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Anthropology×

University College London, Full Time Masters Degrees in Anthropology

We have 29 University College London, Full Time Masters Degrees in Anthropology

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The Anthropology MRes offers students a thorough grounding in a wide range of biological or social science methodologies and methods, an advanced knowledge of contemporary questions in anthropology, and training in statistical and professional skills, which prepare graduates for doctoral research or employment as social science researcher. Read more
The Anthropology MRes offers students a thorough grounding in a wide range of biological or social science methodologies and methods, an advanced knowledge of contemporary questions in anthropology, and training in statistical and professional skills, which prepare graduates for doctoral research or employment as social science researcher.

Degree information

Students develop an advanced knowledge and understanding of topics in one of the sub-disciplines of anthropology (biological, social or material culture). They are prepared for advanced level research through a general training in social science research methods and specialised research training in broad-based anthropological research methods and techniques.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of two core modules (45 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a research dissertation (105 credits).

Core modules:
-Research Methods and Skills
-Ethnographic Area: Critical Literature Review

Optional modules - the following is a selection of possible option modules:
-Anthropological and Archaeological Genetics
-Anthropology of Art and Design
-Anthropology of China
-Anthropology of Nationalism, Ethnicity and Race
-Anthropology of Socialist and Post-Socialist Societies
-Anthropology of the Built Environment
-Ecology of Human Groups
-Evolution of Human Brain, Cognition and Language
-History and Aesthetics of Documentary
-Mass Consumption and Design
-Medical Anthropology
-Medical Anthropology and Primary Care
-Palaeoanthropology
-Population and Development
-Practical Ethnographic and Documentary Filmmaking
-Primate Socioecology
-Risk, Power and Uncertainty
-Ritual Healing and Therapeutic Employment
-Social Construction of Landscape

Dissertation/report
All MRes students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of approximately 17,000 words (inclusive of notes).

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, small group presentations and discussion, tutorials, laboratory and practical work, independent directed reading, interactive teamwork, video, and film and web-based courses. Assessment is through coursework, unseen and take-home examination, laboratory books, posters and the dissertation.

Fieldwork
Students usually conduct fieldwork over the summer after the end of the third term. The research carried out will inform the final dissertation.

Careers

With the completion of the MRes, we expect students to be highly competent professionals, who will either continue to the MPhil/PhD level or who will be well equipped to apply their knowledge of social science methodologies and methods and their specific anthropological expertise in a range of settings.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Independent Consultant, Conferencia Inter Americana de Segundad Social
-Secondary School Teaching Assistant, Longsands Academy
-Anthropology, LSE (The London School of Economics and Political
-Anthropology, University College London (UCL)
-PhD Anthropology, University of Oxford

Employability
The MRes enhances the profile of students who already have a strong background in anthropology by training them in professional skills, statistics and various other social science methods. Exposure to positivist social science methodologies makes graduate attractive candidates for positions in NGOs or work in applied social science. Emphasis on research design and data collection through field research prepares graduates to be independent researchers. The general social science orientation of the degree qualifies students to apply for research positions on grants in various disciplines, and it opens the way to doctoral study in anthropology and other social science subjects.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Anthropology was the first in the UK to integrate biological and social anthropology with material culture into a broad-based conception of the discipline. It is one of the largest anthropology departments in the UK in terms of both staff and research student numbers, offering an exceptional breadth of expertise.

Our excellent results in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise and 2014 Research Excellence Framework show that we are the leading broad-based anthropology department in the UK.

Students are encouraged to take full advantage of the wider anthropological community in London and the department's strong links with European universities and international institutions.

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This MSc aims to provide sufficient knowledge of advanced medically related anthropology to enable students to utilise anthropological approaches in a range of research and professional roles. Read more
This MSc aims to provide sufficient knowledge of advanced medically related anthropology to enable students to utilise anthropological approaches in a range of research and professional roles. We train students in theoretical and applied aspects of the field, preparing them for careers that engage with and impact real-world contexts.

Degree information

Students new to social science develop an understanding of a social science approach to the experience of illness and health, and gain skills required in social anthropological field research and analysis. For students with previous social science training, the programme focuses on the dimensions particular to medical anthropology.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core module (45 credits) optional modules in three distinct fields (45 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules
-Clinical Ethnography
-Medical Anthropology

Optional modules - *Medical anthropology options are available in the following areas:
-Anthropology of Science, Society and Biomedicine
-Ritual Healing and Therapeutic Emplotment
-Anthropology of Ethics and Morality
-Anthropology and Psychiatry

*Students may also choose from among a variety of other options within and beyond medical anthropology

Dissertation/report
All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, small-group presentations and discussion, tutorials, laboratory and practical work, independent directed reading, interactive teamwork, and video film and web based courses. Assessment is through one examination, two essays, optional module requirements and the research dissertation.

Careers

Medical Anthropology is a rapidly expanding interdisciplinary field and graduates of our programme have gone on to develop exciting careers in academia, clinical services, social services, government, and non-governmental organisations.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Medical doctor in specialty training, Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital (NHS)
-MBBS (Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery), Newcastle University
-Research Degree: Anthropology, University College London (UCL)
-Midwife, King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust
-PhD Population Health Sciences, The University of Edinburgh

Employability
Our approach is broad and open-minded, encompassing analysis of diversity issues in clinical practice, critical medical anthropology, psychology/psychiatry, social impact of genetic technologies, demographics, ethics, and studies of traditional healing. UCL is ranked fifth in the QS World University Rankings and our students benefit from a wealth of resources.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Anthropology was the first in the UK to integrate biological and social anthropology with material culture into a broad-based conception of the discipline. UCL Medical Anthropology at UCL integrates interpretive, critical and applied perspectives.

