.
-Private consultancies, eg CgMs and Alan Baxter & Associates.

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The MSc in Construction Project Management (CPM) uses an innovative structure and integrative use of the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) to deliver a flexible and exciting programme of study. Read more
The MSc in Construction Project Management (CPM) uses an innovative structure and integrative use of the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) to deliver a flexible and exciting programme of study. It is designed to meet the challenging demands of the modern learner and the rapidly evolving needs of the construction industry.

We continuously and extensively consult with construction companies and organisations in order to make sure that the course content remains practically relevant for the modern construction manager.

The MSc is available both as a one year full-time programme, and in open-learning mode normally taken over two years (extendable up to 5 years).

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/studying-at-brookes/courses/postgraduate/2015/construction-project-management/

Why choose this course?

- Accreditation by the Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB) and the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) demonstrates professional recognition of the quality of our programme.

- Strong links with prominent companies in the sector, such as Mace, Willmott Dixon and BAM Construction who are all represented in our Professional Liaison Group (PLG), which exists to provide advice on existing and proposed courses of study, on research activities and consultancy work.

- The programme adopts an applied learning approach to ensure that it is real-world focused and holistic. Not only is this more effective, it is more fun than the traditional study and examination approach.

- Students develop a broad range of management skills and knowledge including Building Information Modelling (BIM), project finance, technology, and procurement by working on real-life or realistic problems as experienced by the construction industry, consultants and clients.

- Students are also exposed to behavioural aspects of managing projects, which most construction project managers only experience when their careers in the construction industry are well-advanced.

- There are four intensive study periods during the programme where full-time and open-learning students come together on campus to attend lectures, seminars and workshops and share experiences.

- The course is directly tailored to students with a background in the construction industries who want to develop their careers as Construction Managers. Whether you have a degree in a construction related discipline such as Civil Engineering or Architecture, or have a strong background working in construction, if you want to be a Construction Project Manager this is the course for you.

- Our graduates have an exemplary employment record and now span the globe, working in countries including India, Pakistan, South Africa, Canada, Australia, Peru, Middle East and China.

- Our teaching is backed up by strong research activity. Many of our academic staff are involved in academic research and/or professional or commercial consultancy work.

- Many members of staff are part of Brookes' Oxford Institute of Sustainable Development (OISD), a leading research and promotional organisation noted for its work on sustainable technology in buildings and sustainable urban form.

- Our staff have strong links with local companies and sit on professional committees including CIOB and Constructing Excellence.

Teaching and learning

Teaching, learning and assessment methods are to a considerable degree determined by the use of the applied learning approach which leads to a more challenging and industrially relevant course than the traditional lecture approach. Learning takes place through groups of students puzzling through problems, often adapted from real situations with much of the complexity and context intact, using published resources, or reference to experts who are available to offer advice.

In full-time mode, the delivery of new material is weekly with intermediate tutorial or seminar sessions. The intensive study weeks and a European field-trip, when students in both modes of study come together, complement this delivery pattern. For the open-learner, the virtual learning environment is the primary mode of delivery. Communication with open-learning students will be supplemented by email and telephone during the periods off-campus.

Approach to assessment

Assessment is 100% coursework, which includes a great variety of types of work, including quizzes taken remotely on Moodle (Brookes online learning environment). Material can be downloaded from our virtual learning environment and closed discussions can take place. It also enables on-campus and open-learning students to remain in contact with each other.

Field trips

A European field trip is a compulsory element of the PGCert modules. It typically takes place over a five-day period towards the end of January and is heavily subsidised by the department.

The aim of this field trip is to consolidate the knowledge gained in the early part of the course and to develop team and other relationships through exposing our students to European project management practices and to assess their ability to observe and report on the different approaches to project management in the UK and in a European country.

The field trip normally consists of visits to prominent construction/engineering projects and sites, plus architectural attractions, both en route and at the destination. You are introduced to the development and planning practices at the destination, as well as having the opportunity to visit major complex projects.

Student body

The programme attracts students from diverse backgrounds and locations. Students will normally hold degrees in fields within the realm of the built environment including Civil Engineering, Construction, Architecture and Building, and have decided to contribute to the development of the built environment around us by effectively managing construction projects.

Our students hail from as far afield as Nigeria, Russia and India, with backgrounds ranging from recently graduated at undergraduate level, to working with small local companies, to fully established managers in large international construction companies. This diverse group of students bring with them individual responses to the applied learning approach that is at the core of our course delivery.

Typically the open-learning students are employed by a number of different organisations from the private and public sectors in different countries. They have the opportunity to share their experiences in order to gain better understanding of the industry, the range of challenges that Construction Project Managers face, and therefore the breadth of skills that they need to develop in order to perform successfully.

Our full-time students benefit from contact with the open-learning students engaged in construction project management roles in a variety of built environment projects across many countries.

How this course helps you develop

Graduates of the Department of Real Estate and Construction have an outstanding employment record. Local and national construction companies, developers, project managers, house-builders, surveyors and housing associations regularly recruit our graduates.

Many of these companies visit the department annually to meet students for graduate positions. Our graduates are recognised as having an excellent level of communication, presentation and problem-solving skills.

Careers

All of our open-learning students are employed full-time by prominent companies in the sector. Full-time students find similar employment shortly after graduation. They typically hold (Assistant) Project Manager positions. However, the breadth of knowledge that our students gain gives them the flexibility to function effectively in a number of different roles.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module
Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

Many of our academic staff are involved in academic research and/or professional/commercial consultancy work. In the recent Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014), our Unit of Assessment (UoA 16) ranked 4th within the University in terms of its Grade Point Average (GPA). We hold the 11th position in terms of Research Impact and Power Rating (GPA x number of full-time equivalent staff submitted) among the 45 institutions that submitted to our unit of assessment.

Many members of staff are part of the Oxford Institute of Sustainable Development (OISD). This research and promotional organisation is noted for its work on sustainable technology in buildings and sustainable urban form among many on-going projects.

A recent HEFCE report into sustainable development in higher education in England suggests that the OISD is one of the key players in sustainable development research.

Research areas and clusters

Areas of interest include:
- sustainability, adaptation and resilience to climate change
- Building Information Modelling (BIM)
- collaborative supply networks for procurement and delivery of project
- building economics
- forecasting techniques
- risk management
- social networks in project environments
- managing complex projects
- management of knowledge and innovation as a source of competitive advantage
- adaptive re-use of existing buildings
- facilities management
- health and safety.

Read less
The MSc in Project Management in the Built Environment is designed to meet the growing demand for project managers in the construction industry who can oversee the entire life cycle of any project, including unique and specialist developments. Read more
The MSc in Project Management in the Built Environment is designed to meet the growing demand for project managers in the construction industry who can oversee the entire life cycle of any project, including unique and specialist developments. It is ideal for anyone with ambitions for project management within the construction sector.

We consult extensively with people from a wide spectrum of companies and organisations in order to make sure that the course content remains practically relevant. For example, prominent companies in the industry are represented in our Professional Liaison Group.