Our excellent results in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercises and 2014 Research Excellence Framework show that we are the leading broad-based anthropology department in the UK. We are also one of the largest anthropology departments in the UK, offering a breadth of expertise.

Students are encouraged to take full advantage of the wider anthropological community in London and the department's strong links with European universities and international institutions.

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This MSc provides a thorough grounding in anthropological theory and analysis, an understanding of ethnographic approaches to the study of social worlds, and a strong foundation in research practices. Read more
This MSc provides a thorough grounding in anthropological theory and analysis, an understanding of ethnographic approaches to the study of social worlds, and a strong foundation in research practices. Flexible in its structure, the programme enhances students’ employability by focusing also on the interface between anthropological research and professional practices.

Degree information

The programme aims to develop knowledge and understanding of major theoretical, ethnographic and methodological debates in social anthropology. Students develop an understanding of human cultural worlds through in-depth historical study, gain knowledge of specific societies and specialist approaches, and enhance their independent research skills through practical training in research methods.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (45 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules
-Critical Issues in Social Anthropology
-Research Methods

Optional modules
-Anthropology of Art and Design
-Social Forms of Revolution
-Mass Consumption and Design
-Anthropology and Psychiatry
-The Anthropology of Islam in Diaspora
-Medical Anthropology
-Anthropology of Latin America
-Documentary Film and the Anthropological Eye
-Social Construction of Landscape
-History and Aesthetics of Documentary
-Risk, Power and Uncertainty

Dissertation/report
All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of approximately 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, small group presentations and discussion, tutorials, laboratory and practical work, independent directed reading, interactive teamwork, and video, film and web based courses. It includes a research seminar series with invited speakers. Assessment is through unseen examination, essays, and the research dissertation.

Careers

Recent students on the course have pursued careers in fields including government, business, development, social research and consultancy, and the media, as well as in academia as professional anthropologists.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Editor, Xinhua News Agency
-History of Crime, Université Catholique de Louvain (Catholic Univers
-PhD Anthropology, Harvard University
-Junior Research Executive, BDRC Continental
-PhD Researcher, Max Planck Society

Employability
In addition to the analytical, interpretative and writing skills honed by its core academic training, the course includes a unique orientation towards the interface between anthropological research and professional practice, allowing students to focus on the anthropology of professions including medicine, development, education, the law, the creative industries. Our close co-operation with UCL’s bespoke careers services, provides opportunities for internships and placements during the programme or following its completion.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Anthropology was the first in the UK to integrate biological and social anthropology with material culture into a broad-based conception of the discipline. It is one of the largest anthropology departments in the UK in terms of both staff and research student numbers, offering an exceptional breadth of expertise.

Our excellent results in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise and 2014 Research Excellence Framework show that we are the leading broad-based anthropology department in the UK.

Students are encouraged to take full advantage of the wider anthropological community in London and the department's strong links with European universities and international institutions.

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Digital technologies are now ubiquitous in nearly every part of our lives, and today's students need to become proficient with digital technologies as research and communication tools. Read more
Digital technologies are now ubiquitous in nearly every part of our lives, and today's students need to become proficient with digital technologies as research and communication tools. The Digital Anthropology MSc at UCL combines technical skill with anthropological research methodologies in order to train students for research and involvement in this emergent world.

Degree information

Students gain skills training in digital technologies, from internet and digital film editing to e-curation and digital ethnography; study the anthropological theories of virtualism, materiality/immateriality and social networks; and develop an understanding of the consequences of digital culture through the ethnographic study of its social and regional impact in a global and comparative context.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of one core module (45 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules
-Digital Anthropology and Digital Anthropology Practical

Optional modules
-The Anthropology of Art and Design
-Mass Consumption and Design
-The Anthropology of the Built Environment
-Advanced Topics in Digital Ethnography
-Documentary Film and the Anthropological Eye
-Practical Ethnographic and Documentary Filmmaking
-Digital Infrastructure: Materiality, Information and Politics
-Anthropology and Photography
-Social Construction of Landscape

Dissertation/report
All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a 15,000-word dissertation.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, practicals and laboratory sessions. It includes a weekly seminar series, with invited international speakers. Assessment is through essays, methodology practicals, written examination and the substantial research dissertation.

Careers

In addition to its importance for careers such as in media, design and museums, digital technology is also integral to development, theoretical and applied anthropology. Companies and institutions collaborating with the MSc are: British Telecom, UCL Computer Sciences, UCL Information Studies, Microsoft Research Cambridge, Skype, Intel, the British Museum, NESTA, NOKIA, the Home Office and Inventi V.

The programme is also developing relationships with: Cultural Informatics Research Centre for the Arts and Humanities (CIRCAh), Slade Centre for Electronic Media in Fine Art, Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis, Centre for Museums, Heritage and Cultural Studies, UCL Interaction Centre, UCL Digital Humanities and UCL Urban Laboratory.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Digital Strategist, Canopy Brand Group.
-Researcher, River Research
-Principal Lecturer and Course Director, University of the Arts, London
-Assistant Print Analyst, GroupM
-Graduate Worker, Dare

Employability
New media and technology companies are showing considerable interest in Digital Anthropology as a degree that qualifies students for positions in all fields of user interaction and research. In the last few years students graduating from the MSc have been recruited by the best international agencies doing research on users' digital practices. In the non-profit sector students have joined organisations involved in policymaking, open access and citizen journalism. The subject is also a good grounding for students who are interested in continuing to a variety of PhD programmes.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Digital Anthropology MSc at UCL is becoming a world leader in the training of researchers in the social and cultural dimensions of information technologies and digital media.

UCL Anthropology is one of the largest anthropology departments in the UK and offers an exceptional breadth of expertise. Our excellent results in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise and 2014 Research Excellence Framework show that we are the leading broad-based anthropology department in the UK. The programme combines ethnographic methods, critical thinking and practical explorations of the digital world and encourages in-depth research to develop the next generation of understanding about the impact, consequences, aesthetics and politics of digital technologies and infrastructures.

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The MA is for people with a personal passion for material culture, materials innovations, crafts, designs, heritage, and the cultural issues which they present. Read more
The MA is for people with a personal passion for material culture, materials innovations, crafts, designs, heritage, and the cultural issues which they present. Some are social scientists rethinking the engagement of anthropology, ethnography and material culture; others are designers or makers exploring cultural and social issues.

Degree information

Students will study anthropological and material culture theory, apply social science and ethnographic methodologies to the problems of design, explore the technical, aesthetic and symbolic properties of materials, and examine how these interact with production technologies and consumption choices. They will develop understanding of how working with materials, crafts, and design helps us to rethink, understand, and critique socio-cultural issues in ways beyond other disciplines, and in cutting-edge anthropological ways.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (45 credits), three optional modules (45 credits), a departmental seminar series and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules
-Materials, Anthropology and Design

Optional modules
-Anthropology of the Built Environment
-Anthropology of Art and Design
-Mass Consumption and Design
-Anthropology of Cultural Heritage and Museum Anthropology
-Social Construction of Landscape
-Ethnographic Film
-Archaeobotanical Analysis in Practice
-Archaeometallurgy 1: Mining and Extractive Technology
-Archaeometallurgy 2: Metallic Artefacts
-Archaeological Glass and Glazes
-Interpreting Pottery
-Lithic Analysis
-Archaelogical Ceramics and Plaster
-Issues in Conservation: Understanding Objects

Dissertation/report
All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, and tutorials. Several courses entail practical instruction, including visits to product design companies and trade fairs; archaeological field sites; Kew Botanical Archive and the British Museum. Assessment is through unseen examination, long essays, research methodology project and the dissertation.

Careers

The unique combination of scientific and social science training offers students career pathways in a range of areas including:
-Design research
-Design consultancy and policy
-Heritage and museums
-Materials consultancy: advising industry on different materials, old and new, and their technical and aesthetic properties
-Product marketing
-Fashion marketing and buying
-Academia (PhDs, lecturing)

Employability
In addition to analytic and ethnographic skills honed by the core academic training, graduates develop a solid grounding in materials and design literacy, communication and interpersonal skills, new ways of thinking about culture and society and presentational and studio groupwork skills.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL is a world leader in anthropological work, specialising in material culture, and also a pan-disciplinary leader in materials innovation and making. This MSc is the only specific design anthropology programme with a material culture emphasis, and the only one dedicated to seriously exploring materials and making in cultural terms.

The programme involves interdisciplinary engagements in: looking at materials expertise across London through visits to makespaces and materials libraries; a project for an external design client (in commerce, heritage, or the third sector); weekly high-profile academic speakers on material culture; and optional vocational seminars in spring. In some years we facilitate participation in conferences or workshops abroad.

UCL is located in central London, within walking distance to the British Museum and the British Library. UCL's own museums and collections form a resource of international importance for academic research.

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Contemporary concerns with environment and development require a combination of biological and social anthropological approaches to examine the ecology of resource use in developing societies. Read more
Contemporary concerns with environment and development require a combination of biological and social anthropological approaches to examine the ecology of resource use in developing societies. This MSc evaluates the environmental implications and outcomes of these activities in terms of human subsistence and welfare via a systematic, theoretical and methodological training.

Degree information

Drawing on the strengths of our broad-based department and expertise in human ecology, social anthropology and demography, key areas of investigation include: the implications of changing environments for production systems and human welfare, the sustainable use of natural resources in developing countries and the environmental and welfare impacts of changing patterns of resource use with development.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of three core modules (60 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules:
-Resource Use and Impacts
-Anthropological Research Methods
-Statistics

Optional modules - choose two options from within the department - and in some cases outside the department - including at least one of the following that have been designed specifically for this programme:
-The Ecology of Human Groups
-Population and Development
-Anthropology of Development

Dissertation/report
All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through lectures, seminars, group presentations, tutorials, interactive teamwork, video, and film and web based courses. It includes a non-examined weekly seminar series with both internal and invited speakers. Assessment is through essays, seen and unseen examinations, and the research dissertation.

Careers

Graduates of this programme have gone on to a wide range of relevant careers in research, teaching, consultancy, policy and advocacy work in universities, governmental bodies, national and international NGOs and international research organisations such as the CGIAR.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Public Researcher and Administrator, Global Canopy Program
-Education for Sustainable Development Researcher, Change Agents
-Anthropologist, Fundación Etnollano
-International Health Programme Officer, Royal College of General Practitioners
-Volunteer Co-Ordinator, Marine Research and Education Fund of Andenes (MAREFA)

Employability
The Master's integrates both natural and social science approaches and combines this with training in the methodological and practical dimensions of field work. The interdisciplinary perspective and demonstrable research skills obtained are an ideal training ground for students wishing to work with government, national or international NGOs or conduct further PhD research in the fields of environment and/or development. In addition to specialist knowledge and fieldwork experience, other skills graduates acquire include presentation and IT, research design and development, qualitative and quantitative analysis, project management, team building and leadership, fundraising and critical analysis and evaluation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Anthropology is one of the largest anthropology departments in the UK offering an exceptional breadth of expertise. Our results in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise and 2014 Research Excellence Framework show that we are the leading broad-based anthropology department in the UK.