The MSc is available as a one-year, full-time programme or as an open learning programme (a combination of distance learning with intensive on-campus study periods) which is normally taken over two years. There are two entry points: September and January.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/studying-at-brookes/courses/postgraduate/2015/project-management-in-the-built-environment/

Why choose this course?

- Accreditation by the Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB) and the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) demonstrates professional recognition of the quality of our programme.

- Strong links with prominent companies in the sector, such as Mace, Willmott Dixon and BAM Construction who are all represented in our Professional Liaison Group (PLG), which exists to provide advice on existing and proposed courses of study, on research activities and consultancy work.

- The programme adopts a problem-based learning (PBL) approach to ensure that it is real-world focused and holistic. Not only is this more effective, it is more fun than the traditional study and examination approach.

- Students develop a whole range of management skills and knowledge including project finance, technology, law and contract by working on real-life or realistic problems as experienced by the construction industry, consultants and clients. They are also exposed to behavioural aspects of managing projects, which most project managers only experience when their careers in the construction industry are well-advanced.
- There are four intensive study weeks during the programme where full-time and open-learning students come together on campus to attend lectures, seminars and workshops and share experiences.

- Our students come from a wide range of backgrounds and locations. Many have originally studied subjects outside the realm of the built environment such as law, psychology, architecture and geography, and others have been or still are (in the case of our open-learning students) employed in project management roles. As a result, there are great opportunities to share experiences, to gain a better understanding of the industry and the range of challenges that project managers face and also to benefit from the many different approaches to problem solving that is a feature of such a diverse group of students.

- Our graduates span the globe, working in countries including Malaysia, India and USA.

- Our teaching is backed up by strong research activity. Many of our academic staff are involved in academic research and/or professional or commercial consultancy work. In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise, approximately 80% of our research, with our colleagues in other Built Environment areas, was judged to be of ‘international’ quality, with approximately 40% rated as ‘internationally excellent’ or ‘world leading’.

- Many members of staff are part of Brookes' Oxford Institute of Sustainable Development (OISD), a leading research and promotional organisation noted for its work on sustainable technology in buildings and sustainable urban form.

Teaching and learning

Teaching, learning and assessment methods are to a considerable degree determined by the use of problem-based learning (PBL) which leads to a more challenging and industrially relevant course than the traditional lecture approach. Learning takes place through groups of students puzzling through problems, often adapted from real situations with much of the complexity and context intact, using published resources, or reference to experts who are available to offer advice.

Assessment is 100% coursework, which includes a great variety of types of work, including quizzes taken remotely on Moodle (Brookes online learning environment). Material can be downloaded from our virtual learning environment and closed discussions can take place. It also enables on-campus and open-learning students to remain in contact with each other.

In full-time mode, the delivery of new material is generally bi-weekly with intermediate tutorial or seminar sessions. The intensive study weeks and a European field trip, when students in both modes of study come together, complement this delivery pattern. Outside these periods, online learning is the primary mode of learning for distance-learning study. Communication with distance-learning students will be supplemented by email and telephone during the periods off-campus.

Field trips

A European field trip is a compulsory element of the PGCert modules. It typically takes place over a five-day period towards the end of January and is heavily subsidised by the department.

The aim of this field trip is to consolidate the knowledge gained in the early part of the course and to develop team and other relationships through exposing our students to European project management practices and to assess their ability to observe and report on the different approaches to project management in the UK and in a European country.

The field trip normally consists of visits to prominent construction/engineering projects and sites, plus architectural attractions, both en route and at the destination. You are introduced to the development and planning practices at the destination, as well as having the opportunity to visit major complex projects.

Student body

The programme attracts students from diverse backgrounds and locations.

Many of our current students already hold degrees in fields outside the realm of the built environment including law, psychology and geography, and have decided to contribute to the development of the built environment around us by effectively managing projects. They hail from as far afield as Nigeria and India, with backgrounds ranging from languages to architecture.

This diverse group of students bring with them individual responses to the PBL approach that is at the core of our course delivery.

Typically the distance-learning students are employed by a number of different organisations from the private and public sectors in different countries. They have the opportunity to share their experiences in order to gain better understanding of the industry, the range of challenges that project managers face, and therefore the breadth of skills that they need to develop in order to perform successfully.

Our full-time students benefit from contact with the open-learning students engaged in project management roles in a variety of built environment projects across many countries.

Careers

Graduates of the Department of Real Estate and Construction have an outstanding employment record. Local and national construction companies, developers, project managers, house builders, surveyors and housing associations regularly recruit our graduates.

Many of these companies visit the department annually to meet students for graduate positions. Our graduates are recognised as having an excellent level of communication, presentation and problem-solving skills.

All of our open-learning students are employed full-time by prominent companies in the sector.

Full-time students find similar employment shortly after graduation. They typically hold (Assistant) Project Manager positions. However, the breadth of knowledge that our students gain gives them the flexibility to function effectively in a number of different roles.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

Our teaching is backed by strong research activity. Many of our academic staff are involved in academic research and/or professional/commercial consultancy work.

Areas of interest include:
- sustainability, adaptation and resilience to climate change
- collaborative supply networks for procurement and delivery of project
- building economics
- forecasting techniques
- risk management
- social networks in project environments
- managing complex projects
- management of knowledge and innovation as a source of competitive advantage/li>
- adaptive re-use of existing buildings
- facilities management
- health and safety.

Many members of staff are part of the Oxford Institute of Sustainable Development (OISD). This research and promotional organisation is noted for its work on sustainable technology in buildings and sustainable urban form among many on-going projects.

A recent HEFCE report into sustainable development in higher education in England suggests that the OISD is one of the key players in sustainable development research.

Read less
The MSc in Historic Conservation examines the principles, procedures and practices of the preservation and conservation of historic structures and sites within the context of the wider built environment and the town planning process. Read more
The MSc in Historic Conservation examines the principles, procedures and practices of the preservation and conservation of historic structures and sites within the context of the wider built environment and the town planning process.

The course follows the International Commission on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS) guidelines on education and training, is multidisciplinary and develops knowledge and skills in historic conservation and independent study and research capabilities.

The teaching programme covers the knowledge, skills and professional capabilities identified by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC) as the foundation for professional practice.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/historic-conservation/

Why choose this course?

- The course draws on the expertise of built environment teaching staff at Brookes and from the University of Oxford's Department for Continuing Education.

- Most modules include site visits and/or fieldwork, which give you direct experience of the practical application of conservation principles.

- The Historic Conservation team has an excellent record of research for organisations such as the EU, English Heritage and the government Department for Culture, Media and Sport.

- Visiting speakers from central and local government, conservation agencies, business and industry, consultancies, research bodies and other university departments provide further input bringing that real-world experience to the course.

- The Department of Planning is renowned internationally for its research. In REF 2014 69% of our research was rated as either world leading or internationally excellent.

- Oxford is internationally renowned for its cultural heritage and for the beauty and variety of its historical architecture, presenting many valuable learning opportunities for Historic Conservation students.