Teaching staff are all actively engaged in research or consultancy work in the area of environment and development. A strong alumni network within the Human Ecology Research Group and dedicated programmes of invited speakers allow for significant networking opportunities.

Students are also encouraged to take advantage of the wider anthropological community in London.

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This MA provides a broad based training in social science approaches to the analysis of material and visual media. Read more
This MA provides a broad based training in social science approaches to the analysis of material and visual media: ranging from art, photography, film and media within visual anthropology, to consumption, museum anthropology and cultural heritage, landscape and genres (such as clothing and the built environment), within material culture.

Degree information

The programme covers a range of contexts such as production, exchange and consumption, and uses anthropological perspectives based on the comparative study of societies, historically and culturally. Skills training is given in social anthropological field research and analysis, and in specific methods for the study of material and visual forms.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (45 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules
-Critical Issues

Optional modules - the following is a selection of possible option modules:
-Anthropology and Photography
-Advanced Topics in Digital Culture: Ethnographies of the Digital
-Documentary Film and the Anthropological Eye
-Anthropology of Art and Design
-Social Construction of Landscape
-Transforming and Creating the World
-Anthropology of the Built Environment
-Mass Consumption and Design
-Risk, Power and Uncertainty
-Anthropologies of Religion
-Issues in Power and Culture

Dissertation/report
All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a 15,000-word dissertation.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, group presentations and discussion, tutorials, independent directed reading, interactive teamwork, laboratory and practical work, video, film and web based courses. There will also be visits to museums, galleries and other relevant sites. Assessment is through coursework, unseen examination and the dissertation.

Careers

The programme can lead to careers in a wide range of areas such as architecture, media, commerce and aspects of development work where an emphasis on the material and visual environment is central.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Senior Curator, Frifthdi School of Art, Design and Technology
-Research Executive, Basis Research
-Web Designer, Elena Boykova Sirakova
-MSc Anthropology, Københavns Universitet (University of Copenhagen)
-Associate Director, DA and Company

Employability
The programme is designed as an advanced research degree providing exposure to a vanguard and creative field within anthropology and related disciplines. Students learn how to apply ethnographic theory and methodology in material and visual culture to a wide range of case studies highlighting material culture in the wider world - ranging from art, through photography, clothing, consumption, cultural memory, monuments and the built environment.

The degree can lead to further doctoral research or careers in a wide range of areas such as architecture, media, museums, business and aspects of development work where an emphasis on the material and visual environment is central.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Anthropology is the world's leading centre for the study of material and visual culture. We publish the Journal of Material Culture and several relevant book series, and have nine specialist staff in this field.

The department is one of the largest anthropology departments in the UK. Our excellent results in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercises and 2014 Research Excellence Framework show that we are the leading broad-based anthropology department in the UK.

Students are encouraged to take full advantage of the wider anthropological community in London and the department's strong links with European universities and international institutions.

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This MSc provides students with a foundation in the analysis of human remains, both in archaeological and modern forensic settings. Read more
This MSc provides students with a foundation in the analysis of human remains, both in archaeological and modern forensic settings. With a solid grounding in skeletal and dental anatomy, students learn about morphological variation, development, methods for biological profiling, human disease and forensic approaches to trauma and taphonomy.

Degree information

Students will learn procedures for interpretation and analysis of human skeletal remains - considering both archaeological and modern forensic contexts. There is a unique opportunity to analyse recently excavated human remains, utilising methods and techniques learned during the programme. While the focus of this programme is primarily on modern humans, late Pleistocene hominids are also considered.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of five core modules (75 credits), one optional module (15 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules
-Dental Anthropology
-Forensic Anthropology
-Methodology and Issues in Bioarchaeology and Palaeoepidemiology
-Morphology and Palaeopathology of the Human Skeleton
-Variation and Evolution of the Human Skull

Optional modules
-Anthropological and Archaeological Genetics
-Archaeology of Early Modern Humans
-Forensic Archaeology
-Forensic Geoscience (by arrangement with the Jill Dando Centre for Forensic Sciences)
-Funerary Archaeology
-Human Evolution (by arrangement with the Department of Anthropology)
-Palaeoanthropology (by arrangement with the Department of Anthropology)
-Zooarchaeology in Practice
-Other Master's options available at the Institute of Archaeology.

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars and practical classes. This MSc has strong links with the Forensic Archaeological Science MSc which gives individual programmes an interesting mix of participants and provides many opportunities for discussion. Assessment is through essays, class tests, reports and the dissertation.

Careers

Some graduates of the programme go on to PhD studies, while others go on to work in a range of archaeological and non-archaeological organisations as osteoarchaeological specialists, the police, curators and political researchers.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse archaeology department in the UK, offering students a range of opportunities.

This particular MSc is unique, offering a combination of bioarchaeological and forensic principles for the study of human remains unlike anything else available in the UK. Students further benefit from access to a large collection of skeletal material for study, including dental and palaeopathology reference collections. Access to sophisticated equipment and techniques (laser scanner, SEM, thin sectioning, CT) is also available.

Some lectures will take place at the Royal College of Surgeons and students have access to their teaching collections and museums, including the Wellcome Museum of Anatomy and Pathology.

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Evolutionary theory has radically altered our understanding of human life. The Human Evolution and Behaviour MSc at UCL is designed to provide students with a solid practical and theoretical grounding in issues relevant to the evolution of humans and non-human primates. Read more
Evolutionary theory has radically altered our understanding of human life. The Human Evolution and Behaviour MSc at UCL is designed to provide students with a solid practical and theoretical grounding in issues relevant to the evolution of humans and non-human primates.