Teaching and learning

Teaching and learning methods reflect the variety of topics and techniques associated with historic conservation. These include lectures, directed reading, workshops, seminars, and practical and project work.

Most modules also include site visits and/or fieldwork, which provide students with direct experience of the practical application of conservation principles.

Approach to assessment

Assessment is 100% coursework based.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Read less
This one-year full-time and two-year part-time MSc programme is the benchmark qualification for those wishing to enter the planning profession and is fully accredited by both the RTPI and RICS. Read more
This one-year full-time and two-year part-time MSc programme is the benchmark qualification for those wishing to enter the planning profession and is fully accredited by both the RTPI and RICS.

It takes a broad approach to the “traditional” field of city and regional or town and country planning. You will learn to integrate concerns across the board, including those of economy, climate change, and social need.

The emphasis is on developing a broad and flexible level of knowledge and understanding, enabling you to adapt to developing pressures during your career.

The course combines core planning education with the development of expertise in specialist areas. Our links with practitioners in both the private and public sectors ensures that the course remains at the cutting edge of practice.

The MSc provides full Royal Town Planning Institute (RTPI) and Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) accreditation. The PGDip must be combined with a specialist MSc dissertation for this full accreditation.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/spatial-planning/

Why choose this course?

- It is viewed as the first choice for planning training by a range of employers including local authorities, the Environment Agency and major planning consultancies.

- Frequent guest lectures from industry leaders give you the chance to make important contacts for your future career.

- Learn more about current developments from professionals and academics through our Planning seminar series.

- The department is based in the modern and well equipped Abercrombie building, part of an award-winning recent redevelopment of the campus.

- Access to top-of-the-range facilities including studios, IT suites and computer programs, as well as three libraries and 24/7 online databases which contain all the academic material you require to be successful in their postgraduate studies.

- Study in the world-famous student city of Oxford, a particularly fascinating place for those interested in cities, transport and sustainability.

Professional accreditation

The MSc in Spatial Planning is fully accredited by both the Royal Town Planning Institute (RTPI) and the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS). This means that on graduation you can complete the Assessment of Professional Competence programmes of these professional bodies and become a full member.

In order to attain full accreditation for both the RTPI and RICS, graduates must combine the Postgraduate Diploma in Spatial Planning with one of our specialist master's programmes. These include: an MSc in Environmental Assessment and Management, an MSc in Historic Conservation, an MSc in Urban Planning: Developing and Transitional Regions, or the MA in Urban Design.

Teaching and learning

Learning methods include lectures, directed reading, workshops, seminars, and practical and project work. Some modules include site visits and fieldwork.

Teaching is organised on a module-credit basis, involving approximately 200 hours of personal study and approximately 36 hours of staff contact, normally delivered through three-hour teaching blocks over a 12-week period.

Approach to assessment

Each course module is assessed individually, generally on the quality of written or design work, and to some extent on verbal presentations. Assessment methods may include essays, seminar papers, formal written examinations, in-class tests, project work, design and verbal presentations, workshops, simulations and practical exercises.

Field trips

The MSc in Spatial Planning includes a compulsory overseas field trip that is part of the two semester 1 core modules. The field trip is designed to provide students with practical examples and experience of planning in another European country.

The trip usually takes place in mid-November and normally includes three to four nights away from the UK. In the past, this field trip has been to Barcelona, Amsterdam and Lyon. The teaching staff are constantly reviewing new destinations that can best contribute to students' overall planning education.

Other half or full-day field trips often form part of the individual programmes of specialist modules.

Attendance pattern

Teaching is organised on a module-credit basis. Each module involves approximately 200 hours of personal study and approximately 36 hours of staff contact, normally delivered through three-hour teaching blocks over a 12-week period.

In recent years, teaching has been largely concentrated on Tuesdays and Thursdays, with two modules taught on each day. Generally the first year of the part time course takes place on Thursdays, and the second year on Tuesdays, whilst the full time course has teaching on both these days.

How this course helps you develop

Our courses make much use of invited lectures from planning practice, allowing students to get a feel for the world of current nature of the planning and development industry. In addition the wide spread of backgrounds and current work positions among students on our courses gives access to much valuable experience within each planning cohort.

Careers

Not only is the MSc in Spatial Planning seen as the benchmark qualification for professional planners, it is also widely recognised as providing the transferable skills and critical knowledge necessary in many fields of work in the built and natural environment.

Local government is just one of very many career opportunities available to MSc in Spatial Planning graduates.

Today our alumni can be found in senior positions in some of the largest international planning and environmental consultancies, in government agencies, in large NGOs and campaigning organisations. They can also be found in similar positions in organisations across the globe.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

With more than 600 students engaging a wide range of research topics in our undergraduate, postgraduate and research degree programmes, including Master's by research, the department is widely recognised as a leading educator in environment, design and development subjects.

With a complement of over 60 teaching, administrative, technical and research staff, the department performs a leading role in research and consultancy, with clients and projects covering subjects from local concerns to multinational organisations, government and industry.

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This unique multi-disciplinary course is taught by architects, engineers and physicists involved in practice and research. It focuses on the theory and practice of developing low carbon and sustainable buildings. Read more
This unique multi-disciplinary course is taught by architects, engineers and physicists involved in practice and research. It focuses on the theory and practice of developing low carbon and sustainable buildings.

The course includes a number of interlinked modules that simulate the design and development of a sustainable project. This enables students from different disciplines to develop skills and understanding relevant to their own discipline, be it design or consultancy, and in relation to a national and international context.

Why choose this course?

The course is run by the School of Architecture, which is recognised as one of the country's leading schools of architecture and is consistently ranked by The Architect's Journals one of the five best schools in the UK. You will gain an advanced understanding of the key sustainability issues related to buildings enabling them to strategically influence feasibility and design processes within the built environment. The course attracts some of the best students in the field from a diverse range of ages, backgrounds, gender and nationalities. This offers opportunities for interdisciplinary, globally aware teaching and learning.

The range of subjects draws on the research strengths of the teaching staff and enables research to inform the teaching modules. You are encouraged where possible to take part in staff research projects. You will have the opportunity to go on an annual field trip. This is an opportunity to directly experience some of the very best of sustainable design projects in another culture. Previous field trips have been to Germany, Scotland and Denmark. Students from this course have gone on to work in a wide range of occupations from architectural and engineering practices and research consultancies to development work, furniture design, owning and operating electricity utilities, and even carbon trading.

This course in detail

The course is organised on a modular credit system, 60 credits for postgraduate certificate, 120 credits for the postgraduate diploma (9 months full-time, 20 months part-time) and 180 credits for the master's degree (12 months full-time, 24 months part-time).

Modules combine a ratio of taught to self-led study. For example, a module of 20 credits approximates to 200 hours of student effort, up to 36 hours of which will normally be devoted to lectures, seminars, individual tutorials or other staff contact. The remainder of the time is devoted to student-led study and assessment.

Please note: as courses are reviewed regularly, the module list you choose from may vary from that shown below.

The core modules for the MSc and PGDip are:
-Building Physics (20 credits)
-The Sustainable Built Environment (20 credits)
-Post-occupancy Building Evaluation (20 credits)
-Advanced Low Carbon Building Technologies (20 credits)
-Modelling and Passive Strategies (20 credits)
-Sustainable Design in Context (20 credits)

The compulsory modules for the MSc are:
-Research Methods and Design (10 credits)
-MSc Dissertation (50 credits)

Teaching and learning

The teaching and learning methods reflect the wide variety of topics and techniques associated with sustainability, low-carbon and resource efficient design.

Staff-led lectures provide the framework, background and knowledge base, and you are encouraged to probe deeper into the topics by further reading and review. Analysis, synthesis and application of material introduced in the lectures are achieved through professional and staff-led workshops, group and one-to-one tutorials, student-led seminars, case studies, and practical work that anticipates the design project.

The course attracts students from a diverse range of ages, backgrounds, gender and nationalities. This offers opportunities for interdisciplinary, globally aware teaching and learning. You are exposed to a variety of cultural perspectives and issues through the use of international case studies and draw on their diverse strengths through peer learning and group work.

An annual field trip is an opportunity to directly experience some of the very best of sustainable design projects in another culture. Previous field trips have been to Germany, Scotland and Denmark.

The range of subjects draws on the research strengths of the teaching staff and enables research to inform the teaching modules. You are encouraged where possible to take part in staff research projects.

We attract some of the best students in the field, drawn by the integrating basis of the programme and its solid theoretical foundation on expertise within the University.

Careers and professional development

Graduates will possess an advanced understanding of the key sustainability issues related to buildings enabling them to strategically influence feasibility and design processes within the built environment. They will be familiar with a range of models, tools and methods with which to quantify, predict, evaluate and manage building performance, and will be able to use them and switch to other tools based on an understanding from first principles.

Drawing on a working knowledge of how to minimise energy, carbon emissions and resource consumption in buildings through the various stages of their life cycles, they will be able to take account of changing, incomplete and uncertain information related to the environment. They will also have well developed skills in auditing, analysis, reporting and presentation and a thorough understanding of the interdisciplinary subject area.

Students from this course have gone on to work in a wide range of occupations from architectural and engineering practices and research consultancies to development work, furniture design, owning and operating electricity utilities, and even carbon trading.

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It is expected that applicants from the field of architecture will already possess an accredited graduate diploma or postgraduate degree in architecture (UK), a professional master's in architecture (US), or the international equivalent. Read more
It is expected that applicants from the field of architecture will already possess an accredited graduate diploma or postgraduate degree in architecture (UK), a professional master's in architecture (US), or the international equivalent.

The MArch course is an experimentally minded design studio. You will be working with students from all over the world to generate design proposals that explore the edges of architectural thought.

There is an emphasis not only on the materials and techniques of construction but also elements such as air, heat, water, sound, smell and lights as materials too. This exploration will involve visits to factories and workshops where materials are manipulated in a variety of unusual ways, and also practical experimentation and testing in the studio environment.

This programme offers the opportunity to explore ideas in great detail, resulting in a thesis that might take the form of a video, set of drawings or physical model. The portfolio generated alongside the thesis will act as a curated record of your findings.

Why choose this course?

Oxford Brookes University is unusual in offering this design-based speculative research course in architecture that builds on its excellent reputation for architectural courses at postgraduate and undergraduate level. Brookes' School of Architecture is recognised as one of the country's leading schools and is consistently ranked by The Architects' Journal as one of the five best schools in the UK.
Students from the school figure regularly in national and international prizes and awards, and go on to work for many of the best-known practices in the country. We have an international reputation in research, in areas ranging from sustainable design to modular buildings and from design for well-being to vernacular architecture.

Staff in the school regularly secure research funding from the UK's research councils and the European Union as well as industry, with an annual research grant income averaging £1,000,000 in recent years. This research expertise feeds directly into the teaching programme at all levels, from undergraduate to PhD. The School of Architecture has dedicated studio space and postgraduate facilities.

This course in detail

The Advanced Architectural Design Modules (50+30 credits) represent the core of the learning experience. Project–based learning is used in a studio environment to individually and collectively explore architectural design problems. The design studio tutors will set the specific design problem and methodology employed. It is envisaged that several parallel studios may be established, numbers permitting, each led by separate studio tutors with different agendas, programmes and methodologies. However, the learning outcomes will be common. Initially, there will be only one studio which will be organised as follows:

The first semester is always a rigid organised fabric of reviews, workshops, tutorials and deadlines with students working both individually and in groups. Within this framework students engage in two strands of investigation: A. an in-depth research into the tectonic possibilities of a new material/s and B. the analysis of a real site with the aim of generating a series of questions that demand an architectural response. By the end of the semester each student is expected to present to a jury of invited critics a catalogue both conceptual and material, from which they will make a project, in a coherent manner using appropriate media. This jury provides formative feedback for students on their learning.

The first semester design studio is complimented by a series of challenging, group and individual based workshops, Urban Cultures, on drawing, model making and movie making, run by the tutors. Students are expected to engage in questioning and debate with the lecturers and are required to produce a series of responses in drawn and written forms, which contribute to their design portfolio, around a theme related to the lecture series.

Spread over the second semester there is a further series of lectures on Architecture and the City given by external academics and practitioners. Students are expected to engage in questioning and debate with the lecturers and are required to produce a series of responses in drawn and written forms to exercises set by the visiting lecturer. The results are to be bound into a book, which contributes to and supports their design portfolio, around a theme related to the lecture series.

The second semester design studio focuses on the architectural implications of bringing the two apparently dissimilar strands of the first semester’s investigation into surprising conjunctions. Students are asked to approach the possibilities created by these apparently disconnected procedures in an entirely logical way.
At this stage the studio places emphasis on the importance of developing students’ ability to demonstrate conceptual clarity, to locate their ideas in the spectrum of current and past architecture and to maintain a strong link between concept and product.

Students are also encouraged to explore a wide range of media and technique and to develop a rationale for selecting appropriate techniques for the representation of particular kinds of architectural ideas. Students are required to present their design projects to an invited group of invited critics close to the end of the semester.

This proves formative feedback for students. The final Module mark is generated from a portfolio-based assessment held at the end of the second semester involving a panel internal staff. This system will ensure a parity of marking when the module consists of multiple design studios.

Students also undertake a Research Methods Module in the second semester that prepares them for their dissertation project. A set of generic postgraduate school-wide lectures on research paradigms, methodology and research tools is followed by Masters specific seminars in which students develop a synopsis for their dissertation’. The module is assessed by means of a review of a relevant past Masters dissertation and a synopsis proposal.

The MArch programme concludes with the Dissertation Project in which individual students work with a supervisor on projects that have developed from the work of the design studio. Students are expected to produce original, relevant and valid projects. The dissertation can take a written or design based form. In the latter case a written commentary is expected as part of the dissertation submission. Students submit their dissertation projects at the end of the summer vacation and are expected to hold an exhibition of their work in the Department or elsewhere as agreed.