Degree information

Students develop the ability to generate, assess and synthesise empirical evidence and hypotheses related to human evolution and behaviour. They gain subject-specific skills, such as measuring skeletal material, interpreting and generating data related to human ecology, reproduction and genetics, and generating behavioural data of humans and non-human primates through observation.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of one core module (15 credits), five optional modules (75 credits), and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules - students choose two of the first three modules in the list below. Postgraduate Methods/Statistics I is compulsory for all students.
-Human Behavioural Ecology
-Primate Socioecology
-Palaeoanthropology
-Postgraduate Methods/Statistics 1 (term one)*

Optional modules - students choose three of the following optional modules:
-Advanced Human Evolution
-Anthropological and Archaeological Genetics
-Archaeology of Hunter-Gatherers
-Palaeoanthropology
-Evolution of the Human Brain
-Cognition and Language
-Evolution of the Human Brain and Behaviour
-Primate Evolution
-Variation and Evolution of the Human Skull
-Ethnographic and Documentary Filmmaking

Dissertation/report
All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a 15,000-word dissertation.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures including weekly two-hour departmental seminars, and occasional attendance at non-departmental seminars. Assessment is through take-home examination, essays, lab-books, practical tests, and presentation. The dissertation is assessed by a project presentation and the thesis.

Careers

Many graduates are successful in entering fully funded doctoral programmes based on their training and achievements on the programme. Our graduates also go not o work in the media (TV, radio , publishing), in NGOs (community development, nature conservation), government organisations (national statistics, health programmes), in zoos and museums (overseeing collections, co-ordination research), or become school teachers. Moreover, numerous alumni have become notable academics in their own right, teaching as permanent staff in universities across the globe.

Employability
Graduates of the programme will be trained in the fundamentals of scientific inquiry including hypothesis generation, data collection and statistical analysis, data synthesis and reporting of results. Additionally, they acquire advanced training in computer-based quantitative methods, presentation techniques, and the public understanding of science. Students will also gain skills specific to their dissertation research that can include behavioural observation techniques, field data collection, computer modelling, and advanced shape analysis.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Anthropology was the first in the UK to integrate biological and social anthropology with material culture into a broad-based conception of the discipline. It is one of the largest anthropology departments in the UK in terms of both staff and research student numbers, offering an exceptional breadth of expertise. Our excellent results in 2008 Research Assessment Exercise and 2014 Research Excellence Framework identify us as the leading broad-based anthropology department in the UK. Students are encouraged to take full advantage of the wider anthropological community in London and the department's strong links with European universities and international institutions.

Our excellent results in the 2001 and 2008 Research Assessment Exercises show that we are the top broad-based anthropology department in the UK.

Students are encouraged to take full advantage of the wider anthropological community in London and the department's strong links with European universities and international institutions.

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The Palaeoanthropology and Palaeolithic Archaeology MSc, run jointly by the Institute of Archaeology and UCL Anthropology, brings together the expertise of the two departments to provide graduate students with an integrated training in the biological and archaeological aspects of human evolutionary studies. Read more
The Palaeoanthropology and Palaeolithic Archaeology MSc, run jointly by the Institute of Archaeology and UCL Anthropology, brings together the expertise of the two departments to provide graduate students with an integrated training in the biological and archaeological aspects of human evolutionary studies.

Degree information

Students gain training in research methods and a scientific grounding in the principles, content and practice of palaeoanthropology and palaeolithic archaeology, including: fossil and archaeological evidence of human evolution; temporal and spatial patterns and processes of evolutionary and environmental change; and the evolutionary background for understanding human adaptation and culture.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (30 credits) four optional modules (60 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules - all students are required to take the following:
-Themes in Palaeoanthropology and Palaeolithic Archaeology

Optional modules - students will be encouraged to select options from the following list up to the value of 60 credits. Alternatively, they may choose from the wider range of Master's options available at the UCL Institute of Archaeology or the Department of Anthropology.
-Advanced Human Evolution
-Archaeology of Early Human Origins
-Archaeology of Hunter-Gatherers from the Emergence of Modern Humans
-Evolution of Human Brain and Behaviour
-Geoarchaeology
-Prehistoric Stone Artefact Analysis
-Palaeoanthropology
-Primate Evolution
-Primate Socioecology
-Zooarchaeology in Practice

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, discussions, seminars, laboratory practicals and student presentations. Assessment is through essays, practical examination and seminar presentations, (depending on the options chosen), and the dissertation.

Careers

A significant number of the graduate students from this programme have gone on to take PhDs at UCL, elsewhere in the UK and in other countries. A number of those have been awarded prestigious scholarships to cover their costs. Other graduates have gone on to work in cultural resource management and museums, and others have used their skills to pursue careers in fields such as teaching and business.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Archaeologist, George Washington Foundation
-DPhil in Archaeology, The University of Oxford
-Senior scientist: archaeology, Tetra Tech
-Research Technician, Research Department Forensic Science.
-PhD Anthropology and Archaeology, Stockholms Universitet (Stockholm University)

Employability
The skills which students develop include the critical evaluation of scholarship across the discipline, design and management of personal research, primary data collection and analysis, and the preparation of detailed reports/dissertations up to publication standard. Although these will relate to anthropology and archaeology, they are invaluable skills for other areas of employment.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology and UCL Anthropology have considerable staff expertise in the fields of palaeoanthropology and palaeolithic archaeology. Staff and research students are currently involved in field projects as well as museum-based studies in Britain, various parts of Europe, the Middle East, and eastern and southern Africa.

Our excellent results in the recent Research Excellence Framework (2014) show that our two departments are both very highly ranked in the UK.

Situated in central London, the university is within easy access of the British Museum and Natural History Museum and their outstanding palaeontological and archaeological collections.