Students who have qualified for the award of MA are encouraged to apply to continue to the PhD degree programme in the School if they so wish. A Postgraduate Diploma in Advanced Architectural Design can be gained by students who complete 120 credits but do not complete the full master's programme.

Teaching and learning

Studio research is complemented by a series of challenging talks by visiting academics and practitioners at every stage of the process as well as a consistent programme of individual discussions and workshops with your tutors.

You will work both in groups and individually, exploring a new kind of architecture. The methods of exploration include techniques primarily associated with the movie industry, such as the making of collages, optical composites, physical models and drawings both by hand and computer. The tutors act as guides to reveal areas of interest so that you develop an individual approach to the brief, the programme and the realisation of a project.

Teaching is heavily design-studio based, with project-based learning in a studio environment. Several parallel studies may operate, offering different methodologies but with common learning outcomes. The design studio will be complemented by a series of lectures, reviews, tutorials and site visits.

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The Urban Design course combines students' existing strengths with focused design training to produce urban designers capable of managing the complex problems of development, urban space and form. Read more
The Urban Design course combines students' existing strengths with focused design training to produce urban designers capable of managing the complex problems of development, urban space and form.

The certificate and diploma stages introduce theoretical concepts and practical methods of urban design. They will enable you to understand processes of urban design production and consumption, and to develop skills and techniques for communicating three-dimensional urban design.

Accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS), and by the Royal Town Planning Institute (RTPI) when combined with the PGDip in Spatial Planning.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/urban-design-ma/

Why choose this course?

- Our graduates have very high success rates in gaining employment and have secured posts in the public sector, private consultancy, the voluntary sector, and research and teaching areas.

- Staff are engaged in world-leading research (69% either world leading or internationally excellent in REF 2014) which feeds directly into the teaching and studio work.

- A major strength of the course is its multidisciplinary, collegiate, team-based approach to project work and presentation.

Teaching and learning

Teaching and learning methods reflect the wide variety of topics and techniques associated with urban design in practice.

Lectures provide the framework, essential background and knowledge base for the course, while you are encouraged to probe deeper into different topics by further reading and review.

Analysis, synthesis and application of material introduced in lectures are demonstrated through studio sessions, workshops, seminars and practical project work. Site visits and a fieldwork component are an important component.

Approach to assessment

Modules are assessed by methods that include essays, seminar papers, project work and presentations, workshops and simulations. All the assessment is based on coursework. The assessment methods aim to test not only knowledge but also skills in, for example, research, analysis, specification and design.

Urban Design students

The Joint Centre for Urban Design has around 100 students enrolled at any one time on its academic and research degrees. Over the last five years students have come each year from, on average, 22 different countries and with a wide range of backgrounds.

Careers

Our graduates have very high success rates in gaining employment and have secured posts in the public sector, private consultancy, the voluntary sector, and research and teaching areas.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research areas and clusters

Staff are engaged in world-leading research which feeds directly into the teaching and studio work. Recent topics include:
- place-identity
- heritage led regeneration
- sustainable cities
- place-making
- aesthetic appreciation of buildings, streets and open spaces
- retrofitting cities
- community engagement
- new pedagogy of teaching urban design.

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Architectural regeneration is the collective activities of reusing, adapting and evolving existing buildings within an urban or rural context. Read more
Architectural regeneration is the collective activities of reusing, adapting and evolving existing buildings within an urban or rural context. The activities recognise the impacts these decisions and interventions have on the regeneration of a place, and are underpinned by the principles of environmental, social and cultural sustainability.

This programme promotes an interdisciplinary approach that combines critical thinking and analysis, as well as creative design. It is based on the ethos that the regeneration and development of the inherited built environment, with its social and cultural fabric, is an essential component of sustainable development.

It prepares you for a practical and leading role in organisations involved in architectural regeneration and development. It is international in focus, with an emphasis on field research and design/implementation projects.

Why choose this course?

Oxford Brookes has an established international reputation for its excellence in teaching and research related to international vernacular architecture, architectural conservation and regeneration. Staff teaching on the programme, including Dr Aylin Orbasli and Dr Marcel Vellinga, combine different disciplinary backgrounds with academic and practice experience, and active involvement with projects in different parts of the world. We house the Paul Oliver Vernacular Architecture Library.

We stimulate students towards more innovative approaches and dynamic ways of thinking that are now essential to secure a viable future for historic urban environments, traditional settlements and the world’s vernacular architecture. The international nature of the programme builds up skills to work in different cultural contexts and will introduce students to a network of international organisations in the field.

This course in detail

The course is offered at three levels: as a postgraduate certificate, a postgraduate diploma and a master's degree. Normally candidates enrol for the master's degree, but it is possible to enrol directly on the PGCert or PGDip, either on recommendation from the admissions tutor or as an exit point from the MA.

In total, 180 credits are required to complete the MA in International Architectural Regeneration and Development. These are divided into two parts: 120 credits must be successfully completed to qualify for the postgraduate diploma. During Semesters 1 and 2 all MA students take taught core modules amounting to 90 credits and choose options amounting to 30 credits. Research methods seminars and the dissertation itself account for a further 60 credits required to achieve the MA. For the postgraduate certificate 60 credits are needed.

The programme is made up of core (compulsory) modules and optional modules that are explained in more detail below.

Core modules:
-Architecture, Culture and Tradition
-Applications in Regeneration
-Globalisation, Environment and Development
-Regeneration and Development Project

Optional modules include:
-Vernacular Architecture, Sustainability and Development
-Master Classes
-Development and Urbanisation
-Urban Design Theory
-Independent Study

Other compulsory modules for the MA stage are:
-Research Methods
-Dissertation/Design Project

The course is international in focus and throughout the course references and visits to international contexts are made. A field trip is organised each year to look at international examples of regeneration projects. The international body of students on the course are encouraged to reflect on and present experiences from their countries.

NB As courses are reviewed regularly, the module list you choose from may vary from that shown here.

Teaching and learning

The aim of the course is to provide the knowledge and tools that will enable you to recognise the potential of, and contribute creatively to, the appropriate and sustainable regeneration of the inherited built environment in urban or rural contexts, including vernacular architecture.

The course will help you develop a critical awareness of the cultural embodiment of the built environment and associated regeneration and development processes, and attain skills and tools that are necessary to propose and implement innovative yet culturally sensitive and environmentally sustainable strategies and interventions.

Teaching methods include a combination of lectures and seminars, design studios, workshops and group discussions, field study and master classes.

Careers and professional development

Jobs in architectural regeneration can include a wide range of prospects including private sector consultancy assignments, public sector decision making positions or working for not for profit organisations delivering or assisting the regeneration process.

Graduates of this programme have gone on to work in a wide range of positions in the regeneration field internationally. Much of the success of a career in regeneration is combining the knowledge and skills learnt in the programme with professional skills gained in previous study and practice. Although we are unable to directly ‘find’ jobs for programme graduates, we regularly make recommendations through a good network of contacts and alumni and share employment opportunities with current students and graduates of the programme.

Graduates with architecture backgrounds often go on to work in practices specialising in regeneration or rehabilitation. Younger graduates have found that regeneration expertise has given them an edge and therefore more responsibility in practices they are working at. Those with more experience have found opportunities to diversify and gain positions in consultancy or multi-disciplinary practices.

There are also a wide range of jobs in the non-governmental sectors, ranging from managing small non-governmental (charitable) organisations to working on projects for major donor bodies like UNESCO. We have had an Indian graduate working on post-disaster rebuilding in Haiti, a Japanese graduate working on the preservation of vernacular architecture in Vietnam, and a Canadian graduate running donor-assisted construction programmes in Papua New Guinea. Closer to home, a UK graduate with a background in law is managing a townscape heritage initiative on behalf of the Heritage Lottery Fund.

Overseas students in particular, who have joined the programme from public sector assignments, have found that the degree has helped them both specialise and progress in their departments on their return. One graduate has gone onto head the procurement team in the Ministry of Municipalities specifically dealing with major regeneration projects. Several others work for their respective national heritage authorities.

Other graduates have used the programme as a stepping stone for PhD study, at Brookes or elsewhere. A number of former graduates are now teaching regeneration and conservation at degree and postgraduate levels.

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The MSc Real Estate is a conversion programme for graduates from other academic disciplines and is accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS). Read more
The MSc Real Estate is a conversion programme for graduates from other academic disciplines and is accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS). It is one degree programme with three distinct pathways: Commercial Real Estate; Residential Real Estate and International Real Estate. All three pathways are viewed as a single cohort.

The programme will provide you with all the necessary skills and knowledge to excel in the real estate profession and will prepare you for the challenge of completing the Assessment of Professional Competence (APC) to become a chartered surveyor.

The MSc Real Estate is available for full-time study only. Given the intensity of the programme, you are advised to live in or near Oxford. Please note this course has a September start only.

Accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS)

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/real-estate-international-commercial-or-residential/

Why choose this course?

- The majority of the teaching staff are professionally qualified as chartered surveyors, planners, lawyers or accountants, each of them is dedicated to providing excellent teaching.

- Learning is enhanced by external speakers, field trips and management support from the industry, provided by seven of the major international real estate consultancies who sponsor the programmes: CBRE, Cluttons, DTZ, GVA, Jones Lang LaSalle, Knight Frank and Savills.

- The programme has always enjoyed a very successful level of graduate employment. Our students find employment in both the major international real estate consultancies and local firms.

- The programme is well respected in all areas of the industry and we also have alumni in real estate management companies, banks, financial institutions, government bodies and corporates.

- The small cohort (about 40 students each year) means more individual attention, excellent group dynamics in lectures/discussions, good opportunities for socialising, sharing experiences, supporting each other and creating lasting friendships.

Teaching and learning

The philosophy of the MSc programme is to provide you with a theoretical framework in the early modules and to build on this in the latter stages with practical, real life examples and case studies.

Learning methods include lectures, seminars, tutorials, project work and independent study. Teaching is organised around the component modules, involving a total of around 20 hours of teaching time per week over each 12-week teaching semester.

The semester system requires examinations to be taken at the end of each teaching period. It is a very intensive course and you undertake a substantial amount of private study and project work.

The Integrative Professional Practice module draws together the different subjects taught on the course and enables you to develop strong interpersonal communication via a series of face-to-face role-plays.

In addition to the taught modules (see below), there is also an umbrella module, Real Estate Markets, which incorporates a number of field trips in the UK and Europe.

Approach to assessment

Each module is assessed individually, through coursework such as submission of reports and presentations, and/or formal written examination.

Specialist facilities

Students taking the MSc Real Estate benefit from the allocation of a dedicated base-room in the newly redeveloped Abercrombie Building. The majority of teaching takes place in the base-room which also houses a suite of PCs.

Field trips

One of the most important elements of the MSc Real Estate programme is the field trip schedule, which helps you to build on your learning by giving you the opportunity to see how things are done in practice. These start in the induction week with trips around Oxford and London.

In the autumn, there are further day trips to London and a three-day residential field trip to another major city in the UK. In the spring we have further day trips, and in the summer we have a five-day residential trip to a major European city.

In each case, the intent of the field trips is to 'add flesh to the bones'. In the classroom, we can talk about how things should be done. It is only when on these trips that a student can appreciate how things are done in practice.

The cost of field trips is included in the programme fees.

How this course helps you develop

The MSc Real Estate, although grounded in academic excellence, is a practice-based programme for students wishing to become chartered surveyors. It has established itself as a premier postgraduate programme for students wishing to enter the property profession and it meets the strong demand from the real estate profession for high-calibre postgraduate students both in the UK and overseas.

As a student on the MSc Real Estate, you will benefit from the many contacts that the Department of Real Estate and Construction has established within the property industry and from the networking/career events organised during the year specifically for our students.

The Department also has an active alumni group on LinkedIn for students/graduates in Real Estate and students are encouraged to join when they start the MSc.

Careers

The MSc Real Estate programme at Brookes is highly respected in the profession.

In the case of UK students, it is normal for our students to secure employment before the programme ends. Most students work for the big international real estate companies in London, but our students have also been successful in securing employment in smaller niche practices in London or in other areas of the country.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

David Shiers, co-author of The Green Guide to Specification, is based in the department.

Research areas and clusters

The Real Estate and Land Policy Group examines the impact of land and housing markets/policy on broader development processes - particularly for enhancing urban sustainability. We also address broader market-based fundamentals such as valuation, and emerging areas of research include behavioural finance.

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The Master of Research in Urban Design is designed primarily to enable students to link a programme of substantive research training to the subsequent pursuit of a doctorate. Read more
The Master of Research in Urban Design is designed primarily to enable students to link a programme of substantive research training to the subsequent pursuit of a doctorate.

The course is modular in structure and includes training in urban design and in research methods and methodology.

Research staff are drawn primarily from the Joint Centre for Urban Design and the Department of Planning but with some contributions from the School of Architecture and the Department of Real Estate and Construction, and the wider university community.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/urban-design-mres/

Why choose this course?

- Oxford Brookes is renowned internationally for its research in town and country planning. In REF 2014 69% of our research was rated as either world leading or internationally excellent.

- Staff feed their research directly into the teaching and studio work.

- You will have the opportunity to become involved in research projects of Brookes' Joint Centre for Urban Design.

- Visiting speakers from business and industry, local government, and consultancies and research bodies provide external input.

- Site visits will give you direct experience of some of the most important issues in urban design.

Teaching and learning

Teaching methods reflect the wide variety of topics and techniques associated with urban design and research, and include lectures, studio sessions, seminars, workshops, practical project work, field trips and research project shadowing.

The course includes site visits that provide students with direct experience of some of the most important issues in urban design.

The majority of assessment is based on coursework, such as essays, seminars, project work, presentations and the dissertation.