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The new African Studies degrees at UCL draw on world-leading research and expertise from across the university relating to the study of Africa. Read more
The new African Studies degrees at UCL draw on world-leading research and expertise from across the university relating to the study of Africa. The African Studies with Heritage MA draws on UCL's expertise in archaeology, anthropology and heritage studies to provide an essential background to African pasts and provides a critical framework for assessing the management and protection of heritage resources in Africa.

Degree information

The degree pathways share a common core, comprising modules on the continent’s political and economic past and present, together with training in research methods. In addition, the Heritage pathway offers a range of optional modules drawn from the Departments of Anthropology, Archaeology and Geography, and includes research into museums and sites, intangible heritage, local community histories, archaeology, and the presentation and preservation of cultural materials.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (45 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and a dissertation/report (90 credits).

Core modules:
-Africa: Dialogues of Past and Present
-Debating Africa's Future
-Research Methods in African Studies

Optional modules - students choose three from a range of options including the following:
-Anthropology of Cultural Heritage and Museum Anthropology
-Antiquities and the Law
-Archaeology and Education
-Beyond Chiefdoms: Archaeologies of African Political Complexity
-Critical Perspectives of Cultural Heritage
-Cultural Heritage, Globalisation and Development
-Historical Geographies of the African Diaspora in Britain
-Managing Archaeological Sites
-Managing Museums
-Museum and Site Interpretation

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures and seminars and guided independent research. Assessment is through essays, portfolio, research proposal and examination.

Careers

Graduates will be well placed to take up positions with national and international policy-making bodies, non-governmental development organisations, within national ministries and in the heritage/museums sector.

Employability
Students will develop skills in research and research ethics, thematic debate, archival work, ethnographic field techniques, presentation, and knowledge of key heritage issues (including resource management, African material culture and conservation issues).

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL offers a unique teaching and learning environment in which to study the continent of Africa. More than 35 permanent members of UCL academic staff focus their research primarily on Africa and their field activities span the continent.

African Studies marks the first time existing expertise on Africa at UCL has been combined to offer an interdisciplinary degree.

The programme interweaves the study of the pre-colonial past, the colonial era, and the post-colonial present, with an eye to the future. Modules are arranged thematically around ‘debates’, with lectures presenting a long-term view of issues to frame subsequent seminar discussions.

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Migration in today's globalised world stands at the heart of key national and international debates; including migrants' and asylum seekers' rights and citizenship; state security and border management; and the globalisation of skilled labour markets. Read more
Migration in today's globalised world stands at the heart of key national and international debates; including migrants' and asylum seekers' rights and citizenship; state security and border management; and the globalisation of skilled labour markets. This interdisciplinary MSc offers the best of migration teaching from across UCL's Faculties.

Degree information

The programme combines theoretical and policy debates about migration. Students are equipped with the advanced skills, methods, concepts and theories essential for the study of global migration and gain the opportunity to apply them in both general and more specialised contexts relating to the processes, policies and politics of migration.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (30 credits), a compulsory methods module (15 credits), and five elective modules (75 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules
-Interdisciplinary Approaches to Global Migration
-Issues in Global Migration
-Social Science Research Methodologies and Methods I

Elective modules - students choose a range of modules for courses offered across UCL which offer specialisation on migration which may include the following:
-Social Science Research Methodologies and Methods II (essential only if intending further research training)
-Thinking Space
-Migration and Urban Multiculture
-Mining Social and Geographic Datasets
-Globalisation and Security
-Gender, Generation and Forced Migration
-Ethnicity, Migration and Health
-Migration in the European Union
-International Human Rights Law
-Gender, Generation and Forced Migration
-Anthropology of Nationalism, Ethnicity and Race
-Anthropology and Development
-Postcolonial Cultural Geographies
-Comparative Human Rights Law
-Globalisation in the Twentieth Century
-Equality, Justice and Difference
-Population and Development
-Economics of Migration (Economics prerequisites)

Dissertation/report
All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10-12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, presentations, discussions, independent reading, practicals and workshops. The majority of modules are assessed through coursework although a small number are assessed by examination.

Careers

Graduates of this programme will be well equipped to work with migrants and asylum seekers in different parts of the world, and gain posts in UN, EU, national policy think-tanks, government research and policy departments, NGOs, community-based and grassroots organisations. The programme provides an excellent foundation for students wishing to pursue doctorates in the interdisciplinary field of migration studies.

Employability
Graduates have gone on to work in a range of careers related to migration. The recent destinations of students who graduated from this programme include law, research, policy making and campaigning work. One recent graduate is now a trainee barrister specialising in migration law, another works for a government agency for refugees in Norway. Other recent graduates have found employment in local government posts in the UK and in international organisatiosn such as the Migration Policy Institute. A number of graduates have also successfully received funding to complete further degrees.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL has internationally recognised expertise in the field of migration. It has two established research units, the Migration Research Unit and the Centre for Research on Economic Analysis of Migration. Cutting-edge research on migration also takes place across UCL in many different disciplines including law, public policy, anthropology, development planning, area studies, humanities and health. The involvement of such a wide range of disciplines in teaching on the MSc in Global Migration MSc is unique.

Students benefit from the consolidation of migration expertise across UCL which is complemented by a departmental migration seminar series, and a vibrant and expanding body of PhD students in this field.

Migration research at UCL has a strong international dimension, benefiting from networks across Europe, Africa, Asia and the Americas.

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Gender, Society and Representation is an inter-faculty programme drawing on the unusual breadth of disciplines for which UCL is renowned, including development studies, law, anthropology, literary scholarship, geography and queer studies. Read more
Gender, Society and Representation is an inter-faculty programme drawing on the unusual breadth of disciplines for which UCL is renowned, including development studies, law, anthropology, literary scholarship, geography and queer studies. UCL offers students an opportunity to develop their own interests within this broad intellectual landscape.