Careers

Our graduates have very high success rates in gaining employment and have secured posts in the public sector, private consultancy, the voluntary sector, and research and teaching areas.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research areas and clusters

Staff are engaged in world-leading research which feeds directly into the teaching and studio work. Recent topics include:
- place-identity
- heritage led regeneration
- sustainable cities
- place-making
- aesthetic appreciation of buildings, streets and open spaces
- retrofitting cities
- community engagement
- new pedagogy of teaching urban design.

Read less
The MSc in Urban Planning. Developing and Transitional Regions is concerned with the theory and practice of urban planning in societies undergoing rapid economic, social, technological, environmental and spatial change. Read more
The MSc in Urban Planning: Developing and Transitional Regions is concerned with the theory and practice of urban planning in societies undergoing rapid economic, social, technological, environmental and spatial change.

The emphasis of the course is on institutional aspects of planning and management interventions in the urban sector and the scope of various policy instruments and planning modes to manage the emerging spatial patterns, impacts and processes of urban growth.

The MSc is RICS- and RTPI-accredited.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/studying-at-brookes/courses/postgraduate/2015/urban-planning-developing-and-transitional-regions/

Why choose this course?

In choosing to study the MSc Urban Planning: Developing and Transitional Regions at Oxford Brookes, you will:
- Be on a fully accredited RTPI and RICS course which is viewed as the first choice for urban and development planning training by a range of employers throughout the world - especially governments, local authorities, development and planning consultancies.

- Join and engage with scholars and tutors from diverse intellectual and global backgrounds.

- As well as being one of the world's most famous centres for learning, Oxford is a city with a great urban heritage and is within easy reach of London and other urban centres. Its excellent transport links make it a convenient place to take up a day release part- time course.

- Engage with and benefit from teaching staff who are active in research and practice; drawn primarily from the Department of Planning but with some contributions from the wider university community. Visiting speakers from business and industry, local government, and consultancies and research bodies also provide a major contribution to the teaching programme.

- Benefit from the success of our courses in delivering highly skilled professionals. Our graduates get employment in the private and public sector, international development institutions, NGOs, research institutions and consultancy.

- Study in our brand new £132 million redevelopment of Headington campus, ultra modern spaces and facilities in Abercrombie building and John Henry Brookes building; access to top of the range studios, IT suites and computer programs, library and 24/7 online databases.

Professional accreditation

The MSc Urban Planning: Developing and Transitional Regions is fully accredited by:
- the Royal Town Planning Institute (RTPI).
- the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS). This means that on successful completion of the MSc, graduates can register for - the Assessment of Professional Competence procedures of RICS and RTPI and work towards becoming full members.

Teaching and learning

Learning methods include lectures, directed reading, workshops, seminars, and practical and project work. Some modules include site visits and fieldwork, which provide you with direct experience of practical and current issues.

Teaching is organised on a module-credit basis, each module involving approximately 200 hours of student input and approximately 36 hours of staff contact, normally delivered through three-hour teaching blocks over a 12-week period.

Each course module is assessed individually, generally on the quality of written or design work, and to some extent on verbal presentations. Assessment methods may include essays, seminar papers, formal written examinations, in-class tests, project work, design and verbal presentations, workshops, simulations and practical exercises.

Field trips

Field trips include an international field trip to Europe in the Autumn plus a range of national and local site and institutional visits especially to London throughout the academic year.

Careers

Not only is the MSc Urban Planning: Developing and Transitional Regions a RICS and RTPI professionally recognised qualification, it is also widely regarded as providing the transferable skills, critical knowledge and understanding necessary in many fields of work in the built and natural environment. Today our alumni can be found in senior positions in some of the largest international planning and environmental consultancies, in government agencies, in large NGOs and campaigning organisations across the globe.

The long-standing reputation of the Department of Planning in producing highly skilled, enthusiastic and very capable professional planners aids the employability of our graduates. We are the first port of call for many employers when they are seeking new graduate planners.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

With more than 600 students engaging a wide range of research topics in our undergraduate, postgraduate and research degree programmes, including master's by research, the department is widely recognised as a leading educator in environment, design and development subjects. With a complement of over 60 teaching, administrative, technical and research staff, the department performs a leading role in research and consultancy, with clients and projects covering subjects from local concerns to multinational organisations, government and industry.

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The Development and Emergency Practice (DEP) course provides a unique academic setting for the study of international development, conflict, disaster management, urbanisation, humanitarianism and human rights. Read more
The Development and Emergency Practice (DEP) course provides a unique academic setting for the study of international development, conflict, disaster management, urbanisation, humanitarianism and human rights. With its emphasis on practice, the course offers students the opportunity to develop knowledge, skills and attitudes in the rapidly changing fields of development and emergencies.

The programme is targeted at those with, or seeking, careers in NGOs, bilateral or multilateral humanitarian, development and human rights agencies, or governmental and commercial organisations working in international development.

This programme is run by the Centre for Development and Emergency Practice (CENDEP), which is based within the School of Architecture.

Why choose this course?

This programme has an international reputation for excellence. It is based on the expertise developed at Oxford Brookes University in the Centre for Development and Emergency Practice. You will have the option of going on a field trip. Previous trips have been to Asia, Africa and Latin America. Many graduates go on to secure senior positions with international development or emergency organisations.

This course in detail

This Course requires 200 hours of student input, up to 40 hours of which will be devoted to lectures, seminars, or individual tutorials. The remainder of the time is devoted to self-led study. For the postgraduate certificate it is compulsory to pass the core module, Critical Inquiry, Development and Emergencies: Theory and Policy, and pass other modules to achieve a total of 60 credits. For the postgraduate diploma you must pass 120 credits from the taught modules, including both compulsory modules. For the MA you must gain at least 180 credits, including the dissertation.

As courses are reviewed regularly the module list you choose from may vary from that shown here.
-Critical Inquiry Development & Emergencies: Theory and Policy (compulsory 20 credits)
-Human Rights & Governance (optional 20 credits)
-Disasters, Risk, Vulnerability and Climate Change (optional 20 credits)
-The Refugee Experience: Forced migration, protection and humanitarianism (optional 20 credits)
-Conflict, Violence and Humanitarianism (optional 20 credits)
-Shelter after Disaster (optional 20 credits)
-Programming and Partnerships (optional 10 credits)
-Improving Humanitarian Action: Responding to crisis in 21st Century (optional 10 credits)
-Working with Conflict (optional 10 credits)
-Independent Study (optional 10 credits)
-Research Methods (optional 10 credits)
-Dissertation (50 credits)

Teaching and learning

Teaching and learning strategies are grounded in theory, case studies and field based experience. The programme concentrates on the development of intellectual knowledge and the cultivation of academic skills including synthesis, analysis, interpretation, understanding and judgement. The programme also focuses on the practitioner’s approach, with reference in particular to:
-The setting in which they work (poverty, conflict, power, vulnerability, capability, risk, urbanisation, environmental change and the history and dynamics of particular places, their people and their society).
-The set of approaches they adopt (community mobilisation, aid, human rights advocacy, governance, risk reduction, livelihoods, humanitarian protection, accompaniment and empowerment).
-Themselves (the personal motivations that drive and shape their own vocation, their particular personality, temperament, strengths, abilities and weaknesses).