Degree information

Students gain the advanced skills, methods, concepts and theories required for the study of gender in an interdisciplinary context at graduate level. Optional modules offer students a genuine opportunity to develop their own interests in a wide range of disciplines, and the dissertation provides opportunities for independent research.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme offers two pathways: Taught and Research. The taught pathway consists of three core modules (60 credits), optional modules (60 credits), and a dissertation (60 credits). The research pathway consists of three core modules (60 credits), optional modules (30 credits) and a dissertation (90 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma, three core modules (60 credts), two to four optional modules (60 credits), full-time one year, part-time two years, is offered.

Core modules
-Gender, Society and Representation
-Gender, Politics and Feminism
-Research and Writing Skills

Optional modules - options may include the following:
-Apocalypse Literature
-Equality, Justice and Difference
-Feminism and Philosophy
-Gender, Race and Sexuality: New Readings in Francophone Literature and Visual Culture
-Gendering the Study of Politics: Theory and Practice
-Gender in Policy and Planning
-Gender and Sexuality in Education
-Gender, Sexuality and Cultural Politics
-The Global Politics of Gender and Sexuality
-Hollywood Genres
-The Human and Non-Human in Medieval Art
-Public and Private Modernities
-Readings in 20th Century Chinese Culture: Family, Childhood, Gender
-Reproduction, Sex and Sexuality
-Sex and the Body in Early Modern Europe
-Sexuality and Society in Russia and Eastern Europe
-Theories of Childhood and Society
-Tracing the Body: Technologies of Representation in 18th and 19th Century France
-Women in the Jewish Tradition
-Elective modules from the School of Oriental and African Studies

Dissertation/report
Students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 12,000 words (taught pathway) or 18,000 words (research pathway).

Teaching and learning
Teaching sessions are interactive, with a limited amount of lecturing and an emphasis on student participation and critical discussion. Assessment is through a variety of methods, including essays, coursework, written papers, oral examination and the dissertation.

Careers

Engaging with gender and sexuality concerns is now an integral aspect of research and planning activities in a wide range of fields. The need to address different forms of discrimination has created a demand in both public and private sectors for highly qualified graduates with a broad theoretical background in gender and sexuality studies, a familiarity with the intersectional nature of inequality, and a commitment to social change. Our graduates have gone on to careers as researchers, administrators and communications officers for charities, cultural institutions, NGOs and the private sector, and in academic research in related disciplines.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Acting Co-ordinator, British & Irish Agencies Afghanistan Group
-LLM Law, Birkbeck College
-Research Centre Assistant, Overseas Development Institute
-Support Services Administrator, Multiple Sclerosis Society
-Events / Programmes Co-Ordinator, International Women's Initiative

Employability
Students graduating from this Master's programme will possess a broad understanding of gender issues in social practice and discourse. They will have demonstrated intellectual flexibility in engaging successfully with a diverse and challenging range of subject areas and disciplinary approaches to gender. They will be able to develop and sustain a convincing argument on a variety of complex subjects, supporting their conclusions with appropriate evidence, clearly expressed. They will have experience in researching a topic from scratch, learning to identify and choose between different routes into exploring that topic and producing a coherent account of their research and findings.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Gender and sexuality studies have expanded rapidly in recent decades, to emerge as dynamic interdisciplinary field of study.

As a multi-faculty institution located in the heart of cosmopolitan London and covering an exceptionally wide range of disciplines, UCL offers an ideal environment for gender studies, enabling students to tailor their degrees according to their specific interests and providing a wealth of opportunities for interdisciplinary work.

Staff contributing to MA level and research work in gender studies are drawn from different faculties including Arts & Humanities, Social & Historical Sciences, Laws, and Life Sciences.

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The Central and South-East European Studies MA is a multidisciplinary programme that enables students to gain specialist knowledge and understanding of the complex culture, history, literature, politics and society of the region from Western Bohemia to Wallachia and from Mazuria to Macedonia. Read more
The Central and South-East European Studies MA is a multidisciplinary programme that enables students to gain specialist knowledge and understanding of the complex culture, history, literature, politics and society of the region from Western Bohemia to Wallachia and from Mazuria to Macedonia.

Degree information

Students develop an advanced knowledge of central and south-eastern Europe from a multidisciplinary perspective, focusing on aspects of history, politics and culture. They develop generic research skills, interdisciplinary and discipline specific research skills, area specific research skills and language skills oriented towards carrying out research in the region.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of a choice of one of three compulsory modules (30 credits), and a research dissertation (60 credits). 90 credits can then be selected from a range of options across SSEES.

Core modules - this is a multi-disciplinary programme. Nevertheless, students are required to gain a thorough methodological and theoretical grounding in disciplinary study and hence must choose between one of the following three courses:
-Literary and Cultural Theory
-Historical Methods and Approaches
-Political Analysis AND Political Sociology

Optional modules - total of 90 credits from options below. Subject to approval, optional courses up to the value of 30 credits may be taken from another SSEES MA programme or from another MA programme within UCL (Anthropology, History, European Studies, Comparative Literature etc.).
-All Quiet on the Eastern Front: Culture, Politics and Everyday Life in Central & Eastern Europe from Stalin to Present
-Little Hitlers? Right Radicalism in Central and Eastern Europe, 1900-1945
-Introduction to Discourse Analysis
-Beyond Stereotypes: The Jews in Polish Culture
-Cities in Eastern Europe
-Contemporary Cultural Studies: Between Post-Communism and Post-Modernism
-The Crisis Zone: Central Europe 1900-1990
-How to Read/Interpret Texts: Introduction to Hermeneutics
-'Metropolis': History of Berlin, 1871-1990
-Nation, Identity and Power in Central and Eastern Europe
-Baltic Politics and Society
-Making of the Modern Ukraine
-Security, Identity, Polarity
-The Self and the World: Theoretical Approaches to Travel Writing
-Language Module
-Ethno-Political Conflict in Central and Eastern Europe
-Informal Practices in Post-Communist Societies
-Directed Reading Module

Dissertation/report
All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000-12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, laboratory sessions and workshops. Students are assessed by a variety of methods: including unseen examinations, long essays, course work and the research dissertation.

Careers

With their specialist knowledge and language skills, SSEES Master's graduates can be found in business, finance, the media, international agencies, charities, diplomacy, international security organisations, the law, and academia.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Self-Employed Translator, Self-Employed Translator
-Charity Manager, The Big Give
-Parliamentary Assistant, MP's Assistant
-Research Analysis Intern, TechnoServe
-Assistant Producer, Global Radio

Employability
Students who have successfully completed this programme have progressed to further academic research on the region, or have obtained employment in such organisations as the European Parliament and the Ministry of Defence, as well as roles in business, think tanks, NGOs, or similar, both in Britain and abroad. Networking is facilitated by two major collaborations led by SSEES: CEELBAS and the International Master's (IMESS). Scholarships, internship opportunities and excellent links with other universities in the region provide further benefits.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL School of Slavonic & East European Studies (SSEES) is one of the world's leading specialist institutions, and the largest national centre in the UK, for the study of central, Eastern and south-east Europe and Russia.

Located on the edge of Bloomsbury, SSEES offers an ideal location for scholars. The British Library, British Museum, University of London Library and other similar research centres are all close by.

The SSEES Library is unequalled in Britain for the depth and breadth of its collections, the majority of which are on open access in the SSEES building.

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This MA provides a comprehensive overview of social sciences and humanities in Latin America. The programme’s graduates have established careers in research, journalism, teaching, and policy formulation and implementation in both government agencies and NGOs. Read more
This MA provides a comprehensive overview of social sciences and humanities in Latin America. The programme’s graduates have established careers in research, journalism, teaching, and policy formulation and implementation in both government agencies and NGOs.

Degree information

Depending on their chosen areas of specialisation, students will develop analytical and critical perspectives in multidisciplinary aspects of Latin American anthropology, cultural studies, literature, economics, geography and environmental issues, as well as history, politics and international relations. They will gain key research skills, together with in-depth knowledge of current debates in the field of Latin American Studies.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of one core module (15 credits), five optional modules (75 credits), and the research dissertation (90 credits). Please note: All optional modules are subject to availability.

Core module
-Researching the Americas: Latin America and the Caribbean

Optional modules - students choose five option modules from a selection that includes the following:
-Confronting the Colossus: US Anti-imperialism, 1945-present
-Democratization in Latin America
-Histories of Exclusion: Race and Ethnicity in Latin America
-Social and Economic Development of Contemporary Brazil
-The International Politics of Latin America
-Latin American Economies: Beyond Neoliberalism
-State and Society in Latin America: Ethnographic Perspectives
-The Caribbean from the Haitian Revolution to the Cuban Revolution
-Money and Politics in Latin America
-The Politics of Human Rights in Latin America: Transitional Justice
-Politics, Society and Development in the Modern Caribbean
-The Latin American City: Social Problems and Social Change in Urban Space
-Sustainable Development in Latin America and the Caribbean
-Students may choose a maximum of 30 credits from other departments or from other University of London colleges, subject to the Programme Director's approval.

Dissertation/report
All students write a dissertation of 15,000 words on a research topic of their choice linked to the subject area of one of their taught modules.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures, presentations, research skills training, and independent reading and research. Assessment is through essays, group and individual presentations, analytical exercises, and the dissertation.

Fieldwork
Many of our Master’s students undertake fieldwork in order to carry out research for their dissertation projects. There may be travel costs associated with fieldwork. The Institute has limited funds available to students to help towards the costs of fieldwork. These funds are awarded on a competitive basis on the criteria of academic performance to date, the quality of the research proposal and the importance of fieldwork for completing the research.

Careers

Graduates of this programme will be well placed to use their skills and knowledge to find employment in government, business, journalism, finance, international NGOs, teaching, or for further research in this field.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Global Events Director, FC Business Intelligence
-Administrative Assistant, NHS (National Health Service)
-Production Manager, Red Bee Media
-International Observer, Declined to say

Employability
Students on this degree will have excellent opportunities to expand their professional networks and establish personal contacts that enhance their future employability. Through institute staff members' extensive professional and personal contacts in the region, and through meeting those interested professionals who participate in the institute's extremely active events programme, students will meet potential colleagues in government and the foreign service, development agencies and the international NGO community, business and finance, and print and electronic media. On the basis of such contacts, recent programme graduates have found employment in government (Foreign and Commonwealth Office), NGOs (Amnesty International, Caritas) and political risk-analysis firms, while others have undertaken PhD research.

Why study this degree at UCL?

In the UK the Institute of the Americas occupies a core position in the academic study of the region in promoting, coordinating and providing a focus for research and postgraduate teaching on the Americas, including Canada, the Caribbean, Latin America and the United States.

The institute actively maintains and builds ties with cultural, diplomatic and business organisations with interests in the Americas, and provides resources to the wider academic community, serving and strengthening national networks of North Americanist, Latin Americanist and Caribbeanist scholars.

Students benefit from tuition by world-leading scholars in an academic environment at the cutting-edge of research in the humanities and social sciences.

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