The intention is that a deeper understanding of these factors will enable students to move beyond rigid professional boxes to become more self aware, knowledge based practitioners able to work flexibly around a variety of problems in different situations of poverty, armed conflict and disaster.

Careers and professional development

The course is an ideal platform for you to develop your career in, or move into, international development and emergency organisations. Many graduates are able to secure senior positions.

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This programme is grounded on the belief that architects should be thinking well beyond the constraints of market forces and the traditional disciplinary limits of the profession, towards forms, technology and spaces for a more sustainable future. Read more
This programme is grounded on the belief that architects should be thinking well beyond the constraints of market forces and the traditional disciplinary limits of the profession, towards forms, technology and spaces for a more sustainable future. This is a student-led programme, and you can have very different experiences within it depending on the choices of studios and courses you make.

Why choose this course?

Founded in 1927, the School of Architecture at Oxford Brookes has established an international reputation for the quality of both its research and its teaching. As one of the largest architecture schools in the UK, with around 600 students and 70 staff, it plays a leading role in defining the national, and international, agenda in design education and research. The school enjoys an international reputation in research, in areas ranging from sustainable design to modular buildings and from design for well-being to vernacular architecture.

Staff in the school regularly secure research funding from the UK's research councils and the European Union as well as industry, with an annual research grant income averaging £1m in recent years. This programme provides RIBA/ARB Part 2.

Professional accreditation

Accredited by the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) and the Architects Registration Board (ARB).

This course in detail

Year 1 - Research into design
This year has a very strong emphasis on acquiring in-depth knowledge of an architecturally important field of study and utilising that knowledge in design. This is achieved by taking one of the six 'design specialisations'.

You choose which design specialisation is best for you. The specialisations on offer are deliberately highly diverse to cater for the changing nature of the profession in practice. This course produces graduates for the global market and as such requires a high level of commitment from staff and students.

The design specialisations are:
-Advanced Architectural Design
-International Architectural Regeneration and Development
-Development and Emergency Practice
-Sustainable Building: Performance and Design
-Research-led Design
-Urban Design.

Each of the research specialisations offers teaching from experts within that subject area, and links, through teaching focus and staff, to the five research clusters that are an invaluable resource within the School of architecture.

The five research clusters keep the specialisations at the cutting edge in terms of a global agenda. They are, in general terms, environmental design, technology, development and emergency practice, humanities and architectural design.

Each of the design specialisations include a design project or projects, to which you will apply your detailed learning.

In addition to the design specialisation the first year will, through the Research Philosophy for Design module, widen your thinking in terms of what constitutes research, test your critical thinking and improved your analytical abilities. All of these are essential tools and their enhancement will place you in a stronger position to undertake the design studio in the second year.

Your ability to represent your ideas in a coherent and focused manner is the remit for the Representation module. This module will identify your strengths and build up your weaknesses, both in terms of visual and verbal communication methods. You will be able to dedicate time to fine-tuning techniques or building from basics in sketching, model making, 2D and 3D CAD. Your presentation of methods and actual practice will enable you to build confidence in verbal communication skills.

The Management, Practice and Law module in year one looks at the landscapes within which these issues are being informed. This module is taught by practising architects who have first-hand experience of the issues under discussion. Through a series of workshops you will work on topics that are essential to the practice of architecture. Management, practice and law is part of the design delivery of the programme and you will be expected to approach the coursework from a design position. This module asks that you approach this subject with a very different mind-set than the traditional position.

Due to the diverse and preparative basis of this year it is compulsory for all students to pass all compulsory components of the Research into Design year in order to be progress to the Design and Technology year.

Year 2 - Design and technology
This year is structured to enable you to synthesise a broad range of complex cultural, aesthetic, research and technical factors, and design-specialisation learning, into your major design project and portfolio.

The year is spent participating in one of six design studios. All studios have control over their own programme of projects, and each has a different view of architectural culture and promotes different design methods. The design studios are taught by some of the brightest designers and tutors in the country and consequently their programmes demand high levels of creative and intellectual endeavour from you, as well as high levels of productivity. Their aim is to raise your design thinking, skills and production to the highest possible standard.

All six units present their projects for the year in the induction session and you are asked to select all six in order of preference. This system is to allow for an even distribution of students across all six units. Most students are allocated to their first choice of studio although there is no guarantee of a particular design unit - normally at worst you are allocated your second choice.

During the design and technology year, your design work must develop into technically ambitious architecture and be the subject of your compulsory Advanced Technology for Design module. This module designs through technology and fully complements and parallels your work in the design studio. There is a very strong emphasis here upon the creative possibilities for architectural technology. We ask for an open and experimental approach to technology, but also a clear understanding of its context and aims.

The staff delivering the teaching in the design studio unit and the Advanced Technology for Design module are made up from academics and practitioners. This energetic mix will challenge you to think about design and technology in a new manner, building confidence in ability, enabling deep thinking, and aiding you to define a personal design spirit.

Sitting alongside the design and technology is the second Management, Practice and Law module. This module builds on the learning and skills from the first year module and prepares you for stepping back into practice. As in the first year module this is learning is delivered by practicing architects. Through focus groups with architectural practices, this module figures in the skills that are seen as highly desirable for the ARB part 2 graduate to have when seeking employment.

Throughout the two years of the programme there will be interim reviews. This offers an opportunity to receive feedback from outside of your design studio or design specialisation. We have strong links with practice and architectural institutions and can attract the most able people to sit on our reviews.

This is a programme that aims to give you the skills for international practice.

As our courses are reviewed regularly, modules may vary from those listed here.

Teaching and learning

The unique nature of the Applied Design in Architecture offers you the opportunity to select an individual pathway that will create a distinctive graduate profile that is unique to you alone.

The ability to choose modules from within design specialisations offers you the prospect of defining your own position. You will find that you are being taught with, in most cases, direct entry master's students from countries around the world.

This aspect is complemented by the Year 2 design studio where you will engage with a distinctive agenda and experience a diversity of design specialisation thinking from students within your unit.

Self-directed learning is highly supported by staff in the School of Architecture. Personal choice engenders motivation and a high level of commitment, and the programme has been designed to embrace this aspect whilst clearly building on skills, thinking, application and design production to achieve a final portfolio of the highest standard.

Careers and professional development

The modules Management Practice, and Law 1 and 2, include guidance on the necessary professional skills that are required both for ARB Part 2 and for preparation in commencing ARB Part 3. The design studio generates a portfolio of work that not only demonstrates the learning for ARB Part 2 but also written, research and visual skills. The design portfolio is intended as the vehicle for students to synthesise all facets of their learning in order to seek practice employment.

In addition the school maintains a jobs wall that advertises vacancies locally, nationally and internationally.

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